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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  January 31, 2022 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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in the long—awaited investigation by a senior civil servant into lockdown parties at number 10 and whitehall. sue gray's report is limited for now, due to the ongoing inquiry by the metropolitan police. the public will see sue gray's initial findings the public will see sue gray's initialfindings in the public will see sue gray's initial findings in the the public will see sue gray's initialfindings in the next the public will see sue gray's initial findings in the next couple of hours. opposition parties are worried some of the more serious allegations could be left out. the prime minister will respond to the report in parliament in the next few hours. also this lunchtime: after intense pressure, ministers meet to consider scrapping mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs workers in england. vaccination is the right policy, but forcing vaccination wasn't, not in the middle of a staffing crisis particularly.
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more extensive damage after the double whammy of storms this weekend in scotland and the north—east of england. and the danish footballer christian eriksen, recovered after suffering a cardiac arrest at the euros, signs for brentford on transfer deadline day. and coming up on the bbc news channel: formula 1 makes covid vaccines mandatory for all personnel, meaning everyone working in the paddock has to be fully vaccinated. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. initial findings from the long awaited report by sue gray into multiple parties held at downing street and whitehall during lockdown have been handed to the prime minister.
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the inquiry was ordered by borisjohnson, after a series of media reports about gatherings, held while coronavirus restrictions were in place, in 2020. however, sue gray's report is limited by a metropolitan police request that only "minimal reference" be made to alleged events that may have taken place at number 10. the report is expected to be made public shortly, and borisjohnson will address mps in the next few hours. our political correspondent nick eardley is live in downing street for us this afternoon. for weeks, the answer from for weeks, the answerfrom cabinet ministers when asked about what had gone on in downing street during lockdown was to wait for sue gray's report. this afternoon, we will get her initial findings. report. this afternoon, we will get her initialfindings. this is complicated by the fact that the met police are looking into allegations too and have asked sue gray to leave some of her details out. this will be an important moment for finding
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out some of what happened and for boris johnson's out some of what happened and for borisjohnson�*s premiership. sue gray's investigation into lockdown breaking parties at downing street has taken more than two months, during which a steady stream of damaging claims has emerged. now the prime minister has been updated on what she's found. on a visit to essex earlier, before he received the update, borisjohnson was staying tight—lipped. our viewers want to know, do you think that you have done anything wrong? you want to know, do you think that you have done anything wrong?- have done anything wrong? you will have done anything wrong? you will have to wait — have done anything wrong? you will have to wait and _ have done anything wrong? you will have to wait and see _ have done anything wrong? you will have to wait and see the _ have done anything wrong? you will have to wait and see the outcome . have done anything wrong? you will| have to wait and see the outcome of the investigations, but of course i stick to what i've said in the past. sue gray was tasked with looking at a number of gatherings in downing street and other government departments. the inquiry was initially set up after claims of gatherings in winter 2020 including an alleged christmas party in downing street on the 18th of december. the prime minister said he had been reassured there hadn't been
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a party. his press secretary allegra stratton resigned after being caught on camera joking about such an event. there were also claims of gatherings during november 2020 and even earlier, in may 2020, including on the 20th, a bring your own booze garden gathering which the prime minister apologised for attending. i believed implicitly that this was a work event. —— i believed. but mr speaker, with hindsight, i should have sent everyone back inside. i should have found some other way to thank them. the should have found some other way to thank them-— thank them. the investigation was also known _ thank them. the investigation was also known to _ thank them. the investigation was also known to be _ thank them. the investigation was also known to be looking - thank them. the investigation was also known to be looking at - thank them. the investigation was also known to be looking at two i also known to be looking at two leading parties held the following year by staff at number ten on the 16th of april 2021, the eve of prince philip's funeral. the remit of sue gray's investigation was to set out a general understanding of the nature of gatherings including where and why they were held and who went. it is not expected to be the full report, though. last week the metropolitan police announced it
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would investigate eight of the gatherings. it has asked sue gray to make minimal reference to those well it looks into them. the prime minister has committed to making sue gray's initial findings public minister has committed to making sue gray's initialfindings public and he will answer questions in the house of commons this afternoon in what could prove to be a pivotal moment for his time as prime minister. so we do expect to see the initial findings of that report published within the next couple of hours. borisjohnson will then update mps at half past three and what he says then and what is in those initial findings will really matter. there are some conservative mps who have been waiting for this moment to decide on the prime minister's future. there are others who want to see how mrjohnson responds, whether he shows contrition, whether he comes up with some solutions for changing his downing street operation. the prime minister as mac allies have already been working the room in parliament this morning to
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try and shore up support for boris johnson. they think that over the last couple of weeks, his position has got a lot safer and that more tory mps are coming round to backing him. but exactly what we see this afternoon, there initialfindings of sue gray's report, will be a big moment in what has been a long drawn out saga about whether senior staff and the prime minister himself followed lockdown rules in downing street. w' followed lockdown rules in downing street. . ~ followed lockdown rules in downing street. ., ~ ., followed lockdown rules in downing street. ., ., ., ministers will meet today to decide whether to scrap mandatory covid vaccinations for health workers in england. around 77,000 nhs staff still haven't had a jab, though not all of them will be in contact with patients. the government had said that all frontline workers would need to have a firstjab by this thursday, with a second by april when the mandatory requirement would take effect. unions have warned that the policy could lead to staff shortages at a time when services are under extreme pressure. here's our health correspondentjim reed.
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it has been a controversial policy. there have been warnings that thousands of nhs staff, only in england, could leave or be dismissed for refusing to be vaccinated. this morning, though, signs of a possible u—turn. mil morning, though, signs of a possible u-turn. �* . u-turn. all health care professionals - u-turn. all health care professionals should . u-turn. all health care i professionals should get u-turn. all health care . professionals should get a u-turn. all health care _ professionals should get a vaccine, that's absolutely clear. i think that's absolutely clear. i think that seyi javid the health secretary will say a bit more later on about how they might deal with different variants of coronavirus, because they have different implications when it comes to transmissibility. we have to wait to hear what he says. we have to wait to hear what he sa s. ~ . , we have to wait to hear what he sa s. ~ ., , ., " we have to wait to hear what he sas. . , .,~ ., says. we have been working on the cover macro _ says. we have been working on the cover macro award _ says. we have been working on the cover macro award since _ says. we have been working on the cover macro award since the - cover macro award since the beginning, i do not want to have a vaccination — beginning, i do not want to have a vaccination. the beginning, i do not want to have a vaccination-— beginning, i do not want to have a vaccination. ., , , u, vaccination. the debate has become more heated — vaccination. the debate has become more heated as _ vaccination. the debate has become more heated as the _ vaccination. the debate has become more heated as the deadline - vaccination. the debate has become more heated as the deadline later i more heated as the deadline later this week looms. this clip of a doctor challenging the health secretary on the policy has been viewed more than a million times on social media. as things stand, 1.7 million front line health care staff
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will have to have a first dose of vaccine but thursday or they could lose theirjobs. the latest figures suggest 95% of nhs workers are alreadyjabbed believing around already jabbed believing around 77000 alreadyjabbed believing around 77000 and vaccinated.- 77000 and vaccinated. every vaccination _ 77000 and vaccinated. every vaccination is _ 77000 and vaccinated. every vaccination is a _ 77000 and vaccinated. every vaccination is a result. - 77000 and vaccinated. every vaccination is a result. it's i 77000 and vaccinated. every vaccination is a result. it's a | vaccination is a result. it's a really— vaccination is a result. it's a really positive thing. because staff and patients, and as i say i would love to _ and patients, and as i say i would love to see — and patients, and as i say i would love to see 100% coverage, so we will continue working, we will not take our— will continue working, we will not take our foot off the gas this week, we will_ take our foot off the gas this week, we will continue to encourage and support— we will continue to encourage and support staff with their vaccinations.— support staff with their vaccinations. but it is now understood _ vaccinations. but it is now understood the _ vaccinations. but it is now understood the whole - vaccinations. but it is now l understood the whole policy vaccinations. but it is now - understood the whole policy is vaccinations. but it is now _ understood the whole policy is being reconsidered. an announcement could come as early as this afternoon. the view in government is that the situation has changed because the omicron variant can spread more easily among the double vaccinated, evenif easily among the double vaccinated, even if the jab still reduces severe disease. even if the 'ab still reduces severe disease. ., ., , disease. vaccination is the right oli but disease. vaccination is the right policy but forcing _ disease. vaccination is the right policy but forcing vaccination . policy but forcing vaccination wasn't, but in the middle of a staffing crisis particularly. and
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so, assuming it is going to be scrapped, we will certainly support that scrapping. the scrapped, we will certainly support that scrapping-— that scrapping. the policy of mandatory _ that scrapping. the policy of mandatory vaccines - that scrapping. the policy of mandatory vaccines for - that scrapping. the policy of mandatory vaccines for care | that scrapping. the policy of - mandatory vaccines for care home staff in england has already been in place for more than two months. there is now speculation that rule could also go. i there is now speculation that rule could also go— there is now speculation that rule could also go. i think we are really ha - for could also go. i think we are really happy for our _ could also go. i think we are really happy for our nhs _ could also go. i think we are really happy for our nhs colleagues - could also go. i think we are really happy for our nhs colleagues if. could also go. i think we are reallyl happy for our nhs colleagues if this is what _ happy for our nhs colleagues if this is what is _ happy for our nhs colleagues if this is what is going to happen, because it is an _ is what is going to happen, because it is an unnecessary burden, and persuasion — it is an unnecessary burden, and persuasion will bring us to the same outcoma _ persuasion will bring us to the same outcome. the persuasion will bring us to the same outcome. . , ., ., , ., ., outcome. the vast ma'ority of health care staff have h outcome. the vast ma'ority of health care staff have been — outcome. the vast majority of health care staff have been vaccinated - outcome. the vast majority of health care staff have been vaccinated for l care staff have been vaccinated for covid. it now looks increasingly likely that tens of thousands who haven't will not be losing their jobs this week as a result. our correspondent dominic hughes is at the royal victoria infirmary in newcastle. one wonders what the feelings of a front line staff, where you are at the moment. front line staff, where you are at the moment-— front line staff, where you are at
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the moment. here in use at -- in newcastle _ the moment. here in use at -- in newcastle they — the moment. here in use at -- in newcastle they have _ the moment. here in use at -- in newcastle they have been - the moment. here in use at -- in| newcastle they have been working very hard to try and get as many staff vaccinated as possible. they think they got up to around 95% of front line staff fully vaccinated, but managers hear say they can't afford to lose a single member of staff, such are pressures face from an ongoing coronavirus covid pandemic and also the huge backlog of work that was built up during the pandemic, they still have to get through. so they are not averse at all to the idea of cancelling the mandating of covid vaccines for front line staff. but at this hospital today because other thoughts are turning towards the two—year anniversary of the first patients being admitted to this very hospital to be treated for coronavirus, in the small hours of the 31st of january 2020, the first patients were brought here after falling ill in york and they were treated here at the rvi in newcastle. so we asked some staff hear about their thoughts on what has been a momentous two years.
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there were a lot of questions getting asked but being - a new pandemic none of us really knew the answers. _ i was at the start very worried thinking, "if i've got it, i'd take it home to my children. everyone who works for the trust got an e—mail to say there was a covid . patient in the hospital— and it was like like seeing bigfoot. everyone was like, "did you see this? | did you read this?" and we were all trying to get a grasp of it. i hello, i'm claire frame, i've worked for the trust for eight years as a domestic assistant. we thought it would be more of the specialised wards, like the infectious diseases wards, but then it did start filtering through to, like, the normal wards, so that's when it got a bit, like, real. my name is michael bowman, i've worked for the trust for 15 years as an assistant catering manager and we produce over 4000 meals a day. in the kitchen side of it, it's like the third medicine, what we call it. if it wasn't for us feeding the patients, the patients wouldn't get well. a lot of the staff gave up a lot of their time to come and do extra shifts to keep the department going.
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hi, i'm chris wolf, i have worked at the rvi for eight years - as an operating department orderly. i was living at the time when covid started with my mother _ who is in her 70s and, . like many elderly people, i she got the shielding information, i so i moved out from the family home into a hotel so i couldl continue to do myjob. you are staying away - from all your loved ones, it wasn't a holiday. i'm denise allan, i work at ward 19 which is infectious and tropical medicine. things changed quite quickly as the cases grew into sometimes you were having quite a few cases and they did deteriorate rather quickly. especially people you are expecting not to get ill, like young people, and that's quite daunting and it's not nice to watch. my name is ashley price and i'm a consultant in infectious diseases here in newcastle. i looked after the very first patients who became critically unwell in the trust here. i was on the weekend when we had our first deaths
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and it was incredibly emotional speaking to those first families because you kind of realised that this was going to be the first of many phone calls that would be very similar. the views of some of the staff at the royal victoria infirmary in newcastle on the last two years of the pandemic. and thanks to dominic hughes, health correspondent. thousands of homes in scotland and north—east england are still without power after two storms hit the uk this weekend. two people were killed by falling trees after storm malik blew in and storm corrie has also caused some damage. james shaw has more details. the western isles yesterday evening experiencing gale force winds gusting up to 92 mph. trees were brought down across a broad swathe
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of the north of scotland, blocking roads and damaging power lines. work to clear away the wreckage began in the hours of darkness and will continue through today. in aviemore in the central highlands, emergency teams were working at height to clear roads around the town. and on schools in the worst —— schools the worst affected parts are closed today. the scale of the problems means services along the east coast of scotland and into the north of england are not yet back to normal. one of the biggest challenges is restoring power to people because mccombes after the double impact of two storms in quick succession is, storm malik followed by storm corrie. this storm malik followed by storm corrie. �* , ., storm malik followed by storm corrie. ~ , ., , storm malik followed by storm corrie. a ., , ., ., corrie. as of this morning we have about 40,000 — corrie. as of this morning we have about 40,000 people _ corrie. as of this morning we have about 40,000 people off - corrie. as of this morning we have about 40,000 people off power. corrie. as of this morning we have| about 40,000 people off power as corrie. as of this morning we have - about 40,000 people off power as the result of the two storms, 7000 people from one storm and 30,000
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people from one storm and 30,000 people from one storm and 30,000 people from the other.— people from the other. there are similar problems _ people from the other. there are similar problems in _ people from the other. there are similar problems in the - people from the other. there are similar problems in the north - people from the other. there are similar problems in the north of| similar problems in the north of england. a major incident was declared in county durham as fallen trees blocked roads and wrecked power lines. it was reckoned 7000 customers were still without power. our target is to get everyone connected as soon as possible on monday, — connected as soon as possible on monday, as we can. there is a risk that there — monday, as we can. there is a risk that there will be a small number that there will be a small number that will— that there will be a small number that will roll over into tuesday, unfortunately. and our main aim is to try— unfortunately. and our main aim is to try to— unfortunately. and our main aim is to try to update and give more precise — to try to update and give more precise apps —— estimates for pecule — precise apps -- estimates for --eole. ., , .,, precise apps -- estimates for --eole. ., , ., people. two people died over the course of the _ people. two people died over the course of the weekend, _ people. two people died over the course of the weekend, a - people. two people died over the course of the weekend, a boy - people. two people died over the course of the weekend, a boy in l course of the weekend, a boy in staffordshire and a woman in aberdeen. both were killed by falling trees. and the impact of the two storms was felt around the coasts of the uk as well as inland. it may not have been as widespread as storm arwen before christmas, but the winter is not over yet. james shaw, bbc news, glasgow. borisjohnson will speak to vladimir putin later today, after britain and america warned russia of "devastating" sanctions
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if it invades ukraine. moscow has deployed around 100,000 troops near the border, arguing that a country once part of the soviet union is now seeking much closer ties with the west. our diplomatic correspondent paul adams is here. this again is a ratcheting up of the pressure on russia by the west? yes. pressure on russia by the west? yes, there is no change _ pressure on russia by the west? yes, there is no change on _ pressure on russia by the west? yes there is no change on the ground, those russian troops remain menacing, their presence on the border. us and british officials are talking about the possibility of imminent action by the russians, but this is another big week of diplomacy. as you mention, the prime minister will speak to vladimir putin this afternoon. he will urge him to step back from the brink. any encouraging, he will say, will be a disasterfor encouraging, he will say, will be a disaster for the world and above all for russia. then tomorrow boris johnson and the foreign secretary, liz truss, are travelling to ukraine. that will be the highest
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level demonstration of support for ukraine by any of its allies so far. it comes at a time when the ukrainians are pretty happy with the level of solidarity and assistance they are getting from the uk. let's not forget the main show will be whatever the americans and russians are saying to each other and on that brand we know sergey lavrov, the russian foreign minister and anthony blinken, the us minister of state, will be speaking tomorrow. there are some signs the russians are willing to engage with the americans on washington's proposals regarding european security. there is a possible meeting at the un security council this afternoon if the russians do not succeed in blocking it. it could be an ugly show and it will not resolve anything. finally, along with the diplomacy, a few more sticks, liz truss this afternoon due to unveil some new tougher sanctions, which she says will target those who are key to the creme and's continuation. vladimir putin's spokesman has called those
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statements alarming and at least it seems london has moscow's attention. paul adams, seems london has moscow's attention. pauladams, many seems london has moscow's attention. paul adams, many thanks. our top story this lunchtime... downing street has now received initial findings in the long—awaited investigation by a senior civil servant into lockdown parties at number 10 and whitehall. with an estimated one million women in the uk at risk of harmful gambling, a new campaign to provide support. coming up on the bbc news channel... a new campaign to provide support. can a new man at the helm of everton herald a change in theirfortunes? frank lampard is due to take charge with the club four points off the relegation zone. it's been a year since the military seized power in myanmar, deposing the elected leader aung san suu kyi and reversing a ten—year experiment in establishing a democratic state. nationwide street protests challenged the rule of the generals,
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but were crushed by the military using indiscriminate violence. as our south east asia correspondent jonathan head reports, growing numbers of people are now either fleeing the country, or taking up arms in what is becoming an escalating civil war. until a year ago people in myanmar still believed in a better future. that has now been stolen, they say, by the same soldiers who ruined their past. millions have been caught up in the struggle to overturn the coup. mo is one of them. she led the first protests by yangon's factory workers. today, though, she is in thailand where she has fled with her family. translation: when we first heard about the coup -
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everyone was devastated. i was worried about my workers, that they might be shot, beaten or imprisoned, but my fears vanished once i was on the streets. as we marched and chanted the overwhelming participation of the people, their emotions and their support, gave us courage. back then their inspiration was still aung san suu kyi, though she was detained by the coup leaders. she has always advocated non—violent resistance and for weeks huge street rallies remained peaceful. but the military gunned them down anyway. some of the worst violence was in mo's neighbourhood. she fled before she could be arrested. so many burmese have lost faith in peaceful protest.
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there has been a steady escalation of bombings, shootings and sometimes full—scale gun battles, drawing in volunteers from all walks of life. i met george and frank. we can't use their real names. george used to be a business executive and frank worked in a cafe. but today they are learning to fight with an ethnic insurgent group near the thai border. i have to tell them that, ok, please accept us to get the training and we will also try our best to recruit more people. what about weapons? can you get weapons? no, not at all because we can't afford that. so you have to pay for your own guns? yes, i have to pay for my own guns, so we have to link with some people from the black market.
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it's a tough new world for these city boys turned jungle warriors. george was injured in battle late last year and hasn't yet seen his youngest daughter. what do you think about the soldiers, about the soldiers, they are burmese people like you? of course they do have their own families too, like me, i have a newborn baby, but soldiers are soldiers. and you are prepared to kill them? if necessary, not willingly, if necessary. to fight, flee or surrender, that is the stark choice now confronting so many people in myanmar. mo says she is committed to the struggle against military rule, but she must do it now from another country. jonathan head, bbc news, on the thai—burmese border. a british woman has overturned her conviction for wasting police time in cyprus which she was given
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after she withdrew an allegation of gang rape made in 2019. the woman, who was a student from derby, claimed she'd been pressured by officers to retract her complaint. with more on this i am joined by our europe correspondent anna holligan, who is in nicosia. fill us in on the background to this. , ., , , ., this. there were hugs and smiles of relief at the — this. there were hugs and smiles of relief at the verdict _ this. there were hugs and smiles of relief at the verdict was _ this. there were hugs and smiles of relief at the verdict was read - this. there were hugs and smiles of relief at the verdict was read out . relief at the verdict was read out as a watershed moment for a victim of a miscarriage ofjustice. she was a teenager on a summer break before university when she said she was raped by a group of tourists in the holiday resort of eye napa in cyprus. after days of intense police questioning she withdrew that statement and was accused of public mischief wasting police time by a member of the public reporting of crime. that conviction has been overturned and she has been cleared. activists say it is a bittersweet
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victory because they say they should never have gone this far and her family agreed that for true justice to be done they needed to be a proper investigation of that original rape allegation. her mother hopes it will help other victims of alleged crimes.— hopes it will help other victims of alleged crimes. thank you for that. and holligan _ alleged crimes. thank you for that. and holligan live _ alleged crimes. thank you for that. and holligan live in _ alleged crimes. thank you for that. and holligan live in nicosia. - and holligan live in nicosia. the audio streaming company spotify says it will add advisory notices to any content discussing the coronavirus pandemic. it comes after a number of high—profile figures have spoken out against one of its popular podcasts which has aired anti—vax views. the singersjoni mitchell and neil young have removed their music in protest. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports. hello, friends, i wanted to make a video to address some of the controversy that has been going on over the past few days. joe rogan is the biggest name in podcasting. his $100 million deal with spotify means that the streaming service is the only place to hugh his show which is downloaded an estimated
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is the only place to hear his show which is downloaded an estimated 200 million times a month. but his mix of interviews and opinion is not to everyone's taste. # don't always seem to go, you don't know what you got its gone...# got till its gone...# two music legends, joni mitchell and neil young, have successfully had many of their classic albums removed from spotify because they sayjoe rogan's show is the home of life—threatening covid misinformation. nowjoe rogan is fighting back. he has taken to social media to explain why he interviewed two doctors who question vaccinating children. both these people are very highly credentialled, very intelligent, very accomplished people and they have an opinion that is different from the mainstream narrative. i wanted to hear what their opinion is. the problem i have with the term "misinformation", especially today, is that many of the things that we thought of as misinformation just a short while ago are now accepted as fact. spotify have now published their platform rules for the first time and say that podcasts will have a content advisory warning when they discuss covid—19
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and they will have a covid—19 hub to combat misinformation. just a slight adjustment of several words is hat it's allowing is forjoe rogan not to have his pod touched or taken down or isolated episodes, the devil is in the detail as it pertains tojoe rogan and people still are not happy with the actions that spotify has taken. indeed, one of spotify�*s other high—profile signings, the duke and duchess of sussex, have also voiced their concerns to spotify but will keep working with the streaming giant. joe rogan's later statement did contain one glaring piece of misinformation. he said that he was a joni mitchell fan and loved her song chuck e's in love. chuck e's in love. unfortunately for him that was by rickie leejones. colin patterson, bbc news. it's believed around a million women in britain are at risk through problem gambling.
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the charity gamble—aware has now launched its first campaign aimed specifically at women, warning of the dangers and where to seek help. jon donnison has that story. it has never been easier to gamble, online apps so much more accessible than the old high street betting shops. this new research says it's one factor and has seen a sharp rise in the number of women with gambling issues. it estimates as many as 2.5 million british women experience some level of problem gambling. of those, around 1 million are causing themselves moderate harm and out of that figure half a million are experiencing serious harm. i ended up having to remortgage my house, then after i remortgaged my house i ended up spending that money and then unfortunately when the children were ten and 11 i ended up homeless without anything. then i ended up in a hostel with them.
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this video showing how all—consuming online gambling can be as part of gamble aware's new campaign to encourage women who think they might have a problem to seek help. that is what lisa did and she now runs support groups for other women. i understand about gambling and i understand where it takes people and so i think women can come in, talk about their problems, you know, just feel empowered and just give them that bit of hope that you can overcome a gambling addiction. gamble aware says the number of women gambling online rose sharply during the pandemic with many people stuck at home during lockdowns. it says three key signs you might have a problem are losing track of time while gambling, spending more than you can afford and keeping your habit secret from those around you. jon donnison, bbc news. in football the transfer window closes today and the premier league
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club brentford have signed the denmark and former tottenham midfielder christian eriksen on a six—month deal. the 29—year—old hasn't played since suffering a cardiac arrest in denmark's match against finland at euro 2020 lastjune. here's our sports correspondent olly foster. this was christian eriksen's last competitive game.— this was christian eriksen's last competitive game. this was christian eriksen's last cometitive came. ,, ., , ., ., competitive game. seven months ago denmark's hopes. _ competitive game. seven months ago denmark's hopes, as _ competitive game. seven months ago denmark's hopes, as ever, _ competitive game. seven months ago denmark's hopes, as ever, rested - competitive game. seven months ago denmark's hopes, as ever, rested on | denmark's hopes, as ever, rested on their talisman. denmark's hopes, as ever, rested on theirtalisman. his denmark's hopes, as ever, rested on their talisman. his european championship lasted just 42 minutes. football stopped and feared the worst after he collapsed in their opening match, his team—mates shielded him as he received emergency treatment on the pitch for a cardiac arrest. the medics' rapid response saved his life and amazingly his career as he prepares to play again at the highest level. i am happy to announce that i have signed for brentford football club and i can't wait to get started and hopefully i will see you all very
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soon. , ., , ., ., soon. he is no stranger to the premier league. _ soon. he is no stranger to the premier league. in _ soon. he is no stranger to the premier league. in seven - soon. he is no stranger to the i premier league. in seven years soon. he is no stranger to the - premier league. in seven years at tottenham he has established himself as one of the well�*s great attacking midfielders. in his finalfull season that he carried them to the champions league final. inter milan then came calling and he helped them win the league title, but they had to let him go. he now has a pacemaker and italian league rules do not permit that. for the past few months he has been working on his fitness most recently at ajax, but now he has been given another chance. brentford do not have the pedigree of his previous club but they will give him the platform to show he still has it. they have described his signing for the rest. unbelievable, that would be the title of christian eriksen biography and will appear the story is far from over. ollie foster, bbc news. ollie foster, bbc news. time for a look at the weather, here's ben rich.
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a bit of luck on this one?

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