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tv   Context  BBC News  January 31, 2022 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching context on bbc news. failures of leadership and judgment, a culture in which those with concerns felt unable to speak out, and a series events that should never have taken place. the senior civil servant sue gray delivers her verdict on the downing st parties — some of the behaviour she said is difficult to justify. the prime minister has apologised once again. i want to say sorry and i am sorry for the things we simply did not get right, and also sorry for the way that this matter has been handled. the uk warns of tough new sanctions for russia, while the us says moscow poses a threat notjust to ukraine, but to the international order.
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donald trump admits he did want mike pence to "overturn" the result of the 2020 election and he calls on his supporters to come out in their thousands, if they dare to charge him for it. tonight with the context, ayesha hazarika, former labour advisor and evening standard columnist. and guto harri who worked with borisjohnson when he was the mayor of london. hello and welcome. 12 of the 16 events sue gray investigated are now subject to a police investigation, including three events it's claimed borisjohnson attended in person. in the abridged version of her report published today, sue gray said she was limited in what she could make public because of the met police inquiry. none of the 70 people she has
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spoken to were identified, nor did she include any of the relevant email information, whatsapp messages, or some 300 photographs that the met police now have in their possession. but she didn't pull any punches in her conclusions. some of the behaviour, she wrote, is difficult to justify, and some events should not have been allowed to take place, there were failures of leadership and judgment in parts of number 10 and the cabinet office. some staff had wanted to raise concerns, she said, but felt unable to do so. in the commons this afternoon, borisjohnson apologised again. mr speaker, i get it and i will fix it. and i want to say... and i want to say to the people of this country, i know what the issue is. yes, mr speaker. yes, yes, it is whether this government can
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be trusted to deliver, and i say, mr speaker, yes, we can be trusted. cherishing and nurturing british democracy is what it means to be patriotic. there are members opposite who know that and they know the prime minister is incapable of it. the question they must now ask themselves is what are they going to do about it? they can heap their reputations, the reputation of their party, the reputation of this country on the bonfire that is his leadership, they can spare the country from the prime minister totally unworthy of his responsibilities. it is their duty to do so. and after borisjohnson and the leader of the opposition sir keir starmer had traded blows in the chamber, it was the turn of the prime minister's predecessor, theresa may. what the report does show is that number ten downing st was not observing the regulations they had imposed on members of the public.
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so either my right honourable friend had not read the rules, or did not understand what they meant, and others around him, orthey did not think the rules applied to number ten. which was it? ifa if a prime minister is to fall, someone quite clearly has to wield the knife. did the intervention of prime minister theresa may, was that significant today? i prime minister theresa may, was that significant today?— significant today? i think it was a si . nificant significant today? i think it was a significant moment. _ significant today? i think it was a significant moment. she - significant today? i think it was a significant moment. she picks i significant today? i think it was a l significant moment. she picks and chooses her moments quite judiciously, but actually, it is very difficult tojudge judiciously, but actually, it is very difficult to judge a conservative mps are going to land on this, they are ultimately the arbiters of the future of the prime minister. i thought his performance today was absolutely extraordinary for all the wrong reasons. he said that he was sorry, but it felt like quite an empty word. he then started
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plastering through, saying i will deliver on all these other things. the point that keir starmer made and the point people are reeling from, this was not an ordinary point in time, this was a point at which the british public made such devastating sacrifices and the man who made the rules broke the rules, and i think thatis rules broke the rules, and i think that is why theresa may's question was so pertinent. either he broke the rules unwittingly or he did know, all the people around him did not know, but either way it is not a good look. it not know, but either way it is not a aood look. , not know, but either way it is not a good look-— good look. it is interesting that the normally — good look. it is interesting that the normally loyal— good look. it is interesting that the normally loyal daily - good look. it is interesting that i the normally loyal daily telegraph makes the same point this evening. asked whether they thought he was contrite, a lot of the mps on their way out thought at moments in that exchange he was quite petulant. yes. exchange he was quite petulant. yes, it is not a good _ exchange he was quite petulant. yes, it is not a good look, _ exchange he was quite petulant. yes, it is not a good look, but i don't think_ it is not a good look, but i don't think it — it is not a good look, but i don't think it is — it is not a good look, but i don't think it is a _ it is not a good look, but i don't think it is a moment, the moment of maximum _ think it is a moment, the moment of maximum danger at the borisjohnson passed _ maximum danger at the borisjohnson passed more than a week ago and
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essentially, although there are other— essentially, although there are other things that can cause him problems— other things that can cause him problems down the line, i will be surprised — problems down the line, i will be surprised now if he is brought down by partygate. i would even put it as strongly— by partygate. i would even put it as strongly as — by partygate. i would even put it as strongly as that. we all had what today— strongly as that. we all had what today what we wanted it to find in that report. if you loathe boris johnson — that report. if you loathe boris johnson and were looking for evidence _ johnson and were looking for evidence that he is a bad man and did not— evidence that he is a bad man and did not fit— evidence that he is a bad man and did not fit to be prime minister, you got— did not fit to be prime minister, you got words that were reassuring to you. _ you got words that were reassuring to you. but — you got words that were reassuring to you, but he did not get a killer blow, _ to you, but he did not get a killer blow, and — to you, but he did not get a killer blow, and if— to you, but he did not get a killer blow, and if you are charged today with going — blow, and if you are charged today with going out there to secure his future, _ with going out there to secure his future, you — with going out there to secure his future, you could point out to everyone _ future, you could point out to everyone there was not a killer blow, — everyone there was not a killer blow, so — everyone there was not a killer blow, so for all the pantomime and theatre _ blow, so for all the pantomime and theatre and — blow, so for all the pantomime and theatre and all that the rest of it, you end _ theatre and all that the rest of it, you end up — theatre and all that the rest of it, you end up with an exercise that was: _ you end up with an exercise that was, thanks not to the opposition nor indeed — was, thanks not to the opposition nor indeed the government, but thanks— nor indeed the government, but thanks to — nor indeed the government, but thanks to the metropolitan police, ultimately a futile exercise. let�*s ultimately a futile exercise. let's find out what _ ultimately a futile exercise. let's find out what the _ ultimately a futile exercise. let's find out what the mood - ultimately a futile exercise. let's find out what the mood of - ultimately a futile exercise. let�*s find out what the mood of the party is. we can bring in a conservative mp. i suppose you have been to the meeting of the 1922 committee tonight with the conservative backbenchers coming together, what
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was the reaction when borisjohnson arrived at the meeting? i was was the reaction when boris johnson arrived at the meeting?— arrived at the meeting? i was in art of arrived at the meeting? i was in part of the _ arrived at the meeting? i was in part of the meeting, _ arrived at the meeting? i was in part of the meeting, but - arrived at the meeting? i was in part of the meeting, but the - arrived at the meeting? i was in| part of the meeting, but the part arrived at the meeting? i was in i part of the meeting, but the part i was therefore and i spoke to other colleagues who are there for the full meeting, it was one of support. colleagues are certainly listened to what the pm had to say. there were put to him by members and my overall impression was that this was a prime minister who has apologised, he has apologised repeatedly for a few weeks now and basically he really does understand, as do all the rest of us, i had many e—mails from constituents, the enormous suffering and sacrifices they made during the pandemic and of cause across the country, millions of people went through the same suffering, the prime minister understands that, has apologised and i think what we really need to do, as i said in the house when i spoke during the statement he gave, for people in my constituency, i have a military bases and i'm getting e—mails from
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constituents who are concerned about their loved ones... who constituents who are concerned about their loved ones. . ._ their loved ones... who sets the culture in _ their loved ones... who sets the culture in a _ their loved ones... who sets the culture in a military _ their loved ones... who sets the culture in a military base? - their loved ones... who sets the culture in a military base? i'm i culture in a military base? i'm talkin: culture in a military base? i'm talking about _ culture in a military base? in talking about politics. culture in a military base? i'm talking about politics. who - culture in a military base? i'm. talking about politics. who sets culture in a military base? i'm - talking about politics. who sets the culture at the _ talking about politics. who sets the culture at the top? _ talking about politics. who sets the culture at the top? whoever- talking about politics. who sets the culture at the top? whoever is - talking about politics. who sets the culture at the top? whoever is the l culture at the top? whoever is the senior officer _ culture at the top? whoever is the senior officer at _ culture at the top? whoever is the senior officer at the _ culture at the top? whoever is the senior officer at the time. - culture at the top? whoever is the senior officer at the time. right, l senior officer at the time. right, so can we _ senior officer at the time. right, so can we then _ senior officer at the time. right, so can we then conclude - senior officer at the time. right, so can we then conclude it - senior officer at the time. right, so can we then conclude it is - senior officer at the time. right, so can we then conclude it is the prime minister who sets the culture in at numberten? prime minister who sets the culture in at number ten? but prime minister who sets the culture in at number ten?— in at number ten? but the prime minister has _ in at number ten? but the prime minister has never _ in at number ten? but the prime minister has never denied - in at number ten? but the prime minister has never denied that i in at number ten? but the prime l minister has never denied that was the case. a few weeks ago at prime minister's questions, he profusely apologised for having attended the 20th of may 2020 event, he apologised for the way things were donein apologised for the way things were done in downing street. that has been repeated again in this report that sue gray has come out with and we're talking the same things and sue gray has used different language. he sue gray has used different language-— sue gray has used different lanaauae. ., ., language. he also said he did not attend any _ language. he also said he did not attend any parties, _ language. he also said he did not attend any parties, but _ language. he also said he did not attend any parties, but three i language. he also said he did not attend any parties, but three of l language. he also said he did not. attend any parties, but three of the events he attended and are subject to a criminal inquiry. i events he attended and are sub'ect to a criminal inquiry.i to a criminal inquiry. i think you would agree _ to a criminal inquiry. i think you
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would agree he _ to a criminal inquiry. i think you would agree he said _ to a criminal inquiry. i think you would agree he said that - to a criminal inquiry. i think you| would agree he said that initially but corrected himself subsequently. he says tonight he gets it and can fix it. do you think he is capable of changing the culture within downing street? i of changing the culture within downing street?— downing street? i think he is ca able downing street? i think he is capable of— downing street? i think he is capable of doing _ downing street? i think he is capable of doing that - downing street? i think he is capable of doing that and i i downing street? i think he is i capable of doing that and i think we need to look at this in the context of so many other important decisions that the prime minister has taken. let's not forget that during this enormously difficult period for all of us, and particularly for him who was at the top of the pile in terms of taking decisions, a lot of right decisions were taken, the vaccine roll—out was the best in europe, one of the best in the world, over £400 billion was made available to individuals and companies so that the economy could be sustainable to allow us to have economic growth that we are now having, the fastest growing economy in the g7, and importantly, there are more people in work now than before the pandemic. we also have more vacancies now than before the pandemic. i think certainly this is a prime minister who has taken some
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very important and difficult decisions, including making the right call at christmas in terms of restrictions, so what we need to do now is wait for that report to come to its conclusions and in the meantime, try and address at some other important issues such as those in my constituents writing on the ukraine issue but also on the cost of living, rising energy prices and a whole host of other measures. sue gra sa s a whole host of other measures. sue gray says at — a whole host of other measures. sue gray says at times that there was too little thought given to was happening across the country in considering the appropriateness of these gatherings and how they might appear to the public. there will be plenty of people, myself included, who last parents, i did not go for three months to see my mother when she was dying, and in that period there were 16 parties, 12 of which are now a criminal inquiry and what you are telling us tonight is no one it carries the canon for that? ida.
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it carries the canon for that? no, that is not _ it carries the canon for that? no, that is not what _ it carries the canon for that? no, that is not what i'm _ it carries the canon for that? iifr, that is not what i'm saying. it carries the canon for that? no, that is not what i'm saying. who | that is not what i'm saying. who would then _ that is not what i'm saying. who would then further— that is not what i'm saying. who would then further what today is quite a damning verdict, he was responsible for that? first quite a damning verdict, he was responsible for that?— responsible for that? first can i sa it is responsible for that? first can i say it is not _ responsible for that? first can i say it is not politicians - responsible for that? first can i say it is not politicians are i responsible for that? first can i say it is not politicians are not i say it is not politicians are not aware of the enormous suffering that people in the country have had. i lost someone very close in my family too and there were other funerals for those who are close to me who is departure was done at a distance. it is not as though we do not understand, we do. the issue here however is there are many people who are keen to come to a conclusion right now, when, as you quite rightly say, the police are making investigations. most on the one hand police are making investigations, they have all the facts and figures and i would rather wait for the
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police to come to their conclusions, than coming to premature conclusions right now on facts that i do not have all the details on. we right now on facts that i do not have all the details on.- right now on facts that i do not have all the details on. we are very crateful have all the details on. we are very grateful for — have all the details on. we are very grateful for you _ have all the details on. we are very grateful for you coming _ have all the details on. we are very grateful for you coming on - have all the details on. we are very grateful for you coming on to i have all the details on. we are very. grateful for you coming on to answer our questions this evening, thank you very much. ayesha, just respond to that. there are plenty of things that we do not know yet. we are not in full possession of all the facts and we must wait. what is wrong with waiting for the metropolitan police to come up with the final verdict on this? ~ ., to come up with the final verdict on this? . ., ~ ., to come up with the final verdict on this? ~ ., ~ ., , ., to come up with the final verdict on this? ~ ., ~ ., ., this? we do know some things are out there. the prime _ this? we do know some things are out there. the prime minister _ this? we do know some things are out there. the prime minister said - this? we do know some things are out there. the prime minister said there l there. the prime minister said there were no parties and now we discover that there were about to 16, as you said a 12 are now under criminal investigation. we do note the prime minister is dishonest. he has lied about things. the other thing i thought was absolutely extraordinary was his tone in the house today, because if he was really sorry, he should have looked sorry, he should have sounded sorry. instead we saw this bizarre attack on keir starmer
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putting misinformation onjimmy savile, he put out misinformation about that. and he accused the labour front bench of taking drugs. it was an extraordinary moment and ian blackford, leader of the scottish national party, had a big moment where he ends up walking out of the house because he did call out the prime minister on his lying. we knew the sue gray report would have to be measured, but it comes back to draconian rules that they struck two and now we have this report. the public know this is a man they can no— the public know this is a man they can no longer trust. he has been investigated by the police, he misled — investigated by the police, he misled the house, he must now resign —
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misled the house, he must now resin. ., ., ., ., resign. you will have to withdraw misled. resign. you will have to withdraw misled- mr _ resign. you will have to withdraw misled. mr speaker, _ resign. you will have to withdraw misled. mr speaker, the - resign. you will have to withdraw misled. mr speaker, the prime l misled. mr speaker, the prime minister has _ misled. mr speaker, the prime minister has misled _ misled. mr speaker, the prime minister has misled the - misled. mr speaker, the primej minister has misled the house. unless — minister has misled the house. unless you withdraw, i will have to stop and _ unless you withdraw, i will have to stop and that — unless you withdraw, i will have to stop and that is _ unless you withdraw, i will have to stop and that is not _ unless you withdraw, i will have to stop and that is not good. - unless you withdraw, i will have to stop and that is not good. just i stop and that is not good. just withdraw— stop and that is not good. just withdraw the _ stop and that is not good. just withdraw the words. _ stop and that is not good. just withdraw the words. i - stop and that is not good. just withdraw the words.— stop and that is not good. just withdraw the words. i am standing up for my constituents _ withdraw the words. i am standing up for my constituents that _ withdraw the words. i am standing up for my constituents that you - withdraw the words. i am standing up for my constituents that you know i for my constituents that you know that this _ for my constituents that you know that this prime minister has lied and misled the house. ian blackford it clearly knows _ and misled the house. ian blackford it clearly knows the _ and misled the house. ian blackford it clearly knows the rules _ and misled the house. ian blackford it clearly knows the rules of - and misled the house. ian blackford it clearly knows the rules of the i it clearly knows the rules of the house and some of that was the political theatre no doubt, but i just wonder how it looks when the leader of the scottish national party has to leave the house and the chamber, when many people will think that he is stating fact? it chamber, when many people will think that he is stating fact?— that he is stating fact? it looks like parliament _ that he is stating fact? it looks like parliament is _ that he is stating fact? it looks like parliament is a _ that he is stating fact? it looks. like parliament is a pantomime, regardless of which side you are on. in regardless of which side you are on. in the _ regardless of which side you are on. in the end. — regardless of which side you are on. in the end, we are talking about something extreme serious her, there are people _ something extreme serious her, there are people who think the democratic choice _ are people who think the democratic choice and _ are people who think the democratic choice and the people of the united
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kingdom _ choice and the people of the united kingdom of two years ago, that that can he _ kingdom of two years ago, that that can be overturned by all kind of procedures and policies. maybe there is a killer— procedures and policies. maybe there is a killer blow but i have not seen it yet _ is a killer blow but i have not seen it yet there — is a killer blow but i have not seen it yet. there are so many traditions that i_ it yet. there are so many traditions that i think— it yet. there are so many traditions that i think make the uk a civilised place _ that i think make the uk a civilised place to— that i think make the uk a civilised place to live, they include innocent until proven guilty, you do not speak— until proven guilty, you do not speak out— until proven guilty, you do not speak out when an inquiry is under way _ speak out when an inquiry is under way we _ speak out when an inquiry is under way. we know there were parties of some _ way. we know there were parties of some description, we note the prime minister was present at some, but there _ minister was present at some, but there are — minister was present at some, but there are still issues that are left and the _ there are still issues that are left and the met are getting on with stuff, _ and the met are getting on with stuff, so — and the met are getting on with stuff, so why do we have to jump the gun? _ stuff, so why do we have to jump the gun? why— stuff, so why do we have to jump the gun? why do we have to scream louder and get _ gun? why do we have to scream louder and get him _ gun? why do we have to scream louder and get him out of the commons rather— and get him out of the commons rather than — and get him out of the commons rather than forensically dealing with this? what is frustrating people — with this? what is frustrating people if there is not a killer blow, — people if there is not a killer blow, i— people if there is not a killer blow, i suspect there is not one. it is if you _ blow, i suspect there is not one. it is if you don't— blow, i suspect there is not one. it is if you don't like borisjohnson,
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you loathe — is if you don't like borisjohnson, you loathe him even more, and if you think— you loathe him even more, and if you think he _ you loathe him even more, and if you think he is— you loathe him even more, and if you think he is capable of connecting with the — think he is capable of connecting with the british public in a way people — with the british public in a way people clients, you stick with him, and that— people clients, you stick with him, and that is— people clients, you stick with him, and that is why people end up. in a passage _ and that is why people end up. in a passage of— and that is why people end up. in a passage of time we will go back into those _ passage of time we will go back into those two _ passage of time we will go back into those two camps but i suspect. we can those two camps but i suspect. can bring in those two camps but i suspect. - can bring in catherine. can we talk about one of the points that sue gray makes in heavy points that downing street is now more akin to a small government department than a purely a dedicated prime minister's office, but the structure she said has not changed to recognise that. in the commons today he said he would institute an office of the prime minister rather than an institute, office of 10 downing street. what is the difference? that is the bi street. what is the difference? t'isgt is the big question, we're still waiting to hear, because on one it is a bit of a name change, currently
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called the prime minister's office, it is part of the cabinet office, the overarching department. it has changed, but this has been a 20, 30 year change in terms of the nature of number ten. it was certainly a considerable size under tony blair. what is difficult though, in thinking about this, is the reason why all of this. none of it is particularly new. number ten is very different from other departments, because it has a larger proportion of political appointments and it and a lot of those appointments can be very different units when you are talking about policy units, comms units, they are not integrated necessarily in the same way that you would see in other departments. a lot of the time they are looking as much to the conservative party when there are political appointments as they are to the internal workings of they are to the internal workings of the government. so it is hard to say that this is a new thing that you can therefore say intrinsically that is what led to this. she
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can therefore say intrinsically that is what led to this.— is what led to this. she did say that a lot _ is what led to this. she did say that a lot of — is what led to this. she did say that a lot of them _ is what led to this. she did say that a lot of them had - is what led to this. she did say that a lot of them had spilled i is what led to this. she did say i that a lot of them had spilled into the garden which she said in her report was a healthier environment and they were grateful for that. i'm not making excuses in any shape or form for their behaviour, i think we made that clear with the mp we just spoke to, but is there something in the way down street are structured and is it fit for purpose or is it just overcrowded?— and is it fit for purpose or is it just overcrowded? think it was a valid point _ just overcrowded? think it was a valid point to — just overcrowded? think it was a valid point to talk _ just overcrowded? think it was a valid point to talk about - just overcrowded? think it was a valid point to talk about the i just overcrowded? think it was a valid point to talk about the fact | valid point to talk about the fact it is a home as well as a working office. the fact that one of the events we are talking about, remember that picture of the prime minister and others are sitting in the garden, they said that was a work meeting, they did have drinks, but that i think it is not one of the once police are looking into. so there clearly was a blurring of the boundaries, but what is more difficult when it comes to how much this is down to number ten and the working practice is where she talks
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about confused leadership of he was in charge and she, without naming names, it says senior people should have taken responsibility for decisions and that is because you have all of these different units who are not necessarily all in tune with each other and there is not a clear hierarchy of who is ultimately taking the decision. but that stems from the fact that it is almost akin to the report, reflects the prime minister, reflects working practices, and if you have people vying for control you end up in the situation, so it is not right to just say it is down to long—standing problems with number ten, there is something about each of number ten under every prime minister works at tiffany. under every prime minister works at tiffan . �* ., ., , ., tiffany. 0k, we're going to pause on sue gra tiffany. ok, we're going to pause on sue gray for— tiffany. 0k, we're going to pause on sue gray for a _ tiffany. 0k, we're going to pause on sue gray for a moment. _ tiffany. ok, we're going to pause on sue gray for a moment. i _ tiffany. 0k, we're going to pause on sue gray for a moment. i know i tiffany. 0k, we're going to pause on sue gray for a moment. i know you | sue gray for a moment. i know you will stay with me. —— every prime
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minister working at number ten downing st. in texas on saturday night, the former president donald trump delivered a message many republicans have been eager to hear — president biden and the democrats he said have failed to live up to what they promised and the midterm elections are the opportunity for americans to deliver their verdict. that's what they want to hear. except that was only a slice of it. if i run and if i when, we will treat those people from january 6th fairly. we will treat them fairly. and if it requires pardons, we will give them pardons, because they are being treated so unfairly. again the former president claimed the 2020 election was rigged, which it was not, and if he is prosecuted he said there's only thing for it. if these radical, vicious, racist prosecutors do anything wrong or illegal, i hope we are going to have in this country the biggest protests we have ever had in washington, dc, in new york, in atlanta and elsewhere, because our country and our elections are corrupt.
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they are corrupt. in a statement on sunday night, he wrote in black and white what many have long accused him of doing. let's speak to someone who knows donald trump well — bryan lanza was former communications directorfor president trump's transition team. i was looking for that statement, it has come down, i wonder if someone has come down, i wonder if someone has advised him that that may be the language in that statement was not very smart. it language in that statement was not ve smart. ., , language in that statement was not ve smart. . , , language in that statement was not ve smart. ., , ., , , very smart. it was 'ust absolutely cra , very smart. it was 'ust absolutely crazy, that _ very smart. it wasjust absolutely crazy, that statement _ very smart. it wasjust absolutely crazy, that statement that - very smart. it wasjust absolutely crazy, that statement that he i very smart. it wasjust absolutely crazy, that statement that he set| crazy, that statement that he set about pardoning those individuals and january the 6th. i think the
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vast majority of americans do not think they have been treated harshly, so to see a statement like that. i know pretty well, i've worked with him, he seeks a headline and controversy, but i think he is touching a very dangerous narrative with this country talking about january the 6th that he is on the losing side. january the 6th that he is on the losing side-— january the 6th that he is on the losin: side. ., ., , losing side. said at the outset we know what _ losing side. said at the outset we know what the _ losing side. said at the outset we know what the republicans i losing side. said at the outset we know what the republicans want | losing side. said at the outset we i know what the republicans want to focus on going to be midterms. that is rising levels of crime in cities, the failure of the joe is rising levels of crime in cities, the failure of thejoe biden to bring the democrats together around his legislative agenda, it is the cost of living, all of that very good for republicans to run on of course in the mid—term campaign season. but it is not about that for him it is about him and his legacy. yes, it is always about him. i think we are six years into this trump experience and everything now has become about him, television became about him and now he is at stretching his wings again to say look at me, give me the attention,
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and we all do. we are talking about pretty outrageous statements which were set on saturday, presidential candidates were asked about those comments and will be all week and we will have the cycle of responses and it will carry through to thursday and we will talk more and more about it, it is unavoidable. it is content that everyone has seen. ayesha, i don't know — that everyone has seen. ayesha, i don't know if— that everyone has seen. ayesha, i don't know if you _ that everyone has seen. ayesha, i don't know if you got _ that everyone has seen. ayesha, i don't know if you got a _ that everyone has seen. ayesha, i don't know if you got a cross i that everyone has seen. ayesha, i don't know if you got a cross at i don't know if you got a cross at some of the things the former president said on saturday night, a lot of people in the democratic party appalled by what they had. when he talks about racist prosecutors, the three prosecutors are looking to his business affairs and what he did post—election, they are all black. did you hear a dog whistle politics in what he was saying? whistle politics in what he was sa in: ? ., ., ., , saying? you hear dog whistle olitics saying? you hear dog whistle politics with _ saying? you hear dog whistle politics with everything i saying? you hear dog whistle politics with everything he i saying? you hear dog whistle i politics with everything he says. i thought it was absolutely extraordinary that he was suggesting he would harden the rioters. i think
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his language was actually quite insightful in terms of let's have thousands of people rise up again. that does not look like a man who has any remorse about that terrible insurrection on capitol hill and i think it is a big question for the republican party now, who is, what is the soul of the republican party? do they want to be a more one nation good old republican party or do they want to go down quite a frightening route with donald trump? the big question is, is he going to stand again, and if he does, i think a lot of people are going to be very worried because of the damage to democracy he clearly wants to do. but when you look at who was there on saturday night, there are thousands of people who were there, they believe what he says, would follow him to the end and he has control of the base and that must be of note to the republican hierarchy. yes, he presents a huge challenge to us. i yes, he presents a huge challenge to
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us i always _ yes, he presents a huge challenge to us. i always thought donald trump as an obscene. _ us. i always thought donald trump as an obscene, obnoxious man who is a disgrace _ an obscene, obnoxious man who is a disgrace to _ an obscene, obnoxious man who is a disgrace to the office and a disgrace _ disgrace to the office and a disgrace to the office and a disgrace to public life, but if people — disgrace to public life, but if people choose to vote for him, then the challenge for the rest of us is not to— the challenge for the rest of us is not to prevent that on some technicality, and i admit law and all that— technicality, and i admit law and all that is— technicality, and i admit law and all that is more than a technicality, we have to win that battle _ technicality, we have to win that battle of — technicality, we have to win that battle of ideas. it is a challenge to the _ battle of ideas. it is a challenge to the democrats and indeed people are non—politically aligned to the us to _ are non—politically aligned to the us to do — are non—politically aligned to the us to do what is needed across a number— us to do what is needed across a number of— us to do what is needed across a number of things in the united states— number of things in the united states so— number of things in the united states so that people can see what we see _ states so that people can see what we see in— states so that people can see what we see in donald trump. otherwise, the scariest — we see in donald trump. otherwise, the scariest thing is this guy is not going _ the scariest thing is this guy is not going to seize power by coup, even _ not going to seize power by coup, even though he is talking about things— even though he is talking about things that are really terrifying, but the — things that are really terrifying, but the real horror is the idea that this man _ but the real horror is the idea that this man could yet be democratically elected _ this man could yet be democratically elected and that is where i think the focus — elected and that is where i think the focus of right thinking americans across the board, including _ americans across the board, including in his own party, should
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be. ~ ., , ., ., including in his own party, should be. ., , ., ., , be. well, he does want to be 47 aaain. be. well, he does want to be 47 again. president _ be. well, he does want to be 47 again. president number - be. well, he does want to be 47 again. president number 47, i. again. president number 47, i should say, don't we all want to be 47 again? bryan will stay with us. good evening, after the stormy weather that brought damage and destruction to some parts of the uk, things have been coming down a little bit today, but it has been quite a slow process because we have still had some very strong winds giving rough seas across the eastern side of the uk and as we look ahead through tonight and as we look ahead through tonight and tomorrow, still lots of white lines, isobars, so there is more windy weather in the forecast. also a frontal system pushing in from the west, some cloud, outbreaks of rain with that and after a chilly evening in eastern counties, this zone of cloud and rain untilfog in eastern counties, this zone of cloud and rain until fog will bring with it milder air, so by the end of the night, 6 degrees for norwich, seven for london, more like 11 affair belfast and glasgow because this wedge of mild air will be
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working into the picture between these weather fronts. this one here will bring a zone of cloud and some splashes of rain across parts of northern ireland, north—west england, wales, midlands, quite a lot of cloud to the south as well, brightening up perhaps for eastern england. far north of england should brighten up, scotland certainly seen centring through the day, but with showers across the far north where it will also be very windy. there is of the wind gusts we can expect, in the far north maybe 65 mph in exposed spots. but it will be mild, temperatures between ten and 13 degrees in most cases. through tuesday night into wednesday, that we, the front starts to push northwards again, to cloud and patchy rain pushing into the north of the uk. rain especially across parts of scotland as we go through the day. western and northern areas particularly. further south, the day. western and northern areas particularly. furthersouth, it may brighten up a little. i think we will stick with quite a lot of cloud and we stick with that mild feel, certainly ten to 13 degrees, not as
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windy on wednesday. slightly, day in a store. into thursday, we see a frontal system pushing in from the north—west which will bring outbreaks of heavy rain into scotland and northern ireland. ahead of that, mild weather once again, but behind that weather front, much colder air and some wintry showers because that band of rain is associated with a cold front. it will push southwards, ushering in a colder air. you can see the splodges of white, more wintry showers and against strong winds turned the week. friday, chilly feel to the day and we will see some wintry showers, especially in the north.
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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching context on bbc news. russia and the us clash at a united nations meeting over moscow's troop build—up on the ukraine border. moscow accuses the us of "whipping up hysteria" over the issue washington warns of "decisive, swift action" if russia invades. and , as borisjohnson apologises in the wake of sue gray's report , the met police says its been given hundreds of photos linked to parties at 10 downing street. tonight with the context, ayesha hazarika, former labour adviser and columnist for the evening standard and catherine haddon senior fellow with the institute for government.
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moscow now has 135 thousand troops on ukraine's border. what are they doing there , if not preparing for an invasion? today in new york, the americans were asking that very question at a special session of the un security council — in what turned into, a very public showdown. the us ambassador accused russia of undermining international peace. the russian envoy blamed an outbreak of �*american delirium'. we fully understand the desire of our american colleagues to whip up hysteria regarding its own situation over the so—called russian active aggression. it is something they want to do including within the security council. the security council's colleagues are being put in extremely difficult positions. this is of great harm to ukraine itself. washington's ambassador to the un linda thomas—greenfield, had some new figures to share. she said that there were 10,000 russian troops already in belarus with 30,000 more expected by early
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february, just a two hour drive from the ukrainian capital kyif. you have heard from our russian colleagues that we are calling for this meeting to make you all feel uncomfortable. imagine how uncomfortable. imagine how uncomfortable he would be if you had 100,000 troops sitting on your border so this is not about antics, it's not about rhetoric, it's not about us and pressure. what this is about us and pressure. what this is about is the peace and security of one of our member states. borisjohnson was due to speak with russian president vladimir putin today, but there are reports that conversation was cancelled. when the gray report landed the russians were asked to shift the time of the meeting — and they couldn't. so it was left to foreign secretary liz truss to set out in the commons a bill that will give the uk new powers to hit russian banks, energy companies and "oligarchs close to the kremlin". the legislation she said will be the toughest ever introduced and in place by february tenth.
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we will be able to target any company that is linked to the russian state, engages in business of economic significance to the russian state but operates in a sector of strategic significance to the russian state. not only will he be able to target these entities, we will also be able to go after those who own or control them. those in and around the kremlin would have nowhere to high. last week on this programme, the us financier bill browder said the only way to get the russian president's attention was to target his finances. does this bill rise to the moment. bill browder good evening. does it rise to the challenge? it sounds great. the announcement sounds great. the announcement sounds great. the announcement sounds great but i had had enough experience with british government and other government that the devil is in the details and it will
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ultimately depend if the british government in response to or perhaps in advance of an invasion went to ascension serious russian oligarchs thenit ascension serious russian oligarchs then it could not be better. if it doesn't turn out to be exactly and it's just another empty announcement. it'sjust another empty announcement.- it'sjust another empty announcement. , . ,, ., announcement. they talked about the old and uk announcement. they talked about the gold and uk visas _ announcement. they talked about the gold and uk visas tonight. _ announcement. they talked about the gold and uk visas tonight. the - announcement. they talked about the gold and uk visas tonight. the tier. gold and uk visas tonight. the tier 1 visas that were gold and uk visas tonight. the tier 1visas that were in place for russians bringing wealth into london. there is no news yet although daybell reports by apron on those visas, is there any place for russians to come into london if they are directly connected to the kremlin and what's going on in the ukraine? flit kremlin and what's going on in the ukraine? .., , ., kremlin and what's going on in the ukraine? , ., �* , kremlin and what's going on in the ukraine? , ., ukraine? of course not. any person who is a partner _ ukraine? of course not. any person who is a partner of _ ukraine? of course not. any person who is a partner of that _ ukraine? of course not. any person who is a partner of that an - ukraine? of course not. any person who is a partner of that an air- who is a partner of that an air pollutant, a financial partner should not be coming here and should not be spending their money here and
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not have anything to do with the kingdom but of them are only here and it does create an opportunity for us because since they're already here and have all their money here we have a amount of leverage. particularly if they are looking after putting's money because we can now freeze that money, freeze and feed it and that will change the behaviour of vladimir putin. i know ou behaviour of vladimir putin. i know you represent _ behaviour of vladimir putin. i know you represent some _ behaviour of vladimir putin. i know you represent some high-value i behaviour of vladimir putin. i know i you represent some high-value patent you represent some high—value patent —— claims in the past. the us state department has expressed frustration at the british government failure to take action. how easy if you have the power is in this trust has been setting out to target individuals linked to the russian regime, how easy would it be to find that money? i think the way our banking system is today— i think the way our banking system is today you will be able to track a lot of these accounts and that's what _ lot of these accounts and that's what it — lot of these accounts and that's what it looks like the governments ability _ what it looks like the governments ability but — what it looks like the governments
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ability but i will say as frustrated as americans are with the uk is my frustration — as americans are with the uk is my frustration at the beginning —— behaviour— frustration at the beginning —— behaviour of germany throughout this whole _ behaviour of germany throughout this whole experience in the uk had the opportunity to rise up and shine and show— opportunity to rise up and shine and show they— opportunity to rise up and shine and show they are very significant metre and the _ show they are very significant metre and the european area whereas germany— and the european area whereas germany had the opportunity to step up germany had the opportunity to step up and _ germany had the opportunity to step up and they have shrunk them in this process— up and they have shrunk them in this process to _ up and they have shrunk them in this process to the uk can do more and it's not— process to the uk can do more and it's not what— process to the uk can do more and it's not what we wanted but let's not lose — it's not what we wanted but let's not lose perspective. there is a weak— not lose perspective. there is a weak link— not lose perspective. there is a weak link in this nato agreement that we _ weak link in this nato agreement that we have and that's weak link has been — that we have and that's weak link has been demonstrated everyday by the german government. they labour shadow defence _ the german government. they labour shadow defence minister— the german government. they labour shadow defence minister spoke i the german government. they labour shadow defence minister spoke in i the german government. they labour| shadow defence minister spoke in the house this evening and says that the delay in investigating these golden visas doesn't directly link to £400 million that's been donated to the conservative party by seven individuals who have deep and highly devious links to the kremlin? it's not as if we've only just devious links to the kremlin? it's not as if we've onlyjust discovered this. a lot of it has been around
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for several years.— for several years. london has become a playground — for several years. london has become a playground for— for several years. london has become a playground for are _ for several years. london has become a playground for are not _ for several years. london has become a playground for are not of _ for several years. london has become a playground for are not of dirty i a playground for are not of dirty russian money and we know that huge amounts of money have fun into the conservative party and there was a report that was never published looking at connections between russian money and the conservative party so i think there are serious questions that need to be asked but i also think we need to take a step back and sanctions will only go so far. 0ne back and sanctions will only go so far. one of the issues that vladimir putin has on his side is the general secretary of nato already said no matter what pressure does, nato come troops are not going onto the ground in ukraine so that does give president putin a strategic advantage. many people are feeling he has got the upper hand and that we are brightening around to try to cut some deal with him. he wants nato to go back to where it was
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which is not going to happen. i think it's very difficult for any singular western media to try to move things forward with president putin right now. one of the clearer that has been doing the rounds over the last two days is this idea that they want to be an invasion but crimea willjust be the cloud the people's republic of china crane and incorporated into pressure without an invasion. incorporated into pressure without an invasion-— incorporated into pressure without an invasion. . , ., . , an invasion. what should the west in resonse an invasion. what should the west in response be — an invasion. what should the west in response be if— an invasion. what should the west in response be if that _ an invasion. what should the west in response be if that was _ an invasion. what should the west in response be if that was the - an invasion. what should the west in response be if that was the play? i response be if that was the play? it's a comparable action as hitler annexing — it's a comparable action as hitler annexing czechoslovakia - it's a comparable action as hitler annexing czechoslovakia at - it's a comparable action as hitler annexing czechoslovakia at the l annexing czechoslovakia at the beginning _ annexing czechoslovakia at the beginning of— annexing czechoslovakia at the beginning of the _ annexing czechoslovakia at the beginning of the second - annexing czechoslovakia at the beginning of the second world| annexing czechoslovakia at the i beginning of the second world war and basically— beginning of the second world war and basically if _ beginning of the second world war and basically if we _ beginning of the second world war and basically if we allow _ beginning of the second world war and basically if we allow vladimir l and basically if we allow vladimir putin— and basically if we allow vladimir putin to — and basically if we allow vladimir putin to do — and basically if we allow vladimir putin to do something _ and basically if we allow vladimir putin to do something like - and basically if we allow vladimir putin to do something like that l and basically if we allow vladimir putin to do something like that a j putin to do something like that a complete — putin to do something like that a complete violation _ putin to do something like that a complete violation of _ putin to do something like that a complete violation of all - complete violation of all international— complete violation of all international principles i complete violation of all. international principles of sovereignty _ international principles of sovereignty and - international principles of sovereignty and we - international principles ofl sovereignty and we should international principles of - sovereignty and we should also remember— sovereignty and we should also rememberthat_
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sovereignty and we should also rememberthat we— sovereignty and we should also remember that we signed i sovereignty and we should also remember that we signed a i sovereignty and we should also i remember that we signed a treaty, the united — remember that we signed a treaty, the united states— remember that we signed a treaty, the united states and _ remember that we signed a treaty, the united states and united - remember that we signed a treaty, i the united states and united kingdom and pressure — the united states and united kingdom and pressure with _ the united states and united kingdom and pressure with ukraine _ the united states and united kingdom and pressure with ukraine to- the united states and united kingdom and pressure with ukraine to say- and pressure with ukraine to say that if— and pressure with ukraine to say that if they— and pressure with ukraine to say that if they give _ and pressure with ukraine to say that if they give up _ and pressure with ukraine to say that if they give up their- and pressure with ukraine to say that if they give up their nuclear| that if they give up their nuclear warheads— that if they give up their nuclear warheads that _ that if they give up their nuclear warheads that will— that if they give up their nuclear warheads that will protect - that if they give up their nuclear warheads that will protect theirl warheads that will protect their integrity— warheads that will protect their integrity and _ warheads that will protect their integrity and this _ warheads that will protect their integrity and this agreement i warheads that will protect their i integrity and this agreement was signed _ integrity and this agreement was signed in — integrity and this agreement was signed in 94 _ integrity and this agreement was signed in 94 and _ integrity and this agreement was signed in 94 and here _ integrity and this agreement was signed in 94 and here we - integrity and this agreement was signed in 94 and here we are, i integrity and this agreement was i signed in 94 and here we are, who is talking _ signed in 94 and here we are, who is talking about — signed in 94 and here we are, who is talking about that? _ signed in 94 and here we are, who is talking about that? he _ signed in 94 and here we are, who is talking about that? he signed - signed in 94 and here we are, who is talking about that? he signed an- talking about that? he signed an agreement— talking about that? he signed an agreement and the _ talking about that? he signed an agreement and the heavy- talking about that? he signed an. agreement and the heavy tuesday talking about that? he signed an- agreement and the heavy tuesday not to let pressure — agreement and the heavy tuesday not to let pressure do _ agreement and the heavy tuesday not to let pressure do this _ agreement and the heavy tuesday not to let pressure do this to _ agreement and the heavy tuesday not to let pressure do this to ukraine. i to let pressure do this to ukraine. do you _ to let pressure do this to ukraine. do you think— to let pressure do this to ukraine. do you think there's _ to let pressure do this to ukraine. do you think there's enough - to let pressure do this to ukraine. do you think there's enough steel| to let pressure do this to ukraine. . do you think there's enough steel in washington to push through the sanctions if it was something like that? if it was not an invasion but it was there carving off a large part of the ukrainian territory? i think that the appetite here and it's bipartisan and basically if you have republicans and democrats negotiating a bipartisan way to push forward the legislation in getting a very aggressive action so i think it exists and i don't think we'll see anything happen pretty invasion as much as the ukrainians went back i think they made it clear that that's
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not his choice and it will not happen and they are nervous but it's very bipartisan here that we target russian oligarchs.— russian oligarchs. before i let you uo, russian oligarchs. before i let you no, do russian oligarchs. before i let you go. do you — russian oligarchs. before i let you go. do you get _ russian oligarchs. before i let you go. do you get a _ russian oligarchs. before i let you go, do you get a sense, _ russian oligarchs. before i let you go, do you get a sense, i - russian oligarchs. before i let you go, do you get a sense, i know. russian oligarchs. before i let you | go, do you get a sense, i know you are in touch with the russian community, do you get a sense that people are running scared? yes. this is a terrible — people are running scared? yes. this is a terrible situation to be a lovety— is a terrible situation to be a lovely russian because to get wealthy — lovely russian because to get wealthy they had to work with vladimir— wealthy they had to work with vladimir putin and all of a sudden he is _ vladimir putin and all of a sudden he is in _ vladimir putin and all of a sudden he is in reaching the whole world and shining the light on everybody and shining the light on everybody and so _ and shining the light on everybody and so they have no way of stopping him but _ and so they have no way of stopping him but at _ and so they have no way of stopping him but at the same time and having people in_ him but at the same time and having people in the line of fire service that i_ people in the line of fire service that i may— people in the line of fire service that i may situation for the russiahs_ that i may situation for the russians and they are panicking right— russians and they are panicking right now— russians and they are panicking right now and they should be because they are _ right now and they should be because they are the first line of a tactical— they are the first line of a tactical enough to vladimir putin's money _ tactical enough to vladimir putin's money tote— tactical enough to vladimir putin's mone . ~ , ., ,
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money. we will see if it has any effect. thank _ money. we will see if it has any effect. thank you _ money. we will see if it has any effect. thank you for _ money. we will see if it has any effect. thank you for being - money. we will see if it has any effect. thank you for being with money. we will see if it has any - effect. thank you for being with us. the "partygate" furore is back on the boil tonight. tory backbenchers have been speaking tonight with boris johnson at a meeting of the parliamentary group, 1922 committee. the prime minister was accompanied by chancellor rishi sunak and the deputy pm dominic raab. there was a feeling last week that the threat of tory mutiny had dissipated. but some suggestions tonight they are not yet out of the woods. angela richardson, conservative mp for guildford, has resigned as parliamentary private secretary to michael gove citing her "deep disappointment" in boris johnson. "sue gray's report published today clearly states," she said "that there were failings at number 10 that let us all down." joining me tonight is ayesha hazarika, former labour advisor and catherine haddon from the institute for government what we are watching at the moment is whether the letters of no confidence are submitted back to remember is over the next few days. 54 remember is over the next few days. 5a is the level that will trigger
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confidence vote in the house. do you suspect more conservative members are putting in letters? it’s a are putting in letters? it's a difficult thing. _ are putting in letters? it's a difficult thing. you - are putting in letters? it's a difficult thing. you get - are putting in letters? it's a| difficult thing. you get these rumours on twitter and it's worth noting that david davis, the person who week of the cold for the prime minister to go says he is still considering a later so there's definitely a lot more hot air around them in actual practice but you never know. he talked about the time when theresa may faced the same and it was 48 letters and there was a moment when they were on the cusp of 48 but then they went back out and another one went back in and in they were over the mark but that took several weeks of people saying they were nearly there and it will happen any day so we will not know until it happens and it could be a shock or it could not happen. and it'sjust a mystery to the rest of us on the
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outside. ~ ., ., , ., ., ~ mystery to the rest of us on the outside. ~ ., ., i. ., ~ ., outside. what do you make of the role of the parties _ outside. what do you make of the role of the parties now— outside. what do you make of the role of the parties now because i role of the parties now because clearly they have all of the evidence that she's handed over. e—mails, messages, 300 photographs, but it's not as if it will go to a jury but it's not as if it will go to a jury trial. it's whether there has been a breach of the law or a fixed penalty notice that needs to be issued. how much time should they be given to come to their conclusion? this story has been out for quite some time. they now have a lot of this information that sucre has done this information that sucre has done this initial work and it's often the when the parties are working with corporate fog and that is often an internal investigation in the next i think the metropolitan police have really mishandled this. i don't think it was a conspiracy. i think it's more that they are very bad at doing this type of thing. now, sp has got to be of the essence. they
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have to move very safely. i have spoken to a number of police and and the ebay can get this wrapped up in a couple of weeks' time and i think they would be a lot of pressure on them to do that very quickly. we have not them to do that very quickly. we have got the former chief constable of greater manchester police with us. great to happy with us. do you have some sympathy for cressida, the commission of the metropolitan police? _ , �* , police? huge sympathy. british olice police? huge sympathy. british police officers _ police? huge sympathy. british police officers really _ police? huge sympathy. british police officers really hates - police? huge sympathy. british i police officers really hates getting involved _ police officers really hates getting involved in political issues in getting — involved in political issues in getting involved in controversies. this whole — getting involved in controversies. this whole affair is essentially about — this whole affair is essentially about a — this whole affair is essentially about a lack of political accountability and the police have been _ accountability and the police have been cold — accountability and the police have been cold in to dry and feel a huge -ap been cold in to dry and feel a huge gap with a — been cold in to dry and feel a huge gap with a minor criminal offence designed — gap with a minor criminal offence designed just for the pandemic which has a very— designed just for the pandemic which has a very simple procedure around the issue _ has a very simple procedure around the issue of— has a very simple procedure around the issue of fixed penalty tickets with -- — the issue of fixed penalty tickets with —— which a person pays as a finance _ with —— which a person pays as a finance so— with —— which a person pays as a finance so it's extremely difficult
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for cressida i think. i don't imagine _ for cressida i think. i don't imagine anybody is really doubting who is— imagine anybody is really doubting who is at— imagine anybody is really doubting who is at these various events. i am sure sue _ who is at these various events. i am sure sue gray— who is at these various events. i am sure sue gray has established that i know— sure sue gray has established that i know about the photographs and other materials _ know about the photographs and other materials reinforce that and the issue _ materials reinforce that and the issue at — materials reinforce that and the issue at stake is whether the events and the _ issue at stake is whether the events and the gathering that they were at can be cold work—related event or a social event — can be cold work—related event or a social event. some of those photographs and some of the e—mails and the _ photographs and some of the e—mails and the whatsapp messages be pushed back in— and the whatsapp messages be pushed back in one _ and the whatsapp messages be pushed back in one direction or another across— back in one direction or another across that _ back in one direction or another across that line but i think the disappointing thing here is that the people _ disappointing thing here is that the people who are at these events were a group _ people who are at these events were a group of— people who are at these events were a group of people who oversaw the drying _ a group of people who oversaw the drying up— a group of people who oversaw the drying up of this legislation they don't _ drying up of this legislation they don't come forward and admit what they were _ don't come forward and admit what they were doing broke the spirit of they were doing broke the spirit of the law— they were doing broke the spirit of the law even if they were arguing he did not— the law even if they were arguing he did not break the neck to and accepted the frame and reduce the amount of— accepted the frame and reduce the amount of work the parties have to do. amount of work the parties have to do that _ amount of work the parties have to do. that end of the investigation will depend on those people whether
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they co—operate or not. will depend on those people whether they co-operate or not.— they co-operate or not. whenever a olice are they co-operate or not. whenever a police are asked _ they co-operate or not. whenever a police are asked to _ they co-operate or not. whenever a police are asked to make _ they co-operate or not. whenever a police are asked to make a - they co-operate or not. whenever a l police are asked to make a judgement on these parties it is a judgement because you go if you went to a house in birmingham and somebody was having a party they'll be lots of people there you have to find someone, normally it's the person whose property it is, isn't it? and there for they are going to make a judgement on who has ultimate control of the premises. and in this case it's the prime minister. that lerislation case it's the prime minister. that legislation was _ case it's the prime minister. that legislation was different at different times. the complexity here is that— different times. the complexity here is that clearly the argument is this is that clearly the argument is this is a workplace where a large group of people — is a workplace where a large group of people work included and they are able to— of people work included and they are able to use _ of people work included and they are able to use the card and for those work— able to use the card and for those work purposes. the able to use the card and for those work purposes— able to use the card and for those work purposes. the one relating to the prime minister's _ work purposes. the one relating to the prime minister's flat _ work purposes. the one relating to the prime minister's flat i - work purposes. the one relating to the prime minister's flat i think - the prime minister's flat i think there is a mix—up in the appointment because she talks about the number ten fact—finding prime minister that is at number 11 and if there was a
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feeling among the investigators that there was a party at number 11, would that have serious consequences for the prime minister? absolutely. the word party does not appear in the legislation. but absolutely there — the legislation. but absolutely there are a number of people gathered there from different households for that social gathering and that _ households for that social gathering and that on the face of it would reach _ and that on the face of it would reach the — and that on the face of it would reach the legislation in the prime minister— reach the legislation in the prime minister would have to be interviewed as a suspect under caution — interviewed as a suspect under caution. this is what the police have _ caution. this is what the police have got— caution. this is what the police have got to dry and fine out. the whole _ have got to dry and fine out. the whole thing is bizarre. and we are talking _ whole thing is bizarre. and we are talking about the group of people who oversaw the drying up of the legislation and promoted it and publicise it to the public. it's part— publicise it to the public. it's part of— publicise it to the public. it's part of the challenge the police face _ part of the challenge the police face the — part of the challenge the police face. the public, very clear view that— face. the public, very clear view that they— face. the public, very clear view that they broke the legislation but it would _ that they broke the legislation but it would appear know that downing street _ it would appear know that downing street don't think it did and would try to _ street don't think it did and would try to argue that it did not and the police have — try to argue that it did not and the police have to try to make sense of
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it and _ police have to try to make sense of it and the _ police have to try to make sense of it and the ambiguity and the legislation they can't take it forward _ legislation they can't take it forward and i think the public will be very— forward and i think the public will be very angry whether we like it or not they— be very angry whether we like it or not they will blame the parties for some _ not they will blame the parties for some sites of whitewash. | not they will blame the parties for some sites of whitewash.- not they will blame the parties for some sites of whitewash. i was going to ask you. — some sites of whitewash. i was going to ask you. the _ some sites of whitewash. i was going to ask you, the longer _ some sites of whitewash. i was going to ask you, the longer this _ some sites of whitewash. i was going to ask you, the longer this goes - some sites of whitewash. i was going to ask you, the longer this goes on, | to ask you, the longer this goes on, is there a danger here for the metropolitan police that they are but it's right or wrong that they are being seen to sit on its everybody wants answers and they want yesterday?— everybody wants answers and they want yesterday? absolutely. a huge amount of damage _ want yesterday? absolutely. a huge amount of damage has already - want yesterday? absolutely. a hugej amount of damage has already been done to— amount of damage has already been done to the — amount of damage has already been done to the metropolitan _ amount of damage has already been done to the metropolitan police - done to the metropolitan police because — done to the metropolitan police because of— done to the metropolitan police because of the _ done to the metropolitan police because of the handling - done to the metropolitan police because of the handling and - because of the handling and unfortunately _ because of the handling and unfortunately this— because of the handling and unfortunately this comes i because of the handling and unfortunately this comes on because of the handling and - unfortunately this comes on top of another— unfortunately this comes on top of another very— unfortunately this comes on top of another very difficult— unfortunately this comes on top of another very difficult period - unfortunately this comes on top of another very difficult period for. another very difficult period for the metropolitan _ another very difficult period for the metropolitan police - another very difficult period for l the metropolitan police following the metropolitan police following the handling _ the metropolitan police following the handling of— the metropolitan police following the handling of sarah _ the metropolitan police following the handling of sarah everard - the metropolitan police followingl the handling of sarah everard and the metropolitan police following. the handling of sarah everard and a lot of— the handling of sarah everard and a lot of other— the handling of sarah everard and a lot of other policing _ the handling of sarah everard and a lot of other policing decisions - lot of other policing decisions during — lot of other policing decisions during the _ lot of other policing decisions during the pandemic. - lot of other policing decisions during the pandemic. but- lot of other policing decisions during the pandemic. but i. lot of other policing decisions i during the pandemic. but i think what's _ during the pandemic. but i think what's important _ during the pandemic. but i think what's important is _ during the pandemic. but i think what's important is we - during the pandemic. but i think what's important is we don't - during the pandemic. but i thinkj what's important is we don'tjust bright _ what's important is we don'tjust bright a — what's important is we don'tjust bright a soft— what's important is we don'tjust bright a soft saying _ what's important is we don'tjust bright a soft saying oh _ what's important is we don'tjust bright a soft saying oh well, - what's important is we don'tjust bright a soft saying oh well, it'si bright a soft saying oh well, it's not going — bright a soft saying oh well, it's not going to _ bright a soft saying oh well, it's not going to court, _ bright a soft saying oh well, it's not going to court, it's- bright a soft saying oh well, it's not going to court, it's not- bright a soft saying oh well, it'sl not going to court, it's not going to go— not going to court, it's not going to go to — not going to court, it's not going to go to a — not going to court, it's not going to go to a trial, _ not going to court, it's not going to go to a trial, it's _ not going to court, it's not going to go to a trial, it's just - not going to court, it's not going to go to a trial, it's just a - not going to court, it's not going to go to a trial, it's just a fixed l to go to a trial, it's just a fixed penalty— to go to a trial, it's just a fixed penalty notice _ to go to a trial, it's just a fixed penalty notice and _ to go to a trial, it's just a fixed penalty notice and it's - to go to a trial, it's just a fixed penalty notice and it's just - to go to a trial, it's just a fixed penalty notice and it's just like a speeding — penalty notice and it's just like a speeding frame. _ penalty notice and it's just like a speeding frame, it— penalty notice and it's just like a speeding frame, it is— penalty notice and it's just like a speeding frame, it is not. - penalty notice and it's just like a speeding frame, it is not. thesej
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penalty notice and it's just like a - speeding frame, it is not. these are the most _ speeding frame, it is not. these are the most draconian _ speeding frame, it is not. these are the most draconian ones _ speeding frame, it is not. these are the most draconian ones that - speeding frame, it is not. these are the most draconian ones that our i the most draconian ones that our civil liberties— the most draconian ones that our civil liberties in— the most draconian ones that our civil liberties in recent _ the most draconian ones that our civil liberties in recent living - civil liberties in recent living history— civil liberties in recent living history and _ civil liberties in recent living history and we _ civil liberties in recent living history and we talked - civil liberties in recent living history and we talked about| civil liberties in recent living - history and we talked about the sacrifices — history and we talked about the sacrifices that _ history and we talked about the sacrifices that people _ history and we talked about the sacrifices that people need - history and we talked about the sacrifices that people need an l sacrifices that people need an essential— sacrifices that people need an essential point _ sacrifices that people need an essential point is _ sacrifices that people need an essential point is they- sacrifices that people need an essential point is they are - essential point is they are incredibly draconian - essential point is they are incredibly draconian rolls i essential point is they are - incredibly draconian rolls that were made _ incredibly draconian rolls that were made at _ incredibly draconian rolls that were made at downing _ incredibly draconian rolls that were made at downing street _ incredibly draconian rolls that were made at downing street and - made at downing street and communicated _ made at downing street and communicated to— made at downing street and communicated to those - made at downing street and i communicated to those press conferences _ communicated to those press conferences and _ communicated to those press conferences and boris - communicated to those pressl conferences and boris johnson communicated to those press - conferences and boris johnson looks down _ conferences and boris johnson looks down the _ conferences and boris johnson looks down the barrel— conferences and boris johnson looks down the barrel of _ conferences and boris johnson looks down the barrel of the _ conferences and boris johnson looks down the barrel of the calmer- conferences and boris johnson looks down the barrel of the calmer and l down the barrel of the calmer and told us _ down the barrel of the calmer and told us all— down the barrel of the calmer and told us all to— down the barrel of the calmer and told us all to do _ down the barrel of the calmer and told us all to do our— down the barrel of the calmer and told us all to do our civic - told us all to do our civic tuesday for this— told us all to do our civic tuesday for this country— told us all to do our civic tuesday for this country and _ told us all to do our civic tuesday for this country and then - told us all to do our civic tuesday for this country and then went. told us all to do our civic tuesday. for this country and then went ahead and broke _ for this country and then went ahead and broke the — for this country and then went ahead and broke the rolls. _ for this country and then went ahead and broke the rolls. and _ for this country and then went ahead and broke the rolls. and i— for this country and then went ahead and broke the rolls. and i think- and broke the rolls. and i think whatever— and broke the rolls. and i think whatever the _ and broke the rolls. and i think whatever the police _ and broke the rolls. and i think whatever the police report - and broke the rolls. and i think whatever the police report says and broke the rolls. and i think. whatever the police report says i think— whatever the police report says i think the — whatever the police report says i think the court _ whatever the police report says i think the court of— whatever the police report says i think the court of public- whatever the police report says i think the court of public opinionl think the court of public opinion has already— think the court of public opinion has already made _ think the court of public opinion has already made up _ think the court of public opinion has already made up its - think the court of public opinion has already made up its mind. i think the court of public opinion i has already made up its mind. the oint and has already made up its mind. point and making is an interested has already made up its mind.- point and making is an interested by everybody was asking him questions from across the house today as to whether he was at the suppose it eventin whether he was at the suppose it event in the number 11 flight. could they pass number 11 off as a working environment as well? that is difficult. , . . . , environment as well? that is difficult. , ., . ., , , difficult. they have certainly used the flat to have _ difficult. they have certainly used the flat to have meetings - difficult. they have certainly used the flat to have meetings but - difficult. they have certainly used the flat to have meetings but is i the flat to have meetings but is primarily— the flat to have meetings but is primarily a _ the flat to have meetings but is primarily a home _ the flat to have meetings but is
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primarily a home and _ the flat to have meetings but is primarily a home and again - the flat to have meetings but is| primarily a home and again they the flat to have meetings but is- primarily a home and again they have to have _ primarily a home and again they have to have a _ primarily a home and again they have to have a security— primarily a home and again they have to have a security cloud _ primarily a home and again they have to have a security cloud to _ primarily a home and again they have to have a security cloud to get - primarily a home and again they have to have a security cloud to get up - to have a security cloud to get up there _ to have a security cloud to get up there so — to have a security cloud to get up there so they— to have a security cloud to get up there so they would _ to have a security cloud to get up there so they would have - to have a security cloud to get up there so they would have a - to have a security cloud to get up there so they would have a goodl to have a security cloud to get up - there so they would have a good idea about _ there so they would have a good idea about whether — there so they would have a good idea about whether or— there so they would have a good idea about whether or not _ there so they would have a good idea about whether or not it _ there so they would have a good idea about whether or not it was - about whether or not it was justified _ about whether or not it was justified in _ about whether or not it was justified in the _ about whether or not it was justified in the rumours - about whether or not it was justified in the rumours we | about whether or not it was - justified in the rumours we heard dominic— justified in the rumours we heard dominic cummings— justified in the rumours we heard dominic cummings is _ justified in the rumours we heard dominic cummings is putting - justified in the rumours we heard . dominic cummings is putting about its more _ dominic cummings is putting about its more difficult _ dominic cummings is putting about its more difficult to _ dominic cummings is putting about its more difficult to argue - dominic cummings is putting about its more difficult to argue that - its more difficult to argue that they— its more difficult to argue that they should _ its more difficult to argue that they should be _ its more difficult to argue that they should be in _ its more difficult to argue that they should be in that - its more difficult to argue that they should be in that flat. - its more difficult to argue that| they should be in that flat. it's another— they should be in that flat. it's another tricky— they should be in that flat. it's another tricky one _ they should be in that flat. it's another tricky one and - they should be in that flat. it's another tricky one and that. they should be in that flat. it's - another tricky one and that with one the prime _ another tricky one and that with one the prime minister— another tricky one and that with one the prime minister announced - another tricky one and that with one the prime minister announced the l the prime minister announced the 20th of— the prime minister announced the 20th of may— the prime minister announced the 20th of may but _ the prime minister announced the 20th of may but these _ the prime minister announced the 20th of may but these are - the prime minister announced the 20th of may but these are the - the prime minister announced the . 20th of may but these are the tricky ones and _ 20th of may but these are the tricky ones and what — 20th of may but these are the tricky ones and what was _ 20th of may but these are the tricky ones and what was the _ 20th of may but these are the tricky ones and what was the primitive's . ones and what was the primitive's war because — ones and what was the primitive's war because that's _ ones and what was the primitive's war because that's the _ ones and what was the primitive's war because that's the key- ones and what was the primitive's war because that's the key thing i war because that's the key thing that is— war because that's the key thing that is missing _ war because that's the key thing that is missing from _ war because that's the key thing that is missing from the - war because that's the key thing that is missing from the report i that is missing from the report today— that is missing from the report today and _ that is missing from the report today and in— that is missing from the report today and in the _ that is missing from the report today and in the end _ that is missing from the report today and in the end she - that is missing from the report today and in the end she couldj today and in the end she could not talk about — today and in the end she could not talk about that _ today and in the end she could not talk about that at _ today and in the end she could not talk about that at all _ today and in the end she could not talk about that at all because - today and in the end she could not talk about that at all because it. talk about that at all because it would have _ talk about that at all because it would have been— talk about that at all because it would have been talking - talk about that at all because it would have been talking abouti talk about that at all because it. would have been talking about the detailing _ would have been talking about the detailing events. _ would have been talking about the detailing events.— would have been talking about the detailing events. thank you for your time this evening. _ detailing events. thank you for your time this evening. that _ detailing events. thank you for your time this evening. that us - detailing events. thank you for your time this evening. that us take - detailing events. thank you for your time this evening. that us take a i time this evening. that us take a look at where r this evening. we
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have been waiting for so long for the sue gray report and its army name pages long and is not much evidence in it but what did you make of what you read this evening in the report and test it has implications for the prime minister going forward? i think it does have implications and i think the keywords for me was that the failures of leadership and we've been discussing a lot about the culture in downing street and i work in downing street and i worked as a civil servant, and i worked as a political adviser to gordon brown and in my time there yes, there was and in my time there yes, there was a lot of drinking going on that it did not happen in downing street and the drinking happened in the bar around westminster of course i need around westminster of course i need a separate conversation about the drinking culture but drinking is a part of the business of politics and there were exceptions at downing street but there was not special advisers and political advisers having huge parties. this
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advisers and political advisers having huge parties.— having huge parties. this is something _ having huge parties. this is something which _ having huge parties. this is something which has - having huge parties. this is- something which has happened having huge parties. this is— something which has happened under johnson's watch he has to take responsibility. you set the culture from the top and they will be better questions for boris johnson from the top and they will be better questions for borisjohnson but from the top and they will be better questions for boris johnson but also questions for borisjohnson but also his wife, carriejohnson as well. i his wife, carrie johnson as well. i was thinking while we were listening to aisha there that i can't imagine this happening under theresa may. she's a very different character marcel but i can't imagine people going up downing street at any time with a relic case full of blues went theresa may was sitting at number ten and its rights what aisha says that this does come right from the top. that this does come right from the to -. ~ �* that this does come right from the to.. . �* , that this does come right from the to -. ~ �* , , ., ., top. we've been seeing a lot of stories in _ top. we've been seeing a lot of stories in the last _ top. we've been seeing a lot of stories in the last two days - top. we've been seeing a lot of. stories in the last two days about how the suitcase has been around for years and they're not the first wants to happy tradition. obviously the key difference was that the rolls that were in place at times so it's not entirely about having wine fridges or drinks after work or anything like that. it is about the
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rolls that were in place at the time, the understanding of it and whether or not there was knowingly being breached and who was involved with that but ultimately as you say earlier on this is a test for accountability, political accountability, political accountability in this country. the public are upset about this issue. and they want to understand what's going on so it's not reallyjust about the ins and outs of the details of the party it's about the whole process. and not can stand up giving the public confidence. itrufhat giving the public confidence. what about the point _ giving the public confidence. what about the point that _ giving the public confidence. what about the point that cara starmer made at the end of his speech today at the front bench now has to look at the front bench now has to look at themselves and decide whether they're going to state their career is on his reputation? tonight, it seems they are resolutely behind and the chancellor is a pretender to the crown and he is standing alongside. do you think he gets away with this
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unless someone from the cabinet beside the break? this unless someone from the cabinet beside the break?— unless someone from the cabinet beside the break? this is politics. this is how _ beside the break? this is politics. this is how often _ beside the break? this is politics. this is how often it _ beside the break? this is politics. this is how often it happens. - beside the break? this is politics. this is how often it happens. it i beside the break? this is politics. this is how often it happens. it is| this is how often it happens. it is messy. it is up to the party whether they want to keep as being there and they want to keep as being there and they want to keep as being there and they want a majority so that means they want a majority so that means the premiership as well. and if they are standing by and yes, this becomes about the conservative party as a whole and if that has effects for them in the polls that's what they are willing to chance. they are taking a calculated risk on the one thing you can say is this has been going on for long enough. we've had enough information in the public in one respect or another, maybe not the full answers and maybe not definitive answers on questions like the fixed penalty notice is but is a lot of information out there. so mps are able to make a judgement for themselves and if they choose to stick with the prime minister that's down to them.
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stick with the prime minister that's down to them-— down to them. thank you for your com an down to them. thank you for your company this _ down to them. thank you for your company this evening _ down to them. thank you for your company this evening on - down to them. thank you for your company this evening on the - company this evening on the programme. we will be back tomorrow. join us for that. good night. still plenty going on with our weather in the week i had but hopefully things will be quite as stormy as they were through the weekend which we just had. not one but two storm systems. the first storm and day to into began to be saw another area of low pressure which brought us of 90 mph for some. the storm worked its way east and no storms on our way for tuesday. but that's of white lines and isobars self there will be strong winds in the north and mild air a wedge between these two inner funds. a
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mild feel to the weather on tuesday. the later finds will bring cloud and rain and wheels down into the southwest east anglia and the southeast to brighten up and for the far north of england into scott langley tblisi sunshine and showers in the far north where it will be windy with gusts of 50, 60, maybe 65 in the most ex post places. confirmation of a mild afternoon at nine and i3 confirmation of a mild afternoon at nine and 13 degrees. tuesday night they left their front works north and the isobars became widely spaced and on wednesday still breezy but not as windy as it has been bringing cloud and rain to the north west of scotland dry conditions in south and some sunny spells between nine and 13 degrees. a relatively calm quiet interlude but another frontal system
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marching in. this cold front and outbreaks of rain across scotland into northwest england still very mildly sunshine behind our weather front with white went showers cold air tucking front with white went showers cold airtucking in front with white went showers cold air tucking in through thursday night the later finds will make progress and bring rain into the southeast where we have not seen much behind it the winter showers and a cold feel to the weather to end the working week. on friday we will have cold conditions and strong winds up towards the north and lots of winter showers and the driest conditions further south and east temperatures between five and 10 degrees to sell a cold feel. we get into saturday and at this stage the later finds will set up somewhere across the uk becoming slow. and it
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looks like it will be in northern areas with cold air to the north and the weather front uncertain and let's take a look at the weather front because it stretches all the way across the atlantic. a real pipeline of meister heading in our direction so there is rain in the forecast with brisk winds as well. as we move through the weekend and into next week the weather frontal lobe and its way north and dry conditions with high pressure further south and the weather setup will allow mild air to work across the uk but with occasional incursions of cold from the north with some winter showers. not as stormy as the weekend we just had but plenty going on with our weather.
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tonight at ten... heavy criticism of downing street for those lockdown parties — the initial report identifies failures of leadership and judgement. borisjohnson, who once denied that any rules had been broken, was keen to tell mps and the people of the uk that he was sorry. no fewer than 16 separate gatherings were investigated, including three not previously known about. mrjohnson accepted the findings and faced severe criticism. it isn't enough to say sorry. this is a moment when we must look at ourselves in the mirror and we must learn. by routinely breaking the rules he set, the prime minister took us all for fools. he held people's sacrifice in contempt, he showed himself unfit for office.
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we report from two conservative constituencies, asking people

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