Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 31, 2022 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

10:00 am
the would you put british troops in the sense _ would you put british troops in the sense and — would you put british troops in the sense and what _ would you put british troops in the sense and what would _ would you put british troops in the sense and what would be - would you put british troops in the sense and what would be the - would you put british troops in the i sense and what would be the triggers in terms _ sense and what would be the triggers in terms of— sense and what would be the triggers in terms of russian _ sense and what would be the triggers in terms of russian aggression? - this is bbc news. eight welcome to viewersjoining us on bbc world news. we are following this press conference live in the hungarian capital of budapest, the uk defence secretary on a visit there as part of his visit to speak to eastern european allies, nato allies, on the issue of the situation with russia �*s build—up of troops on its border with ukraine. we are going to keep listening in. to let you know, another press conference in english, some of it in hungarian but there is translation as it goes along so we will stick with this and listen in.
10:01 am
translators interpret.
10:02 am
as you can hear, there's quite a lot of hungarian being spoken at the moment, as we wait, let's listen in, the uk defence secretary responding. the very thing he fears, which is more nato closer to russia would be a consequence of a strategic error of invading a sovereign country such as ukraine. that is what happened in 2014. and that is why we have more forces in estonia, latvia, lithuania, as nato, that is why we see an increase in air policing around places like romania and bulgaria because that is the
10:03 am
ultimate consequence, nato members would feel and fear and worry about what is next and i think that is why it is important to signal we are serious, that is why the united kingdom has offered to nato a range of capabilities including more air policing, more ground forces and more readiness as a way to act as a deterrent and we will obviously be in the hands of nato and the secretary general and the supreme allied commander of europe and how those would be deployed but we stand ready to do our bit on that. and just on the consequences of sanctions. all of us will pay a price but freedom is not free, the most important thing that we can stand up for is the sovereign right of ukraine to choose, what it choosesis of ukraine to choose, what it chooses is secondary to its right to choose. it is the same message in finland, in sweden. and i don't have to tell my hungarian host to
10:04 am
understand the deep importance of sovereignty as a freedom and a right of a nation and i think, you know, the prime minister of hungary all too well understands that, in his discussion with the european commission, sovereignty matters, it matters to hungarians and ukraine and britain believes that right is almost a sacred and we will stand by it. translators interpret.
10:05 am
10:06 am
translators interpret
10:07 am
taking into account europe and the history— taking into account europe and the history of— taking into account europe and the history of europe, i have to say it is not _ history of europe, i have to say it is not only— history of europe, i have to say it is not only germany and hungary that have the _ is not only germany and hungary that have the energy supply, time and relationship with russia. translation: i could add a couple of other western european countries to this list. ~ i western european countries to this list. i i ~ , western european countries to this list. i i ~ i i western european countries to this list. i i ~ , , i, list. which i think in itself is an answer party — list. which i think in itself is an answer party to _ list. which i think in itself is an answer party to the _ list. which i think in itself is an answer party to the question . list. which i think in itself is an - answer party to the question asked.
10:08 am
but i also have to say the hungarian government made measured steps in a timely— government made measured steps in a timely manner well in advance to ensure _ timely manner well in advance to ensure or— timely manner well in advance to ensure or to rule out that the energy— ensure or to rule out that the energy supply of hungary ensure or to rule out that the energy supply of hungary would ensure or to rule out that the energy supply of hungary would be jeopardised or people would suffer. hungary 's gas reserves are filled. so we _ hungary 's gas reserves are filled. so we are — hungary 's gas reserves are filled. so we are not exposed, we are not at the risk— so we are not exposed, we are not at the risk or— so we are not exposed, we are not at the risk or mercy. having said that... having said that, obviously, if you have _ having said that, obviously, if you
10:09 am
have gas — having said that, obviously, if you have gas reserves that are filled up, have gas reserves that are filled up. that— have gas reserves that are filled up, that would not last forever so it is a _ up, that would not last forever so it is a reasonable and sensible thing — it is a reasonable and sensible thing to— it is a reasonable and sensible thing to conduct talks and negotiations in order to discuss and ensure _ negotiations in order to discuss and ensure future gas supplies as well and i_ ensure future gas supplies as well and i think— ensure future gas supplies as well and i think that is the only responsible behaviour of any leadership. hungary shares borders with ukraine, a neighbouring country, so for hungary, _ a neighbouring country, so for hungary, ukraine is at least as important _ hungary, ukraine is at least as important as any other country, the sovereignty— important as any other country, the sovereignty of ukraine is of importance.
10:10 am
ukraine had accepted and welcomed hungary— ukraine had accepted and welcomed hungary 's _ ukraine had accepted and welcomed hungary 's help for very many years, starting _ hungary 's help for very many years, starting in _ hungary 's help for very many years, starting in 2014. and we have defence relations and military— and we have defence relations and military ties with ukraine dating back very— military ties with ukraine dating back very long, let me just refer to the fact— back very long, let me just refer to the fact since 2001, we had a joint military— the fact since 2001, we had a joint military unit with ukraine which is still up _ military unit with ukraine which is still up and — military unit with ukraine which is still up and running. we have provided financial support to ukraine —
10:11 am
we have also provided treatments to injured _ we have also provided treatments to injured and _ we have also provided treatments to injured and wounded ukrainian soldiers — injured and wounded ukrainian soldiers and service men. we have military cooperation up and running. _ we have military cooperation up and running, countries had a meeting and the ukrainian chief of defence participated in that meeting. so the peace _ participated in that meeting. so the peace and _ participated in that meeting. so the peace and security and stability of ukraine _ peace and security and stability of ukraine is— peace and security and stability of ukraine is of key importance to us. now, _ ukraine is of key importance to us. now, sanctions. ialready ukraine is of key importance to us. now, sanctions. i already said ukraine is of key importance to us. now, sanctions. ialready said in ukraine is of key importance to us. now, sanctions. i already said in an
10:12 am
answer— now, sanctions. i already said in an answer to— now, sanctions. i already said in an answer to a — now, sanctions. i already said in an answer to a previous question we have _ answer to a previous question we have signed or approved the sanctions even in the past so the previous— sanctions even in the past so the previous set of sanctions. but we very much disagree with the practice _ but we very much disagree with the practice were the signatories of the sanctions _ practice were the signatories of the sanctions are not equal in terms of respecting — sanctions are not equal in terms of respecting that sanction so when adhering — respecting that sanction so when adhering to the sanctions, it is expected — adhering to the sanctions, it is expected from some of the countries but not _ expected from some of the countries but not from others, this is something we can... the secretary was clear when talking about _ the secretary was clear when talking about the _ the secretary was clear when talking about the sanctions, it has to be assessed — about the sanctions, it has to be assessed who the sanctions is good or had _ assessed who the sanctions is good or had too, — assessed who the sanctions is good or bad too, who will benefit from
10:13 am
the sanctions, who will suffer from the sanctions, who will suffer from the sanctions. i would like to refer back to what was said — i would like to refer back to what was said previously. that the prime interest— was said previously. that the prime interest is— was said previously. that the prime interest is not sanctions, the prime interest— interest is not sanctions, the prime interest is— interest is not sanctions, the prime interest is not sanctions, the prime interest is not conflict, the prime interest— interest is not conflict, the prime interest is— interest is not conflict, the prime interest is to carry on with diaiogue _ interest is to carry on with dialogue and negotiations. we will also answer whether we will oppose to the _ also answer whether we will oppose to the deployment of nato troops into surrounding our neighbouring countries — into surrounding our neighbouring countries. we would not oppose that. we do _ countries. we would not oppose that. we do not _ countries. we would not oppose that. we do not oppose that.
10:14 am
so we are not against that, we just said that _ so we are not against that, we just said that we ourselves, right now, are capabie — said that we ourselves, right now, are capable of being up to the requirements of fulfilling the tasks on our— requirements of fulfilling the tasks on our own. however, should any of the countries — on our own. however, should any of the countries or other countries be in need _ the countries or other countries be in need of— the countries or other countries be in need of such assistance or would require _ in need of such assistance or would require such — in need of such assistance or would require such assistance, obviously, the sovereign countries, it is their right— the sovereign countries, it is their right to _ the sovereign countries, it is their right to do — the sovereign countries, it is their right to do so. the secretary said if the _ right to do so. the secretary said if the united kingdom has offered forces _ if the united kingdom has offered forces to— if the united kingdom has offered forces to the alliance, to nato. hungary — forces to the alliance, to nato. hungary has done the same. hungary also made _ hungary has done the same. hungary also made her commitment, offered forces _ also made her commitment, offered forces and _ also made her commitment, offered forces and listed what hungary would be capable of doing on her own.
10:15 am
hungary— be capable of doing on her own. hungary also reported how far we could _ hungary also reported how far we could go— hungary also reported how far we could go in terms of a contribution to international forces. and we said the force _ to international forces. and we said the force that we offered to nato in this respect is not smaller than any foreign _ this respect is not smaller than any foreign force that would be deployed to hungary for that reason. and i think— to hungary for that reason. and i think that — to hungary for that reason. and i think that if nato 's military leadership understands and believes and agrees with what we have said, then i_ and agrees with what we have said, then i think— and agrees with what we have said, then i think everyone should believe then i think everyone should believe the same _ then i think everyone should believe the same. that this is the case.
10:16 am
so again, let me say we are not against — so again, let me say we are not against the _ so again, let me say we are not against the deployment of foreign forces _ against the deployment of foreign forces into any other countries, should — forces into any other countries, should those countries want or require — should those countries want or require that and what the secretary said, _ require that and what the secretary said. they— require that and what the secretary said, they are sovereign countries so they— said, they are sovereign countries so they have every right to do so. but currently, as things stand right now. _ but currently, as things stand right now, hungary is capable of fulfilling this task on her own. you very much — thank you for the question is, our agenda _ thank you for the question is, our agenda is — thank you for the question is, our agenda is very tight so we have time for one _ agenda is very tight so we have time for one short question and answer or
10:17 am
answers _ indistinct reporter question 0ne one question to the minister, during the course _ one question to the minister, during the course of negotiations, or is there _ the course of negotiations, or is there any— the course of negotiations, or is there any talk about the headcount of 1000 _ there any talk about the headcount of 1000 and what is the current of1000 and what is the current status— of1000 and what is the current status of— of 1000 and what is the current status of this matter? thank you. the secretary said forces
10:18 am
were _ thank you. the secretary said forces were offered by the uk to nato, we are not— were offered by the uk to nato, we are not talking about a of 1000. what _ are not talking about a of 1000. what i _ are not talking about a of 1000. what i said is that the force we offered — what i said is that the force we offered to— what i said is that the force we offered to nato is at least this capabie — offered to nato is at least this capable or at least as capable as this one — capable or at least as capable as this one in — capable or at least as capable as this one in terms of capabilities. maybe _ this one in terms of capabilities. maybe i— this one in terms of capabilities. maybe i should just clarify because i think there is some confusion, we have offered to nato not to a particular country but to nato, a force ranging from more typhoon fast jets to a battle group that can be deployed plus more readiness forces. we have been specifically offered to any one country, we have done it through the secretary general of nato and my planning staff will be going to brussels this week to work out if or where but it is important to signal that we are ready to do that deployment and indeed some more ships as well.
10:19 am
translator interprets iam i am sorry, the gentleman from great britain. _ i am sorry, the gentleman from great britain. he _ i am sorry, the gentleman from great britain, he has one question. i think— britain, he has one question. i think this _ britain, he has one question. i think this is _ britain, he has one question. i think this is important. i am so sorry. — think this is important. i am so sorry. thank— think this is important. i am so sorry, thank you.
10:20 am
indistinct question translator interprets
10:21 am
minister responds in hungarian first, whether we share the concern as to _ first, whether we share the concern as to what _ first, whether we share the concern as to what would happen in such a case _ as to what would happen in such a case that— as to what would happen in such a case that was mentioned, actually, almost _ case that was mentioned, actually, almost fully, we just shared the opinion— almost fully, we just shared the opinion about what would happen, what would be the consequences of such an _ what would be the consequences of such an aggression. again, we would just like to repeat what i _ again, we would just like to repeat what i have — again, we would just like to repeat what i have said several times todayi — what i have said several times today. our conviction, this crisis shoutd _ today. 0ur conviction, this crisis should not— today. our conviction, this crisis should not be solved by arms, and power. _ should not be solved by arms, and
10:22 am
power, primarily. but again, obviously, the united kingdom — but again, obviously, the united kingdom has assessed the situation and evaluated the situation and made the decision and it is a sovereign country— the decision and it is a sovereign country which is free to do any decision— country which is free to do any decision in— country which is free to do any decision in this respect and it is not to— decision in this respect and it is not to us— decision in this respect and it is not to us to _ decision in this respect and it is not to us to sort of... assessed that _ not to us to sort of... assessed that decision or criticise or comment— that decision or criticise or comment on that decision. you very much _ comment on that decision. you very much i_ comment on that decision. you very much. ~ ., , much. i think two things, the benefit of — much. i think two things, the benefit of an _ much. i think two things, the benefit of an alliance, - much. i think two things, the benefit of an alliance, we - much. i think two things, the j benefit of an alliance, we can much. i think two things, the - benefit of an alliance, we can play to our strengths so hungary has been helping ukraine with training and aid etc and you know, there are 30 members so who does what, you know, in a sense, as long as the outcome is the right thing and i think the united kingdom, its european leadership on legal aid has shown there are other countries willing to support but also we looked to other leaderships in areas such as
10:23 am
training, aid, and indeed sanctions should that be required. i think on the fundamentals, i think what it shows is my defence command paper was correct, and mentally, which is we need to be more ready and more present in places that matter, that deter, no point sitting in the uk on our backsides, that will not deter countries such as russia, we have to be in the theatre, in the area. and also my decision to invest in upcoming challenger three, upcoming and increasing the number of boxer armoured vehicles, laying more orders for new ships, the new generation of attack submarines, while those do not miraculously turn up while those do not miraculously turn up overnight i think it shows the command paper direction of travel was exactly in the right space. i think if you are trying to get at the size of the armed forces as i have always said, the thread dictates the size, i think for now the armed forces are the right size, the armed forces are the right size, the scale, as i said at the beginning of this answer, our alliance is how we develop mass, it
10:24 am
always has been, i don't think britain has been able to generate mass since the 1920s to the idea we will somehow magic up a huge mass overnight even if we were to go to three orfour micro overnight even if we were to go to three or four micro percent gdp overnight even if we were to go to three orfour micro percent gdp is not necessarily going to deliver the answer we want but i think it shows we are in the right direction and i know i have at my fingertips at the moment is a significant number of forces to offer nato and privileged to be able to do that. let's see what nato wishes to do. i think they are strong forces when they are combined with the united states and other european allies and i think that produces a strong deterrent and a message that they should go for it they are needed and the threat dictates. translator interprets
10:25 am
10:26 am
thank you, dad concludes the press briefing, thank you to the ministers for the comprehensive briefing and information they provided. thank you to representatives _ information they provided. thank you to representatives of _ information they provided. thank you to representatives of the _ information they provided. thank you to representatives of the press - information they provided. thank you to representatives of the press and l to representatives of the press and media _ to representatives of the press and media for— to representatives of the press and media for their presence and questions. thank you. we hope to see you soon _ questions. thank you. we hope to see you soon. have a lovely day. that concludes — you soon. have a lovely day. that concludes the _ you soon. have a lovely day. that concludes the press _ you soon. have a lovely day. trust concludes the press conference being held in budapest in hungary, the capital there, the uk defence minister, the defence secretary ben wallace and his hungarian
10:27 am
counterpart. the hungarian defence minister. holding thejoint counterpart. the hungarian defence minister. holding the joint press conference on the situation with russia. and its build—up of troops on the border with ukraine. 0ne russia. and its build—up of troops on the border with ukraine. one of the key lines the defence secretary saying that it was important to de—escalate the ukraine russia crisis and in his words, a war would lead to greater instability, higher fuel prices and migrant flows. let's bring in a representative from chatham house, head of the ukraine forum. i'm not sure how much of that you heard. clearly the uk defence secretary trying to rally support among nato allies particularly in eastern europe. do you see any way of this being the escalated, the tensions between nato and russia? clearly we don't seek massive de—escalation on the russian side and this is what we have to watch
10:28 am
and this is what we have to watch and i guess the response that nato has two this massive build—up that russia has created all along the ukrainian border but also on the nato border in belarus is to enhance its forward presence. this trend started in 2014, let's remember when russia annexed crimea and the separatist uprising in eastern ukraine so nato is planning for eventual possibilities that it had to defend the eastern flank of nato in case there is escalation between ukraine and russia.— in case there is escalation between ukraine and russia. when we look at the russian — ukraine and russia. when we look at the russian response _ ukraine and russia. when we look at the russian response to _ ukraine and russia. when we look at the russian response to the - the russian response to the suggestion of sanctions that would target the key figures who america and the eu consider to be behind the decisions being made how much leverage does russia have, how much of an impact with its retaliatory
10:29 am
moves have on the west if it were to go ahead with any of that? first moves have on the west if it were to go ahead with any of that?— go ahead with any of that? first of all, it is important _ go ahead with any of that? first of all, it is important to _ go ahead with any of that? first of all, it is important to understand l all, it is important to understand the proposed sanctions are notjust targeting people are government officials who are in policy—making that leads to aggression or an accession for the change of borders, right now the sanctions proposed especially by the united states target all as they say individuals key for the kremlin and that is quite a vague interpretation of what it means, it means many more people in large industries in the oligarchy community could be targeted and i think russian money much more entrenched in the west and that would hurt of course private interests of the individuals and that would also hurt the capacity of russian state to borrow money on the international markets. obviously, there will be a price to pay for the
10:30 am
west because large companies especially german companies to a lesser degree, american companies, will pay a price because they are already planning or contingency plans, investments are falling and russia, even if europeans are not imposing sanctions, american sanctions make it very difficult for multinational corporations to operate so there will be a certain cost but i think the cost on the ship will be disproportionately bigger than those on the western side. when we have had the comments from borisjohnson saying if russia is going to go further into ukraine, it would spell disaster from russia and we need to step back from the brink, how will those comments go down in the kremlin? i how will those comments go down in the kremlin?— the kremlin? i don't think the kremlin is _ the kremlin? i don't think the kremlin is listening _ the kremlin? i don't think the kremlin is listening too - the kremlin? i don't think the kremlin is listening too much | the kremlin? i don't think the l kremlin is listening too much to the kremlin? i don't think the - kremlin is listening too much to the speeches and rhetoric. they are
10:31 am
watching the alliance, the transatlantic alliance, the actions of the united states. they are watching the level of perseverance inside ukraine to defend ukraine and obviously this is what will decide the fate of this the most recent assistance to ukrainian armed forces by the uk help raise the first four beaten and that could come into his calculus. and that could happen over the next couple of months and the crisis is not going to go away with us. he will use every opportunity he can to escalate in order to get his strategic objective, to get the united states out of europe, to underline transatlantic alliance and direct ukraine. find underline transatlantic alliance and direct ukraine.— direct ukraine. and when we hear that phrase _ direct ukraine. and when we hear that phrase that _ direct ukraine. and when we hear that phrase that president - direct ukraine. and when we hear that phrase that president putin l that phrase that president putin should be within russia's sphere of
10:32 am
influence, what does that look like influence, what does that look like in a practical sense for people living in ukraine on a day—to—day basis? it living in ukraine on a day-to-day basis? ., ., , ~' basis? it would eventually look like somethin: basis? it would eventually look like something that _ basis? it would eventually look like something that russia _ basis? it would eventually look like something that russia had, - basis? it would eventually look like something that russia had, i - basis? it would eventually look like something that russia had, i would argue, in the late 905 in the beginning of the 2000 when ukraine was a sovereign state but russia had a strong leveraged and infiltration in the ukrainian security service. it built ukraine in the russian market, turning its economy towards the east, making ukraine dependent on russian energy sources and making sure ukraine is not turning into a functional democracy that would inspire russian people. it means russia wants to arrest ukrainian organisation. this is why people in ukraine see that there is a struggle and battle for ukraine to be able to modernise, to be a member of the
10:33 am
european family of developed nations thatis european family of developed nations that is competing in the global market and attracts investors. russia wants it to be the grey zone, neutral buffer state where russia has the upper hand in capital and policy—making. tibia has the upper hand in capital and policy-making— has the upper hand in capital and policy-making. 0k, thank you very much. uk government ministers will meet later to decide whether to scrap mandatory covid vaccinations for national health service staff in england. under the controversial proposals, front line workers must be fully vaccinated by the start of april, or face losing theirjobs. critics of the measure say it could lead to a staffing crisis. our health editor, hugh pym, reports. it's proved a highly controversial policy, and there have been warnings that thousands of nhs staff in england could leave or be dismissed by employers for refusing to get vaccinated. the royal college of midwives has already called for a delay, arguing there could be a catastrophic impact
10:34 am
on maternity services because of workforce shortages. the latest figures showed that around 77,500 nhs staff in england, about 5%, had not had anyjab, though not all will be in frontlinejobs. ministers and health leaders have said before now that the policy the vaccination was the right policy but not forcing it. assuming it is going to be scrapped, we will certainly support that scrapping but also support the continued conversations to try and encourage as many people as possible to get vaccinated. ministers and health leaders have said before now that the policy is needed to provide reassurance to patients. the health secretary, sajid javid, argued it was the professional duty of frontline staff to get jabbed, but he was challenged by a doctor at a london hospital. i've had covid at some point. yes. i've got antibodies. yeah.
10:35 am
and i've been working on covid icu since the beginning. i have not had a vaccination. i do not want to have a vaccination. many health care workers have not opposed mandatory vaccinations for staff. if a patient comes to me and says... "should i have the vaccine? have you been vaccinated, doctor?" that answer should always be, "yes, of course i've been vaccinated and you should, too." there is no wriggle room ethically for doctor or a nurse or anybody talking to patients. it's understood the policy is now being reconsidered with a view in government that the landscape has changed because the omicron variant has not proved as serious as the delta wave, during which the policy was first drawn up. ministers will meet today to decide whether to continue with the plan. it's understood no final decisions have yet been made. the risk is that nhs chiefs, who've tried to defend it will feel undermined by any u—turn, and there will be demands for care home staff in england who lost theirjobs because of a similar compulsory vaccination policy to be reinstated. hugh pym, bbc news.
10:36 am
you will be aware we have not spoken about lisa gray report. it got about lisa gray report. it got -ushed about lisa gray report. it got pushed back. _ about lisa gray report. it got pushed back. i— about lisa gray report. it got pushed back. i can _ about lisa gray report. it got pushed back. i can bring - about lisa gray report. it got pushed back. i can bring you| about lisa gray report. it got i pushed back. i can bring you an update on it. our political editor has been tweeting in the last half an hour or so about that report, the report into the gatherings, parties, said to be held in street and whitehall during the lockdown is. the tweet says there have been a lot of last—minute changes in the whole process so subject moving around again but, as things stand, it does seem like the report will go to number ten later this morning. we will of course bring you any updates as soon as we get it. but the uk
10:37 am
prime minister borisjohnson has been speaking in the past few minutes while speaking to nhs staff in essex. i know there is a lot of policy. this is the first time we have heard from you since we found out the met police were asking for a lot of the report not to be made public. do you understand why some people are now concerned it might be a whitewash? you will have to wait and see both what _ you will have to wait and see both what sue — you will have to wait and see both what sue gray says and the met poticei — what sue gray says and the met police i— what sue gray says and the met police. i am what sue gray says and the met police. iam here what sue gray says and the met police. i am here to talk about the second _ police. i am here to talk about the second anniversary of brexit. it is two years— second anniversary of brexit. it is two years ago since we got brexit donei _ two years ago since we got brexit donei here — two years ago since we got brexit done. here we are in one of this country's — done. here we are in one of this country's first free ports at tiibury _ country's first free ports at tilbury and quite an amazing thing. because _ tilbury and quite an amazing thing. because of— tilbury and quite an amazing thing. because of the ability now to put in tax incentives, which he could not do before. — tax incentives, which he could not do before, plus the support. here at
10:38 am
tiibury— do before, plus the support. here at tiibury you _ do before, plus the support. here at tilbury you have ports, forward of dagenham — tilbury you have ports, forward of dagenham coming into create a gigantic— dagenham coming into create a gigantic facility that has the potential to generate tens of thousands ofjobs. in an area, tilbury. — thousands ofjobs. in an area, tilbury, which has traditionally been _ tilbury, which has traditionally been one — tilbury, which has traditionally been one of the most deprived parts of the _ been one of the most deprived parts of the thames gateway region, and deprived _ of the thames gateway region, and deprived parts of the south—east, but now— deprived parts of the south—east, but now has the potential to be a massive — but now has the potential to be a massive nexus between this country and the _ massive nexus between this country and the rest of the world. it is very. — and the rest of the world. it is very. very— and the rest of the world. it is very, very exciting to see it happen _ very, very exciting to see it happen. we have been telling your mps privately you don't think you have _ mps privately you don't think you have done — mps privately you don't think you have done anything wrong when it comes— have done anything wrong when it comes to — have done anything wrong when it comes to parties in downing street. is comes to parties in downing street. is that _ comes to parties in downing street. is that your— comes to parties in downing street. is that your position that other people — is that your position that other people made mistakes, but you did not? i_ people made mistakes, but you did not? ii people made mistakes, but you did not? .i ., ., ,, ., ., not? i am here to talk about... in a lot of our— not? i am here to talk about... in a lot of our viewers _ not? i am here to talk about... in a lot of our viewers want _ not? i am here to talk about... in a lot of our viewers want to - not? i am here to talk about... in a lot of our viewers want to know - not? i am here to talk about... in a lot of our viewers want to know the j lot of our viewers want to know the answer to that question. do you think you, the prime minister, have done anything wrong? you think you, the prime minister, have done anything wrong?— done anything wrong? you will to wait to see _ done anything wrong? you will to wait to see the _ done anything wrong? you will to
10:39 am
wait to see the outcome - done anything wrong? you will to wait to see the outcome of - done anything wrong? you will to wait to see the outcome of the i wait to see the outcome of the investigations. of course i stick absolutely to what i have said in the past — absolutely to what i have said in the past and i am here to talk about — the past and i am here to talk about... you did not do anything wrong? — about... you did not do anything wrong? i— about... you did not do anything wrong? i am _ about... you did not do anything wrong? iam here about... you did not do anything wrong? i am here to talk about this free ports _ wrong? i am here to talk about this free ports around the uk. what they are also— free ports around the uk. what they are also doing... you will have to wait _ are also doing... you will have to wait and — are also doing... you will have to wait and see _ are also doing... you will have to wait and see what the investigation saysi _ wait and see what the investigation says what — wait and see what the investigation says. what we're doing is getting on with opening up free ports around the uk _ with opening up free ports around the uk. 0ne with opening up free ports around the uk. one in northern ireland, one in scotland _ the uk. one in northern ireland, one in scotland at least. they have massive — in scotland at least. they have massive potential to unite and level up. massive potential to unite and level up look— massive potential to unite and level up look at — massive potential to unite and level up. look at what is happening in teesside. — up. look at what is happening in teesside, incredible. using the potential— teesside, incredible. using the potential for the freeport model, cutting _ potential for the freeport model, cutting taxes, directing investment to bring _ cutting taxes, directing investment to bring in— cutting taxes, directing investment to bring in huge high skilled, high wage _ to bring in huge high skilled, high wage jobs— to bring in huge high skilled, high wage jobs in new technologies that are green— wage jobs in new technologies that are green as well. and we can do that around — are green as well. and we can do that around the whole of the uk? are
10:40 am
ou that around the whole of the uk? you going to that around the whole of the uk? site: you going to scrap plans that around the whole of the uk? 22 you going to scrap plans to that around the whole of the uk? 252 you going to scrap plans to make vaccines mandatory for nhs workers? my vaccines mandatory for nhs workers? my view about nhs workers and everybody who is involved in looking after vulnerable people, all health care professionals should get a vaccine — care professionals should get a vaccine. that is absolutely clear. i think— vaccine. that is absolutely clear. i think that — vaccine. that is absolutely clear. i think that the health secretary is going _ think that the health secretary is going to — think that the health secretary is going to be seeing a bit more later on about— going to be seeing a bit more later on about how you might deal with different— on about how you might deal with different variants of coronavirus because — different variants of coronavirus because they have different implications when it comes to transmissibility. you have to wait to hear— transmissibility. you have to wait to hear what he says. we transmissibility. you have to wait to hear what he says.— transmissibility. you have to wait to hear what he says. we have heard a lot about ukraine _ to hear what he says. we have heard a lot about ukraine this _ to hear what he says. we have heard a lot about ukraine this weekend. i a lot about ukraine this weekend. what are you going to be telling president putin when you speak to him? i ii president putin when you speak to him? i .i _ president putin when you speak to him? .i ., him? what i will say, as i have said before, him? what i will say, as i have said before. we — him? what i will say, as i have said before. we all— him? what i will say, as i have said before, we all need _ him? what i will say, as i have said before, we all need to _ him? what i will say, as i have said before, we all need to step - him? what i will say, as i have said before, we all need to step back i before, we all need to step back from _ before, we all need to step back from the — before, we all need to step back from the brink and russia needs to step back— from the brink and russia needs to step back from the brink. i think an invasion— step back from the brink. i think an invasion of— step back from the brink. i think an invasion of ukraine and any incursion— invasion of ukraine and any incursion into ukraine beyond the territory — incursion into ukraine beyond the territory that russia has already
10:41 am
taken _ territory that russia has already taken in — territory that russia has already taken in 2014 would be an absolute disaster— taken in 2014 would be an absolute disaster for the world. above all, it would — disaster for the world. above all, it would be — disaster for the world. above all, it would be a disaster for russia. as you _ it would be a disaster for russia. as you know, the uk believes and supports — as you know, the uk believes and supports the sovereignty of ukraine. we have _ supports the sovereignty of ukraine. we have been there since 2014 training — we have been there since 2014 training ukrainian troops under operation — training ukrainian troops under operation orbital. we gave defensive weaponry _ operation orbital. we gave defensive weaponry to ukraine. what i know is the ukrainians will fight, if you go to ukrainians and talk to ukrainians, iam to ukrainians and talk to ukrainians, i am afraid any further russian _ ukrainians, i am afraid any further russian invasion will be bitterly and bloodily resisted. you russian invasion will be bitterly and bloodily resisted.— russian invasion will be bitterly and bloodily resisted. you can find over the weekend _ and bloodily resisted. you can find over the weekend you _ and bloodily resisted. you can find over the weekend you will - and bloodily resisted. you can find over the weekend you will go - and bloodily resisted. you can find l over the weekend you will go ahead with the national and insurance rise. that would be a squeeze on people's pockets. what are you looking at to mitigate some of the cost of living pressures people will face? we cost of living pressures people will face? i ii cost of living pressures people will face? i .i , ., face? we all understand the pressures — face? we all understand the pressures that _ face? we all understand the pressures that the - face? we all understand the pressures that the cost - face? we all understand the pressures that the cost of i face? we all understand the . pressures that the cost of living crunch — pressures that the cost of living
10:42 am
crunch is — pressures that the cost of living crunch is putting on people. it is being _ crunch is putting on people. it is being driven, as you know, as the inflation _ being driven, as you know, as the inflation we — being driven, as you know, as the inflation we are seeing around the world. _ inflation we are seeing around the world, particularly in energy costs and we _ world, particularly in energy costs and we are — world, particularly in energy costs and we are going to be bringing forward. — and we are going to be bringing forward. i— and we are going to be bringing forward, i know the chancellor is looking _ forward, i know the chancellor is looking at — forward, i know the chancellor is looking at a package to abate energy costs. _ looking at a package to abate energy costs. that _ looking at a package to abate energy costs. that is on top of what we are doing _ costs. that is on top of what we are doing to _ costs. that is on top of what we are doing to try— costs. that is on top of what we are doing to try and support people through— doing to try and support people through this post covid stage. we are seeing — through this post covid stage. we are seeing inflation being fuelled in the _ are seeing inflation being fuelled in the post—thing—mac recovery phase. — in the post—thing—mac recovery phase. we _ in the post—thing—mac recovery phase. we are lifting the minimum wage _ phase. we are lifting the minimum wage by— phase. we are lifting the minimum wage by another thousand pounds. we are cutting _ wage by another thousand pounds. we are cutting the tax on universal credit— are cutting the tax on universal credit is— are cutting the tax on universal credit is a — are cutting the tax on universal credit is a people on universal credit— credit is a people on universal credit and _ credit is a people on universal credit and low incomes get an uplift in their— credit and low incomes get an uplift in their income. but also supporting families— in their income. but also supporting families with a £12 billion package overall— families with a £12 billion package overall to — families with a £12 billion package overall to help people with cost of living _ overall to help people with cost of living crunch. you will be hearing more _ living crunch. you will be hearing more from — living crunch. you will be hearing more from the chancellor in due course. — more from the chancellor in due course. the _ more from the chancellor in due course. the best way to help people
10:43 am
with the _ course. the best way to help people with the cost of living is to have high _ with the cost of living is to have high wage, high skilled jobs. and at the risk— high wage, high skilled jobs. and at the risk of— high wage, high skilled jobs. and at the risk of repeating my earlier point. — the risk of repeating my earlier point, that is one of the benefits we are _ point, that is one of the benefits we are seeing from brexit. as a result— we are seeing from brexit. as a result of— we are seeing from brexit. as a result of the speed of the vaccine roll-out _ result of the speed of the vaccine roll—out and the speed of the booster— roll—out and the speed of the boosterjab roll—out, which was partly _ boosterjab roll—out, which was partly assisted by brexit, we have one of— partly assisted by brexit, we have one of the — partly assisted by brexit, we have one of the most open economy and society— one of the most open economy and society in— one of the most open economy and society in europe. we have unemployment, youth unemployment certainly. _ unemployment, youth unemployment certainly, at record lows. unemployment now nearing record lows. _ unemployment now nearing record lows. more people in work now than before _ lows. more people in work now than before the _ lows. more people in work now than before the pandemic began. that is a great _ before the pandemic began. that is a great thing. _ before the pandemic began. that is a great thing. we need to keep visiting — great thing. we need to keep visiting that and keep going with a hi-h visiting that and keep going with a high wage, high skilled job led recovery. _ high wage, high skilled “ob led recove . i, �* high wage, high skilled “ob led recove . ., �* ., , recovery. your brexit freedom bill, it doesn't have _ recovery. your brexit freedom bill, it doesn't have any _ recovery. your brexit freedom bill, it doesn't have any specifics - recovery. your brexit freedom bill, it doesn't have any specifics in - recovery. your brexit freedom bill, it doesn't have any specifics in it. l it doesn't have any specifics in it. it gives you the ability to do things but not telling what you want to scrap from the eu law? [30 things but not telling what you want to scrap from the eu law?— to scrap from the eu law? do you have anything _ to scrap from the eu law? do you have anything in _ to scrap from the eu law? do you have anything in mind? _ to scrap from the eu law? do you have anything in mind? look- to scrap from the eu law? do you
10:44 am
have anything in mind? look at i to scrap from the eu law? do you i have anything in mind? look at what we have _ have anything in mind? look at what we have already done. free ports around _ we have already done. free ports around the — we have already done. free ports around the uk, 60 free trade deals, cutting _ around the uk, 60 free trade deals, cutting vat— around the uk, 60 free trade deals, cutting vat on sanitary products, changing — cutting vat on sanitary products, changing our whole approach to our agricultural system, changing the way we _ agricultural system, changing the way we support farmers, taking back control— way we support farmers, taking back control of— way we support farmers, taking back control of our watchers, taking back control— control of our watchers, taking back control of— control of our watchers, taking back control of our watchers, taking back control of our borders, taking back control— control of our borders, taking back control of— control of our borders, taking back control of our borders, taking back control of our money, £350 million per week. — control of our money, £350 million per week. i— control of our money, £350 million perweek, i seem control of our money, £350 million per week, i seem to recall. accurately by the way. much more now. _ accurately by the way. much more now. there — accurately by the way. much more now. there are things we can do differently — now. there are things we can do differently and we think in a way that will— differently and we think in a way that will encourage business to invest— that will encourage business to invest even more. what we are doing is we _ invest even more. what we are doing is we are _ invest even more. what we are doing is we are changing the system whereby— is we are changing the system whereby under the retained eu law principle. — whereby under the retained eu law principle, all the eu rules are kept on the _ principle, all the eu rules are kept on the uk — principle, all the eu rules are kept on the uk statute book, frozen, we are changing back so they can all be amended. _ are changing back so they can all be amended, they can all be changed, 'ust amended, they can all be changed, just like _ amended, they can all be changed, just like any other piece of law and
10:45 am
what _ just like any other piece of law and what we _ just like any other piece of law and what we will do is in areas where the uk _ what we will do is in areas where the uk is — what we will do is in areas where the uk is strong, cyber, artificial intelligence, gene technology, all of the _ intelligence, gene technology, all of the cutting—edge technology of the future we are going to be making data. _ the future we are going to be making data. all— the future we are going to be making data, all that area, we will make sure _ data, all that area, we will make sure that — data, all that area, we will make sure that we will do things differently and better, where appropriate. we want diverged for the sake _ appropriate. we want diverged for the sake of it but we will make sure this is— the sake of it but we will make sure this is the _ the sake of it but we will make sure this is the number one place to invest— this is the number one place to invest and _ this is the number one place to invest and do business because of the freedoms that we had might have. prime _ the freedoms that we had might have. prime minister, thank you very much. that was the uk prime minister boris johnson there. thousands of homes across scotland could remain without power for several days after storm corrie brought winds of more than 90 miles an hour overnight. it came just a day after storm malik — in which two people were killed by falling trees. our scotland correspondent alexandra mackenzie has more. it doesn't look much calmer here in dundee this morning. scotland was pummelled by both storms over the
10:46 am
weekend. first on saturday and then the storm overnight last night. there were wins of up to 92 mph recorded at stornoway airport and winds of up to 120 mph in the cairngorms. a60—year—old woman lost her life in on saturday. thousands of people have been without electricity. at one point it is understood that up to 98,000 people were without electricity. the most up—to—date figures we have at the moment are around 7000 from the first storm and 30,000 last night. work has been ongoing over the weekend to try and get as many people back on as quickly as possible. but we do understand that some people could be without electricity until tuesday evening.
10:47 am
now, for some people in aberdeenshire, which was the worst affected area, they were also impacted by storm are when back in november. this is a second time some people are having to go several days without electricity. —— max tarmac. there going to be available for people who cannot cook at home and some centres where people can get a shower or get warm rather electricity is being fixed. schools this morning, particularly in aberdeenshire, will be closed because many schools do not have electricity this morning. definitely worth checking that. transport as well. as covid restrictions are eased slightly, and people are going back to work this morning, transport has been
10:48 am
impacted. trains were off last night. fairies were also impacted. the clear up operation in place this morning after a weekend of two storms battering the country. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood remains in custody for questioning after being arrested on suspicion of rape and assault. greater manchester police said it was made aware of "social media images and videos posted by a woman reporting incidents of physical violence". our reporter, dave guest, has been outside old trafford from where he's given us the latest. mason greenwood made his manchester united debut in 2019, only last year he signed a four—year deal with the club after rising through the ranks of the united academy. but yesterday, manchester united issued a statement saying that mason greenwood would not be playing for or training with manchester united until further notice. that statement was made following allegations online by a woman who said she had been
10:49 am
assaulted by mason greenwood. greater manchester police later confirmed they had been made aware of these social media posts and they had arrested a man in his 205 on suspicion of rape and assault. now when united issued that statement saying mason greenwood would not be rejoining his team—mates until further notice, they also said that the club does not condone violence of any kind. however, they said they would be making no further statement until the full facts were established. of course, establishing the full facts is what greater manchester police hopes to do, it is a process which could take some time and so speculation about what may or may not have happened is not only unwise at this time but also potentially prejudicial. meanwhile, the sportswear manufacturer nike who sponsor the player have said they are deeply concerned by these disturbing allegations and are monitoring the situation very closely. so far, there has been no statement
10:50 am
on behalf of the player. the danish footballer christian eriksen looks set to complete a remarkable comeback — after signing with english premier league side brentford for the rest of this season. eriksen has not played since suffering a cardiac arrest in denmark's opening match of the european championship against finland injune last year. at the time there were fears he would never play again. the 29—year—old midfielder�*s former club inter milan terminated his contract in december because the internal defribulator device that he had implanted is not permitted in italian football. brentford are currently 14th in the premier league. the streaming giant spotify has revealed plans to tackle covid misinformation on its podcasts. it says it will add advisory warnings to any podcast that discusses covid—19. the move follows criticism of its hosting ofjoe rogan, an american podcaster who has promoted scepticism about covid vaccines.
10:51 am
singersjoni mitchell and neil young removed their music from spotify in protest at mr rogan's continued presence on the platform. mark lobel has the latest. following a chorus of disapproval from a number of musical stars, spotify has sought to clarify its stance on covid misinformation on its platform. the online streaming giant is now publishing its platform rules for the first time. users will get a content advisory when podcast episodes contain covid 19 discussions, and listeners will be directed to an updated covid 19 hub to combat misinformation. the row erupted after a podcast hosted byjoe rogan, one of spotify�*s star signings. he had dr robert malone, who was strongly anti—vax and especially anti—vax for children. now i think a lot of people are maybe on the fence
10:52 am
about vaccinating their kids. i think a lot more people are thinking maybe they won't do that over adults getting the vaccine. so when this came out, a few hundred health experts, scientists, wrote to spotify, saying, this is very dangerous. following that, spotify�*s other star podcasters, harry and meghan, issued a statement from their foundation archewell. .. so can spotify now win over their sceptics? just a slight adjustment of several words is what is allowing joe rogan to not have his podcast touched or taken down or isolated episodes.
10:53 am
the devil is in the details as it pertains tojoe rogan, and people still aren't happy with the actions that spotify is taking. this episode underlines the challenge of policing these platforms, as even podcasts now become potential minefields of misinformation. mark lobel, bbc news. well, late sunday night — mr rogan has given his reponse to the decision. i'm sorry," rogan said. "i will do my best to try to balance out these more controversial viewpoints with other people's perspectives so we can maybe find a betterpoint of view." after several years of being kept out of the classroom, teenage mothers in tanzania have been returning to schools this month. pregnant pupils were prohibited from attending classes by the former president in 2017. but late last year, president samia suluhu hassan overturned the ban, giving these girls a second chance to finish their education.
10:54 am
the bbc�*s aboubakar famau reports from a school in the country's southern highlands. classes are back. it was a wish come true for this girl. she is back at school after having her baby. and she's making up for the year she lost. i never thought that i would return to school because i lost my focus. i only saw darkness ahead. she was in her last year of school when she fell pregnant. the government policy meant she had to drop out. it devastated her. i felt very sad because all my dreams were shattered at once. i felt like i will never get another chance to study. the new president has overturned the ban and pregnant girls can go back to school. but of the 1,500 girls expelled from classes in this area, only 240 have returned. a school official told me that they
10:55 am
hope to bring more back soon. it is true that these girls lost a lot of time while at home. but we have created a system called alternative education pathway where these students will have a condensed programme, allowing them to study form one and two within a year and from three and four within another year. although she is back at school, there are some challenges. she has no—one to look after her baby so she brings her to school. she has just walked out of class. she has come here to change her baby's nappy. it's one of the challenges
10:56 am
that she has to overcome of studying and taking care of her child at the same time. she says she is now studying to become a lawyer. the decision to lift the ban has given hundreds like her hope. but for many others, it has come too late. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. through the rest of today, this time is going to push across the north sea and onto the continent, taking the strongest winds with it. behind it, it is going to be windy and sunshine and showers. here is the storm by the time we get to the afternoon. the isobars are telling you it is still windy. a weather front coming our
10:57 am
way later on, introducing rain. strong, gusty went into the afternoon. rain showers coming in across northern ireland, wales, into the home counties, drifting west through the course of the afternoon. it is still going to be windy. if still 44 and 47 in the coastline. it is coming from north—west. temperatures from four to 10 celsius, it will feel cold. some rain initially from the west, pushing southwards and eastwards. still blustery winds and we will see clear skies behind the rain. the lowest temperatures will be in the east. something milder is coming our way from the west. here is our second weather front, sinking southwards, taking the cloud and rain with it. you can see the yellow on the chart, that is indicating higher temperature. all of this
10:58 am
cloud for northern ireland, england and wales, spots of rain, sunshine follows on behind. still blustery wins and some showers. these are the mean wind speeds. the gusts will be higher than this. temperature wise, you will notice the difference. all of us in double figures. as you move on into wednesday, we stay in the mild air. a lot of cloud around. initially spots of rain across england, wales and northern ireland. that will push into scotland. it will be breezy, not as windy as it is going to be today and tomorrow. thursday, this cold front comes in. the blue indicates that the colder air following on the blue indicates that the colder airfollowing on behind and still quite windy. as we head through the latter part of the week, the cold air moves across part of the uk. wintry showers in the north on friday.
10:59 am
11:00 am
this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: fopp the bbc understand s fopp the bbc understand 5 downing street is expecting the sue gray report today. you're going to have to wait and see the outcome of the... you've been telling people privately. you have to wait and see the outcome of the investigations but of course i stick absolutely to what i've said in the past. mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs staff in england could be scrapped — ministers meet today to make the final decision. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood is questioned by police over allegations of rape and assault. the hungarian and uk ministers of defence meet to talk about the ukraine crisis. the uk's ben wallace says we don't
11:01 am
want war or instability. i'm confident that as a nato member, but also as a friend and ally that the united kingdom and hungary discuss what we can do to de—escalate the situation in ukraine. and footballer christian eriksen completes a remarkable comeback. seven months after collapsing with a cardiac arrest during the euros, he's returning to the sport, with a new contract from brentford. the bbc understands that the report by sue gray into social gatherings held at downing street during the covid—19lockdown will be sent to the government later today.
11:02 am
the inquiry was ordered by the prime minister after a series of media reports about parties and gatherings held on various dates during the first lockdown and the period over christmas 2020 at which it's alleged covid—19 rules about socialising were broken. borisjohnson has been speaking in the past hour about the expected report. you're going to have to wait and see the outcome of... can you tell... you're going to have to wait and see the outcome of the investigations, but of course i stick absolutely to what i've said in the past but i'm here to talk about... you didn't do anything wrong? i'm here to talk about the free ports that we are doing around the uk. just to get it op the record, prime minister, is - your position that you did nothing wrong at all? - i'm sticking completely... you're going to have to wait and see what the investigation says and with due respect. let's speak to our political correspondent, jessica parker. so, what is the latest on possible
11:03 am
timings? so, what is the latest on possible timinus? i , _, ., ., ., timings? well my colleague laura keunssberg _ timings? well my colleague laura keunssberg is _ timings? well my colleague laura keunssberg is saying _ timings? well my colleague laura keunssberg is saying that - timings? well my colleague laura keunssberg is saying that the - timings? well my colleague lauraj keunssberg is saying that the bbc understands the prime minister has told cabinet colleagues to expect the sue gray report later today. so it does look likely, always you have to throw in a bit of a caveat, because people have been waiting a long time for this report, but it looks likely we will get the report some time later today. for weeks now, we have been waiting for sue gray. it is something that ministers have talked about when pressed on the details of different events. what will this mean politically for borisjohnson? i think we will have to read the report and read the conclusions of sue gray as to what has gone on and there is the complication after that back and forth between the cabinet office that has been dealing with this and the police holding their own investigation as well. so we have to see what extent maybe it has been
11:04 am
tweaked by sue gray, redrafted in some way, we don't have the original copy either. so a lot of questions, but at least there will still be some answers coming through today when this report looks like it will be finally published for everybody to see. but be finally published for everybody to see. �* i . ., , ., to see. but it is clear, is it, that robabl to see. but it is clear, is it, that probably around _ to see. but it is clear, is it, that probably around half— to see. but it is clear, is it, that probably around half of- to see. but it is clear, is it, that probably around half of the - to see. but it is clear, is it, that i probably around half of the events that have been put out into the public domain through leaks and reporting will not be covered by this report? we reporting will not be covered by this report?— reporting will not be covered by this reort? i i, �* ,, ., , this report? we don't know exactly, so obviously — this report? we don't know exactly, so obviously what _ this report? we don't know exactly, so obviously what the _ this report? we don't know exactly, so obviously what the metropolitan | so obviously what the metropolitan police said is they asked for minimal reference to be made to events relevant to its investigation and we won't have a copy of what sue gray may have originally written, if there have been tweaks, so there are a lot of unknowns in terms of what we will be reading about and while ministers have been talking about
11:05 am
waiting for sue gray's publication there may be an element of waiting for the police's conclusions as well. so it is a complicated picture, but, overall, worth stressing, we have been waiting a long time for these findings to come out, we will learn more today than we knew this morning or yesterday in terms of what went on and what sue gray has been investigating. so it is likely to be a big moment for borisjohnson, who has been under enormous political pressure, not just from opposition parties, but from some of his own mp5 as well. we from some of his own mps as well. we have been waiting for some time and, as the clock has carried on ticking, so the government is turning its attention to other issues and amongst those one of the headline stories today is about whether mandatory vaccinations will or won't go ahead for nhs staff, that is something else borisjohnson has
11:06 am
been talking about. they will go off the agenda later, but that is where the agenda later, but that is where the focus has been today. yes the agenda later, but that is where the focus has been today.- the focus has been today. yes and that is an important _ the focus has been today. yes and that is an important story, - the focus has been today. yes and that is an important story, the - that is an important story, the ministers considering whether to scrap the idea of making vaccines mandatory for front line nhs workers. it was controversial among some conservative mps. but some of the reasoning is omicron and the nature of omicron has changed the picture, mildersymptoms. the picture, milder symptoms. the government picture, mildersymptoms. the government still stressing for people to try and get vaccinations, but also concerns about staff shortages as well in the nhs. we have been hearing from the prime minister today on this issue. all health care professionals should get a vaccine. that's absolutely clear. i think is a sajid javid, the health secretary, is going to be saying a bit more later on about how you might deal with different variants of coronavirus, because they have different implications when it comes to transmissability.
11:07 am
i think you're right in saying that while there are other stories around, as the day goes on, it may be more and more about sue gray, but worth mentioning the government talking about its brexit freedom bill to make it easier to diverge from eu law. i think some people suspect there is an element of trying to reset after a very difficult few weeks, but i think if the day goes as we currently expect, there will be one very clear top political story. there will be one very clear top political story-— political story. thank you very much. political story. thank you very much- we _ political story. thank you very much. we will— political story. thank you very much. we will keep _ political story. thank you very much. we will keep you - political story. thank you very - much. we will keep you up-to-date much. we will keep you up—to—date with all of the news as we get it on the anticipated release of the sue gray report later today. as we've been hearing, government ministers will meet later to decide whether to scrap mandatory covid vaccinations for national health service staff in england. under the controversial proposals,
11:08 am
front line workers must be fully vaccinated by the start of april, or face losing theirjobs. critics of the measure say it could lead to a staffing crisis. our health editor, hugh pym, reports. it's proved a highly controversial policy, and there have been warnings that thousands of nhs staff in england could leave or be dismissed by employers for refusing to get vaccinated. the royal college of midwives has already called for a delay, arguing there could be a catastrophic impact on maternity services because of workforce shortages. the latest figures showed that around 77,500 nhs staff in england, about 5%, had not had anyjab, though not all will be in frontlinejobs. vaccination is the right policy but forcing vaccination wasn't, not in the middle of a staffing crisis, particularly, so, assuming it is going to be scrapped, we will certainly support that
11:09 am
scrapping, but also support of the continued conversations to try and encourage as many people as possible to get vaccinated. ministers and health leaders have said before now that the policy is needed to provide reassurance to patients. the health secretary, sajid javid, argued it was the professional duty of frontline staff to get jabbed, but he was challenged by a doctor at a london hospital. i've had covid at some point. yes. i've got antibodies. yeah. and i've been working on covid icu since the beginning. i have not had a vaccination. i do not want to have a vaccination. many health care workers have not opposed mandatory vaccinations for staff. if a patient comes to me and says. "should i have the vaccine? have you been vaccinated, doctor? " that answer should always be, - "yes, of course i've been vaccinated and you should, too." there is no wriggle room ethically l for doctor or a nurse or anybody talking to patients.
11:10 am
it's understood the policy is now being reconsidered with a view in government that the landscape has changed because the omicron variant has not proved as serious as the delta wave, during which the policy was first drawn up. ministers will meet today to decide whether to continue with the plan. it's understood no final decisions have yet been made. the risk is that nhs chiefs, who've tried to defend it will feel undermined by any u—turn, and there will be demands for care home staff in england who lost theirjobs because of a similar compulsory vaccination policy to be reinstated. hugh pym, bbc news. joining me now is professor martin marshall, chair of the royal college of gps. thank you forjoining us. if it does end up that it's not going to be compulsory for nhs workers to be vaccinated, what do you think about that? i vaccinated, what do you think about that? “ vaccinated, what do you think about that? 4' ., vaccinated, what do you think about that? 4' .i . , ., , that? i think if that decision is confirmed _ that? i think if that decision is confirmed then _ that? i think if that decision is confirmed then it _ that? i think if that decision is confirmed then it must - that? i think if that decision is confirmed then it must be - that? i think if that decision is confirmed then it must be a i that? i think if that decision is i confirmed then it must be a good thing. getting vaccinated is fundamentally important, it is the
11:11 am
best protection we have against covid, it is their professional responsibility of anybody in the nhs to get vaccinated. but we don't believe alongside other bodies that making it compulsory is the right way forward, particularly given the impact on the staffing crisis which has been mentioned by many people. we don't have enough clinicians, so remove 75,000 as a result of something we don't believe is right decision doesn't make sense. is it an argument _ decision doesn't make sense. is it an argument that _ decision doesn't make sense. is it an argument that should ever have been had in your view? arguably, because it has been aired in the way it has, because it is clear that 5% of nhs workers don't have the vaccine, 77,000, and they were holding out with some saying they were prepared to lose than jobs, what message does that send to the public? what message does that send to the ublic? i i ii , what message does that send to the ublic? i i ., , .,, public? well i understand why most
11:12 am
members of — public? well i understand why most members of the _ public? well i understand why most members of the public _ public? well i understand why most members of the public believe - public? well i understand why most. members of the public believe health professionals should be vaccinated, that makes complete sense. the problem of course is making it mandatory. problem of course is making it mandatory-— problem of course is making it mandato . i .i ., mandatory. what i was wondering thou . h in mandatory. what i was wondering though in terms _ mandatory. what i was wondering though in terms of— mandatory. what i was wondering though in terms of your _ mandatory. what i was wondering though in terms of your thinking l mandatory. what i was wondering. though in terms of your thinking on this, what message it sends when people working in the medical profession are not getting it and it is, it has been such a public debate around that, could that have an impact on other people's feelings on getting the vaccine or not? i impact on other people's feelings on getting the vaccine or not?— getting the vaccine or not? i think there is a risk— getting the vaccine or not? i think there is a risk of _ getting the vaccine or not? i think there is a risk of that, _ getting the vaccine or not? i think there is a risk of that, but - getting the vaccine or not? i think there is a risk of that, but let's i there is a risk of that, but let's remember the majority of clinicians, especially doctors have been vaccinated, they have carried out their responsibility and done the right thing according to the evidence, that is the message that should get across to the public. i read one psycho therapist working in the nhs and her description of how she has felt around getting vaccinated and the sort of pressure that has been put on her, it is
11:13 am
quite interesting, i would like to sort of talk to you about that, she is anna and said she is not app anti—vaxer, but doesn't like feeling pressured to get the covid jab and wants it to be her choice. she says she feels she doesn't get a moment to breathe without being interrogated by staff. she was asked if she had had a conversation with herfamily yet and if she had had a conversation with her family yet and had she booked an appoint. it felt like coaching or surveillance on whether or not i would be vaccinated, it is an interesting perspective in terms of how you do have conversations with people who may not be opposed, but it very intelligent, making their own decisions not necessarily against it, but the way it has been gone about was pushing her down a different part, what do you think is the best way to encourage people to be get vaccinated if they're holding
11:14 am
out within the nhs? that be get vaccinated if they're holding out within the nhs?— out within the nhs? that story reflects the — out within the nhs? that story reflects the importance - out within the nhs? that story reflects the importance of - out within the nhs? that story i reflects the importance of people making choices, voluntarily making choices about what medical interventions they have, whether it is drugs for high blood pressure, an operation or vaccinations. interventions like vaccinations are fundamentally important, but allowing professionals to make the choice themselves part of maintaining trust, if you lose trust, you can get into problems pr. i come back to the most important reason we have had concerned is the practical impact on the size of the workforce when the nhs is in crisis. thank you. the government is stepping up its diplomatic efforts to counter the threat of russian military action against ukraine.
11:15 am
the defence secretary ben wallace is on a visit to eastern europe, holding talks in hungary with his ministerial counterpart there. the united nations security council will meet later to discuss the crisis. after his talks in hungary, the defence secretary ben wallace spoke to reporters at a press conference. obviously central europe is incredibly important to all of us, not only in the united kingdom but to nato and it is many of the countries of central europe that will face the direct consequences of russian aggression, or indeed an invasion in ukraine. the consequences could be severe for the people of central europe, including hungary, who will face higher energy prices, food prices and the economic consequences of a conflict, including migration. so it's really important that as a nato member, but also as a friend and ally that the united kingdom and hungary discus what we can do to de—escalate the situation in ukraine and indeed
11:16 am
with the russian government to make sure that we don't end up in a place that is damaging to all of us, especially at this time after the pandemic and i think that's what we were talking about today. but we were also talking about deepening on our co—operation, building on the 2019 agreement with hungary, you know, hungary has a strong tradition of a very professional and capable armed forces, which is exactly the type of partner that the united kingdom likes to work with, indeed we have right now a hungarian commander of of k—for in kosovo and indeed of k—for in kosovo and indeed hungarian forces alongside british forces in cyprus on un duty and i think we think we can do more together in the long run and indeed in the medium term to strengthen those ties and i'm delighted we could discuss those as well. we can talk now to catherine belton, special correspondent for reuters and author of putin's people: how
11:17 am
the kgb took back russia and then took on the west. welcome, thank you forjoining us. what is your analysis of how things are going in terms of what you believe the strategy was for vladimir putin and how it's now playing out?— vladimir putin and how it's now -la in: out? i ~ ii playing out? yes, i think vladimir putin really _ playing out? yes, i think vladimir putin really was _ playing out? yes, i think vladimir putin really was banking - playing out? yes, i think vladimir putin really was banking on - playing out? yes, i think vladimir putin really was banking on more | putin really was banking on more weakness from the west. he believed that the us was deeply divided, which it is after the trump presidency. he watched the biden administration withdraw from afghanistan and he believed he could frighten the west, but he not receive that, but he is faced with a more and more united front from the west and more and more now we have countries that were never before part of nato, such as sweden and
11:18 am
finland saying that they're discussing entering the security bloc. so in fact he is getting a bit of a backlash and actually the response has been counter to his interests. so it is quite an interesting situation. the interests. so it is quite an interesting situation. interests. so it is quite an interestin: situation. i interesting situation. the play book isn't bein: isn't being followed, it is not what happened when he went into crimea. has it, where does it go from here? the initial concerns and wants that he had don't go away, but it is not playing out as he thought it seems? now the great worry for him is that the us has said it is going to push ahead with sanctions. that could target the russian banking system and would cut them off from dollar trade and that would have a huge impact on the russian economy and eat into the huge wind fall reserves
11:19 am
the russian state has been building up the russian state has been building up in case of such sanctions. they could disappear quickly. we are trying to, you know the russian oligarchs are facing a backlash from the us and the uk we heard liz truss announcing the uk will target russian oligarchs who have great influence in the uk that they could face sanctions that new legislation will be drawn up to tackle deep influence here in london. vladimir putin will have to reckon with the _ vladimir putin will have to reckon with the consequences _ vladimir putin will have to reckon with the consequences of- vladimir putin will have to reckon with the consequences of his - with the consequences of his actions. _ with the consequences of his actions. but— with the consequences of his actions, but i _ with the consequences of his actions, but i think— with the consequences of his actions, but i think he - with the consequences of his actions, but i think he was. with the consequences of his - actions, but i think he was banking on the _ actions, but i think he was banking on the west— actions, but i think he was banking on the west to _ actions, but i think he was banking on the west to move _ actions, but i think he was banking on the west to move faster - actions, but i think he was banking on the west to move faster into i on the west to move faster into concessions. _ on the west to move faster into concessions, but— on the west to move faster into concessions, but now— on the west to move faster into concessions, but now he - on the west to move faster into concessions, but now he has, i on the west to move faster into - concessions, but now he has, there is this— concessions, but now he has, there is this huge — concessions, but now he has, there is this huge build _ concessions, but now he has, there is this huge build up— concessions, but now he has, there is this huge build up of— concessions, but now he has, there is this huge build up of military- is this huge build up of military hard _ is this huge build up of military hard ware _ is this huge build up of military hard ware on _ is this huge build up of military hard ware on the _ is this huge build up of military hard ware on the border- is this huge build up of military.
11:20 am
hard ware on the border obviously the potential— hard ware on the border obviously the potential for— hard ware on the border obviously the potential for any— hard ware on the border obviously the potential for any kind - hard ware on the border obviously the potential for any kind of- the potential for any kind of provocation _ the potential for any kind of provocation or— the potential for any kind of provocation or accident - the potential for any kind of provocation or accident is l the potential for any kind of- provocation or accident is great. #i679 _ provocation or accident is great. #i679 it — provocation or accident is great. #i679 it is — provocation or accident is great. #i679 it is a _ provocation or accident is great. #i679 it is a very— provocation or accident is great. #i679 it is a very dangerious . #i679 it is a very dangerious situation _ #i679 it is a very dangerious situation indeed. _ #i679 it is a very dangerious situation indeed.— #i679 it is a very dangerious situation indeed. i .i ., ,, ., situation indeed. what about russian . as situation indeed. what about russian gas sopplies? — situation indeed. what about russian gas supplies? that _ situation indeed. what about russian gas supplies? that seemed _ situation indeed. what about russian gas supplies? that seemed like - situation indeed. what about russian gas supplies? that seemed like big l gas supplies? that seemed like big lever that vladimir putin had at his disposal. lever that vladimir putin had at his disosal. i ii ~ lever that vladimir putin had at his disosal. i .i ,, ., , disposal. yes, and i think that is -robabl disposal. yes, and i think that is probably one — disposal. yes, and i think that is probably one of _ disposal. yes, and i think that is probably one of the _ disposal. yes, and i think that is probably one of the reasons - disposal. yes, and i think that is probably one of the reasons why disposal. yes, and i think that is - probably one of the reasons why now he has been able to go ahead and threaten ukraine quite so vigorously, because now that he has the nord stream gas ukraine is no longer important for russian gas into europe and the door has been left open to him to sort of conduct this campaign of aggression against ukraine, because he no longer has to keep that pipeline supply so secure. i guess we have to see now what is going to happen with nord stream 2.
11:21 am
he has been banking on western weakness, that the nord stream 2 would go ahead, because the west needs energy supply and didn't think the germans would be willing to delay the start of that pipeline. briefly, what would you rate the percentage chances of conflict in ukraine? ii ~ percentage chances of conflict in ukraine? .i ,, , ukraine? yeah, i think it is difficult to _ ukraine? yeah, i think it is difficult to say. _ ukraine? yeah, i think it is difficult to say. we - ukraine? yeah, i think it is difficult to say. we have i ukraine? yeah, i think it is- difficult to say. we have heard some statements from vladimir putin's most hawkish security officials over the weekend, including the head of security council in russia. he is the most hawkish russian official. but even he said russia doesn't want war and the idea that russia is threatening ukraine is absurd. but
11:22 am
it seems that the russian diplomats, russian officials have left the door open to diplomacy, perhaps they will seek some kind of diplomatic solution, but as i said before, with such a build up of military hard ware on the border, the slightest provocation it could escalate out of control and perhaps the russian officials are seeking to blame the west in order to start a confrontation. i guess it is very difficult to say, because even as one russian oligarch told me, the decisions are being taken by such a narrow circle officials.— narrow circle officials. thank you so much- — narrow circle officials. thank you so much- we _ narrow circle officials. thank you so much. we have _ narrow circle officials. thank you so much. we have to _ narrow circle officials. thank you so much. we have to leave - narrow circle officials. thank you so much. we have to leave it - narrow circle officials. thank you i so much. we have to leave it there. because we have breaking news to bring you. sue gray's report has been handed in now. the cabinet office spokesman said that she has provided the update on her investigation.
11:23 am
so that is confirmation that the report has gone to the prime minister. although i'm assuming that is what it means. it says she has provided an update on her investigations to the prime minister. so still a little lack of clarity in that exact quote that we have from the cabinet office spokesperson, but the assumption would be the report has gone in, thatis would be the report has gone in, that is what we were anticipating. but we still do need to get clarity on that, we were expecting last week the report to be published. at the beginning of the week we were expecting the report to be published in its entirety, but a week is a long time in politics and things changed dramatically in the week when the metropolitan police said they would be launching an investigation into the alleged parties in downing street during lockdown and that meant when we do
11:24 am
get the report from sue gray, it won't be the complete report that had been anticipated, looking at the 16 or so gatherings that had been highlighted at downing street during the lockdown. it is thought up to eight of those parties are the subject now of the police investigation, but again i use the word "thought" because we don't have full clarity on what the situation is. wejust full clarity on what the situation is. we just know that police are investigating some of the events and those that the police are not investigating will be able to be included in the sue gray report. let me repeat that line, just a single line from a cabinet office spokesperson saying that sue gray has handed in an update on the report. the prime minister has been out, but once he gets to look at it there will be a few hours for the
11:25 am
government to take a look and then there will be a statement in parliament and parliament sits from 3.30 today. so some time after that. that is the latest that we have from laura keunssberg, our political editor and we will of course keep you updated as soon as we get any more developments on that. but sit tight it looks like the will be out later. a british woman has won her appeal against a conviction, following her retracted statement regarding an alleged gang rape in the cypriot holiday resort of ayia napa. with more on this i am joined by ourforeign correspodent who is in nicosia, anna holligan. just remind us of the background to this case first of all. iarruiieiiii just remind us of the background to this case first of all.— this case first of all. well hear la ers this case first of all. well hear lawyers described _ this case first of all. well hear lawyers described this - this case first of all. well hear lawyers described this as - this case first of all. well hear lawyers described this as a - this case first of all. well hear. lawyers described this as a water shed moment, a victory for a victim of a miscarriage ofjustice. to understand what this means we need to go back to here. a young woman travelled to ayia napa on a working
11:26 am
holiday and alleged she was attacked by a group of tourists, gang raped, she went to the police and made the allegation and ten days later she retracted it and she was accused of wasting police time, public mischief wasting police time, public mischief was the charge and the men were released. her lawyers argued the way in which she was treated was unfair and violated her rights to a fair hearing, a fair trial, because the statement, the retraction statement was made during six hours in the police station with no translator or lawyer present and they also argued the original trial was flawed, because the judge failed to hear evidence of the original rape allegation and this has been seen by women worldwide as a victory for victims of sex crimes, because a lot of the activists here were saying actually it is a bitter sweet victory, because for true justice as
11:27 am
her family have said there needs to be a proper investigation of the original rape allegation.- be a proper investigation of the original rape allegation. thank you very much- — the streaming giant spotify has revealed plans to tackle covid misinformation on its podcasts. it says it will add advisory warnings to any podcast that discusses covid—19. the move follows criticism of its hosting ofjoe rogan, an american podcaster who has promoted scepticism about covid vaccines. singersjoni mitchell and neil young removed their music from spotify in protest at mr rogan's continued presence on the platform. let's get more on this with eamonn forde, who's a music business journalist and author. to the power of the big artist then? sorry could you repeat that? it is the power _ sorry could you repeat that? it is the power of _ sorry could you repeat that? it is the power of the _ sorry could you repeat that? it is the power of the big artists in action. it the power of the big artists in action. i i , , , action. it is, but i guess it is also the _ action. it is, but i guess it is also the wider _ action. it is, but i guess it is also the wider media - action. it is, but i guess it is also the wider media storm | action. it is, but i guess it is- also the wider media storm around this as well. there has been ongoing
11:28 am
coverage of this since the end of last week. but you can't say it is exclusively due to neil young and joni mitchell, but they were the catalyst for this. find joni mitchell, but they were the catalyst for this.— joni mitchell, but they were the catalyst for this. and drove a huge amount of the _ catalyst for this. and drove a huge amount of the coverage _ catalyst for this. and drove a huge amount of the coverage because l catalyst for this. and drove a huge| amount of the coverage because of the stance that they took. it took that to crystallise issues for spotify, but why has it taken so long for spotify to grapple and i don't know, has it decided a policy, did it not have a policy on what is going out on its plait form? —— platform? it going out on its plait form? -- platform?— going out on its plait form? -- latform? .i ., , ., ., platform? it did have a platform, that the ceo _ platform? it did have a platform, that the ceo published, - platform? it did have a platform, that the ceo published, they - platform? it did have a platform, that the ceo published, they had i that the ceo published, they had internal policies, but they will make those public. this is a giant international company and i guess they have to figure out what the pr message is going to be. but in something like this, in a world that
11:29 am
moves quickly for a digital company to take four orfive moves quickly for a digital company to take four or five days to respond, suggests they were having lots of fraught internal conversations about how to position this, what their message would be and their response would be. some would say. — and their response would be. some would say. some — and their response would be. some would say, some do _ and their response would be. some would say, some do say _ and their response would be. some would say, some do say that - and their response would be. some would say, some do say that because of the content that it puts out, spotify is an editor and notjust a platform. that has been obviously an ongoing debate. in terms of where they have landed in handling this, what does it say about going forward, what the approach will be, will it mean a change in how spotify operates and what they will take on to the platform? i operates and what they will take on to the platform?— to the platform? i would hope, i would hope _ to the platform? i would hope, i would hope this _ to the platform? i would hope, i would hope this is _ to the platform? i would hope, i would hope this is a _ to the platform? i would hope, i would hope this is a hard - to the platform? i would hope, i would hope this is a hard lesson | would hope this is a hard lesson they have learned and they will be much more proactive in flagging up something like that that was positioned on thejoe rogan podcast that was accused of spreading the disinformation about covid. but it
11:30 am
will apply to other issues, lots of political and social issues that are covered in podcasts. spotify is now effectively a publisher and notjust a platform for musicians. so by giving somebody likejoe rogan and paying him a rumoured one million dollars in a way they are endorsing what he puts on his show and they are complicit in what he puts on his show and the to put safeguards in place. show and the to put safeguards in lace. ii ~' ,~. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. borisjohnson has been handed an update of the sue gray report into downing street parties.
11:31 am
it's expected to be released to the public later. asked if he did anything wrong — the prime minister said people need to wait for the outcome to be published. you will have to wait and see the outcome. you have to wait and see the outcome of the investigations but of course i stick absolutely to what i said in the past. mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs staff in england could be scrapped — ministers meet today to make the final decision. we have to try and balance our protections for public health purposes against our wider action to make sure that our infringements are as minimal as they can safely be. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood is questioned by police over allegations of rape and assault. the hungarian and uk ministers of defence meet to talk about the ukraine crisis — the uk's ben wallace says we don't want war or instability. it's really important that, as a
11:32 am
nato member but also as a friend and ally with the uk, we discussed what we can do to de—escalate the situation in ukraine. let's return to our breaking news. sue gray has provided an update on her investigations on social gatherings held at downing street during the covid—19lockdown to prime minister borisjohnson, a cabinet office spokesman has said. let's speak to victoria derbyshire is at downing street. over to you, victoria. yes, over to you, victoria. yes, we over to you, victoria. yes, we await over to you, victoria. yes, we await the report but we don't know if borisjohnson has got it yet. an update suggests that today won't be about the full findings but we knew that anyway, because the metropolitan police asked us to grey not to include some of the most
11:33 am
important bits in her report. a5 important bits in her report. as soon as we get it obviously will bring you what is in it and what isn't in it. in the meantime, let's tell you more about sue gray. she's a powerful civil servant. her bosses boss as the prime minister. gareth gordon has interviewed her in the past and has this profile of the woman investigating the downing street parties. they used to corner the most powerful civil servant you've never heard of but not any more. bill you've never heard of but not any more. �* ii i ~' i you've never heard of but not any more. . .i , ., you've never heard of but not any more. ~ iii ., , you've never heard of but not any more. iii ., , more. all i ask is that gray be allowed to _ more. all i ask is that gray be allowed to complete - more. all i ask is that gray be allowed to complete her- more. all i ask is that gray be i allowed to complete her inquiry. more. all i ask is that gray be - allowed to complete her inquiry. sue gra . sue allowed to complete her inquiry. sue gray- sue gray- _ allowed to complete her inquiry. sue gray. sue gray. sue _ allowed to complete her inquiry. sue gray. sue gray. sue gray. _ allowed to complete her inquiry. sue gray. sue gray. sue gray. so - allowed to complete her inquiry. sue gray. sue gray. sue gray. so who i allowed to complete her inquiry. sue gray. sue gray. sue gray. so who is| gray. sue gray. sue gray. so who is she and what _ gray. sue gray. sue gray. so who is she and what makes _ gray. sue gray. sue gray. so who is she and what makes her— gray. sue gray. sue gray. so who is she and what makes her tick? - gray. sue gray. sue gray. so who is she and what makes her tick? welll she and what makes her tick? well for a start she's the only whitehall civil servant who is ever run a pub in newry and although it's now a nursery, where a husband, country and western singer bill conlon. iie
11:34 am
and western singer bill conlon. he hated and western singer bill conlon. h2 hated the pub. and actually most of the customers didn't like him either because it was quite miserable in it. so after six to eight weeks, it was making him a bit fed up sol sent him back to london and i carried on running the bar on my own. i, carried on running the bar on my own. ,, i, own. she returned to run the department _ own. she returned to run the department of _ own. she returned to run the department of finance - own. she returned to run the department of finance in - own. she returned to run the i department of finance in belfast own. she returned to run the - department of finance in belfast but the job she really wanted was head of the northern ireland civil service. i , �* ., service. why didn't i get the 'ob? i'm not service. why didn't i get the 'ob? m not i i service. why didn't i get the 'ob? i'm not sure i will i service. why didn't i get the 'ob? i'm not sure i will never i service. why didn't i get the job? i'm not sure i will never quite i i'm not sure i will never quite know, but i suspect people may have thought of that i am perhaps too much of a challenger or a disrupter. i am both. and much of a challenger or a disrupter. lam both. and perhaps much of a challenger or a disrupter. i am both. and perhaps i would bring too much change. bind i am both. and perhaps i would bring too much change.— too much change. and now she has a much bigger— too much change. and now she has a much biggerjob. _ too much change. and now she has a much biggerjob. so _ too much change. and now she has a much biggerjob, so how— too much change. and now she has a much biggerjob, so how will- too much change. and now she has a much biggerjob, so how will she i much biggerjob, so how will she cope estimate we asked the man who knows her from cope estimate we asked the man who knows herfrom his time cope estimate we asked the man who knows her from his time as tony blair's official spokesman. i think she will find _
11:35 am
blair's official spokesman. i think she will find this _ blair's official spokesman. i think she will find this very, _ blair's official spokesman. i think she will find this very, very i she will find this very, very uncomfortable. she is not the sort of person— uncomfortable. she is not the sort of person who, as you know, enjoys being _ of person who, as you know, enjoys being in— of person who, as you know, enjoys being in the — of person who, as you know, enjoys being in the spotlight. but she will think it _ being in the spotlight. but she will think it is — being in the spotlight. but she will think it is her duty and those are four very— think it is her duty and those are four very important letters for her, her duty— four very important letters for her, her duty to — four very important letters for her, her duty to do this honestly to the best of— her duty to do this honestly to the best of her— her duty to do this honestly to the best of her ability and present the truth. _ best of her ability and present the truth. �* ~ ~ best of her ability and present the truth. �* ~ ,, , ., , truth. but mike should be limited in what ou truth. but mike should be limited in what you can _ truth. but mike should be limited in what you can do _ truth. but mike should be limited in what you can do given _ truth. but mike should be limited in what you can do given she - truth. but mike should be limited in what you can do given she is - what you can do given she is investigating your own boss? she is somebody who _ investigating your own boss? she is somebody who as _ investigating your own boss? she is somebody who as a _ investigating your own boss? she is somebody who as a civil _ investigating your own boss? she is somebody who as a civil servant i investigating your own boss? she is somebody who as a civil servant is l somebody who as a civil servant is as close to being independent as it is possible to get mainly because she's at the end of her career now, so she's not worried about climbing the ladder any further. and also because she has so much experience, so much cloud. she's been at that height of power for so long she will be a very difficult and a risky person for anyone to treat improperly. person for anyone to treat improperly-— person for anyone to treat improperly. person for anyone to treat im--roerl. i, , i, person for anyone to treat im--roerl. ., , ., ., improperly. there was only one other cuestion improperly. there was only one other question for — improperly. there was only one other question for sue _ improperly. there was only one other question for sue gray _ improperly. there was only one other question for sue gray which - improperly. there was only one other question for sue gray which could i question for sue gray which could not be avoided. i've had it put to me you are a spy. i not be avoided. i've had it put to me you are a spy-— not be avoided. i've had it put to me you are a spy. i know you had that ut me you are a spy. i know you had that put to _
11:36 am
me you are a spy. i know you had that put to you — me you are a spy. i know you had that put to you and _ me you are a spy. i know you had that put to you and i _ me you are a spy. i know you had that put to you and i think - me you are a spy. i know you had that put to you and i think if i i me you are a spy. i know you had| that put to you and i think if i was a spy i would be a pretty poor spine. people are talking about me being a spy. i think people here have put a lot of trust in me. and they have put a lot of faith in me. you know, we have worked really well together and i didn't think i would be working externally. harare together and i didn't think i would be working externally.— together and i didn't think i would be working externally. have you got that big head _ be working externally. have you got that big head of— be working externally. have you got that big head of the _ be working externally. have you got that big head of the job _ be working externally. have you got that big head of the job and - be working externally. have you got that big head of the job and when i that big head of the job and when you consider leaving? ha. that big head of the job and when you consider leaving?— that big head of the job and when you consider leaving? no. but she did and now _ you consider leaving? no. but she did and now the _ you consider leaving? no. but she did and now the political _ you consider leaving? no. but she did and now the political world i did and now the political world awaits what she will do next. 50 awaits what she will do next. so that's the profile of a woman who was doing her investigations into what parties happen when and who organise them and who was invited. we are going to get her report later today but we don't know exactly when. and it won't be a full and complete report obviously because of the metropolitan police doing their own investigations and they asked her to leave out some key bits so we
11:37 am
have news this morning she's given an to the prime minister but what do you read that to be? it’s an to the prime minister but what do you read that to be?— you read that to be? it's an interesting _ you read that to be? it's an interesting update - you read that to be? it's an interesting update because| you read that to be? it's an i interesting update because it you read that to be? it's an - interesting update because it wasn't delivered but was an update on her investigation and my understanding is that means she is hand of the prime minister the internal findings of her inquiry looking into the general culture of downing street, the civil servants but not those eight events and parties investigated by the met police. that will come at a later date and by using the word update but the cabinet office are saying is this is not over and they will be more to come in the future but essentially the sue gray report we have been waiting for has gone to that building there. so have been waiting for has gone to that building there.— have been waiting for has gone to that building there. so what do you think will be _ that building there. so what do you think will be in _ that building there. so what do you think will be in it? _ that building there. so what do you think will be in it? i _ that building there. so what do you think will be in it? i think _ that building there. so what do you think will be in it? i think there i think will be in it? i think there will be a lot — think will be in it? i think there will be a lot of _ think will be in it? i think there will be a lot of stuff _ think will be in it? i think there will be a lot of stuff about i think will be in it? i think there will be a lot of stuff about the l will be a lot of stuff about the culture, the management of how this was done within downing street, and i don't think it's going to name individual civil servants but i think it will lay the blame clearly on those who are seen as overseeing that culture which led to what
11:38 am
people call a drinking culture during the various coronavirus lockdowns but in terms of the prime minister, and his culpability, that will not be in there at the moment. 0k. will not be in there at the moment. ok. that is grant shapps, i didn't quite see him but he is in a range rover behind me. he is reported to have done a spreadsheet of conservative mp5 to work out who are supporting the prime minister and who needed a bit of coaxing, shall i say? what are you expecting in terms of a timetable in the next couple of hours? �* i ii i of a timetable in the next couple of hours? �* i .i , , hours? it's a bit fluid but we exect hours? it's a bit fluid but we expect the _ hours? it's a bit fluid but we expect the report _ hours? it's a bit fluid but we expect the report to - hours? it's a bit fluid but we expect the report to go i hours? it's a bit fluid but we | expect the report to go public hours? it's a bit fluid but we i expect the report to go public in the next couple of hours. on the government website. followed by the prime ministerial statement on house of commons later this afternoon but that's not confirmed but that's the expectation within government at the moment. at that point you have to see what conservative mp5 think because they are the electorate which matters in this instance. do they feel report has confirmed their worst fears and put in those
11:39 am
non—conference letters or has that investigation taken the sting out of the whole thing? in fact, theyjust wait and see what happens. over the past week or so borisjohnson is most loyal ministers have been doing a shadow whipping operation, grant shapps is one of them, who went on all those shows batting boris johnson saying hang fire, see what in the report, and he gave reasons for borisjohnson to say. it feels as if the does come out of that momentum to try and get rid of him as conservative party leader, so i would be surprised if we hit 54 letters today because that report is not going to be the full thing. explain the significance of 54 letters. t0 explain the significance of 54 letters. i, i ii letters. to challenge the conservative _ letters. to challenge the conservative party i letters. to challenge the i conservative party leader, 1596 letters. to challenge the - conservative party leader, 1596 of conservative party leader, 15% of the parliamentary party have to write letters of no confidence, currently 54 mp5, so they would go to sir graham grady who runs a 1922 committee, trade union for conservative mps, and we think there's about 30 letters at the moment so it would require quite a lot more momentum to get the
11:40 am
necessary number of letters to challenge borisjohnson. my necessary number of letters to challenge boris johnson. my feeling is unless the support is really bad and worse than we are expecting, we are not going to get 54 letters today. that metropolitan police investigation has taken the heat out of it because if we were getting the full thing today including those eight parties potentially which could have fixed penalty notices, it would be far worse for the prime minister but the other thing to know, victoria, there is talk about how downing street itself will be reformed, talk of may be a new code of conduct, rumours of a drinking ban inside a building but also a personnel shake—up because boris johnson ones to do that and then try to move on to other domestic policy things, so the brexit freedom bill announced today looking at those ways the government wants to leave the eu but also the levelling up of the eu but also the levelling up of the white papers, so he will want to get this up, do the necessary changes and try to move on as quickly as possible. abs. changes and try to move on as quickly as possible. a personnel shake-u quickly as possible. a personnel shake-pp are — quickly as possible. a personnel shake-up are people _ quickly as possible. a personnel shake-up are people below i quickly as possible. a personnel shake-up are people below are | quickly as possible. a personnel- shake-up are people below are boris shake—up are people below are boris johnson but not him and his role?
11:41 am
exactly full ofjunior heads will roll is how it will be described and i think civil servants but also people in the political team in downing street could see a change as well. ., downing street could see a change as well. i, downing street could see a change as well. ., .i downing street could see a change as well. ., ., �* , ., well. you said earlier it's all about the — well. you said earlier it's all about the conservative i well. you said earlier it's all about the conservative mps| well. you said earlier it's all - about the conservative mps reaction how they react to whatever we end up seeing today. it's also about members of the public and their constituents because they were the ones telling us a couple of weekends ago there were getting contacts on their constituents are saying they were absolutely furious about these parties. were absolutely furious about these arties. ., , ., , , were absolutely furious about these arties. ., , , ., parties. that shapes the mood of conservative _ parties. that shapes the mood of conservative mps _ parties. that shapes the mood of conservative mps as _ parties. that shapes the mood of conservative mps as well - parties. that shapes the mood of conservative mps as well but - conservative mps as well but obviously if they'd been here all weekend, and here the anger of their constituents, it will reflect on how they feel about the prime minister and that anger was potent a couple of weeks ago when it felt as if there was momentum towards those crucial 5a letters, there was momentum towards those crucialsli letters, but there was momentum towards those crucial 5a letters, but the mood among tory mps has dampened a bit and i think the longer this has gone on the more poisoned has been taken away so fundamentally we'll have to see what's in the report and to be honest no one really knows. we try
11:42 am
to understand as much as possible, but it's not been clear and there is not long to wait now. do but it's not been clear and there is not long to wait now.— but it's not been clear and there is not long to wait now. do you imagine ou sa it not long to wait now. do you imagine you say it will — not long to wait now. do you imagine you say it will be _ not long to wait now. do you imagine you say it will be published _ not long to wait now. do you imagine you say it will be published on - not long to wait now. do you imagine you say it will be published on the . you say it will be published on the website, but do you imagine it will be the full report with loads of black lines through it or a much reduced less impactful four black lines through it or a much reduced less impactfulfour orfive reduced less impactful four or five pages? reduced less impactfulfour orfive pages? i reduced less impactful four or five -a . es? ~ reduced less impactful four or five maes? ~' ., ., , pages? i think it going to be the latter bigger _ pages? i think it going to be the latter bigger sue _ pages? i think it going to be the latter bigger sue gray _ pages? i think it going to be the latter bigger sue gray didn't - pages? i think it going to be the l latter bigger sue gray didn't want to put a report with black marker pens because it will look like a whitewash, and people will be sceptical about whether a thorough job has been done but we might end “p job has been done but we might end up is that report comes out today which is that the culture and general atmosphere and then we get something at a later date about those events being investigated by the met police which could be months away. the met police which could be months awa . ~ ., r, the met police which could be months awa. ., ., ., the met police which could be months awa. ., ~, the met police which could be months awa. ., ., ., the met police which could be months awa.., ., away. who do conservative mps say is resonsible away. who do conservative mps say is responsible for — away. who do conservative mps say is responsible for the _ away. who do conservative mps say is responsible for the culture _ away. who do conservative mps say is responsible for the culture in - away. who do conservative mps say is responsible for the culture in 10 - responsible for the culture in 10 downing street?— responsible for the culture in 10 downing street? there is schools of thouaht. downing street? there is schools of thought- some _ downing street? there is schools of thought. some conservative - downing street? there is schools of thought. some conservative mps, l thought. some conservative mps, sceptics say he's the prime minister and he should take the can for this but others will say downing street
11:43 am
has hundreds of people working in that building, civil servants including the private secretary martin reynolds, who was one of those who may well leave his position following this whole thing. he sent out an e—mail saying make the most of the lovely weather in the most of the lovely weather in the downing street garden on the 20th of may 2020.— the downing street garden on the 20th of may 2020. when we were in lockdown, exactly. _ 20th of may 2020. when we were in lockdown, exactly. he _ 20th of may 2020. when we were in lockdown, exactly. he is— 20th of may 2020. when we were in lockdown, exactly. he is someone i 20th of may 2020. when we were in i lockdown, exactly. he is someone who oversees the day—to—day running of downing street, so that's an obvious person who could be culpable for this but i think what borisjohnson has to do to win round conservative mps is to show something credible in terms of a shake—up. a few changes here and there. some mps could say nothing has really changed but what matters is the public and how it affects the conservative party and the prime minister standing and people are obviously quite tired of the story were still really angry. i think the prime minister will do some kind of further apologies for that culture and take responsibility but how it's framed versus the
11:44 am
personnel changes against what in that report because we don't really know. it was a 25 page report before the metropolitan police investigation and the heat was taken out of the whole thing.— out of the whole thing. thank you very much- _ out of the whole thing. thank you very much- so. — out of the whole thing. thank you very much. so, as— out of the whole thing. thank you very much. so, as soon _ out of the whole thing. thank you very much. so, as soon as - out of the whole thing. thank you very much. so, as soon as we - out of the whole thing. thank you very much. so, as soon as we get out of the whole thing. thank you i very much. so, as soon as we get a little bit more do come back to us. studio: we will see you soon, hopefully. thank you. around a million women in the uk are at risk of harm through problem gambling, according to new research from gambleawa re. the charity is launching a campaign aimed specifically at women, to alert them of the dangers. jon donnison reports. with me now to discuss the mental health impact of gambling on women is gp and tv medic dr ellie cannon. thanks forjoining us. first of all, the overall headline about this being about female gamblers and it looking like there's 500,000 women with a serious gambling issue, is it
11:45 am
an area that tends to be overlooked? absolutely. that's why i'm so pleased to be a part of this campaign with gambler wear, the first of its kind raising the harms from gambling in women. we tend to think of gambling as a male problem. entering betting shops, associated with sport, this type of thing and actually, in the last few years, we've seen a huge rise in the number of women seeking help for gambling and that's likely as a result of online apps, and the fact a lot of them now are specifically targeting women. and of course the pandemic, which is led to isolation and people much more in their homes on their phones and at risk of these harmful behaviours. , phones and at risk of these harmful behaviours-— phones and at risk of these harmful behaviours. , ., ., behaviours. does the report gave an insiaht into behaviours. does the report gave an insight into whether _ behaviours. does the report gave an insight into whether this _ behaviours. does the report gave an insight into whether this is - behaviours. does the report gave an insight into whether this is a - behaviours. does the report gave an insight into whether this is a new . insight into whether this is a new and growing problem or something which has always been there and the
11:46 am
spotlight hasn't been shone on it? it's a combination of both. certainly the spotlight hasn't been shone on it before and the interesting facts which have come out of the report is showing us that women are much less likely to seek help if they have a problem gambling. in fact, help if they have a problem gambling. infact, half help if they have a problem gambling. in fact, half as likely as a male counterpart to seek help for gambling and yet, they are more likely to suffer financial harms. so you've got a perfect storm there of trouble because there is stigma and shame for women to seek help for gambling and yet they are more likely to suffer greater losses. find likely to suffer greater losses. and so how do you _ likely to suffer greater losses. and so how do you reach those women? well, i think talking about it and having an awareness campaign is incredibly important. it's certainly not something i've ever really thought about particularly in
11:47 am
general practice in the 15 years, women and gambling, but of course it has become a lot easier. making sure people are aware of the early warning signs, which are if you're hiding your gambling, time is running away from you when you are on those apps and you are losing more money than you can afford to, and women being aware of the help thatis and women being aware of the help that is out there. their gp or the national gambling helpline which is a phone line but also available on the website. 50 a phone line but also available on the website-— a phone line but also available on the website. ., , ., ., , the website. so through your time as a gp, it's almost _ the website. so through your time as a gp, it's almost inevitable _ the website. so through your time as a gp, it's almost inevitable that - a gp, it's almost inevitable that you will have had women coming to see if you are manifesting other symptoms and maybe not talking about this as a part of it. have many come in and been very open with you about it? in and been very open with you about it? ., , ., , in and been very open with you about it? ., , .,�* in and been very open with you about it?., __,�*, in and been very open with you about it? ., __,�* ,, it? no, they really haven't. this is one reason _ it? no, they really haven't. this is one reason why — it? no, they really haven't. this is one reason why i'm _ it? no, they really haven't. this is one reason why i'm so _ it? no, they really haven't. this is one reason why i'm so keen - it? no, they really haven't. this is one reason why i'm so keen to - it? no, they really haven't. this is one reason why i'm so keen to be| one reason why i'm so keen to be involved in the campaign because i
11:48 am
don't think women feel comfortable evenin don't think women feel comfortable even in the privacy of a gp surgery to talk about this. we know the harms from gambling can be multifactorial, so, as you say, people come in with anxiety and depression, job issues, physical health problems like insomnia not to mention of course financial worries. and there could be gambling there as an underlying cause or an underlying part of it that we are just not finding out so i think the awareness also needs to be improved amongst health care professionals. but also needs to be improved amongst health care professionals.— health care professionals. but what can ou health care professionals. but what can you say — health care professionals. but what can you say to _ health care professionals. but what can you say to someone _ health care professionals. but what can you say to someone is - health care professionals. but what can you say to someone is not - can you say to someone is not talking about it because they feel like it's an intractable problem? they have built up debts and are ashamed and they simply don't know how to deal with it and then got other issues compounding if you are talking about, the anxiety and stress and everything else. what can you actually say to someone who comes in and is open and honest with you about what they are dealing with? , , ., ., with? there is help out there and there are no _
11:49 am
with? there is help out there and there are no services _ with? there is help out there and there are no services dedicated i with? there is help out there and | there are no services dedicated to women in gambling specifically. gps are a good first port of call either to seek charity support because we are aware of what's available locally, whether it's something like gamblers anonymous or via social prescribing teams within general practice helping people to find help, there are gamble aware funded organised clinics around the country, there's not enough but they do exist, and also we can help with other things. we can with mental illness and physical illness. thank ou. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood remains in custody for questioning after being arrested on suspicion of rape and assault. greater manchester police said it was made aware of "social media images and videos posted by a woman reporting incidents of physical violence". our reporter, dave guest, has been outside old trafford from where he's given us the latest. mason greenwood made his
11:50 am
manchester united debut in 2019, only last year he signed a four—year deal with the club after rising through the ranks of the united academy. but yesterday, manchester united issued a statement saying that mason greenwood would not be playing for or training with manchester united until further notice. that statement was made following allegations online by a woman who said she had been assaulted by mason greenwood. greater manchester police later confirmed they had been made aware of these social media posts and they had arrested a man in his 20s on suspicion of rape and assault. now when united issued that statement saying mason greenwood would not be rejoining his team—mates until further notice, they also said that the club does not condone violence of any kind. however, they said they would be making no further statement until the full facts were established. of course, establishing the full facts is what greater manchester police hopes to do, it is a process which could take
11:51 am
some time and so speculation about what may or may not have happened is not only unwise at this time but also potentially prejudicial. meanwhile, the sportswear manufacturer nike who sponsor the player have said they are deeply concerned by these disturbing allegations and are monitoring the situation very closely. so far, there has been no statement on behalf of the player. the labour mp rosie duffield has said that she's carefully considering herfuture in the party because she hasn't received enough support in the face of online abuse. ms duffield says she had been the victim of "obsessive harassment" from current and former members for several years and the party leadership had done little to help her. labour's shadow attorney general, emily thornberry, insists the mp will receive help and support from within the party. there have been conversations with rosie that i'm aware of with those in the leader ship and i'm on a what's app group
11:52 am
and we were discussing with rosie and offering support. i'm a long—standing friend of rosie's, i campaigned to get her elected in 2017 when nobody thought that canterbury would ever go labour. i have always been there to give her support and i think that her current circumstances are really sad and it does need to be sorted and i will play my part, if anyone wants me to help. there's bad news for otters in wales. after decades of population growth, the numbers of them are now falling and experts fear it could be the same story in england and scotland. our environment correspondent steffan messenger has more. if you ever come across an altar in the wild, count yourself very lucky. these elusive animals try their best to stay hidden. for ecologists like eleanor and mia it means some detective work is required to get a
11:53 am
sense of how the species is faring. yes, definitely.— sense of how the species is faring. yes, definitely. yes. delight at the discovery of _ yes, definitely. yes. delight at the discovery of an _ yes, definitely. yes. delight at the discovery of an optus _ yes, definitely. yes. delight at the discovery of an optus droppings. i discovery of an optus droppings. it's got a very distinctive smell and that's for otters to find other signs of other otters but also helps us to track where they are in the field in the wild.— field in the wild. national auto surve s field in the wild. national auto surveys are — field in the wild. national auto surveys are started _ field in the wild. national auto surveys are started in - field in the wild. national auto surveys are started in wales i field in the wild. national auto j surveys are started in wales in field in the wild. national auto - surveys are started in wales in the 19705 and then pesticide pollution was blamed for nearly wiping them out. after the chemicals were banned, the otters had been bouncing back, that is until now. unfortunately for the first time we've seen a decline in otter signs across wales so the last national survey in 2010 had a height of 90% of the server side had signs for otters which was really positive but unfortunately this latest survey has shown we've declined to 70% of those sites so we had quite a drop. the otters returned to riverside just one right across the uk in recent
11:54 am
decades, and it's been seen as a huge and let's face it pretty rare nature conservation success story. and that's why the experts are so worried by the findings of this survey. it worried by the findings of this surve . , ., , ., worried by the findings of this surve. , ., ., ., ., survey. it is a bit of a warning to us that something _ survey. it is a bit of a warning to us that something might - survey. it is a bit of a warning to us that something might be - survey. it is a bit of a warning to | us that something might be going wrong _ us that something might be going wrong it— us that something might be going wrong. it could be habitat, food, pollutants, the general quality of the river, — pollutants, the general quality of the river, that's the next app to try and — the river, that's the next app to try and understand what might be causing _ try and understand what might be causing this and what we can do about— causing this and what we can do about it — causing this and what we can do about it as— causing this and what we can do about it as well.— causing this and what we can do about it as well. meanwhile we've learnt a cheque _ about it as well. meanwhile we've learnt a cheque across _ about it as well. meanwhile we've learnt a cheque across england i about it as well. meanwhile we've l learnt a cheque across england has now been commissioned in response to the welsh survey. it calls for the same to happen in scotland and northern ireland too. in same to happen in scotland and northern ireland too.— same to happen in scotland and northern ireland too. in wales and scotland we _ northern ireland too. in wales and scotland we felt _ northern ireland too. in wales and scotland we felt the _ northern ireland too. in wales and scotland we felt the recovery - northern ireland too. in wales and scotland we felt the recovery was. scotland we felt the recovery was pretty— scotland we felt the recovery was pretty much — scotland we felt the recovery was pretty much almost _ scotland we felt the recovery was pretty much almost complete. i i scotland we felt the recovery was - pretty much almost complete. i would like to _ pretty much almost complete. i would like to think _ pretty much almost complete. i would like to think that — pretty much almost complete. i would like to think that the _ pretty much almost complete. i would like to think that the respective - like to think that the respective governments _ like to think that the respective governments will— like to think that the respective governments will see _ like to think that the respective governments will see the - like to think that the respective - governments will see the importance of the _ governments will see the importance of the barometer— governments will see the importance of the barometer in _ governments will see the importance of the barometer in the _ governments will see the importance of the barometer in the water - of the barometer in the water environment _ of the barometer in the water environment and _ of the barometer in the water environment and the - of the barometer in the water environment and the need . of the barometer in the water environment and the need to| of the barometer in the water. environment and the need to get of the barometer in the water - environment and the need to get more up-to-date _ environment and the need to get more up—to—date information _ environment and the need to get more up—to—date information on _ environment and the need to get more up—to—date information on their- up—to—date information on their status — up—to—date information on their status at— up-to-date information on their status. �* ~ , ~
11:55 am
status. a kingfisher. wildlife a - len it status. a kingfisher. wildlife aplenty it seems _ status. a kingfisher. wildlife aplenty it seems at - status. a kingfisher. wildlife aplenty it seems at this - status. a kingfisher. wildlife i aplenty it seems at this survey status. a kingfisher. wildlife - aplenty it seems at this survey site at least but elsewhere the state of our rivers is causing a lot of debate. with the plight of wales' otters are now another concern to add to the list. the us east coast is cleaning up after a major blizzard hit at the weekend. even florida was affected by the freezing conditions — unusually low temperatures there had a serious affect on the local wildlife. these iguanas you'll be glad to hear are not dead, but got so cold that they become immobile and have been falling out of the trees they normally live in. this prompted the florida weather service to warn the public of the falling reptiles, but said most will recover as the temperature rises. their bodies basically start to shut down so they lose their functions. so they are up in the trees on the branches sleeping, because they get so cold they lose that ability to hang on and then
11:56 am
they do fall out of trees a lot. cold is a very, very life—threatening thing for them because they are from central and south america close the equator where it always stays very warm. hopefully they will defrosting be fine. at the weather with carol kirkwood. through the rest of today storm corrie will push across the north sea onto the near continent taking the strongest winds with it. but behind it it's still going to be windy and we are looking at sunshine and also showers. here is storm corrie by the time we get to the afternoon. a north—westerly wind, still pretty windy and then a weather front comes our way later on introducing some rain. still gusty winds into the afternoon but a lot of dry weather. wintry showers on the hills in scotland and rain showers coming in across northern ireland, wales, cheshire, the midlands, the home counties, drifting west through the afternoon. i mentioned it was going to be
11:57 am
windy. these are the gusts you can expect at three o'clock so still 44-47 in expect at three o'clock so still 1111—117 in the northern half of scotland but 45 as 44—47 in the northern half of scotland but 45 as we go down the north sea coastline. it's coming from a chilly direction from the north—west so despite temperatures of 4-10 it north—west so despite temperatures of 4—10 it will feel cold. this evening and overnight, the weather front shows its hand introducing some rain initially from the west pushing southwards and eastwards but still blustery winds and behind this rain we will see clear skies. the lowest temperatures will be in the east, something milder coming our way from the west. so here is the weather front, way from the west. so here is the weatherfront, the way from the west. so here is the weather front, the second way from the west. so here is the weatherfront, the second one thinking southwards taking cloud and rain with it and you can see the yellows on the charts indicating the higher temperatures are set weather front producing on this cloud for northern ireland, england and wales, spots of rain sinking southwards, sunshine following behind and still blustery winds and a few showers. these are the mean wind speeds. the gusts of course will be higher than this. temperature wise, you will
11:58 am
notice a difference. double figures. ii-13 notice a difference. double figures. 11—13 widely across most of the uk. wednesday we stay in this mild air. a lot of cloud around with initially spots of rain across england, wales and northern ireland pushing into scotland and it will be breezy are not as windy as it is going to be today or indeed tomorrow. then as they move from wednesday into thursday we have a cold front coming in and you can see the blues indicating the colder air following on behind and still quite windy. a5 on behind and still quite windy. as we head through the latter part of the week, eventually the cold air moves across the uk cold enough wintry showers in the north on friday.
11:59 am
12:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines: borisjohnson has been handed sue gray's report into downing street parties. earlier he was asked if he did anything wrong — the prime minister said people need to wait for the outcome to be published. you're going to have to wait and see the outcome of the... you've been telling people privately. you have to wait and see the outcome of the investigations but of course i stick absolutely to what i've said in the past. borisjohnson may have boris johnson may have the borisjohnson may have the report, we don't _ borisjohnson may have the report, we don't know— borisjohnson may have the report, we don't know when _ borisjohnson may have the report, we don't know when it _ borisjohnson may have the report, we don't know when it is _ borisjohnson may have the report, we don't know when it is going - borisjohnson may have the report, we don't know when it is going to i borisjohnson may have the report, i we don't know when it is going to be put on _ we don't know when it is going to be put on the _ we don't know when it is going to be put on the government _ we don't know when it is going to be put on the government web—site. i we don't know when it is going to bej put on the government web—site. as soon _ put on the government web—site. as soon as— put on the government web—site. as soon as it _ put on the government web—site. as soon as it is, — put on the government web—site. as soon as it is, we _ put on the government web—site. as soon as it is, we will— put on the government web—site. as soon as it is, we will tell— put on the government web—site. as soon as it is, we will tell you - put on the government web—site. as soon as it is, we will tell you what i soon as it is, we will tell you what is in _ soon as it is, we will tell you what is in it _ mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs staff in england could be scrapped — ministers meet today to make the final decision. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood is questioned by police over allegations of rape and assault.
12:01 pm
the hungarian and uk ministers of defence meet to talk about the ukraine crisis. the uk's ben wallace says we don't want war or instability. it's important that as a nato member, but also as a friend and ally that the united kingdom and hungary discuss what we can do to de—escalate the situation in ukraine. and footballer christian eriksen completes a remarkable comeback — seven months after collapsing with a cardiac arrest during the euros, he's returning to the sport, with a new contract from brentford good afternoon. the bbc understands
12:02 pm
the prime minister has told colleagues to expect an june the prime minister has told colleagues to expect anjune date to the sue gray report on parties held there during lockdown. the inquiry into the allegations of the gatherings was ordered by the prime minister after a series of media reports which suggested that covid—19 rules had been broken. let's go live to downing street now, and my colleague victoria derbyshire. hello, good afternoon. i don't know if you can hear the music, the guy who used to heckle when we were on couege who used to heckle when we were on college green during brexit is now playing visage's fade to grey! boris johnson has been given an update by sue gray on her report. a5 johnson has been given an update by sue gray on her report. as soon as it is on the government web—site we will tell you what is in it and what is not. the editor of financial
12:03 pm
times said he expected to be four or five pages, because most of it would have been left out after the police requested the key bits were not included. a5 requested the key bits were not included. as soon as we get it, we will let you know what is in it. here was the prime minister talking this morning. you here was the prime minister talking this morning-— this morning. you will have to wait see the outcome _ this morning. you will have to wait see the outcome of— this morning. you will have to wait see the outcome of the _ see the outcome of the investigations, but i stick to what i have _ investigations, but i stick to what i have said — investigations, but i stick to what i have said in the past. i'm here to talk about — i have said in the past. i'm here to talk about---_ i have said in the past. i'm here to talk about---— i have said in the past. i'm here to talk about... you didn't do anything wron: ? talk about... you didn't do anything wronu? i talk about... you didn't do anything wrong? i am _ talk about... you didn't do anything wrong? i am here _ talk about... you didn't do anything wrong? i am here to _ talk about... you didn't do anything wrong? i am here to talk _ talk about... you didn't do anything wrong? i am here to talk about i talk about... you didn't do anythingj wrong? i am here to talk about free orts. is wrong? i am here to talk about free ports- is your— wrong? i am here to talk about free ports. is your position _ wrong? i am here to talk about free ports. is your position you - wrong? i am here to talk about free ports. is your position you did i ports. is your position you did nothina ports. is your position you did nothing wrong? _ ports. is your position you did nothing wrong? you're i ports. is your position you did nothing wrong? you're going| ports. is your position you did i nothing wrong? you're going to have to wait to see _ nothing wrong? you're going to have to wait to see what _ nothing wrong? you're going to have to wait to see what the _ to wait to see what the investigation says with due respect. let's investigation says with due respect. let's look— investigation says with due respect. let's look at the allegations of parties at downing street and across government since the start of the pandemic through 20 and 2021.
12:04 pm
this is the downing street garden on the 15th may 2020 — where the prime minister and his staff were pictured with bottles of wine and a cheeseboard. when asked about it, borisjohnson said, "those people were at work talking about work". the rules in may 2020 told people to avoid in person meetings. five days later, martin reynolds, the prime minister's principal private secretary, invited around 100 people to "socially distanced drinks" — telling people "bring your own booze". the latest party relevation was injune 2020 — where staff in number 10 gathered in the cabinet office for the prime minister's birthday sang happy birthday and were served cake. fast forward to november 2020, sources have told the bbc that downing street staff members attended a gathering with carriejohnson in the flat where she and the prime minister live. a spokesman for mrsjohnson denies the party took place. at the time the rules did not allow for household mixing indoors, apart from support bubbles.
12:05 pm
on the 25th november, news of "unplanned office drinks" at the treasury. and the daily mirror revealed a leaving do was held for no 10 aide, cleo watson, on november the 27th. the pm reportedly made a speech. then we head into the festive period. on the 10th of december the department for education had an office gathering. then came a party for shaun bailey — the conservative candidate for london mayor at the time. he's since resigned from chairing a london assembly committee. next — a quiz in downing street before christmas hosted by the prime minister. the following day, the department for transport held its christmas party. on the 17th — a leaving party at the cabinet office for the outgoing head of the civil service covid taskforce kate josephs. and another party at in the office of the uk's top civil servant simon case.
12:06 pm
mr case had been due to report on claims covid rules were broken at these events, but had to step away when this party came to light last month. downing street originally denied a report by the daily mirror that a party took place on the 18th of december. however, a video obtained by itv news shows the prime minister's then press secretary allegra stratton, joking about reports of an event, saying: "this fictional party was a business meeting and it was not socially distanced." she's since resigned. and finally — the daily telegraph broke the news of two staff parties held in downing street the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral — during which an adviser acted as dj and another was dispatched to the shops with a suitcase to stock up on wine. let's speak to our political correspondent nick eardley. for people just tuning in, for peoplejust tuning in, tell them
12:07 pm
at what time we can expect sue gray's report, however slimmed down it is. ., , it is. certainly within the next three and _ it is. certainly within the next three and a — it is. certainly within the next three and a half— it is. certainly within the next three and a half hours, i it is. certainly within the next i three and a half hours, because the prime minister is going to be up before mps at half past 3. that has been confirmed in the last few minutes by the speaker of the house of commons. we will get that moment where borisjohnson gives us his interpretation of what is in the report and opposition parties have been saying they need at least an hour to look over it. i think we are looking at early afternoon to see what is in sue gray's report and i would emphasise in the statement from the cabinet office confirming that this process was in motion, it says an update from sue gray. this isn't the full report, this isn't what we were talking about this time last week, because that police investigation into various things and them asking for only minimal reference to what they're investigating to be included in the report means this will be slimmed
12:08 pm
down version and won't be the end of things. down version and won't be the end of thins. , ., ., , things. ok. so it is going to be published _ things. ok. so it is going to be published on — things. ok. so it is going to be published on the _ things. ok. so it is going to be published on the government. published on the government web—site, we are told, is that correct, that is when the country will get its first look at it? i suspect that is right, i doubt anybody will see it before that. normally these people are published on the web—site where the government puts all its publications, with these reports into things like the ministerial code, that is where they tend to be. a lot ofjournalists will be sitting pressing f5. although it is not the full thing, it is important, because we will get a flavour of what sue gray thinks has gone on from the investigation she has been doing into all the allegations you were detailing. the ones from the met won't be included,
12:09 pm
but it will be interesting to see whether she talks of culture in no 10 and whether rule—breaking happened on a regular basis, whether she points the finger at any particular people and what boris johnson's reaction is. we know he is not going to resign, we know he doesn't plan to go anywhere, despite what opposition mps say, but his own mps in the conservative party are looking to him for his reaction to see whether he is taking it seriously and it may be by the end of today that we are looking at personnel changes in no 10 as well. 0k. personnel changes in no 10 as well. ok. thank you very much, nick. let's speak to tim durrant, associate director of the research body, the institute for government it is absolutely freezing and there is a wind whipping down downing street! hello to you. so sue gray
12:10 pm
has given an update to the prime minister, what do you take that to mean? it minister, what do you take that to mean? , . ., ., . , mean? it is unclear how much is auoin to mean? it is unclear how much is going to be _ mean? it is unclear how much is going to be in — mean? it is unclear how much is going to be in that. _ mean? it is unclear how much is going to be in that. we - mean? it is unclear how much is going to be in that. we know- mean? it is unclear how much is| going to be in that. we know the police have asked for minimal reference to be made to the ones they're investigating. we knew there would be changes due to that. this word update suggests there may be more information to come down the line. it feels this is not the kind of final chapter of the story and it will keep going for a while yet. in terms of what we are going to see, the expectation is that it will be paired back and slimmed down, but it is nonetheless going to be significant isn't it?- is nonetheless going to be significant isn't it? is nonetheless going to be sirnificant isn't it? , , significant isn't it? yes, the terms of reference _ significant isn't it? yes, the terms of reference are _ significant isn't it? yes, the terms of reference are to _ significant isn't it? yes, the terms of reference are to look _ significant isn't it? yes, the terms of reference are to look into i significant isn't it? yes, the terms of reference are to look into what| of reference are to look into what happened, why the events happened, what the purpose of them was, who organised and authorised them. that will tell us a lot about what was happening in downing street during
12:11 pm
2020 and 2021 and how decisions were made, who the kind of leaders of these processes were that the balance of responsibility between the prime minister, his political advisor and civil servants. we will get to see a lot, but it doesn't, it is not going to answer all the questions that were initially posed. but we are not going to get today who organised them, who attended them for most of them? hat who organised them, who attended them for most of them?— them for most of them? not for all of them, them for most of them? not for all of them. for _ them for most of them? not for all of them, for the _ them for most of them? not for all of them, for the metropolitan i them for most of them? not for all| of them, for the metropolitan police ones, they will be dealt with separately, we don't know why ones the police are looking into. hopefully we will find that out and see whether she answers those other questions about who organised them and what the purpose of them was. we are told it was reported over the weekend that she was furious by the met�*s intervention on friday. i don't know if you know sue gray personally or not, but does that
12:12 pm
ring to you?— personally or not, but does that ring to you? personally or not, but does that rim to ou? ,, ., , , ., ring to you? she has been put in a difficult position _ ring to you? she has been put in a difficult position throughout i ring to you? she has been put in a difficult position throughout all i ring to you? she has been put in a difficult position throughout all of| difficult position throughout all of this. we mentioned this investigation was going to be done by simon case, the most senior civil servant, but there was allegations of a party in his office, so sue gray was brought in. but she has been looking into what the prime minister has been doing and what he knew and didn't know and what he was told, that is a very difficult position for a civil servant to be put in. and to be put in the situation where the police may be going to look into this and that depends on what you find. it is unusual. i think she has had a very difficultjob in balancing all those different aspects. it is not normal for a civil servant to look, the civil service isn't there to investigate potential criminality, thatis investigate potential criminality, that is the police's job. the fact
12:13 pm
they intervened later day will make it difficult. we they intervened later day will make it difficult. ~ ., they intervened later day will make it difficult. ~ . ., it difficult. we have had some conservative _ it difficult. we have had some conservative mps _ it difficult. we have had some conservative mps say - it difficult. we have had some conservative mps say an i it difficult. we have had some - conservative mps say an independent report from sue gray, she is a civil servant and works for the government of the day, her boss is a man who has had to step aside and her boss's bossis has had to step aside and her boss's boss is the prime minister. yes has had to step aside and her boss's boss is the prime minister.— boss is the prime minister. yes it is not independent _ boss is the prime minister. yes it is not independent at _ boss is the prime minister. yes it is not independent at all. - boss is the prime minister. yes it is not independent at all. she i boss is the prime minister. yes itj is not independent at all. she can be very impartial and very thorough in her investigation and her reputation that she is very thorough and won't sort of be put under political pressure. but she is a civil servant and works for this government and the ministerial code for example is very clear it is not the civil service's job to uphold the civil service's job to uphold the code, it is the prime minister's job. because you can't have civil servants who are impartial but unelected, you can't have them making decisions about ministers�* jobs over and above the heads of the elected government.—
12:14 pm
elected government. thank you very much for your— elected government. thank you very much for your time _ elected government. thank you very much for your time this _ elected government. thank you very much for your time this morning. i elected government. thank you very | much for your time this morning. we are going to say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. stay with the news channel for more updates and the update from the report when it is out. she�*s the most powerful women that most people have never heard of — with many predicting that the prime minister�*s fate is in her hands. but who is the senior civil servant sue gray? bbc northern ireland political correspondent gareth gordon has interviewed her in the past and has this profile of the woman investigating downing street. they used to call her the most powerful civil servant you have never heard of. the powerful civil servant you have never heard of.— powerful civil servant you have never heard of. the inquiry taking lace b never heard of. the inquiry taking place by sue _ never heard of. the inquiry taking place by sue grey- _ never heard of. the inquiry taking place by sue grey. sue _ never heard of. the inquiry taking place by sue grey. sue gray. i never heard of. the inquiry taking place by sue grey. sue gray. sue | place by sue grey. sue gray. sue gra . place by sue grey. sue gray. sue gray- who _ place by sue grey. sue gray. sue gray- who is _ place by sue grey. sue gray. sue gray. who is she _ place by sue grey. sue gray. sue gray. who is she and _ place by sue grey. sue gray. sue gray. who is she and what i place by sue grey. sue gray. sue | gray. who is she and what makes place by sue grey. sue gray. sue i gray. who is she and what makes her tick? well for — gray. who is she and what makes her tick? well for a _ gray. who is she and what makes her tick? well for a start _ gray. who is she and what makes her tick? well for a start she _ gray. who is she and what makes her tick? well for a start she is _ gray. who is she and what makes her tick? well for a start she is the i tick? well for a start she is the only whitehall civ servant who has
12:15 pm
run a pub in newry with her husband, a country and western singer. he hated a country and western singer. he: hated the pub. and actually most of the customers didn't like him either, because he was quite miserable in it! so he, after six to eight weeks, it was making him a bit fed up, so i sent him back to london and i carried on running the bar on own. ,, and i carried on running the bar on own. . ., own. she returned to run the department _ own. she returned to run the department of _ own. she returned to run the department of finance - own. she returned to run the department of finance in - own. she returned to run the - department of finance in belfast, but the job she wanted was head of northern ireland civil service? hath? northern ireland civil service? why didn't i northern ireland civil service? why didn'ti aet northern ireland civil service? why didn't i get the _ northern ireland civil service? wu; didn't i get the job, northern ireland civil service? will didn't i get the job, i'm not sure i didn't i get thejob, i'm not sure i will ever know. i suspect people may have thought i... perhaps too much of a challenger or a disruptor. i am both. and perhaps i would bring, perhaps there was going to be too much change. perhaps there was going to be too much change-— perhaps there was going to be too much change. now she has a much
12:16 pm
bi aer much change. now she has a much biggerjob, — much change. now she has a much biggerjob, so _ much change. now she has a much biggerjob, so how— much change. now she has a much biggerjob, so how will— much change. now she has a much biggerjob, so how will she - much change. now she has a much biggerjob, so how will she cope? i much change. now she has a much i biggerjob, so how will she cope? we asked the man who knows her from biggerjob, so how will she cope? we asked the man who knows herfrom his time as tony blair's official spokesman. i time as tony blair's official spokesman-— time as tony blair's official spokesman. time as tony blair's official sokesman. ~ , spokesman. i think she will find this very. _ spokesman. i think she will find this very. very _ spokesman. i think she will find this very, very uncomfortable. i spokesman. i think she will find i this very, very uncomfortable. she is not _ this very, very uncomfortable. she is not the — this very, very uncomfortable. she is not the sort of person who as you know _ is not the sort of person who as you know enjoys — is not the sort of person who as you know enjoys being in the spotlight. but she _ know enjoys being in the spotlight. but she will think it is her duty and those _ but she will think it is her duty and those are four important letters for her. _ and those are four important letters for her. her— and those are four important letters for her, her duty to do this honestly— for her, her duty to do this honestly to the best of her ant and to present — honestly to the best of her ant and to present the truth. —— ability. but may— to present the truth. —— ability. but may she be limited, given she is investigating her own boss. she is as about as _ investigating her own boss. she is as about as close _ investigating her own boss. she is as about as close to _ investigating her own boss. she is as about as close to being - as about as close to being independent _ as about as close to being independent as— as about as close to being independent as its - as about as close to being . independent as its possible, as about as close to being - independent as its possible, mainly because _ independent as its possible, mainly because she — independent as its possible, mainly because she is _ independent as its possible, mainly because she is at _ independent as its possible, mainly because she is at the _ independent as its possible, mainly because she is at the enof - independent as its possible, mainly because she is at the enof end - independent as its possible, mainly because she is at the enof end of. because she is at the enof end of her career— because she is at the enof end of her careerand _ because she is at the enof end of her careerand she— because she is at the enof end of her career and she has— because she is at the enof end of her career and she has so- because she is at the enof end of her career and she has so much. her career and she has so much experience _ her career and she has so much experience and _ her career and she has so much experience and has _ her career and she has so much experience and has been- her career and she has so much experience and has been at- her career and she has so much experience and has been at the| her career and she has so much- experience and has been at the heart of power— experience and has been at the heart of power for— experience and has been at the heart of power for so — experience and has been at the heart of power for so long, _ experience and has been at the heart of power for so long, she _ experience and has been at the heart of power for so long, she will - experience and has been at the heart of power for so long, she will be - experience and has been at the heart of power for so long, she will be a i of power for so long, she will be a difficult _ of power for so long, she will be a difficult person— of power for so long, she will be a difficult person for— of power for so long, she will be a difficult person for anybody- of power for so long, she will be a difficult person for anybody to - difficult person for anybody to treat — difficult person for anybody to treat improperly. _
12:17 pm
difficult person for anybody to treat improperly.— difficult person for anybody to treat improperly. difficult person for anybody to treat imroerl . ., , ., treat improperly. there was only one other question _ treat improperly. there was only one other question for _ treat improperly. there was only one other question for sue _ treat improperly. there was only one other question for sue gray. - other question for sue gray. somebody put it to me that you're a spy. i somebody put it to me that you're a st . " ., somebody put it to me that you're a spy. i know you've had that put to ou. i spy. i know you've had that put to you- i think— spy. i know you've had that put to you- i think if— spy. i know you've had that put to you. ithink if i _ spy. i know you've had that put to you. i think if i was— spy. i know you've had that put to you. i think if i was a _ spy. i know you've had that put to you. i think if i was a spy, - spy. i know you've had that put to you. i think if i was a spy, i - spy. i know you've had that put to you. i think if i was a spy, i thinkl you. i think if i was a spy, i think i would _ you. i think if i was a spy, i think i would he — you. i think if i was a spy, i think i would he a _ you. i think if i was a spy, i think i would be a poor spy if people were talking _ i would be a poor spy if people were talking about me being a spy! i think— talking about me being a spy! i think people here have put a lot of trust _ think people here have put a lot of trust in _ think people here have put a lot of trust in me — think people here have put a lot of trust in me. and they have put a lot of faith— trust in me. and they have put a lot of faith in_ trust in me. and they have put a lot of faith in me — trust in me. and they have put a lot of faith in me and you know, we have worked _ of faith in me and you know, we have worked really well together and i didnt— worked really well together and i didn't think i would be working externally in the way i am. had you not that externally in the way i am. had you got that big — externally in the way i am. had you got that big job _ externally in the way i am. had you got that big job would _ externally in the way i am. had you got that big job would you - externally in the way i am. had you got that big job would you you - got that big job would you you considered leaving? mo. but she did considered leaving? no. but she did and the political word awaits what she will do next. we will get what she will do next. we will get what she has put together at some point in the next few hours. the speaker's office told us that borisjohnson will make a statement to the house of commons at 3.30. as soon as we
12:18 pm
get pit, we will tell you what is in it. earlier, the financial times' whitehall editor, sebastian payne, said the word update was an interesting choice of word. my my understanding is that that means she has handed the prime minister the interim findings of her inquiry, thatis the interim findings of her inquiry, that is looking into the general culture of downing street, the civil service aspect and not those eight events or parties that are being investigated by the metropolitan police. that will come at a later date. what the cabinet aoffice are saying is this is not over, but the sue gray report has gone to that building there. 50 sue gray report has gone to that building there.— sue gray report has gone to that buildin: there. . ., , ., ~' building there. so what do you think will be in it? — building there. so what do you think will be in it? i _ building there. so what do you think will be in it? i think _ building there. so what do you think will be in it? i think there _ building there. so what do you think will be in it? i think there will- building there. so what do you think will be in it? i think there will be - will be in it? i think there will be a lot of stuff— will be in it? i think there will be a lot of stuff about _ will be in it? i think there will be a lot of stuff about the _ will be in it? i think there will be a lot of stuff about the culture, i a lot of stuff about the culture, the management of how this was done within downing street and i don't think it will name individual civil servants but will lay the blame on
12:19 pm
those who are seen as overseeing that culture to what people call a drinking culture during the coronavirus lockdowns. in terms of the prime minister, that will not be in there at the moment. i the prime minister, that will not be in there at the moment.— the prime minister, that will not be in there at the moment. i think that is grant shapps. — in there at the moment. i think that is grant shapps, i _ in there at the moment. i think that is grant shapps, i didn't _ in there at the moment. i think that is grant shapps, i didn't quite - in there at the moment. i think that is grant shapps, i didn't quite see l is grant shapps, i didn't quite see him, but somebody said grant shapps in the range rover. he has been reported to have done that spread sheet to say who supported the prime minister and who needed some coaxing shall i say? what are you expecting? it is still fluid, we are expecting the report to go public in the next couple of hours. fin the report to go public in the next couple of hours.— the report to go public in the next couple of hours. on the government web-site? yes _ couple of hours. on the government web-site? yes and _ couple of hours. on the government web-site? yes and followed - couple of hours. on the government web-site? yes and followed by - couple of hours. on the government web-site? yes and followed by a - web-site? yes and followed by a statement _ web-site? yes and followed by a statement in _ web-site? yes and followed by a statement in the _ web-site? yes and followed by a statement in the house - web-site? yes and followed by a statement in the house of - web-site? yes and followed by a - statement in the house of commons as he said he would later this afternoon. that is not confirmed, but that is the expectation within government. at that point, we have to see what conservative mps think. do they feel the report has confirmed their worst fears and put
12:20 pm
in those no confidence letter, or has the metropolitan police investigation taken the sting out of it and they wait and see? boris johnson's loyal ministers have been doing what they call a shadow whipping operation. they go around the mps who didn't back boris johnson, saying hang fire and see what is in the report and hear the reasons boris johnson what is in the report and hear the reasons borisjohnson should stay. it peoples as if the heat has come out of the momentum to get rid of him as conservative party leader. i would be surprised if we hit 5a letters today. would be surprised if we hit 54 letters today-— letters today. explain the 54 letters. letters today. explain the 54 letters so _ letters today. explain the 54 letters. so to _ letters today. explain the 54 letters. so to challenge - letters today. explain the 54 letters. so to challenge a i letters. so to challenge a conservative _ letters. so to challenge a conservative party - letters. so to challenge a | conservative party leader, letters. so to challenge a - conservative party leader, 15% of the parliamentary party have to write letters of no confidence, that is currently 54 mps who would go to the 1922 committee, a kind of trade union for conservative mps. we think
12:21 pm
there is around 20 letters at the moment. so it would require more momentum to challenge borisjohnson. ifeel unless the report momentum to challenge borisjohnson. i feel unless the report is really bad, we are not going to get the 54 letters today. that metropolitan police intervention has taken the heat out of it, if we were going to get the whole thing, including the eight parties that could get fixed penalty notice is it could be worse for the prime minister. but there could be some talk about how downing street will be reformed and maybe a new code of conduct and rumours of a drinking ban and a personnel shake—up and then move on to other policies. we have the brexit freedom bill and the levelling up white paper. forthe bill and the levelling up white paper. for the moment the government wants to get it out, do the necessary changes and try and move on quickly.
12:22 pm
the prime minister will make a statement at 3.30. as soon as we get that report, we will bring it to you and she sebastian said it is the views of conservative party mps and it is your views, as we get it you can start tweeting. that is it for now. back to you. we are anticipating it is on the gov uk web—site. as soon as there is a sign of report we will bring it to you. as we've been hearing, government ministers will meet later to decide whether to scrap mandatory covid vaccinations for national health service staff in england. under the controversial proposals, front line workers must be fully vaccinated by the start of april, or face losing theirjobs. critics of the measure say it could lead to a staffing crisis. our health editor, hugh pym, reports. it's proved a highly
12:23 pm
controversial policy, and there have been warnings that thousands of nhs staff in england could leave or be dismissed by employers for refusing to get vaccinated. the royal college of midwives has already called for a delay, arguing there could be a catastrophic impact on maternity services because of workforce shortages. the latest figures showed that around 77,500 nhs staff in england, about 5%, had not had anyjab, though not all will be in frontlinejobs. vaccination is the right policy but forcing vaccination wasn't, not in the middle of a staffing crisis, particularly, so, assuming it is going to be scrapped, we will certainly support that scrapping, but also support of the continued conversations to try and encourage as many people as possible to get vaccinated. ministers and health leaders have said before now that the policy is needed to provide reassurance to patients. the health secretary, sajid javid, argued it was the professional duty
12:24 pm
of frontline staff to get jabbed, but he was challenged by a doctor at a london hospital. i've had covid at some point. yes. i've got antibodies. yeah. and i've been working on covid icu since the beginning. i have not had a vaccination. i do not want to have a vaccination. many health care workers have not opposed mandatory vaccinations for staff. if a patient comes to me and says. "should i have the vaccine? have you been vaccinated, doctor?" that answer should always be, "yes, of course i've been vaccinated and you should, too." there is no wriggle room ethically for doctor or a nurse or anybody talking to patients. it's understood the policy is now being reconsidered with a view in government that the landscape has changed because the omicron variant has not proved as serious as the delta wave, during which the policy was first drawn up. ministers will meet today to decide whether to continue with the plan. it's understood no final
12:25 pm
decisions have yet been made. the risk is that nhs chiefs, who've tried to defend it will feel undermined by any u—turn, and there will be demands for care home staff in england who lost theirjobs because of a similar compulsory vaccination policy to be reinstated. hugh pym, bbc news. the government is stepping up its diplomatic efforts to counter the threat of russian military action against ukraine. the defence secretary ben wallace is on a visit to eastern europe, and has been holding talks in hungary with his ministerial counterpart there. the united nations security council will meet later to discuss the crisis. after his talks in hungary, the defence secretary ben wallace spoke to reporters at a press conference. obviously, central europe is incredibly important to all of us, not only in the united kingdom, but to nato and it is many of the countries of central europe that will face t direct consequences of
12:26 pm
russian aggression or an invasion in ukraine. the consequences could be severe for the people of central europe, including hungary, who will face higher energy prices, food prices and the economic consequences of a conflict, including migration. so it is important that as a nato member, but also as a friend and ally that the united kingdom and hungary discuss what we can do to de—escalate the situation in ukraine andindeed de—escalate the situation in ukraine and indeed with the russian government to make sure that we don't end up in a place that is damaging to all of us, especially at this time after the pandemic and i think that is what we were talking about today, but we are also talking of deepening our co—operation and building on the 2019 agreement with hungary. hungary has a strong tradition of a very professional and capable armed forces, which is the type of partner that the united
12:27 pm
kingdom likes to work with, we have right now a hungarian commander of k—for kosovo and hungary forces alongside british forces in cyprus. we think we can do more in the long run and the medium term to strengthen those ties. our correspondent james waterhouse, who's in the ukrainian capital, kyiv, explained how the diplomatic efforts of western allies were being viewed there. ukraine's foreign minister, dmytro kuleba, has called on russia to say, look, if you are going to honour the peace process, then pull your troops back, those 100,000 estimated troops on the border. there are concerns in the eastern donbas region that there is more russian tanks and artillery there, but ukrainian ministers are saying, look, we've got no intelligence to suggest russia will invade and moscow has agreed with that, saying it's the west ramping things up and engaging in provocative behaviour. we still do have these military
12:28 pm
drills to the north in belarus where russia has denied putting command posts in there. that remains a security threat for kyiv. the difference this week is, with the ukrainian government saying stay calm, more and more ukrainians are telling us, look, that doesn't make sense. why are you thanking western countries for giving us this military aid if you're telling us there's nothing to worry about? shops and cafes, for example, are starting to shut here because the economy is starting to be affected by this continued uncertainty. thank you. good afternoon. what a turbulent weekend of weather, not one but two storm systems bringing gales one but two storm systems bringing gates and disruption particularly to the north. storm corrie is sliding away eastwards, but in its wake some strong winds down the east coast and there could be some coastal flooding. there are some showers and
12:29 pm
some sunshine. temperatures five to ten degrees. later we will see cloud and rain into northern ireland and western scotland. that will work eastwards as we go through tonight with some mist and hill fog developing. this ushering in milder air. by the end of the night temperatures climbing in the south—east and for aberdeen and glasgow values of ii south—east and for aberdeen and glasgow values of 11 degrees tomorrow morning. a mild feel to tomorrow, the southern half of the uk seeing cloud and rain. the north seeing sunshine and the odd shower. another windy day, particularly in scotland, up to 70mph. but feeling milding with top temperatures of 13. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. borisjohnson has been handed an update of the sue gray report into parties at downing street. earlier he was asked
12:30 pm
if he did anything wrong. the prime minister said people need to wait for the outcome to be published. you're going to have to wait and see the outcome of the... you've been telling people privately. you have to wait and see the outcome of the investigations but of course i stick absolutely to what i've said in the past. mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs staff in england could be scrapped. ministers meet today to make the final decision. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood is questioned by police over allegations of rape and assault. the hungarian and uk ministers of defence meet to talk about the ukraine crisis. the uk's ben wallace says we don't want war or instability. it's really important that, as a nato member but also as a friend and ally between the united kingdom and hungary, that we discuss what we can do to de—escalate the situation in ukraine. a british woman has won her appeal
12:31 pm
against a conviction, following her retracted statement regarding an alleged gang rape in the cypriot holiday resort of ayia napa. our europe correspondent, anna holligan, was at cyprus's supreme court in nicosia. she gave us more details about the appeal. well, her lawyers described this as a watershed moment, a victory for a victim of a miscarriage ofjustice but you are right, in order to understand what this means we need to go back to how we got here. it was a young woman, a teenager, who had travelled to ayia napa on a working holiday between her a—levels and starting university. she alleged she was attacked by a group of tourists, raped, gang raped, she went to the police, made this allegation and then ten days later she retracted it and she was then accused of wasting police time, public mischief was the charge, and the men were released and allowed to go home. she went from being the victim to the accused. now, her lawyers argued the way in which she was treated was unfair. it violated her rights to a fair hearing, a fair trial,
12:32 pm
because the retraction of the statement was made during the course of six hours in the police station with no translator or lawyer present, and they also successfully argued that the original trial was flawed because the judge failed to hear evidence of the original rape allegation and this is being seen by women worldwide actually as a victory for victims of sex crimes because of course a lot of the activists here were saying actually it's a bittersweet victory because for true justice, as herfamily have said, there needs to be a proper investigation of that original rape allegation. more now on government ministers meeting today to decide whether to scrap mandatory covid vaccinations for national health service staff in england. earlier, i spoke to professor martin marshall, chair of the royal college of gps to get his reaction.
12:33 pm
if it does end up that it's not going to be compulsory for nhs workers to be vaccinated, what do you think about that? i think if that decision is confirmed then it must be a good thing. getting vaccinated is fundamentally important, it is the best protection we have against covid, it is their professional responsibility of anybody in the nhs to get vaccinated. but we don't believe alongside other bodies that making it compulsory is the right way forward, particularly given the impact on the staffing crisis which has been mentioned by many people. we don't have enough clinicians, so remove 75,000 as a result of something we don't believe is right decision doesn't make sense. is it an argument that should ever have been had in your view? arguably, because it has been aired in the way it has, because it is clear that 5% of nhs workers don't have the vaccine, 77,000, and they were holding out with some saying they were prepared to lose than jobs, what message does that send to the public? well i understand why most members of the public believe health
12:34 pm
professionals should be vaccinated, that makes complete sense. the problem of course is making it mandatory. what i was wondering though in terms of your thinking on this, what message it sends when people working in the medical profession are not getting it and it is, it has been such a public debate around that, could that have an impact on other people's feelings on getting the vaccine or not? i think there is a risk of that, but let's remember the majority of clinicians, especially doctors have been vaccinated, they have carried out their responsibility and done the right thing according to the evidence, that is the message that should get across to the public. i read one psychotherapist working in the nhs and her description of how she has felt around getting vaccinated and the sort of pressure
12:35 pm
that has been put on her, it is quite interesting, i would like to sort of talk to you about that, she is anna and said she is not an anti—vaxer, but doesn't like feeling pressured to get the covid jab and wants it to be her choice. she says she feels she doesn't get a moment to breathe without being interrogated by staff. she was asked if she had had a conversation with her family yet and had she booked an appointment. it felt like coaching or surveillance on whether or not i would be vaccinated, it is an interesting perspective in terms of how you do have conversations with people who may not be opposed, but it very intelligent, making their own decisions not necessarily against it, but the way it has been gone about was pushing her down a different part, what do you think is the best way to encourage people to be get vaccinated if they're holding out within the nhs?
12:36 pm
that story reflects the importance of people making choices, voluntarily making choices about what medical interventions they have, whether it is drugs for high blood pressure, an operation or vaccinations. interventions like vaccinations are fundamentally important, but allowing professionals to make the choice themselves part of maintaining trust, if you lose trust, you can get into problems pr. i come back to the most important reason we have had concerned is the practical impact on the size of the workforce when the nhs is in crisis. we have reaction from the prime minister is spokesperson to the news that sue gray's report has been
12:37 pm
delivered to downing street or at least the way it was put is that sue gray has provided an update so let me tell you what the prime minister spokesperson as saying. we can confirm sue gray has provided an update on the findings will be published this afternoon. he said we are not seeking to interpret the word update but it is a reflection that there is an ongoing police investigation. asked if they would be a further report after the met police investigation, he said we will consider what will be appropriate in due course and it's not clear how the police investigation will interact with any ongoing work. as for this version of the report, he says we will publish what we have received. the spokesperson said sue gray spoke briefly to the prime minister yesterday but didn't go into the detail of her report. the prime minister statement will take place at 3:30pm in the commons and the spokesperson will not pre—empt the prime minister statement and that
12:38 pm
document arrived at around 11:20am. obviously the great unknown is how much will be in that report. we were hearing earlier potentially is gone from about 25 pages to five pages and will be interesting to see whether it's effectively the full length of the report but with chunks blanked out to indicate how much isn't going into the public domain at the stage or it would have been boiled down to potentiallyjust five pages. we are still waiting for it to be put into the public domain and we expect that to be done by the government websites are of course we are staying across that are looking for any updates on there. so as soon as the report is published, we will bring you the details of it but currently what we do know is that there will be a statement from the prime minister in the commons at 3:30pm. he is going through that report and it is unclear at this
12:39 pm
point whether opposition parties will have had the report as well because they have said they need to haveit because they have said they need to have it obviously with plenty of time for them to be able to respond to whatever the prime minister says in his statement at 3:30pm. lots of things we still don't know but what we do know is the update is with the prime minister and there will be a statement from the prime minister at 3:30pm, so we will bring you all the very latest updates as soon as we get them. care home residents in england can have as many visitors as they like from today, as covid restrictions are eased. the changes will also see self—isolation periods cut or removed altogether. scotland and wales have already eased restrictions, while northern ireland is in the process of doing so. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood remains in custody for questioning after being arrested on suspicion of rape and assault. greater manchester police said it was made aware of "social media images and videos posted by a woman reporting incidents of physical violence". our reporter, dave guest, has been outside old trafford
12:40 pm
from where he's given us the latest. mason greenwood made his manchester united debut in 2019, only last year he signed a four—year deal with the club after rising through the ranks of the united academy. but yesterday, manchester united issued a statement saying that mason greenwood would not be playing for or training with manchester united until further notice. that statement was made following allegations online by a woman who said she had been assaulted by mason greenwood. greater manchester police later confirmed they had been made aware of these social media posts and they had arrested a man in his 20s on suspicion of rape and assault. now when united issued that statement saying mason greenwood would not be rejoining his team—mates until further notice, they also said that the club does not condone violence of any kind. however, they said they would be making no further statement until the full facts were established.
12:41 pm
of course, establishing the full facts is what greater manchester police hopes to do, it is a process which could take some time and so speculation about what may or may not have happened is not only unwise at this time but also potentially prejudicial. meanwhile, the sportswear manufacturer nike who sponsor the player have said they are deeply concerned by these disturbing allegations and are monitoring the situation very closely. so far, there has been no statement on behalf of the player. the danish footballer christian eriksen looks set to complete a remarkable comeback after signing with english premier league side brentford for the rest of this season. eriksen has not played since suffering a cardiac arrest in denmark's opening match of the european championship against finland injune last year. at the time there were fears he would never play again. the 29—year—old midfielder�*s former club inter milan terminated his contract in december
12:42 pm
because the internal defribulator device that he had implanted is not permitted in italian football. brentford are currently 14th in the premier league. the streaming giant spotify has revealed plans to tackle covid misinformation on its podcasts. it says it will add advisory warnings to any podcast that discusses covid—i9. the move follows criticism of its hosting ofjoe rogan, an american podcaster who has promoted scepticism about covid vaccines. singersjoni mitchell and neil young removed their music from spotify in protest at mr rogan's continued presence on the platform. following a chorus of disapproval from a number of musical stars, spotify has sought to clarify its stance on covid misinformation on its platform. the online streaming giant is now publishing its platform rules for the first time. users will get a content advisory when podcast episodes contain covid—i9 discussions,
12:43 pm
and listeners will be directed to an updated covid i9 hub to combat misinformation. the row erupted after a podcast hosted byjoe rogan, one of spotify�*s star signings. he had dr robert malone, who was strongly anti—vax and especially anti—vax for children. now i think a lot of people are maybe on the fence about vaccinating their kids. i think a lot more people are thinking maybe they won't do that over adults getting the vaccine. so when this came out, a few hundred health experts, scientists, wrote to spotify, saying, this is very dangerous. following that, spotify�*s other star podcasters, harry and meghan, issued a statement from their foundation archewell...
12:44 pm
so can spotify now win over their sceptics? just a slight adjustment of several words is what is allowing joe rogan to not have his podcast touched or taken down or isolated episodes. the devil is in the details as it pertains tojoe rogan, and people still aren't happy with the actions that spotify is taking. this episode underlines the challenge of policing these platforms, as even podcasts now become potential minefields of misinformation. mark lobel, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news. borisjohnson has been handed an update of the sue gray report into parties at downing street. earlier he was asked if he did anything wrong. the prime minister said people need to wait for the outcome to be published. mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs
12:45 pm
staff in england could be scrapped. ministers meet today to make the final decision. and footballer christian eriksen completes a remarkable comeback. seven months after collapsing with a cardiac arrest during the euros, he's returning to the sport, with a new contract from brentford. thousands of homes across scotland could remain without power for several days after storm corrie brought winds of more than 90 miles an hour overnight. it came just a day after storm malik in which two people were killed by falling trees. our scotland correspondent alexandra mackenzie has more. it does look much calmer here in dundee this morning, but scotland was pummelled by both storms over the weekend, first storm malik on saturday and then storm corrie overnight last night. there were winds of up to 92 mph recorded at stornoway airport
12:46 pm
and winds of up to 120 mph in the cairngorms. and one woman, a 60—year—old woman, lost her life in aberdeen on saturday. thousands of people have been without electricity. at one point it's understood that up to 98,000 people were without electricity. the most up—to—date figures we have at the moment are around 7,000 from storm malik, and 30,000 last night from storm corrie. work has been ongoing over the weekend to try and get as many people back on as quickly as possible, but we do understand that some people could be without electricity until tuesday evening. now, for some people in aberdeenshire, which is the worst affected area, they were also impacted by storm arwen back in november, so this is the second time that some people are having to go several days
12:47 pm
without electricity. now, facilities have been put in place for people there. there are food vans going to be available again today for people who are unable to cook at home, and some facilities and community centres where people can go along just to get warm or to get a shower, while the electricity is being fixed. now schools this morning, particularly in aberdeenshire, some will be closed because many schools do not have electricity this morning. so definitely worth checking that. and transport as well. as covid restrictions are eased slightly and people are beginning to go back to work a bit more at this morning, transport has been impacted. many trains were off last night. that's likely to be affected again this morning. and ferries were also impacted. so a big clear up operation in place in scotland this morning after a weekend of two storms battering the country.
12:48 pm
the labour mp rosie duffield has said that she's carefully considering herfuture in the party because she hasn't received enough support in the face of online abuse. ms duffield says she had been the victim of "obsessive harassment" from current and former members for several years and the party leadership had done little to help her. labour's shadow attorney general, emily thornberry, insists the mp will receive help and support from within the party. there have been conversations with rosie that i'm aware of with those in the leadership and i'm on a whatsapp group and we were discussing with rosie and offering support. i'm a long—standing friend of rosie's, i campaigned to get her elected in 2017 when nobody thought that canterbury would ever go labour. i have always been there to give her support and i think that her current circumstances are really sad and it does need to be sorted and i will play my part, if anyone wants me to help.
12:49 pm
later this week, beijing will become the first city ever to host both the summer and winter olympics. putting on one of the world's biggest sporting events in a country still committed to zero—covid and with the omicron variant spreading has presented a massive logistical challenge. the solution has been to enforce enormous, strict, separation bubbles — as our china correspondent, stephen mcdonell, explains. in beijing, olympic athletes and the public are not allowed to mix. from arrival at the airport, visiting teams are in their own bubble. people will recognise the birds nest olympic stadium and this is one of the main bubble areas. without special olympic accreditation or without permission from officials, you can't go past those gates to enter the bubble. even though it's a huge area with venues and the like, a small village effectively, even within there, there
12:50 pm
are discrete bubbles so that athletes don't mix with the media or invited spectators. using dedicated driving lanes, olympic vehicles move between zones. special high—speed trains also connect to the city and the mountain venues. to get an idea of the scale of this, let's have a look at a map. there are three main bubble areas. one in downtown beijing, one in beijing's mountains and another in the mountains of neighbouring hebei province. with bubble transport in between. but it's even more completed than you might think because there are also these little satellite bubbles attached to the main ones. this 5—star hotel for example is its own isolation bubble. those staying there won't meet anyone out on the street. they will just shuttle from the hotel to the olympic events and after that they will leave china.
12:51 pm
thousands of university students will help to make the olympics run smoothly. some inside the bubbles, some outside. this woman was a volunteer at the 2008 beijing olympics. this year she is volunteering again. we are just ordinary people working as assistants as best we can. if we do every little thing well, we can help complete something huge like the olympics. nearly 2,000 volunteers have joined armies of security staff. they will separate categories of people to reduce covid—i9 transmission at the games. beijing has been testing entire housing communities following recent outbreaks of the virus. as for the public, they may not be able to buy olympic tickets, but at least they can watch the games on television during this new year holiday.
12:52 pm
some sad news to bring you, we are here the actor who played the east enders gp since the start of the soap opera has died. leonard fenton has died at the age of 95, he played doctor legg since first appearing in the first episode of eastenders in 1985 and his last appearance was in february 2019. very well known face to viewers of eastenders over the years. he was the original gp in walford. he was there giving out advice and appearing and even after he stopped as a regular character, he stopped as a regular character, he did continue to appear occasionally in cameo appearances. the last one was the episode in
12:53 pm
february 2019, when he was completely written out of eastenders at that point but leonard fenton, the actor who played doctor legg in eastenders has died at the age of 95. after decades of population growth, the numbers of them are now falling and experts fear it could be the same story in england and scotland. our environment correspondent steffan messenger has more. if you ever come across |f you ever come across an if you ever come across an altar in the wild, count yourself very lucky. these elusive animals try their best to stay hidden. for ecologists like eleanor and mia it means some detective work is required to get a sense of how the species is faring. yes, definitely. yes. delight at the discovery of an otter�*s droppings. it's got a very distinctive smell
12:54 pm
and that's for otters to find other signs of other otters but also helps us to track where they are in the field in the wild. national otter surveys are started in wales in the 1970s and then pesticide pollution was blamed for nearly wiping them out. after the chemicals were banned, the otters had been bouncing back, that is until now. unfortunately for the first time we've seen a decline in otter signs across wales so the last national survey in 2010 had a height of 90% of the server side had signs for otters which was really positive but unfortunately this latest survey has shown we've declined to 70% of those sites so we had quite a drop. the otters returned to riverside just one right across the uk in recent decades, and it's been seen as a huge and let's face it pretty rare nature conservation success story. and that's why the experts are so worried by the findings of this survey. it is a bit of a warning to us that something might be going wrong.
12:55 pm
it could be habitat, food, pollutants, the general quality of the river, that's the next app to try and understand what might be causing this and what we can do about it as well. meanwhile we've learnt a cheque across england has now been commissioned in response to the welsh survey. it calls for the same to happen in scotland and northern ireland too. in wales and scotland we felt the recovery was pretty - much almost complete. i would like to think _ that the respective governments will see the importance - of the barometer in the water environment and the need to get more up—to—date information _ on their status. a kingfisher. wildlife aplenty it seems at this survey site at least but elsewhere the state of our rivers is causing a lot of debate. with the plight of wales' otters are now another concern to add to the list.
12:56 pm
the us east coast is cleaning up after a major blizzard hit at the weekend. even florida was affected by the freezing conditions unusually low temperatures there had a serious affect on the local wildlife. these iguanas you'll be glad to hear are not dead, but got so cold that they become immobile and have been falling out of the trees they normally live in. this prompted the florida weather service to warn the public of the falling reptiles but said most will recover as the temperature rises. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. through the rest of today storm corrie will push the weather is slowly coming down a little after the two storm systems that work through the weekend. the most recent, storm corrie, sliding eastwards of high pressure building
12:57 pm
behind but still quite a squeeze in the white lines on this chart. a squeeze on the isobars. still quite windy out there particularly down the east coast with strong winds and high tides still bring a potential for some coastal flooding, showers down the east coast as well. a few showers out west and cloud in northern ireland in western scotland with outbreaks of rain. temperatures in the first part of the evening will drop away across eastern areas. briefly turning chilly into the east of the uk but out west, more cloud rolling in. outbreaks of rain. the rain at lightand rolling in. outbreaks of rain. the rain at light and patchy with mist and hill fog and as that works eastwards, temperatures will climb up. seven in london by the end of the night. 11 in aberdeen, glasgow and belfast. turning much milder. a wedge of milder between these weather fronts, wedge of milder between these weatherfronts, still, though, white lines on the chart, isobars, so it will still be pretty windy during tuesday particularly across the northern half of the uk. we will see some brighter skies developing here.
12:58 pm
showers in the far north. more cloud and a lingering weather front in parts of northern ireland, north—west england, wales, the south—west and something brighter in eastern england later. the wind, feature once again. not as windy as it was over the weekend. maybe 70 miles an hour gusts and expose northern areas but really mild actually. top temperatures of 12—13. tuesday into wednesday, this weather front works its way northwards taking some patchy rain with it. the what isobars opening out on the chart a little so the wind less of a feature on wednesday. still breezy but not as windy as it has been. patchy rain drifting northwards across scotland. drierfurther patchy rain drifting northwards across scotland. drier further south potentially with cloud and temperatures still on the mild side. 11-13. temperatures still on the mild side. 11—13. thursday, a band of rain southwards with a cold front. behind that, the air will turn colder as the potential for wintry showers,
12:59 pm
and it will again be fairly windy but not as windy as it was on the weekend. turning colderfor the end of the week.
1:00 pm
in the long—awaited investigation by a senior civil servant into lockdown parties at number 10 and whitehall. sue gray's report is limited for now, due to the ongoing inquiry by the metropolitan police. the public will see sue gray's initial findings the public will see sue gray's initialfindings in the public will see sue gray's initial findings in the the public will see sue gray's initialfindings in the next the public will see sue gray's initial findings in the next couple of hours. opposition parties are worried some of the more serious allegations could be left out. the prime minister will respond to the report in parliament in the next few hours. also this lunchtime: after intense pressure, ministers meet to consider scrapping mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs workers in england. vaccination is the right policy, but forcing vaccination wasn't, not in the middle of a staffing crisis particularly.
1:01 pm
more extensive damage after the double whammy of storms

44 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on