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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 31, 2022 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

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ml iei downin . street. some in downin street. some wwerful downing street. some powerful contributions in that piece, and you consent the —— sense the anger from lots of people. if that translates into the anger people have been saying they have been feeling in their constituencies, what will that mean for mrjohnson? their constituencies, what will that mean for mrjohnson?_ mean for mrjohnson? tonight there has been so — mean for mrjohnson? tonight there has been so much _ mean for mrjohnson? tonight there has been so much happening, - mean for mrjohnson? tonight there has been so much happening, it- mean for mrjohnson? tonight there has been so much happening, it is. has been so much happening, it is hard to be definitive about what the next moves look like, but there are plenty of things that are true that we know for sure. many mps are spitting chips, they are incandescent, they have heard that kind of anger. but we also know that their allies are determined to help him hang on. they believe he had a decent performance when he was tucked away with hundreds of tory mps tonight accounted for what had happened, and he promised a series of changes to them. and what those changes are and whether he actually sticks to the promises he made will be part of what determines how he is able to hang on or not in the coming weeks. but what will also be very important is what the police turn
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up, there are investigations that are ongoing, and also what will be important, just as we heard what happens to the public mood. politicians often say, they don't pay attention to the polls, but of course they do, and it will be critical in the coming days and weeks to see whether public opinion moves more decisively against boris johnson or whether mps hearing from their constituents, watching their e—mail inboxes, feel actually this could be a moment where things begin to calm down. but there is no doubt that downing street, even if they think today is something that they have almost been relieved to get out of the way, they know that this isn't over, and what happens next is not all in their hands.— not all in their hands. many thanks once again. _ not all in their hands. many thanks once again, laura _ not all in their hands. many thanks once again, laura kuenssberg, - not all in their hands. many thanks once again, laura kuenssberg, our political editor. that's it from downing street, as the questions about boris johnson's future show no signs of abating. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. have a very good night.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are ali miraj, who is a columnist at the article, and aletha adu, who is a political correspondent at the daily mirror. welcome to you both. let's have a look through what's already in. the guardian leads with sue gray's report, which blamed a "failure of leadership" for allowing parties to take place in downing street when the country was under strict lockdown. the same story makes the front page of the times, which reports that borisjohnson is facing a police investigation over at least four lockdown parties. the financial times says the prime minister is rejecting calls to resign,
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following that report by sue gray. the daily mail suggests the publication ofjust 12 pages has left the country stuck in limbo, and calls for the whole report to be published. and according to the telegraph, borisjohnson is to ask sue gray for a new report — in a bid to appease his backbenchers and save his premiership. right, let's start. i normally go ladies first, but i'm going to go with you, ali. you are a formerly —— former tory candidate. let's look at it broadly before we look at the times. weill. candidate. let's look at it broadly before we look at the times. well, i think it's clearly _ before we look at the times. well, i think it's clearly another _ before we look at the times. well, i think it's clearly another bad day - think it's clearly another bad day for the prime minister and for the conservative party. this is been going on for weeks. i think the pantomime season ended in december,
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but now it's the end of january, and now the prime minister is talking about yet another further sue gray report coming out. if i was hosting a party, sue gray would be the chief guest. she probably wants to relax now with a cup of cocoa. she's been very brave, she has basically talked about failures of leadership at the top of government and in the civil service. the prime minister could have published the report in full. it was a political decision at the request of the met do not publish it. i don't think anything would have necessarily been prejudiced. the prime minister didn't necessarily have to agree with that. now we have this going on for weeks, i must say that i do have a lot of respect for angela restriction, a 2019 intake mp —— angela richardson.
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who not only abstained over the 01 patterson debacle on that whole second jobs issue, but has been dying from the government —— on patterson —— resigned from the government. good to see there are still people in the government willing to put their money where their mounts it —— mouth is. it will be up to others. fix, their mounts it -- mouth is. it will be up to ethere— be up to others. a lot of tory mps would argue _ be up to others. a lot of tory mps would argue that _ be up to others. a lot of tory mps would argue that started - be up to others. a lot of tory mps would argue that started with... l would argue that started with... looking at the front pages, so many are similar. is there anything in the times that particularly caught your eye? figs the times that particularly caught our e e? �* , , ., the times that particularly caught oure e? a ., your eye? as you say, most of the front pages _ your eye? as you say, most of the front pages use — your eye? as you say, most of the front pages use that _ your eye? as you say, most of the front pages use that quote of- your eye? as you say, most of the | front pages use that quote of boris johnson, _ front pages use that quote of boris johnson, appearing to smirk. making a statement before mps. we must note
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that he _ a statement before mps. we must note that he said _ a statement before mps. we must note that he said there were a series of failures— that he said there were a series of failures of— that he said there were a series of failures of leadership there. we had a number— failures of leadership there. we had a number of mps calling for him to resign _ a number of mps calling for him to resign it _ a number of mps calling for him to resign. it was extremely heated and tense _ resign. it was extremely heated and tense in _ resign. it was extremely heated and tense in the chamber, and this is remarkable, that somehow, you have front ventures sitting at the front i’i l ht front ventures sitting at the front right next — front ventures sitting at the front right next to borisjohnson, sort of jeering _ right next to borisjohnson, sort of jeering and — right next to borisjohnson, sort of jeering and booing. didn't hear any of that— jeering and booing. didn't hear any of that during his speech. the times going _ of that during his speech. the times going on— of that during his speech. the times going on the police investigating parties _ going on the police investigating parties we didn't know about. we've -ot parties we didn't know about. we've got to— parties we didn't know about. we've got to remember the excuses that the prime _ got to remember the excuses that the prime minister came to the common chamber— prime minister came to the common chamber with before christmas. initially. — chamber with before christmas. initially, after the reports, he said _ initially, after the reports, he said there were definitely no breaches of lockdown rules. now here he is today— breaches of lockdown rules. now here he is today apologising to the nation — he is today apologising to the nation. it's remarkable. he's heard
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from _ nation. it's remarkable. he's heard from his— nation. it's remarkable. he's heard from his own — nation. it's remarkable. he's heard from his own colleagues calling their— from his own colleagues calling their hearts out. one of them saying their hearts out. one of them saying the prime _ their hearts out. one of them saying the prime minister —— because the prime _ the prime minister —— because the prime minister think i'm a full? that— prime minister think i'm a full? that is— prime minister think i'm a full? that is the _ prime minister think i'm a full? that is the problem for number ten. i think they denied a few weeks ago that there had been a party in november 2020, the night the dominic cummings left. playing winner takes it all. if that is not true, that causes even more problems. it's the same line, failure of leadership, which has been picked up by most of the press tonight. let's look at the guardian. tories turning on the p.m. . irate look at the guardian. tories turning on the am -_ look at the guardian. tories turning on the p.m. . we keep hearing these stories. on the p.m. . we keep hearing these stories- i'll— on the p.m. . we keep hearing these stories. i'll believe _ on the p.m. . we keep hearing these stories. i'll believe it _ on the p.m. . we keep hearing these stories. i'll believe it when _ on the p.m. . we keep hearing these stories. i'll believe it when i - on the p.m. . we keep hearing these stories. i'll believe it when i see - stories. i'll believe it when i see
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it. i spoke to one tory mp early this evening who was fuming with rage. to quote him, "i will not be over this prime minister. " he said not yet, but i've refilled my fountain. i think a lot of people are very upset. you looked at the killer statement made by theresa may, no love lost between her and borisjohnson. he was constantly trying to undermine her own premiership when she was prime minister, but did ask a simple question — did the prime minister not understand the rules, or did he think they did not apply to him? and thatis think they did not apply to him? and that is a killer question that needs to be answered. you have not only theresa may, other seniorfigures coming out, but ultimately, and keir starmer alluded to this, you have this spectacle of senior cabinet members, very credible people,
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hard—working, who are being tainted by this. the question is, how long is the party going to allow this nonsense to continue? distracting from government and it makes the mother of all parliaments look weak and shambolic, and it needs to be dealt with.- look weak and shambolic, and it needs to be dealt with. staying with ou, ali. needs to be dealt with. staying with you. ali. do — needs to be dealt with. staying with you. ali- do you _ needs to be dealt with. staying with you, ali. do you think _ needs to be dealt with. staying with you, ali. do you think he _ needs to be dealt with. staying with you, ali. do you think he is - needs to be dealt with. staying with you, ali. do you think he is a - needs to be dealt with. staying with you, ali. do you think he is a for - you, ali. do you think he is a for the time being?— you, ali. do you think he is a for the time being? potentially, but you have the local _ the time being? potentially, but you have the local elections _ the time being? potentially, but you have the local elections in _ the time being? potentially, but you have the local elections in may. - the time being? potentially, but you have the local elections in may. we l have the local elections in may. we also looked... is not universal. the very successful mayor of teesside who is referred to as the angel of the north, he was saying you will not get the... it is a big step to get rid of the prime minister who won a majority of ady a couple years ago, but this manner of leadership has to be dealt with. i cannot see attacking out of the... but it's not
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his business to run the government. it's a prime minister's job. his business to run the government. it's a prime minister'sjob. and not to throw him under the bus. aletha, let's move on to the metro. what did you make of the performance in pmqs? it what did you make of the performance in pmqs? . , what did you make of the performance in pmqs? ., , ., , in pmqs? it was quite remarkable. after keir starmer _ in pmqs? it was quite remarkable. after keir starmer made _ in pmqs? it was quite remarkable. after keir starmer made quite - in pmqs? it was quite remarkable. after keir starmer made quite a i after keir starmer made quite a heartfelt — after keir starmer made quite a heartfelt response to his statement, saying _ heartfelt response to his statement, saying that the public, many of them felt guilty _ saying that the public, many of them felt guilty. he repeated that word i think three times, guilty for not ietting — think three times, guilty for not letting their children have birthday parties. _ letting their children have birthday parties, for not being there for their— parties, for not being there for their loved ones, holding their hands — their loved ones, holding their hands in — their loved ones, holding their hands in their last moments and not being _ hands in their last moments and not being able _ hands in their last moments and not being able to hold farewell funerals. it was remarkable that boris _ funerals. it was remarkable that borisjohnson quickly funerals. it was remarkable that boris johnson quickly hit that and said that — boris johnson quickly hit that and said that the labour leader was
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speaking — said that the labour leader was speaking nonsense, and went on to say that— speaking nonsense, and went on to say that keir starmer was responsible for not putting someone behind _ responsible for not putting someone behind bars. that was not true. we had many— behind bars. that was not true. we had many mps saying, particularly needing _ had many mps saying, particularly needing dories, saying keir starmer has been _ needing dories, saying keir starmer has been responsible for saying things— has been responsible for saying things that were not true. you see it time _ things that were not true. you see it time and — things that were not true. you see it time and time again. —— nadine dorries _ it time and time again. —— nadine dorries hes— it time and time again. —— nadine dorries. he's desperate to appear contident— dorries. he's desperate to appear confident and he starts to come across _ confident and he starts to come across as — confident and he starts to come across as too much. that was quite saddening — across as too much. that was quite saddening to see. i spoke to many families who had spewed —— throughout this entire scandal, and expressing how disgusted and second they felt _ expressing how disgusted and second they felt. they felt as if he was taking — they felt. they felt as if he was taking them for fools. he felt this was a _ taking them for fools. he felt this was a game to him. seeing how long he can—
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was a game to him. seeing how long he can last. — was a game to him. seeing how long he can last, and he does not really care about — he can last, and he does not really care about the sacrifices that they made _ care about the sacrifices that they made it's— care about the sacrifices that they made. it's remarkable that he could apologise _ made. it's remarkable that he could apologise and then make jerry remarks _ did that strike the right tone for you and something during this two and fro? i you and something during this two and fro? ., �* ~' and fro? i don't think it did. if ou are and fro? i don't think it did. if you are in _ and fro? i don't think it did. if you are in a — and fro? i don't think it did. if you are in a whole... - and fro? i don't think it did. if you are in a whole... i - and fro? i don't think it did. if you are in a whole... i think. and fro? i don't think it did. if. you are in a whole... i think the prime minister got the right tone when it was complete contrition, and he should have published a report. now it's a situation where we've heard the same mantra from minister after minister, wait for sue gray's report. that's now going to big giving way to wait for cressida dick's report. this story was... the prime minister probably feels that by pushing this out, time is on his
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side, and labour had a ten point lead. i think he's going to have a conversation with vladimir putin and releasing the leveling of white people don't my paper. the prime minister ensures he was looking stronger —— leveling of white paper. i think he should have got it out there, shown complete contrition and it would've been much betterfor everyone to see the facts. he's talking about sue gray to point no. —— two point zero. it talking about sue gray to point no. -- two point zero.— -- two point zero. it short of defies delete _ -- two point zero. it short of defies delete to _ -- two point zero. it short of defies delete to think - -- two point zero. it short of defies delete to think that i -- two point zero. it short ofl defies delete to think that the police wouldn't have known what was going on. it’s police wouldn't have known what was auoin on. �* , police wouldn't have known what was auoin on. h ., going on. it's quite remarkable. it's 2022, — going on. it's quite remarkable. it's 2022, and — going on. it's quite remarkable. it's 2022, and there's _ going on. it's quite remarkable. it's 2022, and there's cameras i it's 2022, and there's cameras everywhere. people have their smartphones, and to think nobody
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would _ smartphones, and to think nobody would feel— smartphones, and to think nobody would feel comfortable reporting this. she's not talking about the police _ this. she's not talking about the police per— this. she's not talking about the police per se, but she's saying there — police per se, but she's saying there needs to be better mechanisms to encourage people to come over. that comes _ to encourage people to come over. that comes down from the top. if you're _ that comes down from the top. if you're in— that comes down from the top. if you're in the workplace and will feel comfortable making reports and complaints were voiced her concerns, that the _ complaints were voiced her concerns, that the problem set by the top. not the people at the bottom who are struggling. she has a lot to answer for, struggling. she has a lot to answer for. and _ struggling. she has a lot to answer for. and it's— struggling. she has a lot to answer for, and it's remarkable. we had boris _ for, and it's remarkable. we had borisjohnson saying for, and it's remarkable. we had boris johnson saying that he for, and it's remarkable. we had borisjohnson saying that he is for, and it's remarkable. we had boris johnson saying that he is the man to _ boris johnson saying that he is the man to fix — boris johnson saying that he is the man to fix this problem, but he's still not — man to fix this problem, but he's still not explaining. he hasn't even admitted _ still not explaining. he hasn't even admitted what these problems are. he'siust _ admitted what these problems are. he'sjust pushing people back to this report. it's been squashed because — this report. it's been squashed because of this met police
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investigation. many legal experts are confused as to why the report couldn't— are confused as to why the report couldn't be — are confused as to why the report couldn't be published entirely. again, — couldn't be published entirely. again, as— couldn't be published entirely. again, as my colleague says, it's up to boris— again, as my colleague says, it's up to borisjohnson. he could've had this done — to borisjohnson. he could've had this done with before christmas, when _ this done with before christmas, when we — this done with before christmas, when we first started saying these claims _ when we first started saying these claims were not true. the public is 'ust claims were not true. the public is just dragged through the mud, continuing to endure the contact of trauma _ continuing to endure the contact of trauma it's— continuing to endure the contact of trauma. it's also for the people who are struggling mentally. ali, it is the telegraph that is leading on that. i wonder what you made as a tory fall over and someone who hangs around about the drinking —— follower. is it not reasonable for people who have had a busy day to have a drink at the end of the day?
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to have a drink at the end of the da ? , ., ., , .,

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