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tv   Newsday  BBC News  January 31, 2022 11:00pm-11:31pm GMT

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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... has your leadership failed? the initial report into parties at downing street during covid lockdowns finds "failures of leadership and judgment" at number ten — putting prime ministerjohnson under renewed pressure. back i want to say sorry. i get it, and i will fix that. by routinely breaking the rules he sets, the prime minister took us all for fools. he held people sacrificing contempt and he showed
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himself unfit for office. meanwhile, police investigating the parties say they've received hundreds of photographs and documents. also in the programme... it's a year since the military seized power in myanmar — un investigators say more than a thousand people might have been killed in war crimes since the coup. and after a solitary hundredth birthday thanks to covid, a celebration to remember for a hundred and first — with thousands of cards. live from our studio in singapore... this is bbc news. it's newsday. it's 7am in singapore, and ”pm in london where borisjohnson has been addressing his mps in a private meeting, trying to fend off more calls for him to step down. it comes after he again apologised to parliament,
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following a report by a senior civil servant into downing street parties during lockdowns. though limited in scope due to an ongoing police inquiry, the report was nevertheless greeted with anger by many mps including those in his own party. police say they are reviewing more than 300 photos passed to officers in relation to 12 events across government on eight different dates. our political editor laura kuenssberg reports on the day's events. it has been a long, uncomfortable wait for number ten — an official verdict into the government itself breaking the rules. part one, at least, has now arrived. will you take responsibility, prime minister? there may be no easy downing street escape. the blond head and red box you can spot from the sky arriving for a moment borisjohnson�*s enemies believed could be a reckoning. prime minister.
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he started with another apology. firstly, i want to say sorry, i and i'm sorry for the things we simply didn't get right and also sorry for the way that this - matter has been handled. and it's no use saying that this or that was within the rules, i and it's no use saying that people were working hard. _ this pandemic was hard for everyone. his penance, though — not changing his own address, but shifting others around. mr speaker, it isn'tl enough to say sorry. this is a moment when we must look at ourselves in _ the mirror and we must learn. we are making changes now to the way downing street . and the cabinet office run, - so that we can get on with the job that i was elected to do, - mr speaker, and the job that this government was elected to do. mr speaker, i get it and i will fix it. - the findings are grim
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for downing street. ms gray found a serious failure to observe the high standards expected, with too little thought given to what was happening across the country. there were failures of leadership and judgment by different parts of number ten and the cabinet office. she found excessive consumption of alcohol that is not appropriate in a professional workplace at any time, and some staff who had wanted to raise concerns about behaviours felt unable to do so. this may not be the full and final version, but the conclusion is clear — a number of these gatherings should not have been allowed to take place or to develop in the way that they did. and, remember, this is only the initial report into what has emerged week by grisly week about what was going on behind the closed door of number ten. jokes about explaining away the rules. this fictional party was a business meeting! cheese and wine in the garden,
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claims of loud music and parties in the flat upstairs. birthday cake in the cabinet room. the rule—setters alleged to be rule—breakers while the rest of the country was locked down. in contrast to the prime minister's seeming hope to rush through the statement this afternoon, the leader of the opposition was brutal and took his time. by routinely breaking the rules he set, the prime minister took us all for fools. he held people's sacrifice in contempt, he showed himself unfit for office. prime minister, the british public aren't fools. they never believed a word of it. they think the prime minister should do the decent thing and resign. of course, he won't, because he is a man without shame. some ministers hung their heads as the labour leader appealed to them, to their tory colleagues, to call time on the prime minister labour claims is now
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simply not fit to govern. they can heap their reputations, the reputation of their party, the reputation of this country, on the bonfire that is his leadership, or they can spare the country from a prime minister totally unworthy of his responsibilities. the eyes of the country are upon them. they will be judged by the decisions they take now. in all the sound and fury at borisjohnson, the snp breaking commons manners... he misled the house, he must now resign. ..branding him a liar. that man has misled the house. a wild ride in the commons. shut up. downing street had hoped the danger was passing. borisjohnson�*s lieutenants tried to grab control and shore up angry mps, but attacks on number ten from the tory side were opened by none other than a withering
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former prime minister. either my right honourable friend had not read the rules or didn't understand what they meant, and others around him, or they didn't think the rules applied to number ten. which was it? i am deeply concerned by these events and very concerned indeed by some of the things that he has said from that dispatch box and i have to tell him, he no longer enjoys my support. it seems a lot of people - attended events in may 2020. the one i recall attending - was my grandmother's funeral. i didn't hug my siblings, i didn't hug my parents. j i gave a eulogy and then afterwards, i didn't even go to her— house for a cup of tea. i drove back three hours i to kent from staffordshire. does the prime minister think i'm a fool? - no, mr speaker, i want to thank my honourable friend and i want to say how deeply i sympathise with him and his family for their loss. disbelief on the faces of some of borisjohnson�*s own side.
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despair across much of the tory party and fatigue at weeks and weeks of this mess, but there is not yet a resolve to see the back of the man who won a historic majority with a promise of change. not tonight, not yet. as we said, this initial report by the senior civil servant sue gray, is a long way from the full document. she was asked by the metropolitan police to keep to a minimum any references to events that detectives were now investigating. that meant severely limiting what sue gray could publish. we now know that scotland yard is investigating 12 events , on eight separate dates, including an event in the prime minister's flat in downing street. our correspondent daniel sandford has more on the police investigation — and a warning, there is some flash photography in this report.
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the departure of dominic cummings from downing street in november 2020. two gatherings held on the day he left are among those now under investigation by scotland yard, detectives examining whether the prime minister and his staff were breaking the lockdown rules that they themselves had written. borisjohnson has previously told the house of commons that no rules were broken that day. so which events are the police investigating? starting on may 20th, 2020 with the infamous "bring your own booze" event, they're looking at 12 different gatherings on eight different dates. eight of the events were in downing street and four in the neighbouring cabinet office. one was in the prime minister's own flat. the last two events were leaving dos held on the same day in april last year. we had a bundle of material provided to us just friday, which is well over 500 pieces of paper, about a ream and a half, and we received over 300 photographs, so we've just received that and my officers
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are prioritising this week to consider what's been provided in that bundle of material, what further investigations that they need to do and, of course, who they're going to be contacting. and who might get fined? well, that's not yet clear. detectives will be writing to dozens of staff in downing street and the cabinet office, asking for their accounts of the gatherings and whether they had a reasonable excuse for their actions. although the maximum penalty for these alleged offences is only a small fine, detectives here say they will be fast—tracking the investigation and it should be over in a matter of weeks, rather than months. but how damaged are the metropolitan police after being caught in this political storm? they've been accused of not intervening to stop the alleged parties at the time and then getting in the way of the publication of sue gray's full report by asking for the details not to be published. i understand the frustrations, i feel frustrated. what's important, though,
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is that i don't allow my frustrations to interfere with an independent police investigation. the force said today that it understood that its actions around the alleged downing street parties had divided opinion, but it insisted that it had to take difficult decisions, even when they were contentious. daniel sandford, bbc news at new scotland yard. so we know the prime minister has come under fierce criticism from his own mps and rivals. but what are conservative voters thinking? i am joined now by deborah and gavin taylor in essex in england. they are lifelong conservative voters. gavin is a member of the party. it's wonderful to have you on the programme, the both of you. ijust want to start by asking you, deborah, how damaging do you think this affair and this report are to the prime minister. i this affair and this report are to the prime minister.— this affair and this report are to the prime minister. i don't think it is that bad- _ the prime minister. i don't think it is that bad- i _ the prime minister. i don't think it is that bad. i really _ the prime minister. i don't think it is that bad. i really don't. - the prime minister. i don't think it is that bad. i really don't. i - the prime minister. i don't think it is that bad. i really don't. i think | is that bad. i really don't. i think we'd spent a lot of time on it now.
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i think the criminal investigation is far more important, but at the moment, i'm hoping from the end of this week, we will stop talking about it and talk about more important issues.— about it and talk about more important issues. about it and talk about more im ortant issues. , ., , , important issues. gavin, perhaps the next question — important issues. gavin, perhaps the next question to _ important issues. gavin, perhaps the next question to you, _ important issues. gavin, perhaps the next question to you, you _ important issues. gavin, perhaps the next question to you, you know, - important issues. gavin, perhaps the next question to you, you know, as l next question to you, you know, as deborah has just said, next question to you, you know, as deborah hasjust said, it's next question to you, you know, as deborah has just said, it's time to move on, but when you look through that report, some of the things that struck me certainly that the gatherings according to sue gray did not observe the highest standards expected of the entire british population at the time. you know, as somebody who presumably did adhere to the rules at the time, how does that make you feel that the people responsible for some of the most important decisions in the country were not doing that? {lin important decisions in the country were not doing that?— important decisions in the country were not doing that? on the face of it, it hurts. — were not doing that? on the face of it, it hurts. nobody _ were not doing that? on the face of it, it hurts. nobody wants _ were not doing that? on the face of it, it hurts. nobody wants to - were not doing that? on the face of it, it hurts. nobody wants to see i it, it hurts. nobody wants to see rule breakers. we know rule breaking was happening, you know, it's one of those _ was happening, you know, it's one of those things — was happening, you know, it's one of those things that you've got to lead
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from the _ those things that you've got to lead from the top, about obviously you've the work _ from the top, about obviously you've the work with the people that are under_ the work with the people that are under you — the work with the people that are under you and the people under have also got _ under you and the people under have also got to— under you and the people under have also got to work in unison. if they werent— also got to work in unison. if they weren't actually playing by the rules _ weren't actually playing by the rules as — weren't actually playing by the rules as set out by the leader, then they should — rules as set out by the leader, then they should fall down on it. the report is— they should fall down on it. the report is very lacking apart from the data — report is very lacking apart from the data they are investigating. i think— the data they are investigating. i think we — the data they are investigating. i think we need to wait for the full report— think we need to wait for the full report to — think we need to wait for the full report to come out to see exactly who is — report to come out to see exactly who is doing what when and who knew about _ who is doing what when and who knew about it _ who is doing what when and who knew about it and _ who is doing what when and who knew about it and who didn't stop it. indeed — about it and who didn't stop it. indeed. apple report not being released of course because of the fact that the metropolitan police are coming to the details as we understand it. deborah, you know, if we play fast forward a little and more details do come out and party gate does and up enveloping the prime minister and his colleagues. what kind of example does this set, do you think, for leaders in the country orfor voters do you think, for leaders in the country or for voters like yourself
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when you have to evaluate these kinds of decisions. i when you have to evaluate these kinds of decisions.— kinds of decisions. i think, you know, kinds of decisions. i think, you know. we _ kinds of decisions. i think, you know, we will— kinds of decisions. i think, you know, we will evaluate - kinds of decisions. i think, you know, we will evaluate this, i kinds of decisions. i think, you | know, we will evaluate this, we kinds of decisions. i think, you - know, we will evaluate this, we will certainly be evaluating this over the next election, and i think that's what needs to happen after this report is published, the criminal reports, and i hope it's just a few weeks and that a few months. we will have to look and see is he worth keeping on? i think one of the problems that so many people have said today is he is the best we've got at the moment, we just don't see who the alternative could be. that there was somebody who could take his place tomorrow, i think he would probably go. timer;r think he would probably go. they took us to brexit, _ think he would probably go. they took us to brexit, they've taken us took us to brexit, they've taken us to the _ took us to brexit, they've taken us to the pandemic, i don't see anyone else that could have done that to the strength that he is shown. he is a maverick, — the strength that he is shown. he is a maverick, but i think he has got to value _ a maverick, but i think he has got to value going forward, depending on the actual—
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to value going forward, depending on the actual final report if that does take him — the actual final report if that does take him down, then that has to be a consequence — take him down, then that has to be a consequence of where we are. deborah. _ consequence of where we are. deborah, gavin, thank you so much for your thoughts. thank you for joining us on newsday. we turn next to the ukrainian crisis, and the continuing tensions between russia and the west. president biden says russia will face swift and severe consequences if it walks away from diplomacy and invades ukraine. at a special meeting of the un security council, the us ambassador said russia had conducted the biggest mobilisation of troops seen in europe in decades. russia's ambassador accused the us of whipping up tensions, insisting russia had no plan to invade ukraine. nada tawfik is at the un headquarters in new york, on whether there was any outcome at the meeting. we asked that to the us ambassador to the un because the united states had called this meeting. she said they didn't get out the answers they wanted from russia but that they hoped a diplomatic way
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forward was still possible. look, i mean, this meeting, there was debate about whether it should even be held by the members in the security council, ultimately, ten members sided with the united states, believing that this was in the interest of the security council to try for preventative diplomacy, to try to get involved before a crisis. on the other hand, you had china siding with russia saying it was the united states fanning the flames here, not helping to de—escalate the situation by calling this meeting and three other countries abstained in that procedural vote to hold this meeting. so it really did underline the divisions on the security council between the west and russia and ultimately no one was expecting any outcome from this meeting. next lets hearfrom lyse doucet in the ukrainian capital kyiv, on the mood there. a lot of anxiety, a certain amount
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of resignation and anger. this is not a new crisis for ukrainians. they have been living with this crisis day in and day out since russia first invaded in 2014, not just invading but occupying crimea which it does still to this day. separatists moving into eastern ukraine. the suffering is most acute for those on the front line right up against the borders where russian troops, tens of thousands of russian troops, tens of thousands of russian troops are on the other side. they have not been on the other side just in the past few weeks where we have seen this intensification of this policy. that's why it zielinski the ukrainian prime minister addressed the foreign minister, france, this crisis is no than what it was last year. the fact of the matter is that it is, and many ukrainians have been taking issue with what they said,
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every single person here who hasn't called for more support from nato as they take on this threat from russia. you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme... we'll meet the woman celebrating her 101st birthday — after experiencing a let down in last year's lockdown. this is the moment that millions in iran have been waiting for after his long years in exile the first hesitant steps of the ayatollah khomeini on iranian soil. south africa's white government has offered its black opponents concessions unparalleled in the history of apartheid. and the anc leader nelson mandela is to be set free unconditionally. three, two, one. the countdown to the critical moment, the worlds most powerful rocket ignited all of its 27 engines
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at once and part of its power is this recycling of the rocket slashing the cost of the launch that makes this a breakthrough in the business of space travel. two americans have become the first | humans to walk in space without any| lifeline to this patient. one would call it a piece of cake. thousands of people have given the yachtswoman alan macarthur a spectacular homecoming in the cornish port of falmouth after she smashed the world record for sailing solo around the world non—stop. this is newsday on the bbc. i'm karishma vaswani in singapore. our headlines... the initial findings of the report into parties at downing street during the covid lockdown have been published — outlining failures of leadership and judgment.
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on the eve of the first anniversary of the myanmar military coup, britain, the united states and canada have imposed fresh sanctions, this time on top members of the judiciary involved with the prosecution of myanmar�*s ousted leader, aung san suu kyi. reports say the militaryjunta has now charged her with influencing election officials, in addition to previous charges. meanwhile, un investigators say more than a thousand people may have been killed in crimes against humanity and war crimes since the coup. i'm joined now by yang—he lee who was the un special rapporteur for human rights in myanmar from 2010 to 2014. founder member of the special advisory council for myanmar, it is wonderful to have you on the programme. i want to start by asking you we are a year into the cool, when more sanctions placed on officials overnight, but what else has the international community done to really put the pressure on me and meyer to change or improve the
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situation there is a love is a special repertory from 2014 to 2000 20. as for your question about the international community, let's look at the international community from the side of the un. the un has done absolutely nothing, the un, the security council has done absolutely nothing to address the situation. as you mentioned at the top of the report, individual countries have started to impose sanctions on the personalities and enterprises owned by the military. it's a little too late. it's been a year now, but it's never too late to start to really come down on the illegal quintana that they have attempted. apologies
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for the mistake in that time they spend their thank you for correcting that. when you look at the terms or rather the action that is currently being put in place by the international community, what else would you like to see? what do you think might be more effective and which countries do you think should be playing a bigger role? first which countries do you think should be playing a bigger role?— be playing a bigger role? first of all, we be playing a bigger role? first of all. we think— be playing a bigger role? first of all, we think the _ be playing a bigger role? first of all, we think the special- be playing a bigger role? first of all, we think the special advisory council for all, we think the special advisory councilfor me and all, we think the special advisory council for me and mark, myself and two other colleagues have formed that that un shed and the international community should do three things, three cuts, cut the arms flow, cut the financial flow, cut the impunity. the un security council must impose an arms embargo. but that doesn't mean that individual states can impose arms embargo. we have some states that have instilled some countries that are trading arms with me in my as thejunta is killing all of
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are trading arms with me in my as the junta is killing all of its people. but most importantly, right now the myanmar oil and gas enterprise is dealing lots of money to the junta and that enterprise needs to be sanctioned and most importantly, us and eu and uk countries like the uk in the international community and australia and south korea for that matter must sanction or cut or withdraw all businesses that they are doing in gas and energy. thank ou so are doing in gas and energy. thank you so much _ are doing in gas and energy. thank you so much for— are doing in gas and energy. thank you so much forjoining _ are doing in gas and energy. thank you so much forjoining us - are doing in gas and energy. thank you so much forjoining us on - you so much forjoining us on newsday with your thoughts. another story for you now — this time, about edna clayton — who reached the milestone age of 100 last year. but covid restrictions meant she spent the day alone in her flat in scotland. this year it's a different story.
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her 101st birthday has been marked by a celebration in her care home with thousands of cards and some rather special messages — as our correspondent lorna gordon has been finding out. happy birthday, edna. what a milestone! edna clayton, 101 today. after spending her 100th alone, staff here were determined to make this birthday special. i've never seen anything like it in my life! an appeal for cards going viral, with more than 30,000 from around the world. have you got a message to everybody that has sent you these cards? what can i say to you all? i love every one of you. edna has dedicated her life to looking after her son, james. separated for much of lockdown, the two were together for her special day. edna, this is your card from the queen. amongst all the cards, this was one that, for edna, stood out.
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from the queen to someone many consider comedy royalty. we've got a special message from someone we've been told you are a big fan of. hello, edna, i'd like to wish you happy birthday. - 101, that's spectacular, well done. oh, billy connolly! i hope you're having a great time. and don't get too drunk. and don't stay out too late dancing tonight. i he looks younger every day! there was dancing and singing, too. at edna's request, a party bus — to see the streets where she used to live. a year late, but this, a birthday to remember. lorna gordon, bbc news, glasgow. what a celebration indeed. as we say goodbye, big celebration for those
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two who are celebrating the lunar new year. have a good one. thanks for watching. to stay with bbc news. hello. the week got off to a stormy start thanks to corrie. the winds have become a little lighter out there now, but for the rest of the week, it will still stay relatively windy, not perhaps as windy, though, as it was due monday. here is corrie come tuesday, menacing down in the middle of the mediterranean. another area of the pressure to the north of the uk will keep it windy here, particularly across scotland, but this weather front sinking south won't bring much in the way of rain. it will usher in quite a bit of cloud and perhaps most noticeably, it will pull in some very mild air, particularly in contrast to monday. sunshine probably most widespread, actually, for scotland and northern england. furthersouth, rather more overcast skies, some patchy light rain or drizzle, but gusts of wind across northern most scotland could still hit up to 80 mph, but what a difference
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in those temperatures for tuesday afternoon, 12—13 celsius, it willjust feel so much milder. and the milder air sticks around as we work our way into wednesday as well. further cloud flooding in from the west. our clearest skies likely to the far northeast of the uk, but because the air itself is mild, i think we will stay frost free, even though temperatures slide down into the range of single figures. and there is this big dome, if you like, of mild air sitting across the uk for wednesday. high pressure to the south, quite a lot of cloud, hopefully some breaks perhaps to the east of the brecons across the northeast of england and for eastern scotland. but despite the cloud, it will still feel considerably warmer than it has done to start the week, again, temperatures in double figures. quite a contrast then to come for the end of the week. thursday, we've got a weather front set to work its way south. some heavy rain initially for scotland and northern ireland, then the front pushing down into england and wales come the afternoon.
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looks like it could eventually bring some rain, something we haven't seen much of in a while, into southernmost england overnight, but the keen eyed amongst you will have noticed the white coming in behind that rain band, much colder airflooding in for friday, another quite deep low to the north of the uk. it's looking windy, it should be bright with a lot of sunshine, but there's the chance that we could see some fairly frequent wintry showers pushing into scotland, i think maybe a few sliding south into northern england as well. and feeling so much colder again by friday. temperatures just 5—9 celsius.
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this is bbc news.
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the headlines... the initial report into parties held at downing street while the uk was under covid lockdown, has blamed failures of leadership and judgment. it says some of the events should not have been allowed to take place, not have been allowed to take place. borisjohnson again apologised, and said he would reform the way downing street is run. opposition leaders called on him to resign. meanwhile, police investigating the claims say they have received hundreds of photographs and documents. the united nations security council is meeting to discuss the tensions in ukraine. the us raised concerns about the build—up of russian forces. moscow says it has nothing to do with ukraine's domestic crisis. the streaming service spotify says it will direct listeners to verified facts about coronavirus. some artists have removed their music from the platform after the us broadcasterjoe rogan included vaccine sceptics on his podcast.

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