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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 31, 2022 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today... mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs staff in england could be scrapped. ministers meet today to make the final decision. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood is continuing to be questioned by police on allegations of rape and assault. prices are going up but what can be done to help? a delay of national insurance going up is going ahead. what can be done to help people with
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energy bills? the storm well ease as we go through the day. twenty one and counting... rafa overtakes roger and novak to set a new record for men's grand slam titles. amelia meet anton. anton meet amelia. hug it out. and a special strictly surprise for 11—year—old amelia as she gets to share the stage with her dance hero, anton du beke. it's monday, the 31st of january. our top story. ministers will meet today to decide whether to scrap mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs staff in england. under the current rules, all frontline workers need to have their firstjab by thursday or face dismissal or redeployment. our health editor hugh pym reports. it's proved a highly controversial policy, and there have been warnings that thousands of nhs staff in england could leave or be dismissed by employers for refusing to get vaccinated. the royal college of midwives has already called for a delay,
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arguing there could be a catastrophic impact on maternity services because of workforce shortages. the latest figures showed that around 77,500 nhs staff in england, about 5%, had not had anyjab, though not all will be in frontlinejobs. ministers and health leaders have said before now that the policy is needed to provide reassurance to patients. the health secretary, sajid javid, argued it was the professional duty of frontline staff to get jabbed, but he was challenged by a doctor at a london hospital. i've had covid at some point. yes. i've got antibodies. yeah. and i've been working on covid icu since the beginning. i have not had a vaccination. i did not want to have a vaccination. many health care workers have not opposed mandatory vaccinations for staff. if a patient comes to me and says... "should i have the vaccine? have you been vaccinated, doctor?"
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that answer should always be, "yes, of course i've been vaccinated and you should, too." there is no wriggle room ethically for doctor or a nurse or anybody talking to patients. it's understood the policy is now being reconsidered with a view in government that the landscape has changed because the omicron variant has not proved as serious as the delta wave, during which the policy was first drawn up. ministers will meet today to decide whether to continue with the plan. it's understood no final decisions have yet been made. the risk is that nhs chiefs, who've tried to defend it will feel undermined by any u—turn, and there will be demands for care home staff in england who lost theirjobs because of a similar compulsory vaccination policy to be reinstated. hugh pym, bbc news. our chief political correspondent adam fleming joins us now from westminster. adam, the government has been under pressure to scrap mandatory vaccinations for nhs staff for a number of weeks.
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why this potential u—turn now? the question of timing is that the deadline for nhs staff to be fully vaccinated in england is april. to get your first dose in time to get your second dose by then he would have to have it this week. there is a sort of semi—deadline approaching. the context has really changed. if you look at government dashboard for temper macro cases, they have gone right down and stabilised. —— covid cases. in parliament quite a number of mps voted against the government on it. if you want to please backbenchers ensure up your position when it has looked shaky in the last few weeks, maybe this is a leader you would reach for and pool. boris johnson will be pulling a few more levers in parliament. today the
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government is talking about a new brexit piece of legislation which would help the government to get rid of the eu law they copied and pasted as we left the eu. the government making the case it means you can have more changes more quickly so you can divert from the old ways of doing things. we think mid week we will get the levelling up white paper, this whole load of ideas for the government's signature policy to bring other parts of the country up to the same economic level as the south—east. at the same time, you have got this potential massive crisis brewing in ukraine with russian troops massing on the border and attention increasing. still dangling over all of this, and we haven't talked about it for a day or two is the sue gray report into potentially lockdown busting parties in downing street and whitehall, which we still haven't received. there is more mystery about what it could contain after the
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back—and—forth between the cabinet office and the police on friday. even though the government is trying very hard to get back to business as usual and there is a lot of stuff going on, we're still waiting for that massive thing to drop, which change everything.— police are continuing to investigate allegations that the manchester united footballer mason greenwood raped and assaulted a woman. the 20—year—old was arrested yesterday after the claims emerged on social media. our reporter, dave guest, is outside old trafford. dave, what more do we know? good morning. mason greenwood of course made his debut for manchester united back in 2019. last year he signed a four year deal with the club after rising through the ranks in the academy. he will not be returning here for the time being. manchester united said mason greenwood may not be playing for or training with the club until further notice. that statement was issued
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following claims made online by women naming she had been assaulted by mason greenwood. greater manchester police later confirmed they had become aware of the allegations and that a man in his 20s had been arrested on suspicion of rain and assault. in the statement in which they said mason greenwood were not be rejoining his team—mates until further notice, manchester united said they would not condone violence of any kind. it said it would not be issuing any further statements until the full facts were established. that is exactly what greater manchester police will be attempting to do when i could take some time. speculation about who did were or what may have happened is not only unwise at this stage but potentially prejudicial. meanwhile sportswear company nikkei which sponsors mason greenwood said it was deeply concerned by the disturbing allegations and was closely monitoring the situation. ——
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nike. so far there has been no statement on behalf of the player himself. that situation will be monitored closely. thousands of homes in scotland could remain without power for several days, following the effects of storms malik and corrie this weekend. winds of more than 80 miles per hour brought down trees across the uk, killing two people. rail and road networks also disrupted. yellow and amber weather warnings will remain in place across parts of northern england and scotland for much of the morning. care home residents in england can have as many visitors as they like from today, as covid restrictions are eased. the changes will also see self isolation periods cut or removed altogether. scotla nd scotland and wales have already eased restrictions while northern ireland and wales are in the process of doing so.
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around a million women in the uk are at risk of harm through problem gambling, according to new research from gambleaware. the charity is launching a campaign aimed specifically at women, to alert them of the dangers. jon donnison reports. it's never been easier to gamble. online apps are much more accessible than the old high street betting shops. this new research says it's one factor that has seen a sharp rise in the number of women with gambling issues. it estimates as many as 2.5 million british women experience some level of problem gambling. of those, around a million are causing themselves moderate harm, and out of that figure, half a million are experiencing serious harm. no, i ended up having to remortgage my house. then, after i remortgaged my house, i ended up spending that money. and then unfortunately, when the children were 10 and 11, i ended up homeless without anything, and then i ended up in a hostel with them. this video showing how all consuming online gambling can be is part of gambleraware's new campaign to encourage women who think
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they might have a problem to seek help. that's what lisa did, and she now runs a support groups for other women. i understand about gambling and i understand where it takes people, and so ijust think women can come in and talk about their problems, you know, and just feel empowered and just give them that bit of hope that you can overcome a gambling addiction. gambleaware says the number of women gambling online rose sharply during the pandemic, with many people stuck at home during lockdowns. it says three key signs you might have a problem are losing track of time while gambling, spending more than you can afford, and keeping your habit secret from those around you. john donnison, bbc news. the streaming platform spotify says it's working to add a warning to any podcast that includes a discussion about covid, after a row about misinformation. the musiciansjoni mitchell and neil young both removed their
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music from spotify in protest over its work with the american podcaster, joe rogan who has interviewed vaccine sceptics. have you ever watched your children having a pillow fight and thought this will go too far and end in tears? have a look at this. this was the first ever professional pillow fighting championship. there are weighted pillows, aren't there? ones that are a bit heavier. when i fight with the kids i had to use the light one. this is in florida. sixteen men and eight women most of them mma fighters competed for a $5,000 prize, using
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a specialised pillow. i once knocked my brother out in a pillow fight. we had beds. he thought the fight was over and i there is a chance for one last wallop will stop i clocked him on the side of the noggin and smashed his head on the bunk bed. and you are still speaking now? i properly spoke to him six years ago. what did your mum do at that point? i can't remember that. you blanked it out because it was too awful. don't try that at home, kids. now the weather with carol. good morning. we are talking about how windy it was in the headlines. gusts of 92 miles an hour in stornoway and also in aberdeenshire. now the wind will slowly start to his. it is the remnants of storm corrie. still packing a punch this morning, the amber weather warning
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has gone but the met office still has gone but the met office still has the yellow weather warning, gusting 50 to 60 miles an hour on the hills and the north sea coast when i will be large waves to watch out for as well. inland gas of a0 to 50 miles an hour. slowly that pulls away into the north sea. dry weather with sunshine in the east. in the west we have showers coming in on brisk winds. some of them will be wintry on the hills. showers crossing northern ireland and into the midlands. these blank circles represent the gusts of wind mid—afternoon. still a2, a5, 55 around the far north of scotland. temperatures today, three to 9 degrees. adding on the wind it will feel quite cold if you are out and about. this evening and overnight more substantial rain from the west which will push eastwards. still windy with a lot of cloud. under the clear skies as the cloud pushes out
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it will be culled. the hint of something milder coming away from the west. temperatures will be up and down all week. thank you. i have my first game of golf this year. are you excited? i am very excited. you always pay close attention to the weather, don't you! with a week to go until it's confirmed just how much higher our energy bills are going to go this year, the government is under pressure to explain what it's going to do to support people with the increased cost of living. nina's looking at the options for us. good morning. we have known for a while the base price, the energy supply price has been rocketing. the government can look at ways to support people who are struggling at the moment, especially with inflation being so high. and that list of options just got shorter.
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from april, all employees, employers and the self employed will pay an extra 1.25 pence more in the pound for national insurance. for someone earning £30,000 a year that menas an extra £21a in contributions. those on higher wages will pay more. there had been calls to scrap or delay that rise but both the chancellor and the prime minister have made it clear it will happen to help fund the nhs and social care. campaigners had been calling for a delay to the national insurance rise because it will come in the same month as energy bills go up. the energy price cap is the maximum amount people can be charged for gas and electricity if they use an average amount. it went up in october but wholesale gas prices have continued to rocket so the cap will go up again. it could mean another £700 a year
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for the average household. with inflation also on the rise, people's budgets are really getting squeezed. so what can the government do to help? one idea is a cut on the vat or value added tax that everyone pays on their energy bills. at the moment it's 5% but if it was cut to zero then people could save around £61 a year. plus people on high incomes who could afford the prices rises would also see their bills go down. another option could be to extend some of the schemes that already exist like the warm home discount. it's a one off £1a0 taken off your energy bill. at the moment, some low income, working age households get this as well as people on pension credit. the government could look at increasing the amount or making it available to more people. they could also scrap the green energy levies. we'll pay those. these things do still need to be funded. where would that money come from? however you look at things, there are no easy fixes. ultimately this kind of change... global increase in energy prices, is something that means collectively as a country we are poorer.
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we don't have as much money given, we had to spend more on energy. what the government can choose to do is decide how those affected distributed across households. that could be by protecting poorer households relative to richer households, that could be by borrowing and making future households worse off in exchange for being able to protect all households now. it is a case of distributing the pain. there is no way in which you can kind of remove that altogether. so the pain is coming, it's just a question of who feels it most. lots of pressure on the government to announce something before news on that new price cap comes next monday. it is tricky. if they do it for everyone than wealthy people will benefit. we do expect something in terms of support before next monday. let's take a look at today's papers. "u turn on mandatory
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jabs for nhs workers." the paper reports that health secretary sajid javid is considering the move in england after being warned that the nhs could face "crippling" staff shortages. the arrest of manchester united footballer mason greenwood on suspicion of rape and assault leads the front page. the guardian carries a picture of rafael nadal who has become the most successful men's tennis player of all time after winning his 21st grand slam title at the australian open. he was level with roger federer and novak djokovic. the paper also reports that boris johnson will try to "seize back control" this week with a string
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of "high profile announcements and photo opportunities" on issues including brexit, the ukraine and the cost of living crisis. one of those announcements makes the front page of the daily mail. in an article to mark the second anniversary of the uk's exit from the eu, borisjohnson unveils plans for a new brexit freedoms bill, which the paper says would "slash red tape and boost trade". have you recovered? sorry about that. one of those mornings! i quite clearly know his name is roger federer. do you remember he had a beautiful cardigan with gold inlay? i asked if he had another one and he said he had. we both wore his cardigan for said he had. we both wore his cardiganforan said he had. we both wore his cardigan for an interview. it had a significant tug on it. i would like
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to see a picture of that. i did tell him i would wear it the next time i played tennis but i do not think i have played tennis since. good morning! i am going to do this because i quite like this. it is about broken new year's resolutions in the daily telegraph. new year's resolutions have gone to pot at this time of year. my new year's resolution was to have more sleep. mine was to keep dancing and eat more cake. you are on the right trend. one study said new year's resolutions, if you break them, it is not that you've failed. what you should be doing is you should set a new year's resolution for a treat. more about deciding to have something lovely. if you say you want to run every day, perhaps on days when it is raining do not go for a run. that is your treat for
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the day. it is about psychology of being positive rather than punishing yourself. ok. ithink being positive rather than punishing yourself. ok. i think that is brilliant. i would yourself. ok. i think that is brilliant. iwould rather yourself. ok. i think that is brilliant. i would rather have a treat. this is in the daily mirror. britain is being urged to throw the biggest ever thank you party on sunday the 5th ofjune for the queen'splatinum jubilee. sunday the 5th ofjune for the queen'splatinumjubilee. ross kemp queen'splatinum jubilee. ross kemp is queen'splatinumjubilee. ross kemp is coming on the programme later to talk about this. alan titchmarsh, lorraine kelly and rogerjohnson have all been named promoting plans for street parties around the country. they are hoping 10 million people will be sharing a jubilee lunch to thank the queen. that means cake for you! we will definitely go to one party. i think i will be involved somewhere. you can come round mine if you like? shall i? no! we are going to show you some altars. not good news. not good news
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about otters. after decades of population growth, the number in wales is falling. experts fear it could be the same story in england and scotland. our correspondent has more. if you have ever come across an altar in the wild, count yourself very lucky. these elusive animals try their best to stay hidden. for ecologists like these commitments detective work is required to get a sense of how the species is faring. definitely. confirm? yes, definitely. confirm ? yes, definitely. definitely. confirm? yes, definitely.— definitely. confirm? yes, definitel . , ., , definitely. delight at the discovery of an otter's _ definitely. delight at the discovery of an otter's droppings. _ definitely. delight at the discovery of an otter's droppings. it - definitely. delight at the discovery of an otter's droppings. it helps i definitely. delight at the discovery| of an otter's droppings. it helps us to track where _ of an otter's droppings. it helps us to track where they _ of an otter's droppings. it helps us to track where they are _ of an otter's droppings. it helps us to track where they are in - of an otter's droppings. it helps us to track where they are in the - of an otter's droppings. it helps us to track where they are in the field j to track where they are in the field in the wild. to track where they are in the field in the wild-— in the wild. national otter survey started in the _ in the wild. national otter survey started in the 1970s. _ in the wild. national otter survey started in the 1970s. pesticide i started in the 19705. pesticide pollution was blamed for nearly
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wiping out the creatures. after the chemicals were banned otter5 had been bouncing back, until now. for the first been bouncing back, until now. fr?" the first time we have seen a decline in otter numbers in wales. there was 90% of the sites having sites of altar5 and that has dropped to 70%. sites of altars and that has dropped to 70%. , ., , , , ., , ., to 70%. this has been seen as a huge and re to 70%. this has been seen as a huge and pretty rare _ to 70%. this has been seen as a huge and pretty rare nature _ to 70%. this has been seen as a huge and pretty rare nature conservation i and pretty rare nature conservation 5ucce55 and pretty rare nature conservation success story. that is why the experts are so worried about the findings of the survey. it is experts are so worried about the findings of the survey.— findings of the survey. it is a warnin: findings of the survey. it is a warning to — findings of the survey. it is a warning to something - findings of the survey. it is a warning to something might| findings of the survey. it is a - warning to something might going wrong _ warning to something might going wrong it— warning to something might going wrong. it could be food, pollutants, general— wrong. it could be food, pollutants, general quality of the river. that is the _ general quality of the river. that is the next — general quality of the river. that is the next step, to understand what might— is the next step, to understand what might be _ is the next step, to understand what might be causing it and do something about_ might be causing it and do something about it _ might be causing it and do something about it. we might be causing it and do something
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about it. ~ ., ., ., . m might be causing it and do something about it. ~ ., ., ., . , about it. we have learned a check up on otter populations _ about it. we have learned a check up on otter populations has _ about it. we have learned a check up on otter populations has been - on otter populations has been commissioned in england following the welsh survey with calls for the same to happen in scotland and northern ireland. in same to happen in scotland and northern ireland.— same to happen in scotland and northern ireland. in scotland we felt the recovery _ northern ireland. in scotland we felt the recovery was _ northern ireland. in scotland we felt the recovery was pretty - northern ireland. in scotland we | felt the recovery was pretty much complete. we would like to think respective governments will see the importance of the otter a5 a barometer of the environment. wildlife aplenty it seems that this survey site at least. elsewhere, the state of the rivers is causing a lot of debate with the plight of wales's otters another concern to add to their list. still to come on today's programme... now the news, travel and weather.
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good morning, i'm asad ahmad. an investigation has begun after a woman was dragged along a platform, as she tried to board a london overground train. it happened at wood street station in walthamstow earlier this month, when the lady's hand got trapped in a door. the rail accident investigation branch said she was then forced to run alongside the train for about 20 metres, before the train stopped. the woman wasn't injured. transport for london has apologised. hundreds of hospital workers, employed by serco, have gone on strike at st barts, the royal london and whipps cross hospitals. it's in a dispute over pay. the unite union claims workers, including porters, cleaners and catering staff, are paid up to 15% less than their nhs colleagues. serco says its recently increased its pay offer. the widow of tory mp james brokenshire, who died from lung cancer before christmas, has called for a national screening programme to improve survival rates.
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cathy brokenshire said she wanted others to avoid the same fate as her husband, the old bexley and sidcup mp, who was aged 53. his widow said she hoped she could "bring some positivity" from his death. nearly 50,000 people are diagnosed with the condition every year. people hit by flash floods last summer, are being urged to share their experiences, to try and force thames water to make improvements to drainage. the flooding happened injuly, hitting homes and businesses across half of london's boroughs. campaigners want people affected to take part in a thames water questionnaire, to highlight the scale of the problem. the water board welcomes more engagement. a brief look at the travel. the northern line has a reduced service until may. due to major upgade work. onto the weather now with kate. good morning.
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it is a rather blustery start to the new week. storm corrie, last night's storm, is tracking into the north sea and we are left with a north—westerly breeze and flow. but high pressure is building. now, on that north—westerly breeze, you could see one or two showers blow through. plenty of sunny spells around today. it's going to stay breezy throughout. gusts of 30, a0 mph, perhaps easing into the evening. and temperatures feeling cooler than yesterday. the maximum somewhere between seven and nine celsius. now, overnight tonight, we will get some clear spells to start with, but more cloud is edging in from the west. and that is a warm front bringing some milder air. still quite chilly overnight. the minimum temperature, three to four celsius. that warm front also could bring some spells of light rain and drizzle as we head into tuesday morning. it's going to be a rather grey start tomorrow. spots of rain will start to clear. a cold front sinking south. that will break the cloud up through the afternoon. but some sunny spells. still quite breezy tomorrow as well. there is a lot of dry weather
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in the forecast this week. it's still quite breezy, and temperatures for the next couple of days are still reasonably mild. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye— bye. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. coming up on the programme this morning. giving police more powers to combat stalking will be debated by mp5 today. we'll be speaking to the fathers of two women, gracie spinks and alice ruggles, who were both killed after being stalked. the actor turned documentary maker ross kemp willjoin us from windsor castle, to tell us all about this year's national thank you day, which isjoining forces with the queen's jubilee celebrations. and, whatever you do, don't miss this. you show me a bit of street and i will show— you show me a bit of street and i will show you some waltzing.
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when amelia met anton. we'll show you what happened when the 11—year—old cancer survivor had a dancing lesson with her strictly hero. looks like a lot of fun. i got to watch the _ looks like a lot of fun. i got to watch the entire _ looks like a lot of fun. i got to watch the entire show - looks like a lot of fun. i got to watch the entire show from i looks like a lot of fun. i got to | watch the entire show from the looks like a lot of fun. i got to - watch the entire show from the side as well. did watch the entire show from the side as well. , , ., watch the entire show from the side as well. , ,, ., watch the entire show from the side as well. , i. ., ., ., ., as well. did you not want to 'oin in? i thinkfi as well. did you not want to 'oin in? i think i fl as well. did you not want to 'oin in? i think i would i as well. did you not want to 'oin in? i think i would have i as well. did you not want to join in? i think i would have ruined l as well. did you not want to join | in? i think i would have ruined it for the audience! _ in? i think i would have ruined it for the audience! but _ in? i think i would have ruined it for the audience! but i _ in? i think i would have ruined it for the audience! but i did - in? i think i would have ruined it for the audience! but i did makej in? i think i would have ruined it i for the audience! but i did make a surprise appearance. that is coming up surprise appearance. that is coming up in a bid. and after a good as well. john is with us today. we've had some amazing sport of this year. at the final of the australian open won by rafael nadal was one of the greatest. he open won by rafael nadal was one of the greatest-— the greatest. he was never going to win it. the greatest. he was never going to win it- there — the greatest. he was never going to win it. there are _ the greatest. he was never going to win it. there are moments - the greatest. he was never going to win it. there are moments in - the greatest. he was never going to win it. there are moments in sportl
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win it. there are moments in sport when sports _ win it. there are moments in sport when sports men _ win it. there are moments in sport when sports men and _ win it. there are moments in sport when sports men and women - win it. there are moments in sport i when sports men and women produce something that illustrates why they are the very best. they dig deep and find it. this was raffin adele, is well to win, making the impossible possible. two sets down, he came back to win against daniil medvedev, the bass player remaining in the austrian open. —— the best player. no one imagined he would have been there after what he went through last year. i think there are those moments where you kind of stand alone. what there are those moments where you kind of stand alone.— kind of stand alone. what he did, the crowd. _ kind of stand alone. what he did, the crowd. i'm — kind of stand alone. what he did, the crowd, i'm in _ kind of stand alone. what he did, the crowd, i'm in the _ kind of stand alone. what he did, the crowd, i'm in the crowd - kind of stand alone. what he did, l the crowd, i'm in the crowd clearly wanted nadal to come back and win it. you felt for medvedev. he is a bit of a villain and he doesn't mind embracing it. yeah, but i think it was inevitable. in sport, in life, you always love a good story. you love it when the protagonist can deliver that. that is what rafael nadal did. obviously there was so much support for him. whilst he has been brilliant, no one has got to that kind of elusive 21st
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grand slam. you have had djokovic, you've got nadal, you got roger federer, all playing at the same time. all three of them have driven each other on. and yet nadal is the one who has just got over the line. and he has got the french open to come. which i think he has won 80a times. it is usually raffin nadal on clay. 21 could soon become 22. what a day, what a match. raffin adele with one of the great sporting moments, winning a 21st grand slam yesterday. more than any other male player. but nadal staged an astonishing comeback. never before has anybody come back from two sets down to win the australian open singles title. he won the next three. you can see how much it meant to him. the fourth man in history to win each grand slam twice. it will go down as one of
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those amazing sporting moments. of course, for me it's amazing to achieve another grand slam at this moment of my career. itjust means a lot to me, and of course i know it's a special number, 21, and i am not, eh... lam not — i mean, i know how it means, no? and, eh, it's a big significance, this title, no? still think it is sinking in. nadal�*s greatest rivals, roger federer and novak djokovic, were both missing from the tournament. they've both taken to instagram to congratulate nadal. certainly nadal has that in abundance. having produced a comeback of their own two level
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their series, englandcould at last of their deciding t20 match against the west indies after a dramatic finale in barbados. it started well, taking four quick wickets. some big hitting saw the hosts finished strongly. they set a target of 180. england were always struggling. they needed to 20 from the last over. and what unaware it was. jason holder taking four wickets in four balls. only the fourth man to do that in t20 internationals. talking of the unexpected, who would have expected this? everton are expected to confirm frank lampard as their new manager today. lampard has finalised a two and a half—year deal, and is now putting his backroom staff in place and working on new signings. the a3—year—old will replace rafael benitez, who left the club earlier this month after one win in 13 games. an interesting appointment. obviously he believes he can go in there, despite everything going on off the field, results not being as
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good on the pitch. it is a big move. his career as a manager said in its infancy. wayne rooney said no thanks. 33 minutes past six. we've reached another milestone in the pandemic today. it's exactly two years since a uk hospital took in its first known covid patient. that hospital was in newcastle, and our health correspondent dominic hughes is there. dom, it's been a particularly tough couple of years for nhs staff, hasn't it? it really has. and who would have thought _ it really has. and who would have thought that two years on from those first patient puma grubbing right here in— first patient puma grubbing right here in the early hours of the 3ist january. — here in the early hours of the 3ist january, 2020, we would have be here talking _ january, 2020, we would have be here talking about this pandemic that is rolled _ talking about this pandemic that is rotied on— talking about this pandemic that is rolled on and on? after what has been _ rolled on and on? after what has been a _ rolled on and on? after what has been a momentous two years, we have asked _ been a momentous two years, we have asked the _ been a momentous two years, we have asked the staff here to reflect on their— asked the staff here to reflect on their experiences. there's a lot of questions getting asked, but, being a new pandemic, none of us really knew the answers.
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i don't tell my family much what's happened, because i don't understand. your colleagues are such a good comfort, but you don't take it home with you. i looked after the very first patients who became critically unwell in the trust here. i was on the weekend when we had our first deaths. and it was incredibly emotional, speaking to those first families, because you kind of realised that this was going to be the first of many phone calls that would be very similar. 112 patients? 112 patients. i think there's been many low points. i think we've all had birthdays and funerals and things that we've missed. to know that you are not alone, to know that we're very much like a big family here. without that, i think that those low points would have been much, much lower. i was living at the time when covid started with my mother, who's in her 705. and like many elderly people, she got the shielding information.
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so i moved out from there, the family home, into a hotel so i could continue to do myjob. you know, you're washing your clothes as best you can, you're staying away from all of your loved ones. it's not — it wasn't a holiday. things changed quite - quickly as the cases grew. initially, you were having quite a few patients and they did - deteriorate really quickly, especially people that - you weren't expecting to get ill, like young people. - and that's quite daunting, and it's not nice to watch. | being part of research into the vaccines that have come out has been one of my proudest moments working in the nhs, working in medicine. there are many people who work in these hospitals from many walks of life, and together we can achieve fantastic things. i think you've just got to learn - to cut off and not let it take over. and if you can't do that, - you're not in the rightjob, really, so, the voices there of staff here
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at the _ so, the voices there of staff here at the royal victoria infirmary. i am joined — at the royal victoria infirmary. i am joined by margaret gray, the deputy— am joined by margaret gray, the deputy chief operating officer here. margaret. — deputy chief operating officer here. margaret, we heard those lovely voices— margaret, we heard those lovely voices of— margaret, we heard those lovely voices of the staff. what was it like your— voices of the staff. what was it like your two years ago when those first patients arrived? to like your two years ago when those first patients arrived?— first patients arrived? to be fair, we didn't know _ first patients arrived? to be fair, we didn't know what _ first patients arrived? to be fair, we didn't know what to - first patients arrived? to be fair, we didn't know what to expect. l first patients arrived? to be fair, | we didn't know what to expect. it started _ we didn't know what to expect. it started off — we didn't know what to expect. it started off pretty— we didn't know what to expect. it started off pretty exciting, - started off pretty exciting, frenetic _ started off pretty exciting, frenetic. it _ started off pretty exciting, frenetic. it was _ started off pretty exciting, frenetic. it was two - started off pretty exciting, i frenetic. it was two patients. started off pretty exciting, - frenetic. it was two patients. it started — frenetic. it was two patients. it started off _ frenetic. it was two patients. it started off quite _ frenetic. it was two patients. it started off quite slowly. - frenetic. it was two patients. it. started off quite slowly. actually the difference _ started off quite slowly. actually the difference was _ started off quite slowly. actually the difference was this _ started off quite slowly. actually the difference was this was - started off quite slowly. actually the difference was this was a - started off quite slowly. actually i the difference was this was a global pandemic — the difference was this was a global pandemic the _ the difference was this was a global pandemic. the staff— the difference was this was a global pandemic. the staff were _ the difference was this was a global. pandemic. the staff were frightened. we didn't— pandemic. the staff were frightened. we didn't know— pandemic. the staff were frightened. we didn't know what _ pandemic. the staff were frightened. we didn't know what to _ pandemic. the staff were frightened. we didn't know what to expect. - pandemic. the staff were frightened. we didn't know what to expect. it - we didn't know what to expect. it impacted — we didn't know what to expect. it impacted are _ we didn't know what to expect. it impacted are not— we didn't know what to expect. it impacted are not only _ we didn't know what to expect. it impacted are not only the - we didn't know what to expect. it impacted are not only the lives i we didn't know what to expect. it impacted are not only the lives of patients— impacted are not only the lives of patients and _ impacted are not only the lives of patients and those _ impacted are not only the lives of patients and those of— impacted are not only the lives of patients and those of us - impacted are not only the lives of patients and those of us at - impacted are not only the lives of patients and those of us at work, | patients and those of us at work, but our— patients and those of us at work, but our own— patients and those of us at work, but our own lives. _ patients and those of us at work, but our own lives. it _ patients and those of us at work, but our own lives. it was - patients and those of us at work, i but our own lives. it was extremely busy~ _ but our own lives. it was extremely busy~ it _ but our own lives. it was extremely busy~ it was— but our own lives. it was extremely busy. it was difficult _ but our own lives. it was extremely busy. it was difficult to _ but our own lives. it was extremely busy. it was difficult to understandl busy. it was difficult to understand what was _ busy. it was difficult to understand what was going _ busy. it was difficult to understand what was going to _ busy. it was difficult to understand what was going to happen - busy. it was difficult to understand what was going to happen next. i busy. it was difficult to understand i what was going to happen next. very quickly— what was going to happen next. very quickly we _ what was going to happen next. very quickly we have — what was going to happen next. very quickly we have had _ what was going to happen next. very quickly we have had an _ what was going to happen next. very quickly we have had an enormous - quickly we have had an enormous amount— quickly we have had an enormous amount of— quickly we have had an enormous amount of patients _ quickly we have had an enormous amount of patients at _ quickly we have had an enormous amount of patients at the - quickly we have had an enormous| amount of patients at the hospital who did _ amount of patients at the hospital who did not — amount of patients at the hospital who did not know— amount of patients at the hospital who did not know how _ amount of patients at the hospital who did not know how poorly - amount of patients at the hospital who did not know how poorly theyj who did not know how poorly they were _ who did not know how poorly they were going — who did not know how poorly they were going to— who did not know how poorly they were going to be, _ who did not know how poorly they were going to be, or— who did not know how poorly they were going to be, or how- who did not know how poorly they were going to be, or how poorly. who did not know how poorly they. were going to be, or how poorly the staff are _ were going to be, or how poorly the staff are going — were going to be, or how poorly the staff are going to _ were going to be, or how poorly the staff are going to be. _ were going to be, or how poorly the staff are going to be. it— were going to be, or how poorly the staff are going to be. it was- were going to be, or how poorly the staff are going to be. it was very . staff are going to be. it was very difficult — staff are going to be. it was very difficult. ., ., , ., . ., difficult. how do you reflect on the iast two difficult. how do you reflect on the past two years? —
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difficult. how do you reflect on the past two years? how— difficult. how do you reflect on the past two years? how do _ difficult. how do you reflect on the past two years? how do you - difficult. how do you reflect on the past two years? how do you feel. past two years? how do you feel about— past two years? how do you feel about it? — past two years? how do you feel about it? l — past two years? how do you feel about it? ., , . ' past two years? how do you feel about it? ~' , ., , ., about it? i think the staff have been incredible. _ about it? i think the staff have been incredible. i— about it? i think the staff have been incredible. ithink- about it? i think the staff have| been incredible. i think they've been _ been incredible. i think they've been professional. _ been incredible. i think they've been professional. they've - been incredible. i think they've - been professional. they've expanded extremely— been professional. they've expanded extremely well— been professional. they've expanded extremely well to— been professional. they've expanded extremely well to each—way - been professional. they've expanded extremely well to each—way that - been professional. they've expanded extremely well to each—way that we i extremely well to each—way that we have had _ extremely well to each—way that we have bad and — extremely well to each—way that we have bad and i_ extremely well to each—way that we have had. and i think— extremely well to each—way that we have had. and i think this— extremely well to each—way that we have had. and i think this is- extremely well to each—way that we have had. and i think this is our- have had. and i think this is our fifth _ have had. and i think this is our fifth wave _ have had. and i think this is our fifth wave. unbelievable - have had. and i think this is our. fifth wave. unbelievable response from the — fifth wave. unbelievable response from the staff— fifth wave. unbelievable response from the staff on _ fifth wave. unbelievable response from the staff on the _ fifth wave. unbelievable response from the staff on the ground. - fifth wave. unbelievable responsel from the staff on the ground. they are tired _ from the staff on the ground. they are tired and — from the staff on the ground. they are tired and they— from the staff on the ground. they are tired and they are _ from the staff on the ground. they are tired and they are stressed. i from the staff on the ground. they. are tired and they are stressed. you mentioned a — are tired and they are stressed. mentioned a fifth wave. who are tired and they are stressed.” mentioned a fifth wave. who would have thought two years ago we would have thought two years ago we would have been— have thought two years ago we would have been talking about that? absolutely not.— absolutely not. what is the situation — absolutely not. what is the situation in _ absolutely not. what is the situation in the _ absolutely not. what is the situation in the hospital- absolutely not. what is the - situation in the hospital today? we have 74 patients. only one in itu, which _ have 74 patients. only one in itu, which is _ have 74 patients. only one in itu, which is great _ have 74 patients. only one in itu, which is great. the _ have 74 patients. only one in itu, which is great. the difference - have 74 patients. only one in itu, which is great. the difference this| which is great. the difference this time _ which is great. the difference this time is _ which is great. the difference this time is we — which is great. the difference this time is we peak— which is great. the difference this time is we peak to _ which is great. the difference this time is we peak to three - which is great. the difference this time is we peak to three years - which is great. the difference this| time is we peak to three years ago at 150 _ time is we peak to three years ago at 150 patients _ time is we peak to three years ago at 150 patients. patients _ time is we peak to three years ago at 150 patients. patients generallyj at 150 patients. patients generally have at150 patients. patients generally have not— at150 patients. patients generally have not been— at 150 patients. patients generally have not been as _ at 150 patients. patients generally have not been as well _ at 150 patients. patients generally have not been as well but - at 150 patients. patients generally have not been as well but they. at 150 patients. patients generally. have not been as well but they have been old _ have not been as well but they have been old and — have not been as well but they have been old and frail, _ have not been as well but they have been old and frail, so _ have not been as well but they have been old and frail, so a _ have not been as well but they have been old and frail, so a different- been old and frail, so a different group _ been old and frail, so a different group of— been old and frail, so a different group of patients _ been old and frail, so a different group of patients in— been old and frail, so a different group of patients in this - been old and frail, so a different group of patients in this time, i been old and frail, so a different. group of patients in this time, but not so _ group of patients in this time, but not so ill— group of patients in this time, but not so ill and _ group of patients in this time, but not so ill and not— group of patients in this time, but not so ill and not so _ group of patients in this time, but not so ill and not so many- group of patients in this time, but not so ill and not so many in- group of patients in this time, but not so ill and not so many in itu, i not so ill and not so many in itu, which _ not so ill and not so many in itu, which is — not so ill and not so many in itu, which is a — not so ill and not so many in itu, which is a help _ not so ill and not so many in itu, which is a help.— not so ill and not so many in itu, which is a help. quite a contrast to this time last _ which is a help. quite a contrast to this time last year? _
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which is a help. quite a contrast to this time last year? yes. _ which is a help. quite a contrast to this time last year? yes. although | this time last year? yes. although it has been — this time last year? yes. although it has been more _ this time last year? yes. although it has been more difficult - this time last year? yes. although it has been more difficult in - this time last year? yes. although it has been more difficult in other| it has been more difficult in other ways— it has been more difficult in other ways because _ it has been more difficult in other ways because we _ it has been more difficult in other ways because we had _ it has been more difficult in other ways because we had a _ it has been more difficult in other ways because we had a lot- it has been more difficult in other ways because we had a lot of- it has been more difficult in otherl ways because we had a lot of staff offer~ _ ways because we had a lot of staff offer~ we — ways because we had a lot of staff offer~ we went _ ways because we had a lot of staff offer. we went from _ ways because we had a lot of staff offer. we went from an _ ways because we had a lot of staff offer. we went from an average i ways because we had a lot of staffj offer. we went from an average of ways because we had a lot of staff - offer. we went from an average of 6% sickness _ offer. we went from an average of 6% sickness rate — offer. we went from an average of 6% sickness rate at — offer. we went from an average of 6% sickness rate at this _ offer. we went from an average of 6% sickness rate at this time _ offer. we went from an average of 6% sickness rate at this time last - offer. we went from an average of 6% sickness rate at this time last year- sickness rate at this time last year to 12~5%~ — sickness rate at this time last year to 12~5%~ a— sickness rate at this time last year to 12~5%~ a lot _ sickness rate at this time last year to 12.5%. a lot of— sickness rate at this time last year to 12.5%. a lot of clinical- sickness rate at this time last year to 12.5%. a lot of clinical staff - to 12.5%. a lot of clinical staff of. to 12.5%. a lot of clinical staff of a — to 12.5%. a lot of clinical staff of a lot — to 12.5%. a lot of clinical staff of. a lot needing _ t012.5%. a lot of clinical staff of. a lot needing to— t012.5%. a lot of clinical staff of. a lot needing to go- t012.5%. a lot of clinical staff of. a lot needing to go off- to 12.5%. a lot of clinical staff| of. a lot needing to go off and isolate — of. a lot needing to go off and isolate or— of. a lot needing to go off and isolate or with _ of. a lot needing to go off and isolate or with covid. - of. a lot needing to go off and isolate or with covid. that - of. a lot needing to go off and j isolate or with covid. that was incredibly— isolate or with covid. that was incredibly difficult, _ isolate or with covid. that was incredibly difficult, as - isolate or with covid. that was incredibly difficult, as well - isolate or with covid. that was incredibly difficult, as well as. isolate or with covid. that was i incredibly difficult, as well as on the backdrop _ incredibly difficult, as well as on the backdrop of _ incredibly difficult, as well as on the backdrop of emergency - incredibly difficult, as well as on the backdrop of emergency care| incredibly difficult, as well as on - the backdrop of emergency care been very busy _ the backdrop of emergency care been very busy. we — the backdrop of emergency care been very busy. we have _ the backdrop of emergency care been very busy. we have had _ the backdrop of emergency care been i very busy. we have had unprecedented numbers— very busy. we have had unprecedented numbers of— very busy. we have had unprecedented numbers of patients _ very busy. we have had unprecedented numbers of patients for _ very busy. we have had unprecedented numbers of patients for the _ very busy. we have had unprecedented numbers of patients for the past - very busy. we have had unprecedented numbers of patients for the past 18 - numbers of patients for the past 18 months _ numbers of patients for the past 18 months. ., ., , ., , months. you mentioned the staff bein: off months. you mentioned the staff being off and _ months. you mentioned the staff being off and there _ months. you mentioned the staff being off and there is _ months. you mentioned the staff being off and there is a _ months. you mentioned the staff being off and there is a whole - months. you mentioned the staff. being off and there is a whole issue today— being off and there is a whole issue today about mandatory vaccinations. how do _ today about mandatory vaccinations. how do you — today about mandatory vaccinations. how do you feel about the prospect of that— how do you feel about the prospect of that perhaps been delayed, or even _ of that perhaps been delayed, or even called off? i of that perhaps been delayed, or even called off?— of that perhaps been delayed, or even called off? i think we need to wait for the _ even called off? i think we need to wait for the meeting _ even called off? i think we need to wait for the meeting this _ even called off? i think we need to wait for the meeting this morning. j wait for the meeting this morning. we are _ wait for the meeting this morning. we are in— wait for the meeting this morning. we are in a — wait for the meeting this morning. we are in a very— wait for the meeting this morning. we are in a very fortunate - wait for the meeting this morning. we are in a very fortunate position that over— we are in a very fortunate position that over 95% _ we are in a very fortunate position that over 95% of _ we are in a very fortunate position that over 95% of our _ we are in a very fortunate position that over 95% of our staff- we are in a very fortunate position that over 95% of our staff have - we are in a very fortunate position i that over 95% of our staff have been vaccinated _ that over 95% of our staff have been vaccinated that _ that over 95% of our staff have been vaccinated that we _ that over 95% of our staff have been vaccinated that we know— that over 95% of our staff have been vaccinated that we know of. - that over 95% of our staff have been vaccinated that we know of. that - that over 95% of our staff have been vaccinated that we know of. that is. vaccinated that we know of. that is probably— vaccinated that we know of. that is probably a — vaccinated that we know of. that is probably a better _ vaccinated that we know of. that is probably a better situation - vaccinated that we know of. that is probably a better situation than - vaccinated that we know of. that is probably a better situation than a i probably a better situation than a lot of— probably a better situation than a lot of other— probably a better situation than a lot of other trust _ probably a better situation than a lot of other trust in _ probably a better situation than a lot of other trust in the _ probably a better situation than a lot of other trust in the country. i lot of other trust in the country. we are — lot of other trust in the country. we are working _ lot of other trust in the country. we are working towards - lot of other trust in the country. - we are working towards implementing the new_ we are working towards implementing the new law. _ we are working towards implementing the new law. but — we are working towards implementing the new law, but obviously, _ we are working towards implementing the new law, but obviously, any- the new law, but obviously, any delay— the new law, but obviously, any delay would _
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the new law, but obviously, any delay would give _ the new law, but obviously, any delay would give us _ the new law, but obviously, any delay would give us some - the new law, but obviously, any delay would give us some time i the new law, but obviously, any. delay would give us some time to understand — delay would give us some time to understand what— delay would give us some time to understand what the _ delay would give us some time to understand what the situation - delay would give us some time to understand what the situation is i delay would give us some time to. understand what the situation is and what we _ understand what the situation is and what we need — understand what the situation is and what we need to— understand what the situation is and what we need to do _ understand what the situation is and what we need to do is— understand what the situation is and what we need to do is deliver- understand what the situation is and what we need to do is deliver care i what we need to do is deliver care to our— what we need to do is deliver care to our patients _ what we need to do is deliver care to our patients.— what we need to do is deliver care to our patients. thank you for your time. we to our patients. thank you for your time- we will— to our patients. thank you for your time. we will bring _ to our patients. thank you for your time. we will bring to _ to our patients. thank you for your time. we will bring to bringing - to our patients. thank you for your time. we will bring to bringing you more _ time. we will bring to bringing you more reports from the royal victoria infirmary _ more reports from the royal victoria infirmary throughout the morning. thank— infirmary throughout the morning. thank you — infirmary throughout the morning. thank you. see you later. i saw isawa i saw a rogue picture of us in the studio there. what we're having for your breakfast?— studio there. what we're having for your breakfast?- get - studio there. what we're having for your breakfast?- get it. your breakfast? porridge. get it while ou your breakfast? porridge. get it while you can- _ you might remember a rather special moment from a couple of weeks ago, which involved an 11—year—old girl called amelia. amelia lost one of her legs to cancer, and recently she was fitted with a prosthetic blade, which will help her get back to herfirst love — dancing. naturally, she's a huge fan of strictly. so we thought it might be nice to surprise amelia with some messages from some of the stars — including her absolute favourite, anton du beke. strictly theme. you're getting a new prosthetic leg, which is brilliant! and, you're going to take up dancing again, which is even more brilliant. my love, you are an inspiration,
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and i'm sending you lots and lots of love. and maybe one day in the future, you and i could have a dance. well, guess what? amelia was in the audience for anton and erin's tour. i went along too. music plays. hello. nice to see you. now, if you were watching bbc breakfast about ten days ago, you might remember the amazing 11—year—old we met on the programme called amelia. what we know about amelia is she loves to dance. and her absolute hero is anton du beke, whojust happens to be performing on his tour here in birmingham. now, amelia is inside, but she doesn't know we're here, so we're sneaking in the back entrance with a few surprises. come on!
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we are backstage at the birmingham symphony hall. you can hear that live music — the show is going on. come inside, we've got to be quiet. we know where amelia and herfamily are. they�* re in rowj. let's have a little look. there's anton and erin. looking amazing. the show�*s going on, so, shh. very good so far. music plays. with my new found experience, i've got to say anton's very good out of hole. but once he gets in hole, just loses a bit of form. ladies and gentlemen, we've already mentioned him today. please welcome to the stage, the wonderful dan walker.
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audience cheers. the wonderful dan walker. hello, birmingham! the wonderful dan walker. oh, this is nice, isn't it? the wonderful dan walker. hello, everybody. the wonderful dan walker. wow! the wonderful dan walker. we also have someone very, very special in the audience with us here in birmingham. would you please give a huge round of applause to 11—year—old amelia, who's with us in the audience today? audience applauds. there she is down there. give us a wave, amelia. let me tell you a little bit about amelia, because as i said, she's11. and back in 2017, amelia was diagnosed with bone cancer. now, she loves to dance. she loves dancing. everyone up here loves dancing as well. and what happened to amelia is, the cancer got into her body and she had to have her leg amputated. and she had a prosthetic leg on her left leg for a while. and earlier this month, she managed to get a blade fitted. now, as somebody who loves dancing, the blade has enabled her to move much more freely and actually do what she loves.
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and let me tell you two things about amelia. number one, she loves to dance. number two — slightly more surprisingly — she loves you, anton. audience laughs. absolutely loves you. you can't blame the girl. i know! she's an intelligent, young, bright young lady, of course. of course you are. so if you don't mind... idon't mind. ..and i'm sure this wonderful audience will celebrate, as i ask michelle, her mum, and amelia to come and join us on stage! audience cheers. amelia and michelle! come and join us over here, guys. amelia, meet anton. anton, meet amelia. come on, let's hug it out. saturday was always strictly. no matter where we was, - if we was in hospital, we got home.
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however ill she felt, - we had to have strictly on. and it'sjust inspired her to keep going, and to keep challenging i and pushing herself. and the incredible thing is today, i think i'm right in saying this, today is actually the four year anniversary of your first operation. to understand that i had cancer was horrible, and it was very hard. but when i knew i was going to walk again, and i got to dance again... it's ok, take your time. itjust helped me express myself, kind of, and it was something i really enjoyed. come on. wow! what was that like? it's hard, isn't it, to have a moment like that, and then sort of calm yourself down and have a little think about it? was that you on stage in front of hundreds of people there? music plays. i know it's been a crazy day so far,
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and your heads probably all over the place, but we've got — if you're up for it — one last surprise for you. yeah? yeah. are those happy tears? yeah. good. if you want to follow me, we're going back out on stage. have you watched star wars? i have. i was saying to my dad that looks like the millennium falcon. it does a bit, doesn't it? the thing? so, i've just said to you in there, "come out on stage", ok? so here we are on stage. i know you don't want to dance with me. you probably need somebody who knows what they're doing. so i'm going to go over there, and the fellow who you quite like is going to come over here. i'll see you in a mo, amelia. that's what you call a showbiz sweep. now, tell me about your dancing. what do you like to do? well, i like to do street dance at the moment. street dancing? yeah. lucky for you, i'm quite the expert at the street dance. so you show me a bit of street,
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and i'll show you a bit of waltzing. how's that? does that sounds like a deal? yeah. i like this that you just did. and a—wham and bam! and you'll pop in that and pop in that, and five and six and seven and... one, two, three. hum and hum and hum, and hum. she pops her shoulder — classy! out... ..up and round. a—one, a—two, a—three and... ..four. and open and close, and up. applause. she had the best day. that looks amazing. you held it together well there because that is such an emotional moment 21st came up. she is onl 11 emotional moment zist came up. she is only 11 years old, so you have to be very careful. her mum and dad knew about it. amelia had the best
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day. i spoke to her a lot and she absolutely loved it. for her to be on stage and feel the warmth, all that appreciation from the audience, people in the audience were crying, error and had a lovely chat with her afterwards as well. the hold is always brilliant. and anton did a lovelyjob. always brilliant. and anton did a lovel 'ob. . .. always brilliant. and anton did a lovel 'ob. ., ,, , ., always brilliant. and anton did a lovelyjob— lovely 'ob. thank you, anton. i think lovely job. thank you, anton. i think amelia _ lovely job. thank you, anton. i think amelia was _ lovely job. thank you, anton. i think amelia was slightly - lovely job. thank you, anton. i | think amelia was slightly better lovely job. thank you, anton. i i think amelia was slightly better at street dance than he was. don’t think amelia was slightly better at street dance than he was. don't tell him that. here _ street dance than he was. don't tell him that. here is _ street dance than he was. don't tell him that. here is carol— street dance than he was. don't tell him that. here is carol with the - him that. here is carol with the weather. wasn't that gorgeous? it was lovely. good luck —— good morning. this morning it is still pretty windy. storm corrie still pulling away from our shores but still packing a point. last night it created gusts of wind of 92 mph in stornoway and for birdie. this morning it is heading out into the north sea. continuing to pull away. behind it we still do have tightly packed isobars, so it will still be windy. the met office has a yellow weather warning for
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this storm, producing 50 to 60 mph wind across eastern england and north—east abingdon. in angus, a0 to 50 mph. still the risk travel disruption. the other thing this morning is the risk of ice in northern scotland. here we have some wintry showers. a lot of dry weather. a few migraine showers in northern ireland, north—west england, wales, down towards the midlands. they will push westwards through the afternoon. these are the wind gusts left behind. still pretty windy through the day. not as strong as first thing this morning. temperature wise feeling cool. three to 9 degrees. and on that cold north—westerly wind and you certainly won't notice it. as we head through the evening and overnight, more substantial rain across northern ireland, scotland, getting to parts of western england and wales. it pushes eastwards.
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behind it we will see a clearance in the sky and it will be cool in eastern areas. the hint of something milder coming our way across northern ireland, with overnight lows of 80 degrees. a5 northern ireland, with overnight lows of 80 degrees. as we go through tomorrow, you can see how we have the milder air ensconced in the south. cold air sinking south. we are looking at windy conditions. here is our cloud associated with that front heading south with patchy rain. clearskies that front heading south with patchy rain. clear skies and sunshine behind. a few showers on the wind. it will still be noticeably windy. these are the gusts you can expect. temperature wise you will notice this as well. temperature is 11 to 13 degrees. much milder than today. the weather will be topsy—turvy this week. into wednesday, we are looking at a mile today. murky, cloudy and breezy. a5 at a mile today. murky, cloudy and breezy. as we head towards the latter part of the week, mild air across us initially. a5 latter part of the week, mild air across us initially. as the cold front sinks south, the cold air
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sinks behind it. the isobars again are telling you it is going to be quite windy. eventually the cold air will be in the whole of the uk as we get to friday. wintry showers on friday, especially in the north. thank you, carol. let's return to our top story. and it's the news that nhs and social care staff in england may not lose theirjobs if they refuse to get the covid vaccine. ministers are meeting today to decide whether to drop that policy. we can hear now what the opposition think. emily thornberry is the shadow attorney general. good morning. do you think a u—turn on this mandatory vaccination for nhs workers in england, is it the right thing to do? i nhs workers in england, is it the right thing to do?— right thing to do? i think it is definitely _ right thing to do? i think it is definitely worth _ right thing to do? i think it is definitely worth thinking - right thing to do? i think it is i definitely worth thinking about right thing to do? i think it is - definitely worth thinking about it again— definitely worth thinking about it again because i think the path of omicron — again because i think the path of omicron has been better than we feared. _ omicron has been better than we feared. so — omicron has been better than we feared, so i think that needs to be looked _ feared, so i think that needs to be looked at — feared, so i think that needs to be looked at i— feared, so i think that needs to be looked at. i think also, we have seen _ looked at. i think also, we have seen many— looked at. i think also, we have seen many more people from the nhs
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coming _ seen many more people from the nhs coming forward and getting the vaccine — coming forward and getting the vaccine than we thought. they need to reassess — vaccine than we thought. they need to reassess. obviously what we need to reassess. obviously what we need to do _ to reassess. obviously what we need to do is— to reassess. obviously what we need to do is retain as many people as possible — to do is retain as many people as possible within the nhs. people don't _ possible within the nhs. people don'tjoin the nhs possible within the nhs. people don't join the nhs to harm possible within the nhs. people don'tjoin the nhs to harm others. they— don'tjoin the nhs to harm others. theyjoin_ don'tjoin the nhs to harm others. theyjoin the nhs because they have a calling _ theyjoin the nhs because they have a calling. they want to help other people _ a calling. they want to help other people. they wanted to look after them _ people. they wanted to look after them we — people. they wanted to look after them. we want to continue to put forward _ them. we want to continue to put forward the argument that they need to be vaccinated. we need to work with the _ to be vaccinated. we need to work with the unions and the colleges to make _ with the unions and the colleges to make sure — with the unions and the colleges to make sure we get as many people in the nhs _ make sure we get as many people in the nhs vaccinated as possible, with the nhs vaccinated as possible, with the ambition of getting everybody vaccinated, because that is what makes _ vaccinated, because that is what makes sense. vaccinated, because that is what makes sense-— vaccinated, because that is what makes sense. ~ ., ., ., makes sense. what would the labour pa do in makes sense. what would the labour party do in terms _ makes sense. what would the labour party do in terms of— makes sense. what would the labour party do in terms of those _ makes sense. what would the labour party do in terms of those people - party do in terms of those people who may have already left the nhs, or have gone in the last few weeks, and now might want to come back to their career? what should happen to those? latte their career? what should happen to those? ~ ., ., ,, their career? what should happen to those? ~ ., ., «i . , ., those? we need to make the decision in iirincile those? we need to make the decision in principle now. _ those? we need to make the decision in principle now, so _ those? we need to make the decision in principle now, so it _ those? we need to make the decision in principle now, so it may _ those? we need to make the decision in principle now, so it may be - those? we need to make the decision in principle now, so it may be that. in principle now, so it may be that they are _ in principle now, so it may be that they are discussing... i am not in they are discussing... i am not in the room. — they are discussing... i am not in the room. so _ they are discussing... i am not in the room. so i _ they are discussing... i am not in the room, so i don't know, but it may— the room, so i don't know, but it may be _ the room, so i don't know, but it may be they— the room, so i don't know, but it may be they are talking about giving
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people _ may be they are talking about giving people longer to get vaccinated, or sin- people longer to get vaccinated, or sing in _ people longer to get vaccinated, or sing in current circumstances you don't _ sing in current circumstances you don't need — sing in current circumstances you don't need to. let's put this into the mbc — don't need to. let's put this into the mix. there are a number of vaccinations— the mix. there are a number of vaccinations that nhs staff are obliged — vaccinations that nhs staff are obliged to take already. the idea is that this _ obliged to take already. the idea is that this is — obliged to take already. the idea is that this is to be one of the vaccines— that this is to be one of the vaccines they need to take. the common— vaccines they need to take. the common sense behind it is obvious and we _ common sense behind it is obvious and we need to keep bringing people with us— and we need to keep bringing people with us and making sure they understand it is in the interests of themselves, their families and those they look— themselves, their families and those they look after, those they have a calling _ they look after, those they have a calling to — they look after, those they have a calling to look after, to get vaccinated.— calling to look after, to get vaccinated. , ., vaccinated. something else we are talkin: vaccinated. something else we are talking about _ vaccinated. something else we are talking about a _ vaccinated. something else we are talking about a lot _ vaccinated. something else we are talking about a lot at _ vaccinated. something else we are talking about a lot at the _ vaccinated. something else we are talking about a lot at the moment | vaccinated. something else we are. talking about a lot at the moment is the cost of living. the prime minister and the chancellor both confirmed over the weekend the rise in national insurance payments will go ahead. if the labour party were in power, what would you do with that? if in power, what would you do with that? ., ., , ., , that? if the labour party was in iower that? if the labour party was in power we _ that? if the labour party was in power we would _ that? if the labour party was in power we would not _ that? if the labour party was in power we would not be - that? if the labour party was in i power we would not be introducing this. power we would not be introducing this we _ power we would not be introducing this. we believe it is completely wrong _ this. we believe it is completely wrong at — this. we believe it is completely wrong at this time to be introducing a tax _ wrong at this time to be introducing a tax on _ wrong at this time to be introducing a tax onjobs, because it isjust those _ a tax onjobs, because it isjust those that— a tax onjobs, because it isjust those that are working that will be paying _ those that are working that will be paying this. the people at the bottom — paying this. the people at the
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bottom will be paying proportionately more of their wages in taxes. _ proportionately more of their wages in taxes. as— proportionately more of their wages in taxes, as they always do. we need to have _ in taxes, as they always do. we need to have a _ in taxes, as they always do. we need to have a much more progressive tax system _ to have a much more progressive tax system and _ to have a much more progressive tax system and this is not part of it. and they— system and this is not part of it. and they say they need to have a rising _ and they say they need to have a rising national insurance in to sort out the _ rising national insurance in to sort out the social care system. my answer — out the social care system. my answer to _ out the social care system. my answer to that is, what is your plan? — answer to that is, what is your plan? they— answer to that is, what is your plan? they haven't published a plan. there _ plan? they haven't published a plan. there isift— plan? they haven't published a plan. there isn't a — plan? they haven't published a plan. there isn't a plan as to what it is they— there isn't a plan as to what it is they are — there isn't a plan as to what it is they are going to do and that needs to be _ they are going to do and that needs to be looked at properly. what would our lain to be looked at properly. what would your plan be? — to be looked at properly. what would your plan be? l'm — to be looked at properly. what would your plan be? i'm afraid _ to be looked at properly. what would your plan be? i'm afraid it _ to be looked at properly. what would your plan be? i'm afraid it is - your plan be? i'm afraid it is something _ your plan be? i'm afraid it is something we _ your plan be? i'm afraid it is something we are _ your plan be? i'm afraid it is| something we are continuing your plan be? i'm afraid it is i something we are continuing to your plan be? i'm afraid it is - something we are continuing to work on. whatever plan we put forward we will have _ on. whatever plan we put forward we will have these aspirations. to make sure nobody— will have these aspirations. to make sure nobody is denied social care if they needed and nobody is denied social— they needed and nobody is denied social care — they needed and nobody is denied social care because they can't afford — social care because they can't afford it _ social care because they can't afford it. we need to make sure it is accessible to everybody. it is really _ is accessible to everybody. it is really important. a decent society needs— really important. a decent society needs to — really important. a decent society needs to look after the most vulnerable. | needs to look after the most vulnerable.— needs to look after the most vulnerable. , . ., , vulnerable. i understand that but i am askin: vulnerable. i understand that but i am asking you _ vulnerable. i understand that but i am asking you how _ vulnerable. i understand that but i am asking you how you _ vulnerable. i understand that but i am asking you how you would - vulnerable. i understand that but i i am asking you how you would afford it? you talked about a one—off windfall tax. social care and of
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these changes to the nhs, that is a long—term problem and yours is a short—term solution? the short-term solution? the windfall tax in particular _ short-term solution? the windfall tax in particular is _ short-term solution? the windfall tax in particular is about - short-term solution? the windfall tax in particular is about vat, - short-term solution? the windfall tax in particular is about vat, it's| tax in particular is about vat, it's about— tax in particular is about vat, it's about energy prices. what we do about— about energy prices. what we do about energy prices. what we do about energy prices. what we do about energy prices is to get rid of vat on _ about energy prices is to get rid of vat on energy because the government has made _ vat on energy because the government has made a _ vat on energy because the government has made a great deal of money because — has made a great deal of money because the prices in energy have gone _ because the prices in energy have gone up. — because the prices in energy have gone up, therefore obviously there has been _ gone up, therefore obviously there has been an increase in vat the government has been able to collect. we would _ government has been able to collect. we would stop that and have a windfall— we would stop that and have a windfall tax on the energy companies that have _ windfall tax on the energy companies that have been making a great deal of money— that have been making a great deal of money out of the fact that the energy— of money out of the fact that the energy prices have been rising as well _ energy prices have been rising as well. those two things together would _ well. those two things together would help people, to the tune of hundreds— would help people, to the tune of hundreds of pounds. that is a costed plan and _ hundreds of pounds. that is a costed plan and we — hundreds of pounds. that is a costed plan and we put that before the government and say, you don't have a plan when _ government and say, you don't have a plan when it— government and say, you don't have a plan when it comes to cost of living crisis. _ plan when it comes to cost of living crisis. this— plan when it comes to cost of living crisis. this is— plan when it comes to cost of living crisis, this is what we would do. some _ crisis, this is what we would do. some of— crisis, this is what we would do. some of our— crisis, this is what we would do. some of our viewers may have seen one of your fellow mp5, rosie duffield, who is considering her future with the party. she says she
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is feeling unsupported. i have a quick check of her social media profile this morning. her banner on twitter has a picture of you on it. i wonder what you and your party are doing to support her?— doing to support her? there have been conversations _ doing to support her? there have been conversations with - doing to support her? there have been conversations with rosie i doing to support her? there have. been conversations with rosie that doing to support her? there have i been conversations with rosie that i am aware _ been conversations with rosie that i am aware of with those in the leadership. i am on a whatsapp group and we _ leadership. i am on a whatsapp group and we were _ leadership. i am on a whatsapp group and we were discussing with rosie, and we were discussing with rosie, and offering support. i am a long—standing friend of rosie's. i campaigned to get her elected in 2017 when nobody thought canterbury would _ 2017 when nobody thought canterbury would ever— 2017 when nobody thought canterbury would ever go labour. i will always be there _ would ever go labour. i will always be there to — would ever go labour. i will always be there to give her support. and i think— be there to give her support. and i think that — be there to give her support. and i think that current circumstances are really— think that current circumstances are really sad _ think that current circumstances are really sad and it needs to be sorted and i_ really sad and it needs to be sorted and i will— really sad and it needs to be sorted and i will play my part if anyone wants _ and i will play my part if anyone wants me — and i will play my part if anyone wants me to help.— and i will play my part if anyone wants me to help. and i will play my part if anyone wants me to heli. . ,., , ., wants me to help. have you spoken to her directly? — wants me to help. have you spoken to her directly? i've _ wants me to help. have you spoken to her directly? i've not _ wants me to help. have you spoken to her directly? i've not spoken - wants me to help. have you spoken to her directly? i've not spoken to - her directly? i've not spoken to her. i her directly? i've not spoken to her- i only _ her directly? i've not spoken to her. i only found _ her directly? i've not spoken to her. i only found out _ her directly? i've not spoken to her. i only found out about - her directly? i've not spoken to her. i only found out about thisj her. i only found out about this yesterday — her. i only found out about this yesterday afternoon, the recent stop _ yesterday afternoon, the recent stop. there is the social media conversations that have been taking place _ conversations that have been taking place behind closed doors on the whatsapp groups. as i say, i spoke to leadership last night. those
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conversations are going on at the moment— conversations are going on at the moment with her. it is early days and we _ moment with her. it is early days and we need to sort something out and we need to sort something out and she _ and we need to sort something out and she does need to be supported. and, and she does need to be supported. and. as _ and she does need to be supported. and. as i _ and she does need to be supported. and, as i say, there are many women in the _ and, as i say, there are many women in the labour— and, as i say, there are many women in the labour party who want to and will support — in the labour party who want to and will support her. one in the labour party who want to and will sopport her-— will support her. one other thing which is a hot _ will support her. one other thing which is a hot topic _ will support her. one other thing which is a hot topic of _ will support her. one other thing which is a hot topic of debate - will support her. one other thing which is a hot topic of debate at| which is a hot topic of debate at the moment it's what is happening in ukraine. there are reports, and we will talk to the government about this, the uk is considering a major military deployment. i have asked you a lot today about what labour's views are on these issues. how would you feel about sending troops to ukraine potentially? i you feel about sending troops to ukraine potentially?— you feel about sending troops to ukraine potentially? i don't think there is a plan — ukraine potentially? i don't think there is a plan to _ ukraine potentially? i don't think there is a plan to send _ ukraine potentially? i don't think there is a plan to send troops - ukraine potentially? i don't think there is a plan to send troops to | there is a plan to send troops to ukraine — there is a plan to send troops to ukraine i— there is a plan to send troops to ukraine. ithink there is a plan to send troops to ukraine. i think the plan is to send troops _ ukraine. ! think the plan is to send troops to— ukraine. i think the plan is to send troops to many of the places in eastern — troops to many of the places in eastern europe that are now no longer— eastern europe that are now no longer in — eastern europe that are now no longer in the russian sphere of influence _ longer in the russian sphere of influence. so, the baltic states, the plan — influence. so, the baltic states, the plan is — influence. so, the baltic states, the plan is to send troops there, not to— the plan is to send troops there, not to ukraine.— the plan is to send troops there, not to ukraine. forgive me. i'm well -- | not to ukraine. forgive me. i'm well -- i meant — not to ukraine. forgive me. i'm well -- i meant to _ not to ukraine. forgive me. i'm well -- i meant to deal— not to ukraine. forgive me. i'm well -- i meant to deal with _ not to ukraine. forgive me. i'm well -- i meant to deal with the - not to ukraine. forgive me. i'm well -- i meant to deal with the ukraine | —— i meant to deal with the ukraine
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issue. -- i meant to deal with the ukraine issue. ~ ., ., , ,, -- i meant to deal with the ukraine issue. ~ ., ., , ., issue. we are not sending troops to deal with the _ issue. we are not sending troops to deal with the ukraine _ issue. we are not sending troops to dealwith the ukraine issue. - issue. we are not sending troops to deal with the ukraine issue. what l issue. we are not sending troops to i deal with the ukraine issue. what we are doing. _ deal with the ukraine issue. what we are doing, and we support the government at this, we will give logistical— government at this, we will give logistical support to the ukraine military. — logistical support to the ukraine military, the ukraine military are in a better— military, the ukraine military are in a better position than they were when _ in a better position than they were when there — in a better position than they were when there was the invasion of crimea — when there was the invasion of crimea a — when there was the invasion of crimea a few years ago. we have made it perfectly _ crimea a few years ago. we have made it perfectly clear to the russians that we. — it perfectly clear to the russians that we, in the west, stand united and we _ that we, in the west, stand united and we will— that we, in the west, stand united and we will impose a new generation of crippling _ and we will impose a new generation of crippling sanctions against the russians— of crippling sanctions against the russians if they do invade ukraine, and we _ russians if they do invade ukraine, and we are — russians if they do invade ukraine, and we are giving additional support to the _ and we are giving additional support to the baltic states, who are now part of— to the baltic states, who are now part of nato. we have an obligation to ensure _ part of nato. we have an obligation to ensure that they are protected from _ to ensure that they are protected from russian aggression. appreciate our time. from russian aggression. appreciate your time. thank _ from russian aggression. appreciate your time. thank you. _ from russian aggression. appreciate your time. thank you. we _ from russian aggression. appreciate your time. thank you. we will - from russian aggression. appreciate your time. thank you. we will have i your time. thank you. we will have simon clarke. _ your time. thank you. we will have simon clarke, chief— your time. thank you. we will have simon clarke, chief secretary - your time. thank you. we will have simon clarke, chief secretary to i your time. thank you. we will have | simon clarke, chief secretary to the treasury in half an hour. molar simon clarke, chief secretary to the treasury in half an hour.— treasury in half an hour. now the news, weather _ treasury in half an hour. now the news, weather and _ treasury in half an hour. now the news, weather and travel. - good morning, i'm asad ahmad. an investigation has begun after a woman was dragged along a platform, as she tried to board
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a london overground train. it happened at wood street station in walthamstow earlier this month when the lady's hand got trapped in a door. the rail accident investigation branch said she was then forced to run alongside the train for about 20m before the train stopped. the woman wasn't injured. transport for london has apologised. hundreds of hospital workers — employed by serco — have gone on strike at st barts, the royal london and whipps cross hospitals. it's in a dispute over pay. the unite union claims workers including porters, cleaners and catering staff — are paid up to 15% less than their nhs colleagues. serco says its recently increased its pay offer. the widow of tory mp james brokenshire, who died from lung cancer before christmas, has called for a national screening programme to improve survival rates. cathy brokenshire said she wanted others to avoid the same
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fate as her husband — the old bexley and sidcup mp — who was aged 53. his widow said she hoped she could "bring some positivity" from his death. nearly 50 thousand people are diagnosed with the condition every year. people hit by flash floods last summer are being urged to share their experiences — to try and force thames water to make improvements to drainage. the flooding happened injuly — hitting homes and businesses across half of london's boroughs. campaigners want people affected to take part in a thames water questionnaire — to highlight the scale of the problem. the water board welcomes more engagement. a brief look at the travel. the northern line has a reduced service — until may due to major upgade work. onto the weather now with kate. good morning. it is a rather blustery start to the new week.
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storm corrie, last night's storm, is tracking into the north sea and we are left with a north—westerly breeze and flow. but high pressure is building. now, on that north—westerly breeze, you could see one or two showers blow through. plenty of sunny spells around today. it's going to stay breezy throughout. gusts of 30, a0 mph, perhaps easing into the evening. and temperatures feeling cooler than yesterday. the maximum somewhere between seven and nine celsius. now, overnight tonight, we will get some clear spells to start with, but more cloud is edging in from the west. and that is a warm front bringing some milder air. still quite chilly overnight. the minimum temperature, three to four celsius. that warm front also could bring some spells of light rain and drizzle as we head into tuesday morning. it's going to be a rather grey start tomorrow. spots of rain will start to clear. a cold front sinking south. that will break the cloud up through the afternoon. some sunny spells. still quite breezy tomorrow as well. there is a lot of dry weather in the forecast this week. it's still quite breezy,
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and temperatures for the next couple of days are still reasonably mild. you can tune into the breakfast show on bbc radio london. goodbye. good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today... mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs staff in england could be scrapped. ministers meet today to make the final decision. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood is continuing to be questioned by police on allegations of rape and assault. warnings that up to a million women are in danger of becoming problem gamblers. in the sport, on top of men's tennis, 21 and counting for rafa nadal, who has set a new record of grand slam wins. storm corrie is still packing a punch in parts of
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eastern england were strong and gusty winds. slowly today they will start to ease. it's monday, the 31st of january. ministers will meet today to decide whether to scrap mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs staff in england. under the current rules all frontline workers need to have their firstjab by thursday or face dismissal or redeployment. our health editor hugh pym reports. it's proved a highly controversial policy, and there have been warnings that thousands of nhs staff in england could leave or be dismissed by employers for refusing to get vaccinated. the royal college of midwives has already called for a delay, arguing there could be a catastrophic impact on maternity services because of workforce shortages. the latest figures showed that around 77,500 nhs staff in england, about 5%, had not had anyjab, though not all will be in frontlinejobs.
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ministers and health leaders have said before now that the policy is needed to provide reassurance to patients. the health secretary, sajid javid, argued it was the professional duty of frontline staff to get jabbed, but he was challenged by a doctor at a london hospital. i've had covid at some point. yes. i've got antibodies. yeah. and i've been working on covid icu since the beginning. i have not had a vaccination. i did not want to have a vaccination. many health care workers have not opposed mandatory vaccinations for staff. if a patient comes to me and says... "should i have the vaccine? have you been vaccinated, doctor?" that answer should always be, "yes, of course i've been vaccinated and you should, too." there is no wriggle room ethically for doctor or a nurse or anybody talking to patients. it's understood the policy is now being reconsidered with a view in government that the landscape has changed because the omicron variant has not proved as serious as the delta wave,
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during which the policy was first drawn up. ministers will meet today to decide whether to continue with the plan. it's understood no final decisions have yet been made. the risk is that nhs chiefs, who've tried to defend it will feel undermined by any u—turn, and there will be demands for care home staff in england who lost theirjobs because of a similar compulsory vaccination policy to be reinstated. hugh pym, bbc news. our chief political correspondent adam fleming joins us now from westminster. adam, the government has been under pressure to scrap mandatory vaccinations for nhs staff for a number of weeks why this potential u—turn now? ministers are said to be reflecting on this. there is a bit in a timing issue because this policy kicks in in england in april. to have your second vaccine dose in april you would have to have the first one
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this week, so there is a sort of deadline now. then the change in context around covid. if you look at the government dashboard it has fallen way down and is now pretty stable. then the politics. lots of conservative mp5 voted against it when it went through parliament. if you are a conservative prime minister who wanted to appeal to colleagues and hold your future in their hands, this is something maybe you would do. the government is going to be doing more of this stuff this week. they are announcing today they will be a brexit mechanism to make it more easy for the government to change some of the law they inherited from the eu as we left the eu and did not have time to change. also there will be levelling up paper published in the middle of the week so we will more details about government's flagship policy to help areas outside the south—east to get up areas outside the south—east to get up to the same economic level and for people to have the same opportunities as people in the south
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of england. all of this could be derailed by two other things outside the government's control. we are waiting for sue gray's report which could come today or tomorrow, who knows? then the situation in ukraine, where the temperature is really rising. all the russian troops stationed on the ukrainian border. we now know the prime minister is going to be travelling to eastern europe later in the week to eastern europe later in the week to discuss that situation and we are also expecting him to have a phone call with vladimir putin at some point. the sue gray report and ukraine could overshadow anything else happening domestically. thank ou ve else happening domestically. thank you very much- _ the uk will continue its diplomatic efforts today to defuse the tensions between russia and ukraine. our correspondentjames waterhouse is in kyiv. what's the feeling there, james,
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is there a sense military action is becoming more inevitable? i there is a growing sense of frustration. the west, the language has kept heating up, as you said. as for the west, the threat is imminent and likely, whereas the ukrainian government has kept on repeating for people not to panic, there is nothing to suggest russia is going to invade. moscow has agreed with the ukrainian government on that point. borisjohnson are scheduled to have a focal with president putin before travelling to eastern europe. the defence secretary is in hungary today meeting his counterpart. there is a posh hotel where the canadian defence minister is here for meetings. that kind of thing is really ramping up. as ukraine continues to thank western allies for all this monetary help, ukrainians are starting to voice a frustration. they are saying, if you
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are thanking all these countries for their help, why are you telling us there is nothing to worry about? shops are starting to close and parfaits because the economy is starting to feel the pinch with all this uncertainty. on the ground there are thousands of troops stationed on the border. there is reports of an increase in artillery. president putin has been condemned and making plans for russian citizens in region to get access to voting rights, etc. there are movements on the ground but the political pressure is ramping up and thatis political pressure is ramping up and that is getting hard to ignore. thank you. police are continuing to investigate allegations that the manchester united footballer mason greenwood raped and assaulted a woman. the 20—year—old was arrested yesterday after the claims emerged on social media. our reporter, dave guest,
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is outside old trafford. morning. morning. as you know, mason greenber: morning. morning. as you know, mason greenberg made — morning. morning. as you know, mason greenberg made his _ morning. morning. as you know, mason greenberg made his debut _ morning. morning. as you know, mason greenberg made his debut for _ greenberg made his debut for manchester united in 2019. last year he signed a four year deal. —— mason greenwood. he will not be returning here for the time being. they issued a statement saying mason greenwood may not be playing for or training with manchester united until further notice. that lode claims made online by a woman who said she had been assaulted by mason greenwood. —— that followed claims. the police said they had been a made aware of the social media posts and a man had been arrested for assault. manchester united said they would make no further statement until the full facts emerge. establishing the full facts emerge. establishing the full facts emerge. establishing the full facts is what greater
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manchester police will be currently trying to do that could take some time to complete. at this stage were speculation about what might or might not happened is not only unwise but also prejudicial. meanwhile, nike have said they are disturbed by the situation and are monitoring matters closely. there has been no statement yet on behalf of the player. the police investigation will be continuing today. investigation will be continuing toda. . .. investigation will be continuing toda . ., «i thousands of homes in scotland could remain without power for several days, following the effects of storms malik and corrie this weekend. winds of more than 90 miles per hour brought down trees across the uk, killing two people. rail and road networks also disrupted. a yellow weather warning remains in place for eastern scotland and north east england. we will be talking to carol very
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shortly. the streaming platform spotify says it's working to add a warning to any podcast that includes a discussion about covid, after a row about misinformation. the musiciansjoni mitchell and neil young both removed their music from spotify in protest over its work with the american podcaster, joe rogan who has interviewed vaccine sceptics. we just wejust mentioned we just mentioned the terrible storms we have been experiencing the last couple of days. i nearly lost my trousers! it was windy but not that bad! it was not, my trousers fell off. let's go straight to carol. always think before you speak. we will be calling you donald for the rest of the morning. good morning. storm corrie is still with us but it is slowly going to be pushing into the north sea as we go through the day. the wind will slowly ease. there is still a yellow
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met office warning in force for the east of england. tests, 50 to 60 miles an hour. inland we are looking at a0 to 50 mile an hour gusts. the other thing we had a snow shower is coming in across scotland. with the low temperatures there is the risk of ice first thing on untreated surfaces. a few showers coming in across northern ireland, the isle of man, cheshire, down towards the midlands which will be pushing west. a lot of sunshine. even though storm corrie pulls off into the north sea it will still be windy. this is what you can expect by the time you get to mid—afternoon. when you add on the window to the temperatures, wherever you are, it will feel rather cold. this evening and overnight more substantial rain coming in across scotland, northern ireland and then england and wales. a5 ireland and then england and wales. as it pulls away a lot of clad left in its wake. chilly where we have
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the clear skies but milder air coming in from the west. tomorrow will be much milder than today. no chance of losing your trousers tomorrow! i hope not. far too much information. i hope no one has tuned information. i hope no one has tuned in at that point. thank you. see you later. i think we are all grateful for that. more on the story about the change of policy by the government over mandatory vaccines for nhs staff. we are joined mandatory vaccines for nhs staff. we arejoined by mandatory vaccines for nhs staff. we are joined by the mandatory vaccines for nhs staff. we arejoined by the director of mandatory vaccines for nhs staff. we are joined by the director of the royal college of nursing in england and chair of the national care association. thank you very much to both of you for being with us. let's come to you festival. we have spoken to you about what happened in care homes on numerous occasions. i wonder how you are feeling this
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morning. wonder how you are feeling this morninu. . . wonder how you are feeling this mornin.. , ., wonder how you are feeling this morninu. , . ., wonder how you are feeling this mornin.. , ., ., ., morning. frustrated, sad end for all the ieiole morning. frustrated, sad end for all the people who _ morning. frustrated, sad end for all the people who have _ morning. frustrated, sad end for all the people who have lost _ morning. frustrated, sad end for all the people who have lost their - morning. frustrated, sad end for all the people who have lost theirjobs| the people who have lost theirjobs needlessly. it epitomises the position of the government on social care. they trialled it despite the fact we had more vacancies at that time than the nhs has now. and yet they did not listen to the same mitigations, the same arguments. they were put aside. i think we are really happy for our nhs colleagues if this is what is going to happen because it is an unnecessary burden and persuasion will bring us to the same outcome. the and persuasion will bring us to the same outcome.— and persuasion will bring us to the same outcome. the same question to ou. your same outcome. the same question to you. your reaction _ same outcome. the same question to you. your reaction to _ same outcome. the same question to you. your reaction to the _ same outcome. the same question to you. your reaction to the story - same outcome. the same question to you. your reaction to the story we - you. your reaction to the story we have been talking about, the potential u—turn. have been talking about, the potential u-turn. have been talking about, the iotentialu-turn. ., ., , potential u-turn. vaccination is the ri . ht ioli potential u-turn. vaccination is the right policy but _ potential u-turn. vaccination is the right policy but forcing _ potential u-turn. vaccination is the right policy but forcing vaccination l right policy but forcing vaccination was not. — right policy but forcing vaccination was not, not in the middle of a staffing — was not, not in the middle of a staffing crisis, particularly. assuming it will be scrapped but we
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will certainly support the scrapping but also _ will certainly support the scrapping but also support continued conversations to try to encourage as many— conversations to try to encourage as many people as possible to get vaccinated. many people as possible to get vaccinated-— many people as possible to get vaccinated. ~ . . ., vaccinated. what impact with that decision have _ vaccinated. what impact with that decision have for _ vaccinated. what impact with that decision have for you _ vaccinated. what impact with that decision have for you if _ vaccinated. what impact with that decision have for you if it - vaccinated. what impact with that decision have for you if it goes i decision have for you if it goes ahead? if decision have for you if it goes ahead? ., , . . ahead? if it goes ahead, it will mean that _ ahead? if it goes ahead, it will mean that many, _ ahead? if it goes ahead, it will mean that many, many - ahead? if it goes ahead, it will mean that many, many nurses ahead? if it goes ahead, it will- mean that many, many nurses who were set to— mean that many, many nurses who were set to lose _ mean that many, many nurses who were set to lose theirjobs over the next vehemence — set to lose theirjobs over the next vehemence will be able to stay in their— vehemence will be able to stay in theirjobs— vehemence will be able to stay in theirjobs and continue to deliver patient _ theirjobs and continue to deliver patient care as safely as possible, given— patient care as safely as possible, given the — patient care as safely as possible, given the lack of stuff we already have _ given the lack of stuff we already have i _ given the lack of stuff we already have. i really do understand what my colleague _ have. i really do understand what my colleague from social care is saying. _ colleague from social care is saying, that this is a change of heart — saying, that this is a change of heart too — saying, that this is a change of heart too late for the social care sector— heart too late for the social care sector but — heart too late for the social care sector but hopefully it will enable them _ sector but hopefully it will enable them to _ sector but hopefully it will enable them to bring back some of the really— them to bring back some of the really valuable staff they lost. i was going to ask you about bringing back those staff members. give us an idea of numbers, anecdotal evidence you have seen, people who have letter might now be interested in coming back. islate
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letter might now be interested in coming back-— letter might now be interested in coming back. we lost in the region of 40.000. — coming back. we lost in the region of 40.000. that — coming back. we lost in the region of 40,000, that was _ coming back. we lost in the region of 40,000, that was the _ coming back. we lost in the region - of 40,000, that was the government's loan figures _ of 40,000, that was the government's loan figures in social care. it started _ loan figures in social care. it started at— loan figures in social care. it started at the time it was first mooted — started at the time it was first mooted in april, four months after the vaccination came about. by the time the _ the vaccination came about. by the time the 11th of november came, we lost that— time the 11th of november came, we lost that number of staff. the impact — lost that number of staff. the impact has been devastated. social care is— impact has been devastated. social care is on— impact has been devastated. social care is on its knees. the variant is still out _ care is on its knees. the variant is still out there. we do not have people — still out there. we do not have people walking through the doors. vaccination is one of the questions they ask _ vaccination is one of the questions they ask it— vaccination is one of the questions they ask. it is the right policy. we do need _ they ask. it is the right policy. we do need to— they ask. it is the right policy. we do need to move forward to try and encourage — do need to move forward to try and encourage as many people to be vaccinated as physically possible. we have — vaccinated as physically possible. we have infection prevention and control— we have infection prevention and control measures in place and we did that for— control measures in place and we did that for the _ control measures in place and we did that for the first part of this pandemic really successfully, generally speaking. the people who we have _ generally speaking. the people who we have lost, we hope they will think— we have lost, we hope they will think about coming back, we really do, think about coming back, we really do. and _ think about coming back, we really do. and we — think about coming back, we really do, and we will do everything we can
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to try— do, and we will do everything we can to try and _ do, and we will do everything we can to try and encourage them to come back but— to try and encourage them to come back but they will have found other roles _ back but they will have found other roles and _ back but they will have found other roles and may be happier in those roles— roles and may be happier in those roles and — roles and may be happier in those roles and may be happier in those roles and may not want to come back. just in _ roles and may not want to come back. just in case _ roles and may not want to come back. just in case this comes back again and rears — just in case this comes back again and rears its ugly head again. do ou and rears its ugly head again. you think and rears its ugly head again. drr you think there might be nurses in the nhs who left in advance of this will change coming through? certainly. we know there are. we have spoken to many who have already decided to leave, some of him secure jobs across in wales and scotland where the policy is not the same. yes, the majority of those who left as a result of this policy would have started to have been dismissed towards the end of the week and it probably has come just in time to stop the mass exodus we would have seen had the policy gone forward. how can you persuade any nurses who had left already to come back? what can you do?— can you do? that will have to be their choice. _
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can you do? that will have to be their choice. having _ can you do? that will have to be their choice. having made - can you do? that will have to be their choice. having made the . can you do? that will have to be - their choice. having made the choice already and taken a really big decision to leave the nhs in england, then it is going to be a big ask i think right now to try to get them back. i think the important thing is in the middle of a really significant workforce crisis, whilst vaccination is the right policy, making it mandatory in the way it was intended was not. it is going to have such a detrimental effect on patient care and would defeat the object of the policy in the first place. object of the policy in the first laice. ~ . .. object of the policy in the first ilace, . ., .. ., object of the policy in the first ilace. ~ ., «i ., ., object of the policy in the first ilace. . ., «i ., ., place. we talked to you about some other problems _ place. we talked to you about some other problems in _ place. we talked to you about some other problems in social— place. we talked to you about some other problems in social care. - place. we talked to you about some other problems in social care. i - other problems in social care. i wanted to come back to you on that issue. would you like to see that policy without?— issue. would you like to see that ioli without? ~ , , . ,, policy without? absolutely. we think we can still persuade _ policy without? absolutely. we think we can still persuade people - policy without? absolutely. we think we can still persuade people to - policy without? absolutely. we think we can still persuade people to have | we can still persuade people to have that vaccination. if we have the time _ that vaccination. if we have the time to— that vaccination. if we have the time to talk to people whilst doing everything else we need to do, which is around _ everything else we need to do, which is around preventing this infection spreading. — is around preventing this infection spreading, we would stand a good chance _
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spreading, we would stand a good chance. we had had that, what we asked _ chance. we had had that, what we asked for— chance. we had had that, what we asked for was a pause, april so we could _ asked for was a pause, april so we could continue to speak to people. i think— could continue to speak to people. i think people would have moved much closer~ _ think people would have moved much closer~ it _ think people would have moved much closer. it was far too new when it was imposed for the social care sector~ — was imposed for the social care sector. they were trying to answer all the _ sector. they were trying to answer all the questions. science has better— all the questions. science has better information out and we could talk to _ better information out and we could talk to them. that is what we need, to persuade — talk to them. that is what we need, to persuade people and show them the impact _ to persuade people and show them the impact. people understand that is what it— impact. people understand that is what it is— impact. people understand that is what it is that the fact that we had care homes— what it is that the fact that we had care homes that are closing beds at the moment because they cannot staff them. _ the moment because they cannot staff them. they— the moment because they cannot staff them, they cannot support nhs colleagues to discharge safely out of hospital into care settings. it is a problem that could have been avoided _ is a problem that could have been avoided and i think that is what is the most — avoided and i think that is what is the most saddening for people. i have _ the most saddening for people. i have had — the most saddening for people. i have had people messaging me overnight saying, when they read this. _ overnight saying, when they read this. they— overnight saying, when they read this, they were crying because of the people they had lost. some
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people — the people they had lost. some people were working with us for 20 to 30 _ people were working with us for 20 to 30 years. they decided at that point _ to 30 years. they decided at that point of— to 30 years. they decided at that point of their career they did not want _ point of their career they did not want to— point of their career they did not want to be — point of their career they did not want to be told what to do. your reaction to _ want to be told what to do. your reaction to the _ want to be told what to do. your reaction to the rule _ want to be told what to do. your reaction to the rule change - want to be told what to do. gm;- reaction to the rule change in care homes from today. now there will be no limit to the number of visitors allowed in. that must make a ten mendis difference. it allowed in. that must make a ten mendis difference.— mendis difference. it will to the ieo i le mendis difference. it will to the people we _ mendis difference. it will to the people we care _ mendis difference. it will to the people we care for. _ mendis difference. it will to the people we care for. this - mendis difference. it will to the people we care for. this policyl people we care for. this policy needed — people we care for. this policy needed to— people we care for. this policy needed to come through. —— a tremendous difference. it is the right— tremendous difference. it is the right thing, that he had to try and start— right thing, that he had to try and start to _ right thing, that he had to try and start to open up. we have to do that against _ start to open up. we have to do that against the — start to open up. we have to do that against the backdrop of huge staff vacancies— against the backdrop of huge staff vacancies with infection rates running — vacancies with infection rates running where we have got somewhere near 40% _ running where we have got somewhere near 40% of— running where we have got somewhere near 40% of care homes in outbreak scenarios. _ near 40% of care homes in outbreak scenarios. so — near 40% of care homes in outbreak scenarios, so they cannot let people in. i scenarios, so they cannot let people in ithink— scenarios, so they cannot let people in ithink it— scenarios, so they cannot let people in. i think it is all very worrying. we must — in. i think it is all very worrying. we must remember this virus has not .one we must remember this virus has not gone away. _ we must remember this virus has not gone away. it— we must remember this virus has not gone away, it is still out there in communities and the spread is still quite _ communities and the spread is still quite high —
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communities and the spread is still uuite hiuh. . .. communities and the spread is still uuite hiuh. . «i y., communities and the spread is still uuite hiuh. . «i , communities and the spread is still uuite hiuh. . , . quite high. thank you very much indeed. thank— quite high. thank you very much indeed. thank you _ quite high. thank you very much indeed. thank you both - quite high. thank you very much indeed. thank you both very - quite high. thank you very much l indeed. thank you both very much quite high. thank you very much - indeed. thank you both very much for talking to us this morning. you can email us at bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk and we have all the social media accounts as well. problem gambling has been discussed quite a lot in recent years but it's usually portrayed as an issue which affects men. gambleaware wants to redress that. the charity says a million women in the uk are at risk of harm from problem gambling but nearly half won't seek help because of stigma or shame. lisa from essex struggled with her gambling for 16 years. she's been sharing her story. i started gambling. i was introduced to it from the age of about eight years old. my dad taught me how to play cards. and that's really how it all started. and then as i got older, i sort of started going into casinos on my 18th birthday with my dad. and then after casinos, i started going into bookmakers, perhaps putting a bet on the grand national.
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and up until the age of 29, i would say that i was pretty in control of my gambling. i would say the problem started for me when i hit 29, and i want —— i won a six figured sum playing one game of poker. i won over £127,000 in one night. and that night that i won the money was the worst night of my life because that's where my addiction really started to spiral out of control. and then it wasn't until the whole 127 grand sort of went, then i ended up having to remortgage my house. then after i remortgaged my house, i ended up spending that money. and then unfortunately, when the children were 10 and 11, i ended up homeless without anything, so i got back on track.
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on april 2nd 2018, i attended a gamblers anonymous meeting in basildon. there was 35 men and one woman and i remember like, this was my it wasn't my first time in gamblers anonymous. i'd been there before, but this time something different. i knew that i needed to listen to people. and so my my recovery started. that is lisa telling her story. we can speak to zoe who is from the charity gambleaware. latte can speak to zoe who is from the charity gambleaware.— can speak to zoe who is from the charity gambleaware. we have seen auamblin charity gambleaware. we have seen gambling on — charity gambleaware. we have seen gambling on women _ charity gambleaware. we have seen gambling on women on _ charity gambleaware. we have seen gambling on women on the - charity gambleaware. we have seen gambling on women on the rise. - charity gambleaware. we have seen| gambling on women on the rise. the impact of the pandemic has exacerbated that with many more women gambling online sh it escape the isolation and concern around lockdown. on the other side we have seen double the number of women
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presenting for treatment. while gambling doesn't always lead to harm it is important to run this campaign to make women aware of the early warning sign so they can control gambling. in warning sign so they can control unamblin. . warning sign so they can control unamblin. , ., , , ., gambling. in terms of the type of auamblin , gambling. in terms of the type of gambling. is _ gambling. in terms of the type of gambling, is there _ gambling. in terms of the type of gambling, is there a _ gambling. in terms of the type of gambling, is there a difference i gambling, is there a difference between what men tend to put their money into what women tend to put their money into?— their money into? unfortunately it is. men their money into? unfortunately it is- men are _ their money into? unfortunately it is. men are much _ their money into? unfortunately it is. men are much more _ their money into? unfortunately it is. men are much more familiar. their money into? unfortunately it l is. men are much more familiar with sports betting whereas for women they are playing many more games sort of online. they are very available, the digital games you have with the added level of money attached to them. online slots, bingo, scratchcards. whilst there may be low risk, reality is as you continue to play them you can get drawn more and more into gambling behaviour. with this particular campaign, the early warning signs are losing track of the world around you, spending too much time gambling, spending too much money and finally starting to hide your
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gambling from others.- and finally starting to hide your gambling from others. hiding it from others, ou gambling from others. hiding it from others. you talk— gambling from others. hiding it from others, you talk about _ gambling from others. hiding it from others, you talk about the _ others, you talk about the difference in gender in terms of what they gamble. one thing that does unite everybody as the shame and that does surround getting caught in the situation and who you tell on how you deal with it. absolutely right. women are much more stigmatised than men. 39% of women are embarrassed and shameful about the gambling and will not talk to others about it for that very reason. that compares to 22% for men. there is a huge difference and i really hope this campaign will reduce that stigma and make women talk more about the gambling so they can continue to gamble if they wish in a perfectly safe way. i can continue to gamble if they wish in a perfectly safe way.— in a perfectly safe way. i know the auamblin in a perfectly safe way. i know the gambling industry _ in a perfectly safe way. i know the gambling industry does _ in a perfectly safe way. i know the gambling industry does fund - in a perfectly safe way. i know the | gambling industry does fund some in a perfectly safe way. i know the - gambling industry does fund some nhs gambling industry does fund some nhs gambling addiction clinics. other more things the industry itself should be doing to helpful people who struggle with this but particularly women on the back of this campaign?—
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this campaign? there is no silver bullet. this campaign? there is no silver bullet- we _ this campaign? there is no silver bullet. we need _ this campaign? there is no silver bullet. we need action _ this campaign? there is no silver bullet. we need action annals. i this campaign? there is no silver . bullet. we need action annals. this is about the industry in terms of improving, which i believe they are in terms of their own messaging around safely gambling that also in terms of us educating individuals around the risks of gambling, and that starts in school, right through to university and those in the workforce and beyond. it is a completely coordinated approach to tackle gambling harm across the country. tackle gambling harm across the count . . , tackle gambling harm across the count . ., , tackle gambling harm across the count. ., tackle gambling harm across the count . ., , ., ., «i ., country. really good to talk to you. thank ou country. really good to talk to you. thank you very _ country. really good to talk to you. thank you very much. _ here's how windsor castle is looking this morning. very imposing. the actor turned documentary maker ross kemp will be there later on. perhaps he will be doing a harry potter impression! i do not say. he'll be telling us all about this year's national thank you day, which isjoining forces
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with the queen's jubilee celebrations. you can just say no sometimes. it looked a bit like a prison. humour him. here are very good at it. see you in a couple of minutes. thank you in a couple of minutes. thank you for watching. good morning from bbc london, i'm asad ahmad. an investigation has begun after a woman was dragged along a platform as she tried to board a london overground train. it happened at wood street station in walthamstow earlier this month, when the lady's hand got trapped in a door. the rail accident investigation branch said she was then forced to run alongside the train for about 20 metres before the train stopped. the woman wasn't injured. transport for london has apologised. hundreds of hospital workers, employed by serco, have gone on strike at st barts,
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the royal london and whipps cross hospitals. it's in a dispute over pay. the unite union claims workers including porters, cleaners and catering staff, are paid up to 15% less than their nhs colleagues. serco says its recently increased its pay offer. the widow of tory mp james brokenshire, who died from lung cancer before christmas, has called for a national screening programme to improve survival rates. cathy brokenshire said she wanted others to avoid the same fate as her husband, the old bexley and sidcup mp, who was aged 53. his widow said she hoped she could "bring some positivity" from his death. nearly 50,000 people are diagnosed with the condition every year. people hit by flash floods last summer, are being urged to share their experiences, to try and force thames water to make improvements to drainage. the flooding happened injuly, hitting homes and businesses across half of london's boroughs.
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campaigners want people affected to take part in a thames water questionnaire, to highlight the scale of the problem. the water board welcomes more engagement. a brief look at the travel. the northern line has a reduced service until may due to major upgrade work. onto the weather now with kate. good morning. it is a rather blustery start to the new week. storm corrie, last night's storm, is tracking into the north sea and we are left with a north—westerly breeze and flow. but high pressure is building. now, on that north—westerly breeze, you could see one or two showers blow through. plenty of sunny spells around today. it's going to stay breezy throughout. gusts of 30, a0 mph, perhaps easing into the evening. and temperatures feeling cooler than yesterday. the maximum somewhere between seven and nine celsius. now, overnight tonight, we will get some clear spells to start with, but more cloud is edging in from the west.
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and that is a warm front bringing some milder air. still quite chilly overnight. the minimum temperature, three to four celsius. that warm front also could bring some spells of light rain and drizzle as we head into tuesday morning. it's going to be a rather grey start tomorrow. spots of rain will start to clear. a cold front sinking south. that will break the cloud up through the afternoon. some sunny spells. still quite breezy tomorrow as well. there is a lot of dry weather in the forecast this week. it's still quite breezy, and temperatures for the next couple of days are still reasonably mild. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. it has just it hasjust gone it has just gone half past seven. our top story today is the news that nhs and social care staff in england may not lose theirjobs
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if they refuse to get the covid vaccine. ministers are meeting today, to decide whether to drop the controversial policy. simon clarke is chief secretary to the treasury and joins us from westminster. good morning. iwill start good morning. i will start with this very subject. ministers meeting today to talk about this. what message would a u—turn send? weill. message would a u-turn send? well, we alwa s message would a u-turn send? well, we always monitor— message would a u-turn send? well, we always monitor our— message would a u—turn send? well, we always monitor our policies in this space — we always monitor our policies in this space very closely in light of the developing information about coronavirus. the first thing to say is a big _ coronavirus. the first thing to say is a big thank you, obviously mac, to all— is a big thank you, obviously mac, to all those — is a big thank you, obviously mac, to all those nhs workers who have done _ to all those nhs workers who have done such— to all those nhs workers who have done such a fantasticjob over the past two — done such a fantasticjob over the past two years as we wrestle with this _ past two years as we wrestle with this we — past two years as we wrestle with this. we introduced the announcement about— this. we introduced the announcement about mandatory vaccination last autumn — about mandatory vaccination last autumn in— about mandatory vaccination last autumn in light of the fact that we had the _ autumn in light of the fact that we had the delta variant, which was extremely— had the delta variant, which was extremely dangerous, still taking a very high— extremely dangerous, still taking a very high toll on public health. and we did _ very high toll on public health. and we did say— very high toll on public health. and we did say to protect the public and
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the wider— we did say to protect the public and the wider nhs from being overwhelmed. i think that was absolutely the right and proportionate thing to do. since that time — proportionate thing to do. since that time the omicron variant has become _ that time the omicron variant has become dominant. what do we know about— become dominant. what do we know about that? — become dominant. what do we know about that? it is much more transmissible. and while still dangerous, it is somewhat less so than delta — dangerous, it is somewhat less so than delta. any decision taken today will reflect _ than delta. any decision taken today will reflect the fact that those fundamental facts have changed. but the extent _ fundamental facts have changed. but the extent to which that allows us to move _ the extent to which that allows us to move policy on this is something that will— to move policy on this is something that will be — to move policy on this is something that will be decided later. you sound to me _ that will be decided later. you sound to me like _ that will be decided later. you sound to me like a _ that will be decided later. gm, sound to me like a man who knows that change is coming?— sound to me like a man who knows that change is coming? well, look, this is not something _ that change is coming? well, look, this is not something that - that change is coming? well, look, this is not something that is - that change is coming? well, look, this is not something that is my i this is not something that is my decision— this is not something that is my decision to _ this is not something that is my decision to make. the health secretary— decision to make. the health secretary will be chairing the meeting. he will be at the heart of any such— meeting. he will be at the heart of any such decision. we need to wait until he _ any such decision. we need to wait until he and — any such decision. we need to wait until he and colleagues have a chance — until he and colleagues have a chance to _ until he and colleagues have a chance to look at this. it is not for me — chance to look at this. it is not for me to _ chance to look at this. it is not for me to prejudge that. what i can say is _ for me to prejudge that. what i can say is that— for me to prejudge that. what i can say is that what we know about omicron — say is that what we know about omicron is _ say is that what we know about omicron is in relation to delta. what _ omicron is in relation to delta. what a — omicron is in relation to delta. what a change of heart, to undermine
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all the hard work people have been putting get nhs staff england vaccinated?— putting get nhs staff england vaccinated? ., ., ., . ., vaccinated? no, it would not change the reality that _ vaccinated? no, it would not change the reality that getting _ vaccinated? no, it would not change the reality that getting vaccinated i the reality that getting vaccinated is the _ the reality that getting vaccinated is the best way to protect yourself and others. and obviously we are in the most _ and others. and obviously we are in the most boosted country in europe, which _ the most boosted country in europe, which is _ the most boosted country in europe, which is fantastic. that is something which i would urge anyone watching _ something which i would urge anyone watching to go and do, if you haven't— watching to go and do, if you haven't yet done it, because that is the surest — haven't yet done it, because that is the surest way to stay safe. obviously we have to try and balance our protections for public health notices— our protections for public health notices against our wider action to make _ notices against our wider action to make sure — notices against our wider action to make sure infringements on liberty are as _ make sure infringements on liberty are as limited as they can safely be. are as limited as they can safely be that — are as limited as they can safely be that is — are as limited as they can safely be. that is the balance we have always— be. that is the balance we have always been trying to get right since covid started. thousands of workers left _ since covid started. thousands of workers left care _ since covid started. thousands of workers left care homes - since covid started. thousands of workers left care homes because | since covid started. thousands of- workers left care homes because they did not want to be vaccinated. if there is a change of heart, if there is a change of policy for nhs staff, what happens to those people? again, that would have _ what happens to those people? again, that would have to _ what happens to those people? again, that would have to be _ what happens to those people? again, that would have to be for— what happens to those people? again, that would have to be for the - what happens to those people? again, that would have to be for the health secretary _ that would have to be for the health secretary to determine. i would not preempt— secretary to determine. i would not pre—empt any announcement he might
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make _ pre—empt any announcement he might make. obviously, again, as with the front— make. obviously, again, as with the front line _ make. obviously, again, as with the front line nhs, a decision was taken that people who are working with the oldest _ that people who are working with the oldest people, some of the most vulnerable in our society, should be vaccinated — vulnerable in our society, should be vaccinated. there were good reasons for that _ vaccinated. there were good reasons for that. there are good reasons why you'd _ for that. there are good reasons why you'd want— for that. there are good reasons why you'd want people dealing with very vulnerable people to have got protection for both themselves and those _ protection for both themselves and those they are looking after. where the shift _ those they are looking after. where the shift from delta to omicron allows— the shift from delta to omicron allows a — the shift from delta to omicron allows a change in policy in that space _ allows a change in policy in that space is— allows a change in policy in that space is something which, as i say, is for— space is something which, as i say, is for health — space is something which, as i say, is for health ministers to lean on. let's _ is for health ministers to lean on. let's move — let's move onto the national insurance rise. we know that boris johnson and rishi sunak together confirmed that yesterday with a joint newspaper article. despite opposition from within your own how concerned are you about the opposition within your own party, maybe more importantly, tory voters? i think it's really important to explain — i think it's really important to explain again why we have taken the decision— explain again why we have taken the decision to _ explain again why we have taken the decision to introduce the health and social— decision to introduce the health and social care — decision to introduce the health and social care levy. that is because we have a _ social care levy. that is because we have a massive backlog of nhs care
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resulting _ have a massive backlog of nhs care resulting from the pandemic. we know the impact _ resulting from the pandemic. we know the impact it has made and there won't _ the impact it has made and there won't be — the impact it has made and there won't be a — the impact it has made and there won't be a single viewer on this programme will not be aware of someone. — programme will not be aware of someone, somewhere who has fallen victim _ someone, somewhere who has fallen victim to _ someone, somewhere who has fallen victim to the fact that so much routine — victim to the fact that so much routine treatment has had to be rescheduled. it is precisely to enable — rescheduled. it is precisely to enable 9 _ rescheduled. it is precisely to enable 9 million more scans, checks and operations that we are introducing this policy, as well as over the — introducing this policy, as well as over the medium term addressing the very serious _ over the medium term addressing the very serious challenges we face in terms _ very serious challenges we face in terms of— very serious challenges we face in terms of the sustainable solution and fair— terms of the sustainable solution and fair solution for social care costs — and fair solution for social care costs that _ and fair solution for social care costs. that is why we are introducing this policy. i think it is the _ introducing this policy. i think it is the right— introducing this policy. i think it is the right thing to do because the only alternative, let's be clear, would — only alternative, let's be clear, would be — only alternative, let's be clear, would be to work on more borrowing and debt. _ would be to work on more borrowing and debt, which isjust tax is deferred _ and debt, which isjust tax is deferred until the next generation. is deferred until the next generation. is that _ deferred until the next generation. is that the — deferred until the next generation. is that the only alternative? we had conservative mp robert halfon on this programme yesterday said the government should be looking elsewhere to raise this money? iatel’ith elsewhere to raise this money? with resiect, i elsewhere to raise this money? with respect. i think— elsewhere to raise this money? with respect, i think this is a progressive tax rise. the highest earning — progressive tax rise. the highest earning 15% pay half of the cost of the policy — earning 15% pay half of the cost of the policy. the 6 million lowest earners — the policy. the 6 million lowest earners won't pay anything extra to
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fund it _ earners won't pay anything extra to fund it i_ earners won't pay anything extra to fund it. ithink earners won't pay anything extra to fund it. i think it is important we have _ fund it. i think it is important we have a _ fund it. i think it is important we have a broad—based tax rise. you can't _ have a broad—based tax rise. you can't fund — have a broad—based tax rise. you can't fund the spending of the amount— can't fund the spending of the amount we are looking to put in extra _ amount we are looking to put in extra to — amount we are looking to put in extra to the nhs and to social care, without _ extra to the nhs and to social care, without a _ extra to the nhs and to social care, without a broad—based tax increase. no one _ without a broad—based tax increase. no one wants to increase taxes in the conservative party but we also have to _ the conservative party but we also have to reflect the reality of the pandemic— have to reflect the reality of the pandemic and the fact it would not be responsible to do this through more _ be responsible to do this through more borrowing.— be responsible to do this through more borrowint. . , ., .., , more borrowing. have you considered a windfall tax — more borrowing. have you considered a windfall tax on _ more borrowing. have you considered a windfall tax on big _ more borrowing. have you considered a windfall tax on big business, - a windfall tax on big business, perhaps raising capital gains tax? we are set to increase corporation tax. we are set to increase corporation tax that — we are set to increase corporation tax that is — we are set to increase corporation tax. that is something that is baked into the _ tax. that is something that is baked into the chancellor's plans. the tax on business — into the chancellor's plans. the tax on business. we are also clear this needs— on business. we are also clear this needs to _ on business. we are also clear this needs to be — on business. we are also clear this needs to be a broad—based tax to raise _ needs to be a broad—based tax to raise the — needs to be a broad—based tax to raise the amount of money we are looking _ raise the amount of money we are looking to — raise the amount of money we are looking to raise. we have got protections in place to make sure the highest earners pay the most. and obviously the lowest earners don't _ and obviously the lowest earners don't pay — and obviously the lowest earners don't pay anything extra.- and obviously the lowest earners don't pay anything extra. there is a crunch time — don't pay anything extra. there is a crunch time coming _ don't pay anything extra. there is a crunch time coming in _ don't pay anything extra. there is a crunch time coming in terms - don't pay anything extra. there is a crunch time coming in terms of- don't pay anything extra. there is a crunch time coming in terms of the | crunch time coming in terms of the national insurance rise and also energy, basically bills are going to
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go energy, basically bills are going to 9° up energy, basically bills are going to go up and it is going to cost people more money to live. what does the government have up its sleeve to help the poorest people? it’s help the poorest people? it's important — help the poorest people? it's important to _ help the poorest people? it's important to recognise what we are doing _ important to recognise what we are doing to _ important to recognise what we are doing to have the cost of living, an undoubted — doing to have the cost of living, an undoubted challenge this winter. some _ undoubted challenge this winter. some things are entirely outside the government plasma control, including the cost _ government plasma control, including the cost of— government plasma control, including the cost of gas, a big driver behind energy— the cost of gas, a big driver behind energy prices. we are the cost of gas, a big driver behind energy prices. we are investing the cost of gas, a big driver behind energy prices. we are investing to support— energy prices. we are investing to support families. that supports our reaction _ support families. that supports our reaction to— support families. that supports our reaction to reduce the rate for the lowest _ reaction to reduce the rate for the lowest earners, worth an average of inoo _ lowest earners, worth an average of inoo we — lowest earners, worth an average of £1000. we are increasing the national— £1000. we are increasing the national living wage in april to £950 — national living wage in april to £950 an— national living wage in april to £9.50 an hour, a 6.6% increase. these _ £9.50 an hour, a 6.6% increase. these are — £9.50 an hour, a 6.6% increase. these are targeted measures, alongside wider action like freezing fuel duty. — alongside wider action like freezing fuel duty, freezing alcohol duty, freezing — fuel duty, freezing alcohol duty, freezing the tv licence, which the government can take to make sure we support— government can take to make sure we support families at what is undoubtedly a challenging moment. we. know undoubtedly a challenging moment. know that in undoubtedly a challenging moment. - know that in france they have splashed out on subsidies. the danish government is planning to intervene to support its people.
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what is the uk government's plan? istate what is the uk government's plan? we are investing 12 billion this financial— are investing 12 billion this financial year and next. i have listed — financial year and next. i have listed some of the stuff we are doing — listed some of the stuff we are doing from universal credit to the national— doing from universal credit to the national living wage to freezing alcoholm _ national living wage to freezing alcohol... but no broader plan? the government— alcohol... but no broader plan? the government goals always keep this under— government goals always keep this under review. we have given £500 million _ under review. we have given £500 million this— under review. we have given £500 million this winter for... to help some _ million this winter for... to help some of— million this winter for... to help some of the _ million this winter for... to help some of the most vulnerable families with the _ some of the most vulnerable families with the cost of living. there are wider— with the cost of living. there are wider policies like the warm home discount. — wider policies like the warm home discount, which is support for people — discount, which is support for people with their fuel bills. my the warm home _ people with their fuel bills. my the warm home discount _ people with their fuel bills. my the warm home discount be _ people with their fuel bills. my the | warm home discount be extended? making more people eligible? istate warm home discount be extended? making more people eligible? we are extendin: making more people eligible? we are extending the — making more people eligible? we are extending the number— making more people eligible? we are extending the number of— making more people eligible? we are extending the number of people - making more people eligible? we are extending the number of people for l extending the number of people for whom _ extending the number of people for whom the _ extending the number of people for whom the warm home discount plies by 780.00o _ whom the warm home discount plies by 780,000. that is a change occurring already~ _ 780,000. that is a change occurring already~ in— 780,000. that is a change occurring already. in terms of broader options. _ already. in terms of broader options, we continue to look at all of them _ options, we continue to look at all of them it— options, we continue to look at all of them. it is important to be clear as well— of them. it is important to be clear as well that — of them. it is important to be clear as well that labour's policy on a
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vat cut— as well that labour's policy on a vat cut is— as well that labour's policy on a vat cut is not a well targeted one. it vat cut is not a well targeted one. it would _ vat cut is not a well targeted one. it would benefit the highest earners the most _ it would benefit the highest earners the most because they tend to have the most because they tend to have the largest houses and the largest fuel bills — the largest houses and the largest fuel bills. when we are looking at policy— fuel bills. when we are looking at policy in — fuel bills. when we are looking at policy in this space, we want to make _ policy in this space, we want to make sure _ policy in this space, we want to make sure we deliver the best value for the _ make sure we deliver the best value for the taxpayers pound and give them _ for the taxpayers pound and give them the — for the taxpayers pound and give them the most support. one for the taxpayers pound and give them the most support.- for the taxpayers pound and give them the most support. one of the thins ou them the most support. one of the things you are _ them the most support. one of the things you are here _ them the most support. one of the things you are here to _ them the most support. one of the things you are here to talk- them the most support. one of the things you are here to talk to - them the most support. one of the things you are here to talk to us i things you are here to talk to us about today is the brexit freedoms bill, the ability to cut certain eu rules. i want to remind you of something that happened in 2016 when borisjohnson said that removing the 5% charge from domestic energy bills would be one of the benefits from brexit. ~ , . . �* would be one of the benefits from brexit. ~ , ., , �* ., ., brexit. why hasn't he done that? it's brexit. why hasn't he done that? it's exactly _ brexit. why hasn't he done that? it's exactly right _ brexit. why hasn't he done that? it's exactly right we _ brexit. why hasn't he done that? it's exactly right we are - it's exactly right we are introducing the exit freedoms bill, designed _ introducing the exit freedoms bill, designed to make sure that although we have _ designed to make sure that although we have left the european union, which _ we have left the european union, which is _ we have left the european union, which is fantastic, we have got a lot of— which is fantastic, we have got a lot of the — which is fantastic, we have got a lot of the law still in our own domestic— lot of the law still in our own domestic law as a bridging measure as we _ domestic law as a bridging measure as we exit~ — domestic law as a bridging measure as we exit. the bill will allow us to amend — as we exit. the bill will allow us to amend that low much more easily. we need _ to amend that low much more easily. we need to— to amend that low much more easily. we need to have primary legislation to change _
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we need to have primary legislation to change it. it is also ending its special— to change it. it is also ending its special status in our legal system. just back— special status in our legal system. just back to my actual question though. in just back to my actual question thou:h. . just back to my actual question thou:h. , ., ~ . though. in terms of the vat cut, i answered at _ though. in terms of the vat cut, i answered at a _ though. in terms of the vat cut, i answered at a moment _ though. in terms of the vat cut, i answered at a moment earlier - though. in terms of the vat cut, i answered at a moment earlier in i answered at a moment earlier in answer— answered at a moment earlier in answer to— answered at a moment earlier in answer to labour's policy in this case _ answer to labour's policy in this case we — answer to labour's policy in this case. we look at all of our options. a vat— case. we look at all of our options. a vat cut _ case. we look at all of our options. a vat cut is — case. we look at all of our options. a vat cut is something that is within— a vat cut is something that is within our— a vat cut is something that is within our power. it is whether it is the _ within our power. it is whether it is the right— within our power. it is whether it is the right targeted measure. this is the right targeted measure. this is the _ is the right targeted measure. this is the point — is the right targeted measure. this is the point. if we are going to intervene _ is the point. if we are going to intervene in the space and spend hundreds— intervene in the space and spend hundreds of millions, or billions of pounds. _ hundreds of millions, or billions of pounds. we — hundreds of millions, or billions of pounds, we need to make sure that any intervention we make would benefit — any intervention we make would benefit the poorest of the most. we are not— benefit the poorest of the most. we are not persuaded at this point that that is— are not persuaded at this point that that is the — are not persuaded at this point that that is the right intervention. we obviously— that is the right intervention. we obviously continue to look at all of our choices. — obviously continue to look at all of our choices, but to be clear, the benefit — our choices, but to be clear, the benefit of — our choices, but to be clear, the benefit of the vat cut would accrue to the _ benefit of the vat cut would accrue to the people with the largest bills and largest energy costs. 30 to the people with the largest bills and largest energy costs.- to the people with the largest bills and largest energy costs. so has the prime minister _ and largest energy costs. so has the prime minister changed _ and largest energy costs. so has the prime minister changed his - and largest energy costs. so has the prime minister changed his mind - prime minister changed his mind since 2016? the prime minister changed his mind since 2016?— prime minister changed his mind since 2016? , , ., , since 2016? the prime minister was hittthlihtin since 2016? the prime minister was highlighting the _ since 2016? the prime minister was highlighting the fact _ since 2016? the prime minister was highlighting the fact their _ since 2016? the prime minister was highlighting the fact their options i highlighting the fact their options open to—
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highlighting the fact their options open to you when you leave the european — open to you when you leave the european union. we have already exercised — european union. we have already exercised some of them, from ending tampon— exercised some of them, from ending tampon tax. _ exercised some of them, from ending tampon tax, this is another option open _ tampon tax, this is another option open to— tampon tax, this is another option open to us — tampon tax, this is another option open to us. it is one which is not perfect _ open to us. it is one which is not perfect in — open to us. it is one which is not perfect in the context of supporting families— perfect in the context of supporting families with the cost of energy bills _ families with the cost of energy bills. that is why we continue to look— bills. that is why we continue to look at — bills. that is why we continue to look at this— bills. that is why we continue to look at this question.— bills. that is why we continue to look at this question. another week has iassed look at this question. another week has passed and _ look at this question. another week has passed and we _ look at this question. another week has passed and we are _ look at this question. another week has passed and we are still - look at this question. another week has passed and we are still waitingl has passed and we are still waiting for the report from sue gray into the party is being held at downing street. any indication yet when that might happen? if} it street. any indication yet when that might happen?— might happen? is it imminent? i believe it will _ might happen? is it imminent? i believe it will be _ might happen? is it imminent? i believe it will be soon. - might happen? is it imminent? i believe it will be soon. the - might happen? is it imminent? i. believe it will be soon. the precise timing _ believe it will be soon. the precise timing of— believe it will be soon. the precise timing of this is a matter for sue gray _ timing of this is a matter for sue gray it— timing of this is a matter for sue gray it is— timing of this is a matter for sue gray it is a _ timing of this is a matter for sue gray. it is a completely independent process _ gray. it is a completely independent process. and i do not know precisely when _ process. and i do not know precisely when she _ process. and i do not know precisely when she will bring that report forward — when she will bring that report forward. what we have been clear about— forward. what we have been clear about is— forward. what we have been clear about is that when she does give her report— about is that when she does give her report to _ about is that when she does give her report to the prime minister, he set out his— report to the prime minister, he set out his very— report to the prime minister, he set out his very clear ambition to publish — out his very clear ambition to publish that in full and then to make — publish that in full and then to make a — publish that in full and then to make a statement to parliament as soon as— make a statement to parliament as soon as possible afterwards. that is the process— soon as possible afterwards. that is the process that will be followed. simon _ the process that will be followed. simon clarke, give very much.
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some very blustery conditions in part of the uk this morning. carol has got the picture for today and the next few days. good morning. the next few days. good mornint. ., . ., good morning. good morning. we have had tus good morning. good morning. we have had gusty winds — good morning. good morning. we have had gusty winds overnight. _ good morning. good morning. we have had gusty winds overnight. in _ good morning. good morning. we have had gusty winds overnight. in fact, - had gusty winds overnight. in fact, in stornoway and aberdeenshire, the wind associated with storm corrie gusted to 92 mph. through the course of the date storm corrie will continue to push away into the north sea. very slowly the winds will ease. currently the met office still has this yellow weather warning in force across parts of eastern england. along the north sea coastline and over the hills we are expecting costs of 50 to 60 mph. inland we are looking at a0 to a5 mph. some large waves along the north sea coastline. a5 mph. some large waves along the north sea coastline. as we go through the day storm corrie continues to push away into the near continent. you can see from the isobars we are still going to have gusty winds. later a weather front will bring in some rain. we have also got some snow showers in northern scotland first thing. with
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the low temperatures there is the risk of ice on untreated services. a lot of dry weather. a few showers in northern ireland, wales coming to the midlands, pushing west through the midlands, pushing west through the day. these black circles represent the strength of the winds as we head into the middle of the afternoon. still pretty gusty. temperature —wise this is what you can expect. four to 10 degrees. and on the wind —— add on the wind and it will feel colder. this evening and overnight we have got a weather front bringing rain to northern ireland, scotland, england and wales. a5 ireland, scotland, england and wales. as it pushes south and east, clear skies follow behind. still blustery. it is going to be cool for most. a hint of something milder coming our way from the west. here is the weather front sinking south. it is a cold front. you can see we have got isobars close together. it is still going to be windy. a weather front in the north enhancing the showers. a5 weather front in the north enhancing the showers. as the cold front sinks south, the cloud associated with it in northern ireland, england and
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wales also slips south. patchy rain on that. wherever you are tomorrow, still gusty winds. temperatures much milder than today. you will actually notice the difference. we are looking at widely 11 to 13 degrees. a5 looking at widely 11 to 13 degrees. as we head on from tuesday into wednesday, you can see two —— you can see we have the isobars close together. they will open a bit on wednesday, so not as windy. a week weather front across parts of bingen, wales and northern ireland. through the day that will move northwards into parts of scotland. drizzly in the north and west, breezy, joyous conditions in the south—east. again, pretty mild for the time of the year. 11 to 13. this is wednesday's picture. weather fronts waiting in the wings for thursday. wind coming on across the north and west, slipping south. a fair bit of cloud. heavier rain across the north and the west as we go through the latter part of the day. behind that we seek colder air
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and overnight we see some snow showers in parts of scotland and northern ireland. increasing, possibly, to lower levels. . .. increasing, possibly, to lower levels. ., ., ., increasing, possibly, to lower levels-— the i levels. thank you, carol. the complicated _ levels. thank you, carol. the complicated picture. - we have to talk about the australian open because it was blistering heat for rafa nadal. breathtaking. i was saying at 1.1 am breathtaking. i was saying at h am not sure _ breathtaking. i was saying at h am not sure there are enough towels in melbourne — not sure there are enough towels in melbourne. the perspiration coming off rafael— melbourne. the perspiration coming off rafael nadal. a melbourne. the perspiration coming off rafael nadal._ off rafael nadal. a long time out there as well? _ off rafael nadal. a long time out there as well? five _ off rafael nadal. a long time out there as well? five hours. - off rafael nadal. a long time out there as well? five hours. did i off rafael nadal. a long time out| there as well? five hours. did you see him with _ there as well? five hours. did you see him with the _ there as well? five hours. did you see him with the pickle _ there as well? five hours. did you see him with the pickle juice, - see him with the picklejuice, daniil medvedev? see him with the pickle 'uice, daniil medvedev?* see him with the pickle 'uice, daniil medvedev? yes, this is his secret recipe- — daniil medvedev? yes, this is his secret recipe. unbelievable. - daniil medvedev? yes, this is his secret recipe. unbelievable. i- daniil medvedev? yes, this is his l secret recipe. unbelievable. ithink there _ secret recipe. unbelievable. ithink there are _ secret recipe. unbelievable. ithink there are moments in sport when sports _ there are moments in sport when sports men — there are moments in sport when sports men and women show why they are a true _ sports men and women show why they are a true champion. we saw that with rafael— are a true champion. we saw that with rafael nadal yesterday. unbelievable. it's why we love sport~ — unbelievable. it's why we love sport. unpredictable at its best. good _ sport. unpredictable at its best. good morning. ruffin adele called it
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the most — good morning. ruffin adele called it the most... rafael nadal made an amazing _ the most... rafael nadal made an amazing comeback to win a record 21st grand — amazing comeback to win a record zist grand slam title. some of his moments there, some of the greatest — some of his moments there, some of the greatest moments of him i think, winning _ the greatest moments of him i think, winning his _ the greatest moments of him i think, winning his trophies. on his way to winning _ winning his trophies. on his way to winning those 21 titles. we were hoping _ winning those 21 titles. we were hoping to— winning those 21 titles. we were hoping to venue —— bring you a nice little _ hoping to venue —— bring you a nice little wrap — hoping to venue —— bring you a nice little wrap of — hoping to venue —— bring you a nice little wrap of what happened. we could _ little wrap of what happened. we could be — little wrap of what happened. we could be here a long time because he has won— could be here a long time because he has won a _ could be here a long time because he has won a few titles! let's go from one grand — has won a few titles! let's go from one grand slam champion to another and speak— one grand slam champion to another and speak to the former wimbledon whether— and speak to the former wimbledon whether -- — and speak to the former wimbledon whether —— winner, marion bartoli, whojoins _ whether —— winner, marion bartoli, who joins us~ — whether —— winner, marion bartoli, whojoins us. some up for us? we didn't— whojoins us. some up for us? we didn't see — whojoins us. some up for us? we didn't see how he did it yesterday what _ didn't see how he did it yesterday what he _ didn't see how he did it yesterday what he did it in spectacular style,
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didn't— what he did it in spectacular style, didn't he. — what he did it in spectacular style, didn't he, coming through in five sets? _ didn't he, coming through in five sets? it— didn't he, coming through in five sets? it was one of the great sporting _ sets? it was one of the great sporting achievements. some made up for us? absolutely. _ sporting achievements. some made up for us? absolutely. as _ sporting achievements. some made up for us? absolutely. as you _ sporting achievements. some made up for us? absolutely. as you just - sporting achievements. some made up for us? absolutely. as you just said - for us? absolutely. as you just said it was— for us? absolutely. as you just said it was the _ for us? absolutely. as you just said it was the most— for us? absolutely. as you just said it was the most mental— for us? absolutely. as you just said it was the most mental effort - for us? absolutely. as you just said it was the most mental effort i- for us? absolutely. as you just said| it was the most mental effort i have ever seen— it was the most mental effort i have ever seen rafa _ it was the most mental effort i have ever seen rafa coming _ it was the most mental effort i have ever seen rafa coming through. - it was the most mental effort i have ever seen rafa coming through. it. ever seen rafa coming through. it was incredible _ ever seen rafa coming through. it was incredible to _ ever seen rafa coming through. it was incredible to see _ ever seen rafa coming through. it was incredible to see him - ever seen rafa coming through. it was incredible to see him being i ever seen rafa coming through. it. was incredible to see him being down two sets— was incredible to see him being down two sets to _ was incredible to see him being down two sets to love. _ was incredible to see him being down two sets to love, 3—2 _ was incredible to see him being down two sets to love, 3—2 in _ was incredible to see him being down two sets to love, 3—2 in the _ was incredible to see him being down two sets to love, 3—2 in the third, - two sets to love, 3—2 in the third, love _ two sets to love, 3—2 in the third, love - _ two sets to love, 3—2 in the third, love - ao — two sets to love, 3—2 in the third, love - ao keep— two sets to love, 3—2 in the third, love — 40. keep on _ two sets to love, 3—2 in the third, love — 40. keep on fighting. - two sets to love, 3—2 in the third, i love — 40. keep on fighting. when two sets to love, 3—2 in the third, - love — 40. keep on fighting. when he came _ love — 40. keep on fighting. when he came here _ love — 40. keep on fighting. when he came here to— love — 40. keep on fighting. when he came here to abu _ love — 40. keep on fighting. when he came here to abu dhabi, _ love — 40. keep on fighting. when he came here to abu dhabi, which - love — 40. keep on fighting. when he came here to abu dhabi, which is - came here to abu dhabi, which is very close — came here to abu dhabi, which is very close to _ came here to abu dhabi, which is very close to dubai, _ came here to abu dhabi, which is very close to dubai, when - came here to abu dhabi, which is very close to dubai, when he - came here to abu dhabi, which is very close to dubai, when he lostj very close to dubai, when he lost all his— very close to dubai, when he lost all his matches _ very close to dubai, when he lost all his matches and _ very close to dubai, when he lost all his matches and got _ very close to dubai, when he lost all his matches and got covid, i very close to dubai, when he lost all his matches and got covid, no one ever— all his matches and got covid, no one ever thought— all his matches and got covid, no one ever thought he _ all his matches and got covid, no one ever thought he would - all his matches and got covid, no one ever thought he would have| all his matches and got covid, no| one ever thought he would have a shot to _ one ever thought he would have a shot to win— one ever thought he would have a shot to win the _ one ever thought he would have a shot to win the australian - one ever thought he would have a shot to win the australian open. i one ever thought he would have a i shot to win the australian open. as one of— shot to win the australian open. as one of the — shot to win the australian open. as one of the greatest _ shot to win the australian open. as one of the greatest of— shot to win the australian open. as one of the greatest of all— shot to win the australian open. as one of the greatest of all time, - shot to win the australian open. as one of the greatest of all time, he. one of the greatest of all time, he is able _ one of the greatest of all time, he is able to— one of the greatest of all time, he is able to research _ one of the greatest of all time, he is able to research no _ one of the greatest of all time, he is able to research no matter- one of the greatest of all time, hej is able to research no matter what the circumstances _ is able to research no matter what the circumstances are. _ is able to research no matter what the circumstances are. it - is able to research no matter what the circumstances are. it is - is able to research no matter what the circumstances are. it is a - is able to research no matter what the circumstances are. it is a trulyj the circumstances are. it is a truly remarkable — the circumstances are. it is a truly remarkable and _ the circumstances are. it is a truly remarkable and phenomenal- remarkable and phenomenal achievement _ remarkable and phenomenal achievement what— remarkable and phenomenal achievement what he - remarkable and phenomenal achievement what he did - remarkable and phenomenal- achievement what he did yesterday. what sets _ achievement what he did yesterday. what sets him — achievement what he did yesterday. what sets him apart? _ achievement what he did yesterday. what sets him apart? nobody - achievement what he did yesterday. what sets him apart? nobody has i achievement what he did yesterday. . what sets him apart? nobody has done this before _ what sets him apart? nobody has done this before in men's tennis, winning 21 grand _ this before in men's tennis, winning 21 grand slam titles, and he has been _ 21 grand slam titles, and he has been pushed all the way by novak djokovic— been pushed all the way by novak djokovic and roger federer. what
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does set — djokovic and roger federer. what does set rafael nadal apart to go when _ does set rafael nadal apart to go when nobody else in the sport has gone _ when nobody else in the sport has gone before? i when nobody else in the sport has gone before?— gone before? i think it is 'ust his attitude, daily. * gone before? i think it is 'ust his attitude, daily. when _ gone before? i think it isjust his attitude, daily. when you - gone before? i think it isjust his attitude, daily. when you see i gone before? i think it isjust his. attitude, daily. when you see him gone before? i think it isjust his- attitude, daily. when you see him on the practice _ attitude, daily. when you see him on the practice court— attitude, daily. when you see him on the practice court he _ attitude, daily. when you see him on the practice court he has— attitude, daily. when you see him on the practice court he has this - the practice court he has this constant _ the practice court he has this constant intensity— the practice court he has this constant intensity that - the practice court he has this. constant intensity that defines the practice court he has this - constant intensity that defines him from the _ constant intensity that defines him from the rest _ constant intensity that defines him from the rest. he _ constant intensity that defines him from the rest. he is _ constant intensity that defines him from the rest. he is the _ constant intensity that defines him from the rest. he is the only- constant intensity that defines him from the rest. he is the only one . from the rest. he is the only one putting _ from the rest. he is the only one putting in— from the rest. he is the only one putting in the _ from the rest. he is the only one putting in the same _ from the rest. he is the only one putting in the same intensity, i putting in the same intensity, whether— putting in the same intensity, whether it _ putting in the same intensity, whether it is _ putting in the same intensity, whether it is the _ putting in the same intensity, whether it is the first - putting in the same intensity, whether it is the first ball - putting in the same intensity, whether it is the first ball of. putting in the same intensity, whether it is the first ball of a practice — whether it is the first ball of a practice or— whether it is the first ball of a practice or a _ whether it is the first ball of a practice or a match— whether it is the first ball of a practice or a match point- whether it is the first ball of a practice or a match point in. whether it is the first ball of a practice or a match point in a| whether it is the first ball of a - practice or a match point in a grand slam _ practice or a match point in a grand slam that— practice or a match point in a grand slam that is— practice or a match point in a grand slam. that is definitely— practice or a match point in a grand slam. that is definitely setting - practice or a match point in a grand slam. that is definitely setting him| slam. that is definitely setting him apart _ slam. that is definitely setting him apart for— slam. that is definitely setting him apart for me — slam. that is definitely setting him apart. for me that— slam. that is definitely setting him apart. for me that was _ slam. that is definitely setting him apart. for me that was one - slam. that is definitely setting him apart. for me that was one of- slam. that is definitely setting him apart. for me that was one of the i apart. for me that was one of the crucial— apart. for me that was one of the crucial things— apart. for me that was one of the crucial things yesterday. - apart. for me that was one of the crucial things yesterday. he - apart. for me that was one of the crucial things yesterday. he keptl apart. for me that was one of the i crucial things yesterday. he kept on trying _ crucial things yesterday. he kept on trying kept— crucial things yesterday. he kept on trying kept on— crucial things yesterday. he kept on trying. kept on figuring _ crucial things yesterday. he kept on trying. kept on figuring out - crucial things yesterday. he kept on trying. kept on figuring out how- crucial things yesterday. he kept on trying. kept on figuring out how hel trying. kept on figuring out how he could _ trying. kept on figuring out how he could move — trying. kept on figuring out how he could move daniil— trying. kept on figuring out how he could move daniil medvedev- trying. kept on figuring out how he could move daniil medvedev from i trying. kept on figuring out how he i could move daniil medvedev from the back of— could move daniil medvedev from the back of the _ could move daniil medvedev from the back of the court, _ could move daniil medvedev from the back of the court, drop _ could move daniil medvedev from the back of the court, drop shots, - could move daniil medvedev from the back of the court, drop shots, being. back of the court, drop shots, being able to— back of the court, drop shots, being able to serve — back of the court, drop shots, being able to serve better _ back of the court, drop shots, being able to serve better as _ back of the court, drop shots, being able to serve better as well, - back of the court, drop shots, being able to serve better as well, which i able to serve better as well, which he couldn't— able to serve better as well, which he couldn't do— able to serve better as well, which he couldn't do for— able to serve better as well, which he couldn't do for the _ able to serve better as well, which he couldn't do for the first - able to serve better as well, which he couldn't do for the first two - he couldn't do for the first two sets — he couldn't do for the first two sets he — he couldn't do for the first two sets he kept— he couldn't do for the first two sets. he kept on— he couldn't do for the first two sets. he kept on trying - he couldn't do for the first two - sets. he kept on trying constantly. he never— sets. he kept on trying constantly. he never gave _ sets. he kept on trying constantly. he never gave up _ sets. he kept on trying constantly. he never gave up on _ sets. he kept on trying constantly. he never gave up on himself. - sets. he kept on trying constantly. he never gave up on himself. he . he never gave up on himself. he always— he never gave up on himself. he always tried _ he never gave up on himself. he always tried to _ he never gave up on himself. he always tried to find _ he never gave up on himself. he always tried to find a _ he never gave up on himself. he always tried to find a solution. i always tried to find a solution. this— always tried to find a solution. this intensity— always tried to find a solution. this intensity he _ always tried to find a solution. this intensity he has _ always tried to find a solution. this intensity he has in - always tried to find a solution. this intensity he has in his- always tried to find a solution. i this intensity he has in his whole body. _ this intensity he has in his whole body, throughout— this intensity he has in his whole body, throughout his _ this intensity he has in his whole body, throughout his career, - this intensity he has in his whole i body, throughout his career, really, has been _ body, throughout his career, really, has been his— body, throughout his career, really, has been his trademark. _ body, throughout his career, really, has been his trademark. that- body, throughout his career, really, has been his trademark. that is- body, throughout his career, really, j has been his trademark. that is why he is _ has been his trademark. that is why he is here — has been his trademark. that is why he is here he— has been his trademark. that is why he is here. he believed _ has been his trademark. that is why he is here. he believed even - has been his trademark. that is why he is here. he believed even with. he is here. he believed even with the foot— he is here. he believed even with the foot injury. _ he is here. he believed even with the foot injury, the _ he is here. he believed even with the foot injury, the surgery, - he is here. he believed even with the foot injury, the surgery, he i the foot injury, the surgery, he couldn't— the foot injury, the surgery, he couldn't perform _ the foot injury, the surgery, he
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couldn't perform after- the foot injury, the surgery, he - couldn't perform after roland—garros last year. _ couldn't perform after roland—garros last year. the — couldn't perform after roland—garros last year, the kept _ couldn't perform after roland—garros last year, the kept on— couldn't perform after roland—garros last year, the kept on trying, - couldn't perform after roland—garros last year, the kept on trying, kept. last year, the kept on trying, kept on believing — last year, the kept on trying, kept on believing in _ last year, the kept on trying, kept on believing in himself— last year, the kept on trying, kept on believing in himself a - last year, the kept on trying, kept on believing in himself a damp- last year, the kept on trying, keptl on believing in himself a damp ——. rafa _ on believing in himself a damp ——. rafa nadal. — on believing in himself a damp ——. rafa nadal, not _ on believing in himself a damp ——. rafa nadal, not many— on believing in himself a damp ——. rafa nadal, not many people - on believing in himself a damp ——. i rafa nadal, not many people thought he would _ rafa nadal, not many people thought he would have — rafa nadal, not many people thought he would have a — rafa nadal, not many people thought he would have a shot _ rafa nadal, not many people thought he would have a shot to _ rafa nadal, not many people thought he would have a shot to win - rafa nadal, not many people thought he would have a shot to win the - he would have a shot to win the australian — he would have a shot to win the australian open, _ he would have a shot to win the australian open, and _ he would have a shot to win the australian open, and yet- he would have a shot to win the australian open, and yet he - he would have a shot to win the | australian open, and yet he has he would have a shot to win the - australian open, and yet he has done it because _ australian open, and yet he has done it because he — australian open, and yet he has done it because he has _ australian open, and yet he has done it because he has this— australian open, and yet he has done it because he has this incredible - it because he has this incredible belief— it because he has this incredible belief inside _ it because he has this incredible belief inside himself _ it because he has this incredible belief inside himself as - it because he has this incredible belief inside himself as this - belief inside himself as this incredible _ belief inside himself as this incredible intensity. - belief inside himself as this incredible intensity. it- belief inside himself as this| incredible intensity. it takes belief inside himself as this . incredible intensity. it takes so much _ incredible intensity. it takes so much for— incredible intensity. it takes so much for an— incredible intensity. it takes so much for an opponent - incredible intensity. it takes so much for an opponent to - incredible intensity. it takes so much for an opponent to beat. incredible intensity. it takes so i much for an opponent to beat him incredible intensity. it takes so - much for an opponent to beat him in a grand _ much for an opponent to beat him in a grand slam — much for an opponent to beat him in a grand slam in— much for an opponent to beat him in a grand slam in five _ much for an opponent to beat him in a grand slam in five sets. _ much for an opponent to beat him in a grand slam in five sets. daniil- a grand slam in five sets. daniil medvedev— a grand slam in five sets. daniil medvedev dated _ a grand slam in five sets. daniil medvedev dated for— a grand slam in five sets. daniil medvedev dated for two - a grand slam in five sets. daniil medvedev dated for two sets i a grand slam in five sets. daniili medvedev dated for two sets and a grand slam in five sets. daniil. medvedev dated for two sets and a half but _ medvedev dated for two sets and a half but could — medvedev dated for two sets and a half but could not _ medvedev dated for two sets and a half but could not close _ medvedev dated for two sets and a half but could not close it - medvedev dated for two sets and a half but could not close it out. - half but could not close it out. when — half but could not close it out. when it — half but could not close it out. when it became _ half but could not close it out. when it became a _ half but could not close it out. when it became a dogfight, i half but could not close it out. i when it became a dogfight, you half but could not close it out. - when it became a dogfight, you could 'ust when it became a dogfight, you could just see _ when it became a dogfight, you could just see that — when it became a dogfight, you could just see that physically— when it became a dogfight, you could just see that physically and _ just see that physically and mentally— just see that physically and mentally rafael— just see that physically and mentally rafael nadal- just see that physically and mentally rafael nadal was| just see that physically and - mentally rafael nadal was taking the upper hand. — mentally rafael nadal was taking the upper hand. which— mentally rafael nadal was taking the upper hand, which is— mentally rafael nadal was taking the upper hand, which is incredible - mentally rafael nadal was taking the upper hand, which is incredible whenj upper hand, which is incredible when you think— upper hand, which is incredible when you think daniil — upper hand, which is incredible when you think daniil medvedev _ upper hand, which is incredible when you think daniil medvedev is - upper hand, which is incredible when you think daniil medvedev is ten - you think daniil medvedev is ten years— you think daniil medvedev is ten years younger— you think daniil medvedev is ten years younger than— you think daniil medvedev is ten years younger than him. - you think daniil medvedev is ten years younger than him. it - you think daniil medvedev is teni years younger than him. it shows you think daniil medvedev is ten - years younger than him. it shows the amount— years younger than him. it shows the amount of— years younger than him. it shows the amount of stamina, _ years younger than him. it shows the amount of stamina, the _ years younger than him. it shows the amount of stamina, the amount- years younger than him. it shows the amount of stamina, the amount of. amount of stamina, the amount of fitness _ amount of stamina, the amount of fitness level— amount of stamina, the amount of fitness level and _ amount of stamina, the amount of fitness level and resilience - amount of stamina, the amount of fitness level and resilience that. fitness level and resilience that ruffin — fitness level and resilience that ruffin adele _ fitness level and resilience that ruffin adele is _ fitness level and resilience that ruffin adele is able _ fitness level and resilience that ruffin adele is able to - fitness level and resilience that ruffin adele is able to show. i i fitness level and resilience that - ruffin adele is able to show. i hope a lot of— ruffin adele is able to show. i hope a lot of kids — ruffin adele is able to show. i hope a lot of kids have _ ruffin adele is able to show. i hope a lot of kids have been— ruffin adele is able to show. i hope a lot of kids have been switching. ruffin adele is able to show. i hope a lot of kids have been switching on their tv _ a lot of kids have been switching on their tv and — a lot of kids have been switching on their tv and watching _ a lot of kids have been switching on their tv and watching that - a lot of kids have been switching on their tv and watching that much - their tv and watching that much because — their tv and watching that much because that _ their tv and watching that much because that was _ their tv and watching that much because that was a _ their tv and watching that much because that was a masterclassl their tv and watching that much i because that was a masterclass in terms _ because that was a masterclass in terms of— because that was a masterclass in terms of attitude, _ because that was a masterclass in
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terms of attitude, mental - because that was a masterclass in - terms of attitude, mental toughness, io terms of attitude, mental toughness, go on _ terms of attitude, mental toughness, go on the _ terms of attitude, mental toughness, go on the tennis — terms of attitude, mental toughness, go on the tennis court _ terms of attitude, mental toughness, go on the tennis court and _ terms of attitude, mental toughness, go on the tennis court and give - go on the tennis court and give everything _ go on the tennis court and give everything you _ go on the tennis court and give everything you have. _ go on the tennis court and give everything you have. i- go on the tennis court and give everything you have.— go on the tennis court and give everything you have. i am sure many ieiole will everything you have. i am sure many people will be _ everything you have. i am sure many people will be inspired. _ everything you have. i am sure many people will be inspired. i _ everything you have. i am sure many people will be inspired. i think - everything you have. i am sure many people will be inspired. i think we i people will be inspired. i think we all were — people will be inspired. i think we all were. even more remarkable when you consider— all were. even more remarkable when you consider this australian open title came — you consider this australian open title came 13 years after his first. you yourself have won a grand slam. give us _ you yourself have won a grand slam. give us a _ you yourself have won a grand slam. give us a sense of how hard it is and what — give us a sense of how hard it is and what is _ give us a sense of how hard it is and what is required essentially to continue _ and what is required essentially to continue to produce your best at the very top— continue to produce your best at the very top level of the game for that period _ very top level of the game for that period of— very top level of the game for that period of time?— period of time? absolutely. it is extremely _ period of time? absolutely. it is extremely hard _ period of time? absolutely. it is extremely hard but _ period of time? absolutely. it is extremely hard but the - period of time? absolutely. it is| extremely hard but the toughest point _ extremely hard but the toughest point is — extremely hard but the toughest point is a — extremely hard but the toughest point is a grand _ extremely hard but the toughest point is a grand slam, _ extremely hard but the toughest point is a grand slam, at - extremely hard but the toughest point is a grand slam, at two - extremely hard but the toughest - point is a grand slam, at two weeks, is extremely — point is a grand slam, at two weeks, is extremely long _ point is a grand slam, at two weeks, is extremely long. you _ point is a grand slam, at two weeks, is extremely long. you feel- point is a grand slam, at two weeks, is extremely long. you feel you - point is a grand slam, at two weeks, is extremely long. you feel you have| is extremely long. you feel you have played _ is extremely long. you feel you have played for— is extremely long. you feel you have played for a — is extremely long. you feel you have played for a year _ is extremely long. you feel you have played for a year when _ is extremely long. you feel you have played for a year when you _ is extremely long. you feel you have played for a year when you have - played for a year when you have played _ played for a year when you have played and _ played for a year when you have played and won _ played for a year when you have played and won seven _ played for a year when you have played and won seven matches. j played and won seven matches. especially — played and won seven matches. especially in _ played and won seven matches. especially in melbourne - played and won seven matches. especially in melbourne when i played and won seven matches. i especially in melbourne when you have different _ especially in melbourne when you have different conditions, - especially in melbourne when you have different conditions, almost| especially in melbourne when you . have different conditions, almost in every— have different conditions, almost in every single — have different conditions, almost in every single match _ have different conditions, almost in every single match you _ have different conditions, almost in every single match you have - have different conditions, almost in every single match you have to - have different conditions, almost inl every single match you have to play, whether— every single match you have to play, whether it _ whether it is day or night, humid or not. you _ whether it is day or night, humid or not. you have — whether it is day or night, humid or not. you have to— whether it is day or night, humid or not, you have to deal— whether it is day or night, humid or not, you have to deal with - whether it is day or night, humid or not, you have to deal with so - whether it is day or night, humid or not, you have to deal with so many| not, you have to deal with so many different _ not, you have to deal with so many different elements. _ not, you have to deal with so many different elements. that _ not, you have to deal with so many different elements. that is - different elements. that is draining. _ different elements. that is draining, mentally, - different elements. that is - draining, mentally, physically, emotionally. _ draining, mentally, physically, emotionally, that— draining, mentally, physically, emotionally, that is— draining, mentally, physically, emotionally, that is what - draining, mentally, physically, emotionally, that is what you i draining, mentally, physically, - emotionally, that is what you need to have _ emotionally, that is what you need to have a _ emotionally, that is what you need to have a very— emotionally, that is what you need to have a very strong _ emotionally, that is what you need to have a very strong team - emotionally, that is what you need to have a very strong team around | to have a very strong team around you to _ to have a very strong team around you to be — to have a very strong team around you to be able _ to have a very strong team around you to be able to _ to have a very strong team around you to be able to help _ to have a very strong team around you to be able to help you - to have a very strong team around you to be able to help you in - to have a very strong team around j you to be able to help you in every
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single _ you to be able to help you in every single department. _ you to be able to help you in every single department. to _ you to be able to help you in every single department. tojust- you to be able to help you in every single department. to just take i you to be able to help you in everyj single department. tojust take all the boxes — single department. tojust take all the boxes. someone _ single department. tojust take all the boxes. someone like - single department. tojust take all the boxes. someone like rafa - single department. tojust take all. the boxes. someone like rafa nadal has been _ the boxes. someone like rafa nadal has been able — the boxes. someone like rafa nadal has been able to _ the boxes. someone like rafa nadal has been able to do— the boxes. someone like rafa nadal has been able to do that _ the boxes. someone like rafa nadal has been able to do that for - the boxes. someone like rafa nadal has been able to do that for almost| has been able to do that for almost 20 years _ has been able to do that for almost 20 years i— has been able to do that for almost 20 years ijust_ has been able to do that for almost 20 years. ijust can't— has been able to do that for almost 20 years. ijust can't put— has been able to do that for almost 20 years. ijust can't put enough. 20 years. ijust can't put enough words _ 20 years. ijust can't put enough words to— 20 years. ijust can't put enough words to show— 20 years. ijust can't put enough words to show my _ 20 years. ijust can't put enough words to show my appreciation i 20 years. ijust can't put enoughl words to show my appreciation to 20 years. ijust can't put enough- words to show my appreciation to him for everything — words to show my appreciation to him for everything he _ words to show my appreciation to him for everything he has _ words to show my appreciation to him for everything he has given— words to show my appreciation to him for everything he has given the - for everything he has given the sport — for everything he has given the sport he — for everything he has given the sport he is— for everything he has given the sport. he is an— for everything he has given the sport. he is an extraordinary. for everything he has given the - sport. he is an extraordinary human being. _ sport. he is an extraordinary human being. an _ sport. he is an extraordinary human being, an extraordinary— being, an extraordinary sportsperson. - being, an extraordinary sportsperson. he - being, an extraordinary sportsperson. he is- being, an extraordinary sportsperson. he is a i being, an extraordinary. sportsperson. he is a role being, an extraordinary- sportsperson. he is a role model around _ sportsperson. he is a role model around this— sportsperson. he is a role model around this world. _ sportsperson. he is a role model around this world. and _ sportsperson. he is a role model around this world. and honestly, sportsperson. he is a role model. around this world. and honestly, i want _ around this world. and honestly, i want to— around this world. and honestly, i want to enjoy _ around this world. and honestly, i want to enjoy all _ around this world. and honestly, i want to enjoy all this _ around this world. and honestly, i want to enjoy all this last - around this world. and honestly, i want to enjoy all this last few- want to enjoy all this last few years— want to enjoy all this last few years from _ want to enjoy all this last few years from roger, _ want to enjoy all this last few years from roger, rafa - want to enjoy all this last few years from roger, rafa and l want to enjoy all this last few- years from roger, rafa and even novak. _ years from roger, rafa and even novak, because _ years from roger, rafa and even novak, because we _ years from roger, rafa and even novak, because we all— years from roger, rafa and even novak, because we all know- years from roger, rafa and even novak, because we all know it i years from roger, rafa and even novak, because we all know it is| novak, because we all know it is coming — novak, because we all know it is coming to— novak, because we all know it is coming to an _ novak, because we all know it is coming to an end _ novak, because we all know it is coming to an end and _ novak, because we all know it is coming to an end and we - novak, because we all know it is coming to an end and we are - novak, because we all know it is i coming to an end and we are going novak, because we all know it is - coming to an end and we are going to be so— coming to an end and we are going to be so sad— coming to an end and we are going to be so sad when— coming to an end and we are going to be so sad when the _ coming to an end and we are going to be so sad when the three _ coming to an end and we are going to be so sad when the three of- coming to an end and we are going to be so sad when the three of those - be so sad when the three of those major— be so sad when the three of those major champions _ be so sad when the three of those major champions will— be so sad when the three of those major champions will walk- be so sad when the three of those major champions will walk away. be so sad when the three of those . major champions will walk away from this game _ major champions will walk away from this came. . . major champions will walk away from this came. , ., ., major champions will walk away from this tame. , ., ., ,, ., «' major champions will walk away from this tame. , ., ., ,, .,«' ., major champions will walk away from this came. , ., ., ,, ., this game. great to speak to you this game. great to speak to you this morning. — this game. great to speak to you this morning, marion, _ this game. great to speak to you this morning, marion, get - this game. great to speak to you this morning, marion, get your. this morning, marion, get your thoughts — this morning, marion, get your thoughts on what was a brilliant day yesterday _ thoughts on what was a brilliant day yesterday. a breathless match. rafael— yesterday. a breathless match. rafael nadal clinched his zist grand slam in— rafael nadal clinched his zist grand slam in melbourne yesterday. having — slam in melbourne yesterday. having produced a comeback of their own to _ having produced a comeback of their own to level the series, england lost the — own to level the series, england lost the deciding t20 match against
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the west— lost the deciding t20 match against the west indies in barbados. started well for— the west indies in barbados. started well for england, they took four early— well for england, they took four early wickets, but some big hitting saw the _ early wickets, but some big hitting saw the hosts finished strongly, setting — saw the hosts finished strongly, setting a — saw the hosts finished strongly, setting a target of 180. england needed — setting a target of 180. england needed 20 from their last over. inevitably— needed 20 from their last over. inevitably there were going to hit out. jason — inevitably there were going to hit out. jason holder took four wickets in four— out. jason holder took four wickets in four balls. the first man to do that in— in four balls. the first man to do that in t20 — in four balls. the first man to do that in t20 internationals. we could be about to see the new man taking _ we could be about to see the new man taking over _ we could be about to see the new man taking over at everton. it is going to be _ taking over at everton. it is going to be frank— taking over at everton. it is going to be frank lampard, of all people. it is to be frank lampard, of all people. it is a _ to be frank lampard, of all people. it is a big _ to be frank lampard, of all people. it is a big move. despite the uncertainty of the club, five managers in five years, he is in line _ managers in five years, he is in line to — managers in five years, he is in line to take _ managers in five years, he is in line to take over on a two and a half— line to take over on a two and a half year— line to take over on a two and a half year deal, replacing rafa benitez. _ half year deal, replacing rafa benitez, who left the club this month— benitez, who left the club this month after one win in 13 matches. it month after one win in 13 matches. it will— month after one win in 13 matches. it will be _ month after one win in 13 matches. it will be an— month after one win in 13 matches. it will be an interesting one. relative _ it will be an interesting one. relative inexperience in his managerial infancy.- relative inexperience in his managerial infancy. relative inexperience in his manaaerialinfan , , managerial infancy. wayne rooney is a man who many _ managerial infancy. wayne rooney is a man who many people _ managerial infancy. wayne rooney is a man who many people will- managerial infancy. wayne rooney is a man who many people will know, l a man who many people will know, even though they don't follow football, and what happened over the weekend was that wayne rooney
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basically said, i don't want to talk to everton about theirjob. he has a big job to do at derby county. it says a lot given the difficulties he is facing — says a lot given the difficulties he is facing at derby county. he wants to sta . is facing at derby county. he wants to stay- for— is facing at derby county. he wants to stay. for frank _ is facing at derby county. he wants to stay. for frank lampard, - is facing at derby county. he wants to stay. for frank lampard, this i is facing at derby county. he wants to stay. for frank lampard, this is| to stay. for frank lampard, this is probably make or break. he has to make it work. i’m probably make or break. he has to make it work-— probably make or break. he has to make it work. �* ., ,., make it work. i'm going in somewhere with difficulties _ make it work. i'm going in somewhere with difficulties on _ make it work. i'm going in somewhere with difficulties on and _ make it work. i'm going in somewhere with difficulties on and off— make it work. i'm going in somewhere with difficulties on and off the - with difficulties on and off the pitch — with difficulties on and off the iitch. . . with difficulties on and off the iitch. ., , ., with difficulties on and off the iitch. . , ., ., , ., , _ pitch. the fans are really unhappy about it. pitch. the fans are really unhappy about it- not— pitch. the fans are really unhappy about it. not about _ pitch. the fans are really unhappy about it. not about lampard, - pitch. the fans are really unhappy about it. not about lampard, but| pitch. the fans are really unhappy . about it. not about lampard, but the changes. they want stability. rafa benitez changes. they want stability. rafa itenitez was _ changes. they want stability. rafa itenitez was i _ changes. they want stability. rafa benitez was i was _ changes. they want stability. rafa benitez was i was going to be a tricky— benitez was i was going to be a tricky appointment.— benitez was i was going to be a tricky appointment. great manager, but sometimes _ tricky appointment. great manager, but sometimes it _ tricky appointment. great manager, but sometimes it doesn't _ tricky appointment. great manager, but sometimes it doesn't fit. - tricky appointment. great manager, but sometimes it doesn't fit. we . but sometimes it doesn't fit. we should get news on that today. but sometimes it doesn't fit. we - should get news on that today. thank ou, john. should get news on that today. thank you. john- lovely _ should get news on that today. thank you, john. lovely to _ should get news on that today. thank you, john. lovely to speak _ should get news on that today. thank you, john. lovely to speak to - should get news on that today. t�*ista; you, john. lovely to speak to marion bartoli about rafael nadal. it's a massive day for care home residents in england, and their families. from today, you can have as many visitors as you like, as the covid restrictions are eased. not only that, but residents can also have a day out without needing to self—isolate on return. eileen and jacqueline's dad
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thomas is in a care home. theyjoin us from county durham. good morning to both of you. thank you for being with us. eileen, explain the family situation? you are the official carer, is that right? are the official carer, is that ritht? ~ . ., are the official carer, is that ritht? ~ ., ., ., right? well, at the moment, for the last six months _ right? well, at the moment, for the last six months i _ right? well, at the moment, for the last six months i was _ right? well, at the moment, for the last six months i was granted - last six months i was granted essential— last six months i was granted essential care. however, my father has a _ essential care. however, my father has a large — essential care. however, my father has a large family. and it's been extremely. _ has a large family. and it's been extremely, just difficult for us all. extremely, 'ust difficult for us all. ., ., «i , extremely, 'ust difficult for us all. ., ., 4' , all. how did it work between you? were ou all. how did it work between you? were you the _ all. how did it work between you? were you the only _ all. how did it work between you? were you the only person - all. how did it work between you? were you the only person who - all. how did it work between you? l were you the only person who could go in? how did it work for everybody else in the family? i go in? how did it work for everybody else in the family?— else in the family? i had my own health issues, _ else in the family? i had my own health issues, so _ else in the family? i had my own health issues, so i— else in the family? i had my own health issues, so i wasn't - else in the family? i had my own l health issues, so i wasn't working. obviously. — health issues, so i wasn't working. obviously, my older sister lives in australia — obviously, my older sister lives in australia. my younger sister works full-time — australia. my younger sister works full—time. the rest of the family members. — full—time. the rest of the family members, you know, just allow me to id members, you know, just allow me to go in _ members, you know, just allow me to
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go in because — members, you know, just allow me to go in because i was the only one available — go in because i was the only one available to go and visit him every day. although it's been difficult for them. — day. although it's been difficult for them, they still, you know, the fact that _ for them, they still, you know, the fact that somebody was getting in there _ fact that somebody was getting in there to _ fact that somebody was getting in there to see him was better than nothing — there to see him was better than nothint. , .. there to see him was better than nothini. . .. ., there to see him was better than nothin.. , .. ., .,, nothing. jacqueline, what has it been like for _ nothing. jacqueline, what has it been like for the _ nothing. jacqueline, what has it been like for the rest _ nothing. jacqueline, what has it been like for the rest of - nothing. jacqueline, what has it been like for the rest of the - been like for the rest of the family? been like for the rest of the famil ? . . . been like for the rest of the famil ? . , , ., been like for the rest of the famil ? ., , , ., , family? oh, it has been tough. very tou:h. but family? oh, it has been tough. very tough- itut we _ family? oh, it has been tough. very tough. but we are _ family? oh, it has been tough. very tough. but we are all— family? oh, it has been tough. very tough. but we are all excited - family? oh, it has been tough. very tough. but we are all excited today. j tough. but we are all excited today. it tough. but we are all excited today. it means _ tough. but we are all excited today. it means everything _ tough. but we are all excited today. it means everything to _ tough. but we are all excited today. it means everything to us. - tough. but we are all excited today. it means everything to us. i- tough. but we are all excited today. it means everything to us. i am - it means everything to us. i am getting — it means everything to us. i am getting quite _ it means everything to us. i am getting quite emotional. - it means everything to us. i am getting quite emotional. it’s. it means everything to us. i am getting quite emotional.- getting quite emotional. it's all riaht, it's getting quite emotional. it's all right, it's understandable. - getting quite emotional. it's all right, it's understandable. lotsj getting quite emotional. it's all. right, it's understandable. lots of people will be in the same situation. explain to us what it has been like to know where your dad is but not to be able to see him and look after him and talk to him? filth. look after him and talk to him? oh, it has been — look after him and talk to him? oh, it has been torture. it has been torture — it has been torture. it has been torture it's— it has been torture. it has been torture. it'sjust_ it has been torture. it has been torture. it'sjust been- it has been torture. it has been torture. it'sjust been so- torture. it'sjust been so emotional. _ torture. it'sjust been so emotional. i— torture. it'sjust been so emotional. i can't - torture. it'sjust been so emotional. i can't even. torture. it'sjust been so. emotional. i can't even find torture. it'sjust been so- emotional. i can't even find the words _ emotional. ican't even find the words to— emotional. i can't even find the words to describe. _ emotional. i can't even find the words to describe. to _ emotional. i can't even find the words to describe. to describel emotional. i can't even find the - words to describe. to describe how
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hard it— words to describe. to describe how hard it has— words to describe. to describe how hard it has been. _ words to describe. to describe how hard it has been. but _ words to describe. to describe how hard it has been. but i _ words to describe. to describe how hard it has been. but i feel- words to describe. to describe how hard it has been. but i feel totally. hard it has been. but i feel totally blessed _ hard it has been. but i feel totally blessed that — hard it has been. but i feel totally blessed that we _ hard it has been. but i feel totally blessed that we are _ hard it has been. but i feel totally blessed that we are now- hard it has been. but i feel totally blessed that we are now going - hard it has been. but i feel totally blessed that we are now going toi hard it has been. but i feel totally. blessed that we are now going to get the opportunity— blessed that we are now going to get the opportunity to— blessed that we are now going to get the opportunity to do _ blessed that we are now going to get the opportunity to do that _ blessed that we are now going to get the opportunity to do that today. - the opportunity to do that today. his family. — the opportunity to do that today. his family. his— the opportunity to do that today. his family, his extended - the opportunity to do that today. his family, his extended family, i the opportunity to do that today. i his family, his extended family, his grandchildren. _ his family, his extended family, his grandchildren, yes, _ his family, his extended family, his grandchildren, yes, it— his family, his extended family, his grandchildren, yes, it is _ his family, his extended family, his grandchildren, yes, it is going - his family, his extended family, his grandchildren, yes, it is going to i grandchildren, yes, it is going to be fantastic _ grandchildren, yes, it is going to be fantastic. fantastic. - grandchildren, yes, it is going to be fantastic. fantastic. find - grandchildren, yes, it is going to be fantastic. fantastic. and eileen, 'ust talk be fantastic. fantastic. and eileen, just talk us — be fantastic. fantastic. and eileen, just talk us through _ be fantastic. fantastic. and eileen, just talk us through how _ be fantastic. fantastic. and eileen, just talk us through how the - just talk us through how the lockdown has affected your dad? i know he has really struggled with the isolation, hasn't he? filth. the isolation, hasn't he? oh, hu:el . the isolation, hasn't he? oh, hugely. absolutely _ the isolation, hasn't he? 0h, hugely. absolutely hugely. well, it's the _ hugely. absolutely hugely. well, it's the difference between life and death _ it's the difference between life and death he — it's the difference between life and death. he repeatedly told us that he wanted _ death. he repeatedly told us that he wanted to— death. he repeatedly told us that he wanted to die. he is from a huge family~ _ wanted to die. he is from a huge family. although he only has three daughters, he has extended family and we _ daughters, he has extended family and we have grandchildren and children — and we have grandchildren and children. and he repeatedly said he wanted _ children. and he repeatedly said he wanted to— children. and he repeatedly said he wanted to die. he used to sit with his head _ wanted to die. he used to sit with his head hanging down. this isn't a dent gentleman —— this is a gentleman who had a visits daily from _ gentleman who had a visits daily from several people. and we are an
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extremely— from several people. and we are an extremely close family. it's had a profound — extremely close family. it's had a profound effect on the family. it's almost _ profound effect on the family. it's almost like today, i can be released from the _ almost like today, i can be released from the boxing ring. we can be happy— from the boxing ring. we can be happy again. it has been a continuous fight for everything. i 'ust continuous fight for everything. i just can't— continuous fight for everything. i just can't think of a more difficult time _ just can't think of a more difficult time that— just can't think of a more difficult time that we have had to endure. my father. _ time that we have had to endure. my father, because of his dementia, i don't _ father, because of his dementia, i don't think— father, because of his dementia, i don't think he has totally understood. i think itjust don't think he has totally understood. i think it just felt abandoned. understood. i think it 'ust felt abandoned- understood. i think it 'ust felt abandoned. . ,, abandoned. and jacqueline, i think we can see — abandoned. and jacqueline, i think we can see some _ abandoned. and jacqueline, i think we can see some pictures - abandoned. and jacqueline, i think we can see some pictures that - abandoned. and jacqueline, i think we can see some pictures that so i we can see some pictures that so many families have been through. this was your dad's 80th birthday. you were able to celebrate but you had to be a safe distance away? yeah, that's right. yeah, yeah. it was sad — yeah, that's right. yeah, yeah. it was sad. , ., was sad. sorry, eileen, what were ou was sad. sorry, eileen, what were you saying? _
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was sad. sorry, eileen, what were you saying? i _ was sad. sorry, eileen, what were you saying? i was _ was sad. sorry, eileen, what were you saying? i wasjust _ was sad. sorry, eileen, what were you saying? i wasjust saying, - was sad. sorry, eileen, what were you saying? i wasjust saying, he l you saying? i was 'ust saying, he wouldn't even — you saying? i wasjust saying, he wouldn't even look _ you saying? i wasjust saying, he wouldn't even look at _ you saying? i wasjust saying, he wouldn't even look at us. - you saying? i wasjust saying, he wouldn't even look at us. he - wouldn't even look at us. he constantly put his head down. a visible _ constantly put his head down. a visible show of depression. mercifully, there was a couple of very good — mercifully, there was a couple of very good carers who were very good to him _ very good carers who were very good to him they— very good carers who were very good to him. they got extremely close to him and _ to him. they got extremely close to him and got — to him. they got extremely close to him and got him through it. but as i say, him and got him through it. but as i say. i— him and got him through it. but as i say. i hope — him and got him through it. but as i say, i hope you choose life now instead — say, i hope you choose life now instead of— say, i hope you choose life now instead of wanting death. he did ask for his— instead of wanting death. he did ask for his great many times during lockdown~ _ for his great many times during lockdown. �* , . . for his great many times during lockdown. . . . . ., for his great many times during lockdown. . . .. ., , ., lockdown. and jacqueline, are you ho i in: lockdown. and jacqueline, are you hoping now _ lockdown. and jacqueline, are you hoping now that — lockdown. and jacqueline, are you hoping now that you _ lockdown. and jacqueline, are you hoping now that you can _ lockdown. and jacqueline, are you hoping now that you can all - lockdown. and jacqueline, are you hoping now that you can all go - lockdown. and jacqueline, are you hoping now that you can all go in, | hoping now that you can all go in, that your dad's condition, his mood might pick up, you might be able to lift him a bit? filth. might pick up, you might be able to lift him a bit?— lift him a bit? oh, absolutely, absolutely- — lift him a bit? oh, absolutely, absolutely. the _ lift him a bit? oh, absolutely, absolutely. the care - lift him a bit? oh, absolutely, absolutely. the care home . lift him a bit? oh, absolutely, | absolutely. the care home has already— absolutely. the care home has already said _ absolutely. the care home has already said they— absolutely. the care home has already said they can - absolutely. the care home has already said they can see - absolutely. the care home has already said they can see a - already said they can see a difference, _ already said they can see a difference, just— already said they can see a difference, just with - already said they can see a difference, just with somel already said they can see a . difference, just with some of already said they can see a - difference, just with some of the visits— difference, just with some of the visits that has been happening i difference, just with some of the i visits that has been happening over the past _ visits that has been happening over the past couple _ visits that has been happening over the past couple of _ visits that has been happening over the past couple of months. - visits that has been happening over the past couple of months. he - visits that has been happening over the past couple of months. he is i the past couple of months. he is responding — the past couple of months. he is responding better. _ the past couple of months. he is responding better. he _ the past couple of months. he is responding better. he is - responding better. he is communicating - responding better. he is communicating better. i responding better. he is i communicating better. he responding better. he is - communicating better. he kind of lost a _ communicating better. he kind of lost a lot— communicating better. he kind of lost a lot of— communicating better. he kind of lost a lot of communication - communicating better. he kind of lost a lot of communication skills| lost a lot of communication skills with his — lost a lot of communication skills
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with his dementia. _ lost a lot of communication skills with his dementia. and _ lost a lot of communication skills with his dementia. and he - lost a lot of communication skills with his dementia. and he has. with his dementia. and he has responded _ with his dementia. and he has responded. ten— with his dementia. and he has responded. ten fold _ with his dementia. and he has| responded. ten fold compared with his dementia. and he has. responded. ten fold compared to with his dementia. and he has- responded. ten fold compared to what he was _ responded. ten fold compared to what he was 18_ responded. ten fold compared to what he was 18 months _ responded. ten fold compared to what he was 18 months ago. _ responded. ten fold compared to what he was 18 months ago. that— responded. ten fold compared to what he was 18 months ago.— he was 18 months ago. that is good to hear. he was 18 months ago. that is good to hear- we — he was 18 months ago. that is good to hear. we wish _ he was 18 months ago. that is good to hear. we wish you _ he was 18 months ago. that is good to hear. we wish you all— he was 18 months ago. that is good to hear. we wish you all the - he was 18 months ago. that is good to hear. we wish you all the very i to hear. we wish you all the very best for that reunion. i am sure it will be absolutely gorgeous. similar scenes happening across england today. i scenes happening across england toda . ., �* «i ., scenes happening across england toda. ., �* «i ., ., scenes happening across england toda. «i ., ., ., today. i don't know how you are feelin: today. i don't know how you are feeling on _ today. i don't know how you are feeling on this _ today. i don't know how you are feeling on this monday - today. i don't know how you are | feeling on this monday morning, today. i don't know how you are - feeling on this monday morning, but if you need a lift, something to put a smile on your face and if you need a lift, something to put a smile on yourface and inspire if you need a lift, something to put a smile on your face and inspire you for the week ahead, make sure you stay with us. at about ten past eight we have a beautiful story coming your way about a young girl. headlines coming up.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today... mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs staff in england could be scrapped. ministers meet today to make the final decision. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood is continuing to be questioned by police on allegations of rape and assault. prices are going up what can be done to help? a delay to a rise in national insurance has been ruled out. what options are there for people struggling to pay their energy bills? storm corrie are still packing a punch across parts of eastern england. very slowly through the course of the day the winds will start to ease. in course of the day the winds will start to ease.— course of the day the winds will start to ease. in the sport, on top ofthe start to ease. in the sport, on top of the tennis. — start to ease. in the sport, on top of the tennis, 21 _ start to ease. in the sport, on top of the tennis, 21 and _ start to ease. in the sport, on top of the tennis, 21 and counting - start to ease. in the sport, on top of the tennis, 21 and counting for| of the tennis, 21 and counting for rafa _ of the tennis, 21 and counting for rafa nadal. he wins the australian
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open _ rafa nadal. he wins the australian open to— rafa nadal. he wins the australian open to create any record of grand slam _ open to create any record of grand slam wins — amelia meet anton. anton meet amelia. hug it out. and a special strictly surprise for 11—year—old amelia as she gets to share the stage with her dance hero, anton du beke. it's monday, the 31st of january. our top story. ministers will meet today to decide whether to scrap mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs staff in england. under the current rules all frontline workers need to have their firstjab by thursday or face dismissal or redeployment. our health editor hugh pym reports. it's proved a highly controversial policy, and there have been warnings that thousands of nhs staff in england could leave or be dismissed by employers for refusing to get vaccinated. the royal college of midwives has already called for a delay, arguing there could be a catastrophic impact on maternity services because of workforce shortages. the latest figures showed that around 77,500 nhs staff in england, about 5%, had not had anyjab,
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though not all will be in frontlinejobs. vaccination is the right policy but forcing vaccination was not monotony middle of a staffing crisis particularly. assuming it will be scrapped, we will support the scrapping but also support continued conversations to try to encourage as many people as possible to get vaccinated. many people as possible to get vaccinated-— many people as possible to get vaccinated. , , , ., ., vaccinated. ministers and health leaders have _ vaccinated. ministers and health leaders have said _ vaccinated. ministers and health leaders have said before - vaccinated. ministers and health leaders have said before now . vaccinated. ministers and health | leaders have said before now that the policy is needed to provide reassurance to patients. the health secretary, sajid javid, argued it was the professional duty of frontline staff to get jabbed, but he was challenged by a doctor at a london hospital. i've had covid at some point. yes. i've got antibodies. yeah. and i've been working on covid icu since the beginning. i have not had a vaccination. i did not want to have a vaccination. many health care workers have not opposed mandatory
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vaccinations for staff. if a patient comes to me and says... "should i have the vaccine? have you been vaccinated, doctor?" that answer should always be, "yes, of course i've been vaccinated and you should, too." there is no wriggle room ethically for doctor or a nurse or anybody talking to patients. it's understood the policy is now being reconsidered with a view in government that the landscape has changed because the omicron variant has not proved as serious as the delta wave, during which the policy was first drawn up. ministers will meet today to decide whether to continue with the plan. it's understood no final decisions have yet been made. the risk is that nhs chiefs, who've tried to defend it will feel undermined by any u—turn, and there will be demands for care home staff in england who lost theirjobs because of a similar compulsory vaccination policy to be reinstated. hugh pym, bbc news. our chief political correspondent adam fleming joins us now from westminster.
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adam, the government has been under pressure to scrap mandatory vaccinations for nhs staff for a number of weeks. ministers are said to be reflecting on this. there is a bit in a timing issue because this policy kicks in in england in april. to have your second vaccine dose in april you would have to have the first one this week, so there is a sort of deadline now. then the change in context around covid. if you look at the government dashboard it has fallen way down and is now pretty stable. we are now getting the omicron variant which is much less dangerous than the delta one, which is what was around at the time the policy was around at the time the policy was conceived.— was around at the time the policy was conceived. that is how simon clark explained — was conceived. that is how simon clark explained it _ was conceived. that is how simon clark explained it to _ was conceived. that is how simon clark explained it to us. _ was conceived. that is how simon clark explained it to us. since - was conceived. that is how simon | clark explained it to us. since that time the omicron _ clark explained it to us. since that time the omicron variant - clark explained it to us. since that time the omicron variant has - clark explained it to us. since that i time the omicron variant has become dominant _ time the omicron variant has become
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dominant it— time the omicron variant has become dominant. it is much more transmissible. while still dangerous it is somewhat less so than delta. any decision taken today will reflect— any decision taken today will reflect the fact those fundamental facts have changed. the extent to which _ facts have changed. the extent to which that — facts have changed. the extent to which that allows us to mid policy on this— which that allows us to mid policy on this will— which that allows us to mid policy on this will be decided later. there is also a political _ on this will be decided later. there is also a political angle _ on this will be decided later. there is also a political angle to - on this will be decided later. there is also a political angle to this. - on this will be decided later. there is also a political angle to this. i i is also a political angle to this. i am not sure you remember but last year when it was being voted on in parliament more than 60 conservative mps voted against the government on it. if you were a prime minister worried about your back benches stabbing you in the back of a downing street party is, maybe this is something you would do. boris johnson will do lots of other things to keep conservative backbenchers happy. there is a new policy on brexit and making it easier for ministers to change eu laws they inherited when they left the eu. we think in the middle of the week we might get a huge paper full of think in the middle of the week we might get a huge paperfull of ideas for levelling up, the prime
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minister's flagship policy for making all areas of the country feeling as wealthy as the others. all of that could look like a total sideshow if we get the report from fuji —— c gray into lockdown parties. police are continuing to investigate allegations that the manchester united footballer mason greenwood raped and assaulted a woman. the 20—year—old was arrested yesterday after the claims emerged on social media. our reporter, dave guest, is outside old trafford. a big story yesterday. what is the news this morning? what do we know? morning. as you know, mason greenwood made his debut for manchester united in 2019. last year he signed a four year deal. he came through the ranks at the manchester united academy. the club made a statement and said he will not be playing for or training with manchester united until further notice. that statement was made
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following claims are women said online she had been assaulted by the player. greater manchester police said they had become aware of the social media post and arrested a man in his 20s on suspicion of rain and assault. when the statement was released, the club also said it did not condone violence of any kind but said it would be making no further statement until all of the facts were known. of course establishing the faxes what greater manchester police is attempting to do. it could take some time. speculation about what may or may not have happened is not only unhelpful but potentially prejudicial at this time. the sportswear company, nike, who sponsored mason greenwood, said they are deeply concerned about these disturbing allegations and are monitoring the situation closely. there has been no statement on
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behalf of the player at this stage. the police investigation will continue today.— the police investigation will continue today. the police investigation will continue toda . . ,, . , continue today. thank you. that is the latest from _ continue today. thank you. that is the latest from old _ continue today. thank you. that is the latest from old trafford - continue today. thank you. that is the latest from old trafford this i the latest from old trafford this morning. thousands of homes across scotland could remain without power for several days after storm corrie brought winds of more than 80 miles per hour overnight. it came just a day after storm malik left at least two dead across the uk. our reporter alexandra mackenzie is in dundee for us this morning. we can see damage. is that recent or from a few days ago? we we can see damage. is that recent or from a few days ago?— from a few days ago? we understand this damage — from a few days ago? we understand this damage might _ from a few days ago? we understand this damage might have _ from a few days ago? we understand this damage might have been - from a few days ago? we understand this damage might have been from i from a few days ago? we understand this damage might have been from a | this damage might have been from a previous storm. on our way to dundee last night, we saw lots of trees on the road surrounding dundee and lots of damage. the worst affected area has been aberdeenshire over the weekend. it may look brighter and quite calm in dundee this morning but scotland was pummelled by both
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storms over the weekend. malic festival on saturday and then storm corrie overnight last night. —— first of all. winds of up to 92 miles an hour were recorded at stornoway airport in the western isles last night and winds of up to 120 miles an hour in the cairngorms. also a 60—year—old woman lost her life in the storm in aberdeen on saturday. as you mentioned, as is a people have been without electricity. at one point over the weekend, it was up to 98,000 people. that has improved because work has been going on tirelessly over the weekend to get people back on the grid as quickly as possible. we understand the latest figures, around 7000 people still with no electricity from storm malik and an additional 30,000 from overnight and
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storm corrie. work will continue to get people on as quickly as possible but some people may not have electricity until tuesday night. the deputy first minister said over the weekend we're in for a very difficult these days. i think today will be about finding out what the damage has been overnight. the worst of the damage is expected to be in aberdeenshire and also the clean—up is likely to begin. we have seen over the weekend damage to people's homes and damage to cars and a lot of debris across many of the roads here. . ~ of debris across many of the roads here. . ,, i. of debris across many of the roads here. . ~' ,, , of debris across many of the roads here. . ,, i. , . some breaking news for you this morning. a name you will recognise, christian eriksen, who became very well—known over the summer. he collapsed on the pitch playing for denmark. he hasjust signed a deal
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with brentford in a premier league. he has signed a six—month deal and it could go on for a couple of years. brentford havejust posted the announcement and five minutes later christian eriksen has reacted to that, obviously expressing his delight. we know he was desperately keen to get back into football. there has been a huge amount of debate as to whether he would be able to. brentford have signed him. what a brilliant story! can you imagine the reception? everyone knew a lot about their story. he was playing football at inter milan. last month they released him. you are not allowed to play football if you have an implantable cardiac defibrillator which he has in his body. there had been talk about him coming to brentford. he has been training hard. that deal hasjust gone through. for anyone who watched the match when he collapsed, to even be talking about him playing
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football again is incredible. there are moments when his life was in the balance. it was one of those again, i remember the time of day it was, i was watching with my children are you are having a conversation with your kids about what is happening and why it is important. the rest of the team—mates put a ring around him knowing how serious it was. it was an awful moment and when the news came through a little bit after the game actually he was ok and hopefully he would be fine, and potentially he is back on a football pitch in the premier league. brilliant news for him. we have been talking a lot about the weather at the weekend. parra can give us plenty more detail. —— carol. today storm corrie will move into the north sea. the strong winds will continue to ease. still a pretty
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windy day. the met office has a yellow weather warning out for gusty winds, gusting 50 to 60 miles an hour along the north sea coastline. there will be some big waves. still the chance of travel disruption as we go through this morning. the other thing we have, a lot of snow showers coming in across scotland. the risk of ice on untreated surfaces. rain showers coming in across northern ireland, the isle of man, cheshire, the midlands and down towards the home counties. they will drift further west. a lot of dry weather will ensue. drift further west. a lot of dry weatherwill ensue. it drift further west. a lot of dry weather will ensue. it will still be windy despite the fact storm corrie is pulling away. gusty winds, this is pulling away. gusty winds, this is the kind of level you can expect mid—afternoon. 44 miles an hour in the mid—hebrides. temperatures between four and ten. it will still feel cold. this evening and overnight are more substantial band
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of rain comes in across northern ireland, scotland, england and wales, pushing south and is. let indie is. the hint of something milder coming into the west. it will not necessarily last. by the end of the week it will be much colder again. you tease us with some nice weather and the new steal it away. thank you, carol. see you later. you might remember a rather special moment from a couple of weeks ago which involved an 11 year old girl called amelia. amelia lost one of her legs to cancer and recently she was fitted with a prosthetic blade which will help her get back to her first love dancing. naturally, she's a huge fan of strictly so we thought it might be nice to surprise amelia with some messages from some of the stars including her absolute favourite, anton du beke. strictly theme. you're getting a new prosthetic leg, which is brilliant! and, you're going to take up dancing again, which is even more brilliant.
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my love, you are an inspiration, and i'm sending you lots and lots of love. and maybe one day in the future, you and i could have a dance. i got igota i got a call from anton last week saying he is currently on tour with erin. they are in birmingham and would they like to come along? we managed to get immediate there without knowing anything with her parents and there were a few surprises along the way. have a look. music plays. hello. nice to see you. now, if you were watching bbc breakfast about ten days ago, you might remember the amazing ii—year—old we met on the programme called amelia. what we know about amelia is she loves to dance. and her absolute hero is anton du beke, whojust happens to be performing on his tour here in birmingham. now, amelia is inside, but she doesn't know we're here, so we're sneaking in the back
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entrance with a few surprises. come on! we are backstage at the birmingham symphony hall. you can hear that live music — the show is going on. come inside, we've got to be quiet. we know where amelia and herfamily are. they�* re in rowj. let's have a little look. there's anton and erin. looking amazing. the show�*s going on, so, shh. very good so far. music plays. with my new found experience, i've got to say anton's very good out of hold. but once he gets in hold, just loses a bit of form. ladies and gentlemen, we've already mentioned him today. please welcome to the stage,
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the wonderful dan walker. audience cheers. hello, birmingham! oh, this is nice, isn't it? hello, everybody. wow! we also have someone very, very special in the audience with us here in birmingham. would you please give a huge round of applause to ii—year—old amelia, who's with us in the audience today? audience applauds. there she is down there. give us a wave, amelia. let me tell you a little bit about amelia, because as i said, she's 11. and back in 2017, amelia was diagnosed with bone cancer. now, she loves to dance. she loves dancing. everyone up here loves dancing as well. and what happened to amelia is, the cancer got into her body and she had to have her leg amputated. and she had a prosthetic leg on her left leg for a while. and earlier this month, she managed to get a blade fitted. now, as somebody who loves dancing,
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the blade has enabled her to move much more freely and actually do what she loves. and let me tell you two things about amelia. number one, she loves to dance. number two — slightly more surprisingly — she loves you, anton. audience laughs. absolutely loves you. you can't blame the girl. i know! she's an intelligent, young, bright young lady, of course. of course you are. so if you don't mind... idon't mind. ..and i'm sure this wonderful audience will celebrate, as i ask michelle, her mum, and amelia to come and join us on stage! audience cheers. amelia and michelle! come and join us over here, guys. amelia, meet anton. anton, meet amelia. come on, let's hug it out.
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saturday was always strictly. no matter where we was, - if we was in hospital, we got home. however ill she felt, - we had to have strictly on. and it'sjust inspired her to keep going, and to keep challenging i and pushing herself. and the incredible thing is today, i think i'm right in saying this, today is actually the four year anniversary of your first operation. to understand that i had cancer was horrible, and it was very hard. but when i knew i was going to walk again, and i got to dance again... it's ok, take your time. itjust helped me express myself, kind of, and it was something i really enjoyed. come on. wow! what was that like? it's hard, isn't it, to have a moment like that, and then sort of calm yourself down and have a little think about it? was that you on stage in front of hundreds of people there?
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music plays. i know it's been a crazy day so far, and your heads probably all over the place, but we've got — if you're up for it — one last surprise for you. yeah? yeah. are those happy tears? yeah. good. if you want to follow me, we're going back out on stage. have you watched star wars? i have. i was saying to my dad that looks like the millennium falcon. it does a bit, doesn't it? the thing? so, i've just said to you in there, "come out on stage", 0k? so here we are on stage. i know you don't want to dance with me. you probably need somebody who knows what they're doing. so i'm going to go over there, and the fellow who you quite like is going to come over here. i'll see you in a mo, amelia. that's what you call a showbiz sweep. now, tell me about your dancing. what do you like to do?
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well, i like to do street dance at the moment. street dancing? yeah. lucky for you, i'm quite the expert at the street dance. so you show me a bit of street, and i'll show you a bit of waltzing. how's that? does that sounds like a deal? yeah. i like this that you just did. and a—wham and barn! and you'll pop in that and pop in that, and five and six and seven and... one, two, three. hum and hum and hum, and hum. she pops her shoulder — classy! out... ..up and round. a—one, a—two, a—three and... ..four. and open and close, and up. applause. gosh, she's brilliant. she had such a lovely day. huge thank you to anton and erin and everyone else on that awful that they are travelling around the country at the moment, so
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very busy. anton was fantastic and who worked behind—the—scenes to try to make that happen. she is brilliant. quite daunting. at 11. i had a chat with her mum and dad and they have gone home happy. i am sure she is dancing somewhere, teaching anton sum up the street lives. she was good but i hope that has put a smile on your face this morning. it is two years ago since the first hospital in the uk took its first covid patient. a particularly tough couple of years also many people working in the nhs.— working in the nhs. here at the r0 al working in the nhs. here at the royal victoria — working in the nhs. here at the royal victoria infirmary, - working in the nhs. here at the royal victoria infirmary, two - working in the nhs. here at the i royal victoria infirmary, two years ago today, the first patients were
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admitted to be treated for coronavirus. it has been a momentous two years and we have asked staff to reflect on their experiences in the last 2a months. a; reflect on their experiences in the last 24 months.— reflect on their experiences in the last 24 months. a lot of questions bein: last 24 months. a lot of questions being asked- _ last 24 months. a lot of questions being asked. no _ last 24 months. a lot of questions being asked. no one _ last 24 months. a lot of questions being asked. no one really - last 24 months. a lot of questions being asked. no one really knew. last 24 months. a lot of questions i being asked. no one really knew the answers. i being asked. no one really knew the answers. ., �* y being asked. no one really knew the answers. ., �* , . , answers. i don't tell my family match what — answers. i don't tell my family match what happened - answers. i don't tell my familyj match what happened because answers. i don't tell my family - match what happened because they do not understand. your colleagues are such a good comfort. you do not take home with you. i such a good comfort. you do not take home with vom— home with you. i looked after their first patients _ home with you. i looked after their first patients who _ home with you. i looked after their first patients who became - home with you. i looked after their first patients who became criticallyj first patients who became critically unwell _ first patients who became critically unwell ih _ first patients who became critically unwell in their trust. i was on the weekend — unwell in their trust. i was on the weekend when we had our first deaths — weekend when we had our first deaths it— weekend when we had our first deaths. it was incredibly emotional, speaking _ deaths. it was incredibly emotional, speaking to those first families. you kind — speaking to those first families. you kind of realise this was going to be _ you kind of realise this was going to be the — you kind of realise this was going to be the first of many phone calls that would — to be the first of many phone calls that would be very similar. m that would be very similar. patients, that would be very similar. wz patients, 112 patients. i think there have been many low points. we have all had birthdays and funerals and things we have missed. to know you are not alone. i think low
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points would have been much, much lower. i was living at the time when covid started with my mother, who's in her 70s. and like many elderly people, she got the shielding information. so i moved out from there, the family home, into a hotel so i could continue to do myjob. you know, you're washing your clothes as best you can, you're staying away from all of your loved ones. it's not — it wasn't a holiday. things changed quite - quickly as the cases grew. initially, you were having quite a few patients and they did - deteriorate really quickly, especially people that - you weren't expecting to get ill, like young people. - being part of research into the vaccines that have come out has been one of my proudest moments working in the nhs, working in medicine. there are many people who work in these hospitals from many walks of life, and together we can achieve fantastic things. i think you've just got to learn - to cut off and not let it take over. and if you can't do that, -
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you're not in the rightjob, really, because it is quite testing. pretty sobering listening to some of the reflections from staff here in the reflections from staff here in the royal victoria infirmary. i am joined by the boss, the chief executive of newcastle nhs foundation trust. thank you for joining us this morning. we have had lovely words from some of your staff. how do you reflect on the last two years? with then, obviously, it has been obviously an unprecedented time like no other certainly in my lifetime. from the moment the first patient arrived two years today in fact, right through all the various ways during the pandemic, which have all been different, it has been amazing to see the response of the 8000 also
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star. it has absolutely been incredible.— star. it has absolutely been incredible. . , . ., incredible. -- also star. one of the stories and — incredible. -- also star. one of the stories and headlines _ incredible. -- also star. one of the stories and headlines as _ incredible. -- also star. one of the stories and headlines as the - incredible. -- also star. one of the l stories and headlines as the meeting of ministers, whether to push ahead on mandatory vaccinations. you mentioned the staff and that is a keyissue mentioned the staff and that is a key issue for you. you have done a lot of work trying to get staff vaccinated.— lot of work trying to get staff vaccinated. ., . , ' , ., ., vaccinated. fortunately, 95% of our staff are vaccinated. _ vaccinated. fortunately, 95% of our staff are vaccinated. vaccination . vaccinated. fortunately, 95% of our staff are vaccinated. vaccination is | staff are vaccinated. vaccination is the right thing. mandating it has given us some difficulty. i would say we cannot afford to lose one member of staff in the nhs family at the moment. talking to colleagues up and down the country, many of them are faced with very scary results of the mandatory stance, if it continues. i welcome the fact there will be a discussion today and a potential review. i think the right to do is to try and support staff with good information, good advice
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about what the benefits are of the vaccine and to continue down that route. it vaccine and to continue down that route. ,., , ., ., route. it sounds he would not mind if it were delayed _ route. it sounds he would not mind if it were delayed or _ route. it sounds he would not mind if it were delayed or even - if it were delayed or even cancelled.— if it were delayed or even cancelled. . , .. if it were delayed or even cancelled. . , ~ ., , cancelled. certainly. ithink now is the riaht cancelled. certainly. ithink now is the right time _ cancelled. certainly. ithink now is the right time to _ cancelled. certainly. ithink now is the right time to make _ cancelled. certainly. ithink now is the right time to make that - the right time to make that decision, i hope it is made today. where does it leave you? do you feel like you are in a limbo because you have put in all this work tim get people vaccinated? hat have put in all this work tim get people vaccinated?— have put in all this work tim get people vaccinated? not really. every vaccination is _ people vaccinated? not really. every vaccination is a _ people vaccinated? not really. every vaccination is a positive _ people vaccinated? not really. every vaccination is a positive thing - people vaccinated? not really. every vaccination is a positive thing for- vaccination is a positive thing for staff and patients. i would love to see 100% coverage. we will continue to work and not take our foot off the gas this week and will continue to support staff with the vaccinations.— to support staff with the vaccinations. . ,, , ., . to support staff with the vaccinations. . ,, . ., vaccinations. thank you so much for our time vaccinations. thank you so much for your time this _ vaccinations. thank you so much for your time this morning. _ vaccinations. thank you so much for your time this morning. staff- vaccinations. thank you so much for your time this morning. staff here l your time this morning. staff here really reflecting on what has happened in the last year, the last two years. he would have still two years later we would be discussing in the north—east what is now the fifth wave of the pandemic? it is
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still ongoing today. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm asad ahmad. an investigation has begun after a woman was dragged along a platform, as she tried to board a london overground train. it happened at wood street station in walthamstow earlier this month, when the lady's hand got trapped in a door. the rail accident investigation branch said she was then forced to run alongside the train for about 20 metres before the train stopped. the woman wasn't injured. transport for london has apologised. hundreds of hospital workers, employed by serco, have gone on strike at st barts, the royal london and whipps cross hospitals. it's in a dispute over pay. the unite union claims workers including porters, cleaners and catering staff, are paid up to 15% less than their nhs colleagues. serco says its recently
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increased its pay offer. the widow of tory mp james brokenshire, who died from lung cancer before christmas, has called for a national screening programme to improve survival rates. cathy brokenshire said she wanted others to avoid the same fate as her husband, the old bexley and sidcup mp, who was aged 53. his widow said she hoped she could "bring some positivity" from his death. nearly 50,000 people are diagnosed with the condition every year. people hit by flash floods last summer, are being urged to share their experiences, to try and force thames water to make improvements to drainage. the flooding happened injuly, hitting homes and businesses across half of london's boroughs. campaigners want people affected to take part in a thames water questionnaire, to highlight the scale of the problem. the water board welcomes more engagement. a brief look at the travel.
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the northern line has a reduced service until may, due to major upgrade work. onto the weather now with kate. good morning. it is a rather blustery start to the new week. storm corrie, last night's storm, is tracking into the north sea and we are left with a north—westerly breeze and flow. but high pressure is building. now, on that north—westerly breeze, you could see one or two showers blow through. plenty of sunny spells around today. it's going to stay breezy throughout. gusts of 30, 40 mph, perhaps easing into the evening. and temperatures feeling cooler than yesterday. the maximum somewhere between seven and nine celsius. now, overnight tonight, we will get some clear spells to start with, but more cloud is edging in from the west. and that is a warm front bringing some milder air. still quite chilly overnight. the minimum temperature, three to four celsius. that warm front also could bring some spells of light rain and drizzle as we head into tuesday morning. it's going to be a rather
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grey start tomorrow. spots of rain will start to clear. a cold front sinking south. that will break the cloud up through the afternoon. but some sunny spells. still quite breezy tomorrow as well. there is a lot of dry weather in the forecast this week. it's still quite breezy, and temperatures for the next couple of days are still reasonably mild. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye— bye. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. rip off britain live follows breakfast on bbc one. let's out what's coming up on today's programme with julia, angela and gloria. good morning. we have a packed week ahead.
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and of course, the issue that's on everyone's minds at the moment — the rising cost of living. all week, we'll have expert advice to help make sure it doesn't keep you up at night, including, how to get the lowest prices on fuel, food and energy. but we're kicking off today with a scam that really tugs on the heart strings — how two doting mums were conned out of thousands when they thought they were helping their kids. my daughter was in trouble. you know, gosh, i must do something about— you know, gosh, i must do something about this _ you know, gosh, i must do something about this i— you know, gosh, i must do something about this. . , ,., , you know, gosh, i must do something about this. . , , , about this. i felt absolutely sick. m le . s about this. i felt absolutely sick. my legs went — about this. i felt absolutely sick. my legs went to _ about this. i felt absolutely sick. my legs went to jelly. _ ijust could not believe it. plus cockapoo or not—a—poo?! we'll be hearing from the dog lovers who thought they were buying one of britain's most popular dog breeds, only to find out, via a dna test, they'd got something very different indeed.
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alongside that, the writer and food poverty campaignerjack monroe, will be right here with tips to find the lowest prices on your groceries. and we've got queen of complaints nikki stopford and fraud lawyer arun chauhan solving more of your problems on the spot in our advice clinic. so if you've got questions for them — or you just want to say hello, drop us a line — ripoffbritain@bbc.co.uk so, lots to look forward to. see you at 9.15am! look forward to learning about that massive dog. i will be tuning in. the family of gracie spinks will be a step closer to getting a new law in her memory today, as mps hold a debate about funding trained staff to help victims of stalking report their concerns to police. gracie was fatally stabbed last year, after being stalked. herfamily�*s campaign has received huge public support. now the family of another victim of stalking, alice ruggles, have backed the campaign. we'rejoined now by gracie's dad richard
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spinks and alice's dad clive. good morning to you all. thank you very much indeed for talking to us. richard, if i can come to you first of all, you are going to be travelling to london today. it is a big day in your campaign. what are you expecting? big day in your campaign. what are you exoecting?_ you expecting? yeah, it is a fantastic — you expecting? yeah, it is a fantastic opportunity - you expecting? yeah, it is a fantastic opportunity really l you expecting? yeah, it is a l fantastic opportunity really to you expecting? yeah, it is a - fantastic opportunity really to hear what the _ fantastic opportunity really to hear what the politicians are going to say after — what the politicians are going to say after all the support we have had _ say after all the support we have had. 100,000 signatures. so much support— had. 100,000 signatures. so much support locally and nationally. we want to _ support locally and nationally. we want to make a difference. we want the law _ want to make a difference. we want the law amended. we want funding for stalking _ the law amended. we want funding for stalking victims and advocates of stalking — stalking victims and advocates of stalking victims. it is a milestone, really. _ stalking victims. it is a milestone, really. and — stalking victims. it is a milestone, really, and it is the end of phase one _ really, and it is the end of phase one we — really, and it is the end of phase one we are _ really, and it is the end of phase one. we are not going to let this no. one. we are not going to let this go we _ one. we are not going to let this go we are — one. we are not going to let this go. we are going to stay with this. it is go. we are going to stay with this. it is a _ go. we are going to stay with this. it is a very— go. we are going to stay with this. it is a very important day for us. clive, _ it is a very important day for us. clive, thank— it is a very important day for us. clive, thank you for being with us. tell us a bit about alice? she was
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killed in 2016. i would tell us a bit about alice? she was killed in 2016. iwould imagine tell us a bit about alice? she was killed in 2016. i would imagine the story about gracie would have brought back all sorts of memories? it has. the first thing i would like to say— it has. the first thing i would like to say to — it has. the first thing i would like to say to gracie's _ it has. the first thing i would like to say to gracie's parents - it has. the first thing i would like to say to gracie's parents is- it has. the first thing i would like to say to gracie's parents is howl to say to gracie's parents is how terribly— to say to gracie's parents is how terribly sorry _ to say to gracie's parents is how terribly sorry i_ to say to gracie's parents is how terribly sorry i am _ to say to gracie's parents is how terribly sorry i am to _ to say to gracie's parents is how terribly sorry i am to hear - to say to gracie's parents is how terribly sorry i am to hear whatl terribly sorry i am to hear what happened — terribly sorry i am to hear what happened to _ terribly sorry i am to hear what happened to her. _ terribly sorry i am to hear what happened to her. we _ terribly sorry i am to hear what happened to her. we made - terribly sorry i am to hear what happened to her. we made it l terribly sorry i am to hear what . happened to her. we made it our life's— happened to her. we made it our life's work— happened to her. we made it our life's work to _ happened to her. we made it our life's work to prevent _ happened to her. we made it our life's work to prevent what - happened to her. we made it our- life's work to prevent what happened to alice, _ life's work to prevent what happened to alice. happening _ life's work to prevent what happened to alice, happening to _ life's work to prevent what happened to alice, happening to others. - life's work to prevent what happened to alice, happening to others. we i to alice, happening to others. we have _ to alice, happening to others. we have good — to alice, happening to others. we have good storyteller _ to alice, happening to others. we have good storyteller that - to alice, happening to others. we have good storyteller that us - to alice, happening to others. we l have good storyteller that us going. then you _ have good storyteller that us going. then you are — have good storyteller that us going. then you are set _ have good storyteller that us going. then you are set by— have good storyteller that us going. then you are set by curing - have good storyteller that us going. i then you are set by curing something like gracie's — then you are set by curing something like gracie's. we _ then you are set by curing something like gracie's. we realise _ then you are set by curing something like gracie's. we realise how- then you are set by curing something like gracie's. we realise how far- then you are set by curing something like gracie's. we realise how far we l like gracie's. we realise how far we all to— like gracie's. we realise how far we all to go _ like gracie's. we realise how far we all to go yes. _ like gracie's. we realise how far we all to go. yes, alice _ like gracie's. we realise how far we all to go. yes, alice had _ like gracie's. we realise how far we all to go. yes, alice had a - like gracie's. we realise how far we all to go. yes, alice had a brief- all to go. yes, alice had a brief relationship _ all to go. yes, alice had a brief relationship. she _ all to go. yes, alice had a brief relationship. she finished - all to go. yes, alice had a brief relationship. she finished withi all to go. yes, alice had a brief. relationship. she finished with her boyfriend — relationship. she finished with her boyfriend at — relationship. she finished with her boyfriend at the _ relationship. she finished with her boyfriend at the end _ relationship. she finished with her boyfriend at the end of— relationship. she finished with her boyfriend at the end of it. - relationship. she finished with her boyfriend at the end of it. when . relationship. she finished with her. boyfriend at the end of it. when she found _ boyfriend at the end of it. when she found out _ boyfriend at the end of it. when she found out he — boyfriend at the end of it. when she found out he had _ boyfriend at the end of it. when she found out he had been— boyfriend at the end of it. when she found out he had been cheating - boyfriend at the end of it. when she found out he had been cheating her| found out he had been cheating her in her~ _ found out he had been cheating her in her~ he _ found out he had been cheating her in her. he stalked _ found out he had been cheating her in her. he stalked her— found out he had been cheating her in her. he stalked her mercilessly. in her. he stalked her mercilessly for a _ in her. he stalked her mercilessly for a three — in her. he stalked her mercilessly for a three or— in her. he stalked her mercilessly for a three or four— in her. he stalked her mercilessly for a three or four months. - in her. he stalked her mercilessly for a three or four months. she . in her. he stalked her mercilessly. for a three or four months. she went to the _ for a three or four months. she went to the police — for a three or four months. she went to the police. they— for a three or four months. she went to the police. they sue _ for a three or four months. she went to the police. they sue the _ for a three or four months. she went to the police. they sue the police - to the police. they sue the police information— to the police. they sue the police information notice. _ to the police. they sue the police information notice. it _ to the police. they sue the police information notice. it didn't- to the police. they sue the police information notice. it didn't stopl information notice. it didn't stop it. information notice. it didn't stop it ten _ information notice. it didn't stop it. ten minutes— information notice. it didn't stop it. ten minutes later— information notice. it didn't stop it. ten minutes later he - information notice. it didn't stop it. ten minutes later he broke i information notice. it didn't stop l it. ten minutes later he broke into her flat— it. ten minutes later he broke into her flat and — it. ten minutes later he broke into her flat and killed _ it. ten minutes later he broke into her flat and killed her. _ it. ten minutes later he broke into her flat and killed her.— her flat and killed her. crikey, it's awful. _ her flat and killed her. crikey, it's awful, isn't _ her flat and killed her. crikey, it's awful, isn't it? _ her flat and killed her. crikey, it's awful, isn't it? even - her flat and killed her. crikey, it's awful, isn't it? even now. her flat and killed her. crikey, | it's awful, isn't it? even now it her flat and killed her. crikey, i it's awful, isn't it? even now it is so hard to talk about. i would
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imagine that driving force, which we have spoken to richard and alice about in the past, that is what keeps you going, to make sure other families don't have to go through what yourfamily has families don't have to go through what your family has been through, i would imagine that is why you are supporting this campaign? absolutely. we have to do more. yes, there _ absolutely. we have to do more. yes, there has— absolutely. we have to do more. yes, there has been— absolutely. we have to do more. yes, there has been progress. _ absolutely. we have to do more. yes, there has been progress. there - absolutely. we have to do more. yes, there has been progress. there have i there has been progress. there have been, _ there has been progress. there have been. for— there has been progress. there have been, for example _ there has been progress. there have been, for example the _ there has been progress. there have been, for example the stalking - been, for example the stalking protection— been, for example the stalking protection order— been, for example the stalking protection order is. _ been, for example the stalking protection order is. but - been, for example the stalking protection order is. but there i been, for example the stalking. protection order is. but there are issues _ protection order is. but there are issues with— protection order is. but there are issues with those _ protection order is. but there are issues with those and _ protection order is. but there are issues with those and we - protection order is. but there are issues with those and we are - protection order is. but there are i issues with those and we are trying to address — issues with those and we are trying to address those. _ issues with those and we are trying to address those. that _ issues with those and we are trying to address those. that is _ issues with those and we are trying to address those. that is one - issues with those and we are trying to address those. that is one of- to address those. that is one of armagh— to address those. that is one of armagh other _ to address those. that is one of armagh other campaigns. - to address those. that is one of armagh other campaigns. they| to address those. that is one of. armagh other campaigns. they are meant _ armagh other campaigns. they are meant to— armagh other campaigns. they are meant to be — armagh other campaigns. they are meant to be a _ armagh other campaigns. they are meant to be a quick— armagh other campaigns. they are meant to be a quick and _ armagh other campaigns. they are meant to be a quick and easy- armagh other campaigns. they are meant to be a quick and easy way. armagh other campaigns. they are i meant to be a quick and easy way for the police _ meant to be a quick and easy way for the police to— meant to be a quick and easy way for the police to get— meant to be a quick and easy way for the police to get some _ meant to be a quick and easy way for the police to get some restraint - meant to be a quick and easy way for the police to get some restraint in i the police to get some restraint in place _ the police to get some restraint in place breaching— the police to get some restraint in place. breaching one _ the police to get some restraint in place. breaching one is _ the police to get some restraint in place. breaching one is a - the police to get some restraint in place. breaching one is a criminall place. breaching one is a criminal offence — place. breaching one is a criminal offence and _ place. breaching one is a criminal offence. and yet _ place. breaching one is a criminal offence. and yet in _ place. breaching one is a criminal offence. and yet in practice - place. breaching one is a criminal offence. and yet in practice theyl offence. and yet in practice they are not— offence. and yet in practice they are not proving _ offence. and yet in practice they are not proving quick— offence. and yet in practice they are not proving quick and - offence. and yet in practice they are not proving quick and easy. i offence. and yet in practice theyl are not proving quick and easy. it is no _ are not proving quick and easy. it is no use — are not proving quick and easy. it is no use blaming _ are not proving quick and easy. it is no use blaming a _ are not proving quick and easy. it is no use blaming a particular- is no use blaming a particular police — is no use blaming a particular police force _ is no use blaming a particular police force for— is no use blaming a particular police force for not _ is no use blaming a particular police force for not using i is no use blaming a particular. police force for not using them. is no use blaming a particular- police force for not using them. we have to _ police force for not using them. we have to get — police force for not using them. we have to get to — police force for not using them. we have to get to the _ police force for not using them. we have to get to the bottom - police force for not using them. we have to get to the bottom of - police force for not using them. we have to get to the bottom of this. i have to get to the bottom of this. we know— have to get to the bottom of this. we know the _ have to get to the bottom of this. we know the home _ have to get to the bottom of this. we know the home office - have to get to the bottom of this. we know the home office has i have to get to the bottom of this. i we know the home office has done some _ we know the home office has done some evaluation— we know the home office has done some evaluation two _ we know the home office has done some evaluation two but _ we know the home office has done some evaluation two but they - we know the home office has done some evaluation two but they have| some evaluation two but they have not been _ some evaluation two but they have not been published. _ some evaluation two but they have not been published. we _ some evaluation two but they have not been published. we are - some evaluation two but they have not been published. we are callingj not been published. we are calling for an— not been published. we are calling foran independent— not been published. we are calling for an independent review- not been published. we are calling for an independent review of - for an independent review of stalking _ for an independent review of stalking protection- for an independent review of stalking protection orders i for an independent review of - stalking protection orders because we need _ stalking protection orders because we need them _ stalking protection orders because we need them in _ stalking protection orders because we need them in place _ stalking protection orders because we need them in place to- stalking protection orders because we need them in place to keep i we need them in place to keep victims — we need them in place to keep victims safer— we need them in place to keep victims safer and _ we need them in place to keep victims safer and stop - we need them in place to keep victims safer and stop cases i we need them in place to keepj victims safer and stop cases as we need them in place to keep i victims safer and stop cases as they do. �* , ., 4' .,
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victims safer and stop cases as they do. �* ~ ., ., ., , do. alison, i know one of the things ou are do. alison, i know one of the things you are keen _ do. alison, i know one of the things you are keen to _ do. alison, i know one of the things you are keen to talk _ do. alison, i know one of the things you are keen to talk about - do. alison, i know one of the things you are keen to talk about is - do. alison, i know one of the things you are keen to talk about is extra i you are keen to talk about is extra support for victims of stalking when they report a problem. you say they need more help when talking to the police. what do you want to happen? stalking was recognised as a criminal— stalking was recognised as a criminal offence back in 2012, but it has _ criminal offence back in 2012, but it has been— criminal offence back in 2012, but it has been added to the existing harassment law. we need people to 'oin harassment law. we need people to join the _ harassment law. we need people to join the dots up. when somebody makes _ join the dots up. when somebody makes a — join the dots up. when somebody makes a complaint to the police it is actually— makes a complaint to the police it is actually followed through. we need _ is actually followed through. we need to— is actually followed through. we need to actually educate the professionals, educate the justice system, _ professionals, educate the justice system, that whatever is in place at this moment in time is not working. this is— this moment in time is not working. this is a _ this moment in time is not working. this is a massive, massive problem, much _ this is a massive, massive problem, much bigger— this is a massive, massive problem, much bigger than we ever believed or realised _ much bigger than we ever believed or realised. ~' ., much bigger than we ever believed or realised. ~ ., , ., much bigger than we ever believed or realised. ~' ., , ., . realised. clive, i know you wanted to come on _ realised. clive, i know you wanted to come on that? _ realised. clive, i know you wanted to come on that? yes, _ realised. clive, i know you wanted to come on that? yes, it - realised. clive, i know you wanted to come on that? yes, it is - realised. clive, i know you wanted i to come on that? yes, it is massive, it is huge- — to come on that? yes, it is massive, it is huge- the _ to come on that? yes, it is massive, it is huge. the government's - to come on that? yes, it is massive, it is huge. the government's own i it is huge. the government's own figures, _ it is huge. the government's own figures, that— it is huge. the government's own figures, that came _ it is huge. the government's own figures, that came in _ it is huge. the government's own figures, that came in their- it is huge. the government's own i figures, that came in their comments on the _ figures, that came in their comments on the petition, — figures, that came in their comments on the petition, during _ figures, that came in their comments on the petition, during 2019, - figures, that came in their comments on the petition, during 2019, 2020, i on the petition, during 2019, 2020, in that— on the petition, during 2019, 2020, in that year— on the petition, during 2019, 2020, in that yearl— on the petition, during 2019, 2020, in that year! million _ on the petition, during 2019, 2020, in that year! million women - on the petition, during 2019, 2020, in that year! million women were i in that year! million women were victims _ in that year! million women were victims of— in that year! million women were victims of stalking, _ in that year! million women were
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victims of stalking, and _ in that year! million women were victims of stalking, and half - in that year! million women were victims of stalking, and half a i victims of stalking, and half a million — victims of stalking, and half a million men. _ victims of stalking, and half a million men. 1,000,000 - victims of stalking, and half a million men. 1,000,000 and| victims of stalking, and half a i million men. 1,000,000 and a victims of stalking, and half a - million men. 1,000,000 and a half people _ million men. 1,000,000 and a half people one — million men. i,000,000 and a half people one in— million men. 1,000,000 and a half people. one in five _ million men. i,000,000 and a half people. one in five women- million men. i,000,000 and a half people. one in five women in- million men. 1,000,000 and a half people. one in five women in theirl people. one in five women in their lifetimes _ people. one in five women in their lifetimes will— people. one in five women in their lifetimes will be _ people. one in five women in their lifetimes will be stocked, - people. one in five women in their lifetimes will be stocked, one i people. one in five women in their lifetimes will be stocked, one in. lifetimes will be stocked, one in ten men — lifetimes will be stocked, one in ten men it— lifetimes will be stocked, one in ten men it is— lifetimes will be stocked, one in ten men. it is a _ lifetimes will be stocked, one in ten men. it is a massive - lifetimes will be stocked, one in. ten men. it is a massive problem, lifetimes will be stocked, one in- ten men. it is a massive problem, it is usually— ten men. it is a massive problem, it is usually distressing _ ten men. it is a massive problem, it is usually distressing for— ten men. it is a massive problem, it is usually distressing for the - is usually distressing for the people — is usually distressing for the people concerned. - is usually distressing for the people concerned. you i is usually distressing for thej people concerned. you can't is usually distressing for the - people concerned. you can't imagine not knowing — people concerned. you can't imagine not knowing when _ people concerned. you can't imagine not knowing when that _ people concerned. you can't imagine not knowing when that person - people concerned. you can't imagine not knowing when that person will i not knowing when that person will show _ not knowing when that person will show up. — not knowing when that person will show up. what _ not knowing when that person will show up, what they— not knowing when that person will show up, what they will— not knowing when that person will show up, what they will do. - not knowing when that person will show up, what they will do. in i not knowing when that person will i show up, what they will do. in some of the _ show up, what they will do. in some of the worst— show up, what they will do. in some of the worst cases, _ show up, what they will do. in some of the worst cases, it _ show up, what they will do. in some of the worst cases, it can _ show up, what they will do. in some of the worst cases, it can escalate i of the worst cases, it can escalate to the _ of the worst cases, it can escalate to the worst _ of the worst cases, it can escalate to the worst it _ of the worst cases, it can escalate to the worst. it is _ of the worst cases, it can escalate to the worst. it is a _ of the worst cases, it can escalate to the worst. it is a huge - of the worst cases, it can escalatel to the worst. it is a huge problem. the government, _ to the worst. it is a huge problem. the government, yes, _ to the worst. it is a huge problem. the government, yes, they- to the worst. it is a huge problem. the government, yes, they fund i to the worst. it is a huge problem. i the government, yes, they fund some of the _ the government, yes, they fund some of the huge _ the government, yes, they fund some of the huge enterprises, _ the government, yes, they fund some of the huge enterprises, the _ of the huge enterprises, the national— of the huge enterprises, the national stalking _ of the huge enterprises, the national stalking helpline, i of the huge enterprises, the - national stalking helpline, another charity _ national stalking helpline, another charity who — national stalking helpline, another charity who do _ national stalking helpline, another charity who do high _ national stalking helpline, another charity who do high risk _ national stalking helpline, another charity who do high risk advocacy. i charity who do high risk advocacy. they— charity who do high risk advocacy. they put — charity who do high risk advocacy. they put a — charity who do high risk advocacy. they put a quarter _ charity who do high risk advocacy. they put a quarter of _ charity who do high risk advocacy. they put a quarter of £1— charity who do high risk advocacy. they put a quarter of £1 million i they put a quarter of £1 million into those _ they put a quarter of £1 million into those charities. _ they put a quarter of £1 million into those charities. 1.5 - they put a quarter of £1 million into those charities. 1.5 millionj into those charities. 1.5 million victims — into those charities. 1.5 million victims in — into those charities. 1.5 million victims in a _ into those charities. 1.5 million victims in a year? _ into those charities. 1.5 million victims in a year? do _ into those charities. 1.5 million victims in a year? do the - into those charities. 1.5 millioni victims in a year? do the sums. into those charities. 1.5 million - victims in a year? do the sums. that is 17p— victims in a year? do the sums. that is 17p per— victims in a year? do the sums. that is 17p per victim _ victims in a year? do the sums. that is 17p pervictim i_ victims in a year? do the sums. that is i7p per victim. i think— victims in a year? do the sums. that is i7p per victim. i think we - victims in a year? do the sums. that is i7p per victim. i think we have i is i7p per victim. i think we have to is 17p per victim. i think we have to do— is 17p per victim. i think we have to do better— is i7p per victim. i think we have to do better than _ is i7p per victim. i think we have to do better than this. _ is 17p per victim. i think we have to do better than this. i- is i7p per victim. i think we have to do better than this. i would i is i7p per victim. i think we have i to do better than this. i would say, look, _ to do better than this. i would say, look. the _ to do better than this. i would say, look, the problem _ to do better than this. i would say, look, the problem with— to do better than this. i would say, look, the problem with the - to do better than this. i would say, look, the problem with the invictal look, the problem with the invicta -- independent— look, the problem with the invicta —— independent stalking _ look, the problem with the invictai —— independent stalking advocates, the people — —— independent stalking advocates, the people who _ —— independent stalking advocates, the people who provide _ —— independent stalking advocates, the people who provide help- —— independent stalking advocates, the people who provide help and i the people who provide help and support— the people who provide help and support for— the people who provide help and support for the _ the people who provide help and support for the victims, -
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the people who provide help and support for the victims, they i the people who provide help and support for the victims, they dol support for the victims, they do many— support for the victims, they do many things. _ support for the victims, they do many things, they _ support for the victims, they do many things, they will - support for the victims, they do many things, they will make i support for the victims, they do| many things, they will make the liaison— many things, they will make the liaison is— many things, they will make the liaison is that _ many things, they will make the liaison is that will _ many things, they will make the liaison is that will help - many things, they will make the liaison is that will help them i many things, they will make the liaison is that will help them go| many things, they will make the i liaison is that will help them go to the police — liaison is that will help them go to the police they— liaison is that will help them go to the police. they will— liaison is that will help them go to the police. they will do _ liaison is that will help them go toi the police. they will do everything, emotional— the police. they will do everything, emotional support _ the police. they will do everything, emotional support and _ the police. they will do everything, emotional support and so - the police. they will do everything, emotional support and so on, - the police. they will do everything, j emotional support and so on, there are not— emotional support and so on, there are not enough— emotional support and so on, there are not enough of— emotional support and so on, there are not enough of them. _ emotional support and so on, there are not enough of them. it - emotional support and so on, there are not enough of them. it is - emotional support and so on, there are not enough of them. it is a i are not enough of them. it is a postcode — are not enough of them. it is a postcode lottery. _ are not enough of them. it is a postcode lottery. the - are not enough of them. it is a postcode lottery. the suzy- are not enough of them. it is a - postcode lottery. the suzy lamplugh trust and _ postcode lottery. the suzy lamplugh trust and paladin _ postcode lottery. the suzy lamplugh trust and paladin are _ postcode lottery. the suzy lamplugh trust and paladin are stretched - postcode lottery. the suzy lamplugh trust and paladin are stretched to i trust and paladin are stretched to capacity — trust and paladin are stretched to capacity. some _ trust and paladin are stretched to capacity. some areas _ trust and paladin are stretched to capacity. some areas are - trust and paladin are stretched to capacity. some areas are great, i capacity. some areas are great, there — capacity. some areas are great, there are — capacity. some areas are great, there are some _ capacity. some areas are great, there are some parts— capacity. some areas are great, there are some parts of- capacity. some areas are great, there are some parts of the i capacity. some areas are great, i there are some parts of the country where _ there are some parts of the country where there — there are some parts of the country where there are _ there are some parts of the country where there are local— there are some parts of the country where there are local advocacy- where there are local advocacy services, — where there are local advocacy services, charities _ where there are local advocacy services, charities run- where there are local advocacy services, charities run them. i where there are local advocacy. services, charities run them. but its patchwork _ services, charities run them. but its patchwork. in _ services, charities run them. but its patchwork. in my— services, charities run them. but its patchwork. in my own - services, charities run them. but its patchwork. in my own county| services, charities run them. but i its patchwork. in my own county of leicestershire _ its patchwork. in my own county of leicestershire there _ its patchwork. in my own county of leicestershire there were - its patchwork. in my own county of leicestershire there were two i leicestershire there were two advocates _ leicestershire there were two advocates until— leicestershire there were two advocates until recently - leicestershire there were two advocates until recently but i leicestershire there were two i advocates until recently but their funding _ advocates until recently but their funding has— advocates until recently but their funding has run— advocates until recently but their funding has run out— advocates until recently but their funding has run out and - advocates until recently but their funding has run out and they- advocates until recently but theirl funding has run out and they have not been — funding has run out and they have not been able _ funding has run out and they have not been able to _ funding has run out and they have not been able to get _ funding has run out and they have not been able to get more. - funding has run out and they have not been able to get more. we i funding has run out and they have i not been able to get more. we have to have _ not been able to get more. we have to have dedicated _ not been able to get more. we have to have dedicated money— not been able to get more. we have to have dedicated money in - not been able to get more. we have to have dedicated money in there. i| to have dedicated money in there. i would _ to have dedicated money in there. i would say— to have dedicated money in there. i would say forming _ to have dedicated money in there. i would say forming me _ to have dedicated money in there. i would say forming me pounds - to have dedicated money in there. i would say forming me pounds a i to have dedicated money in there. i. would say forming me pounds a year. what would _ would say forming me pounds a year. what would £4 — would say forming me pounds a year. what would £4 million _ would say forming me pounds a year. what would £4 million a _ would say forming me pounds a year. what would £4 million a year - would say forming me pounds a year. what would £4 million a year get i would say forming me pounds a year. what would £4 million a year get us? it would _ what would £4 million a year get us? it would get _ what would £4 million a year get us? it would get us — what would £4 million a year get us? it would get us two _ what would £4 million a year get us? it would get us two stalking - it would get us two stalking advocates _ it would get us two stalking advocates guaranteed - it would get us two stalking advocates guaranteed in - it would get us two stalking. advocates guaranteed in every it would get us two stalking - advocates guaranteed in every police area _ advocates guaranteed in every police area a _ advocates guaranteed in every police area a minimum— advocates guaranteed in every police area. a minimum of— advocates guaranteed in every police area. a minimum of two. _ advocates guaranteed in every police area. a minimum of two. that- advocates guaranteed in every police area. a minimum of two. that is- advocates guaranteed in every police area. a minimum of two. that is not| area. a minimum of two. that is not area. a minimum of two. that is not a big _ area. a minimum of two. that is not a big ask _ area. a minimum of two. that is not a big ask please, _ area. a minimum of two. that is not a big ask. please, can— area. a minimum of two. that is not a big ask. please, can we _ area. a minimum of two. that is not a big ask. please, can we do- area. a minimum of two. that is not a big ask. please, can we do that? i a big ask. please, can we do that? that_ a big ask. please, can we do that? that is_ a big ask. please, can we do that? that is the — a big ask. please, can we do that? that is the beginning _ a big ask. please, can we do that? that is the beginning of— a big ask. please, can we do that? that is the beginning of starting i a big ask. please, can we do that? that is the beginning of starting toi that is the beginning of starting to recognise — that is the beginning of starting to recognise stalking _ that is the beginning of starting to recognise stalking and _ that is the beginning of starting to recognise stalking and put - that is the beginning of starting to recognise stalking and put in- that is the beginning of starting to recognise stalking and put in place things— recognise stalking and put in place things that — recognise stalking and put in place things that are _ recognise stalking and put in place things that are dedicated - recognise stalking and put in place things that are dedicated to - things that are dedicated to stalkihd _ things that are dedicated to stalking. stalking _ things that are dedicated to stalking. stalking does- things that are dedicated to stalking. stalking does not| things that are dedicated to i stalking. stalking does not fit within — stalking. stalking does not fit within domestic— stalking. stalking does not fit within domestic abuse. - stalking. stalking does not fit within domestic abuse. some stalking. stalking does not fit. within domestic abuse. some of stalking. stalking does not fit- within domestic abuse. some of it is strange _ within domestic abuse. some of it is strange stocking _ within domestic abuse. some of it is strange stocking. it _ within domestic abuse. some of it is strange stocking. it does _
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within domestic abuse. some of it is strange stocking. it does not - within domestic abuse. some of it is strange stocking. it does not fit - strange stocking. it does not fit within _ strange stocking. it does not fit within nren— strange stocking. it does not fit within men or— strange stocking. it does not fit within men or girl, _ strange stocking. it does not fit within men or girl, it— strange stocking. it does not fit within men or girl, it is- strange stocking. it does not fit within men or girl, it is not- strange stocking. it does not fit within men or girl, it is not all. within men or girl, it is not all wonren, — within men or girl, it is not all wonren, it— within men or girl, it is not all wonren, it is— within men or girl, it is not all women, it is not— within men or girl, it is not all women, it is not all— within men or girl, it is not all women, it is not all violence. | within men or girl, it is not all- women, it is not all violence. the trained _ women, it is not all violence. the trained experts _ women, it is not all violence. the trained experts are _ women, it is not all violence. the trained experts are experts. - women, it is not all violence. the trained experts are experts. theyi trained experts are experts. they will make — trained experts are experts. they will make things _ trained experts are experts. they will make things better— trained experts are experts. they will make things better for- will make things better for everyone _ will make things better for everyone-— will make things better for eve one. . . , will make things better for eve one. , everyone. richard, i can see you noddin: everyone. richard, i can see you nodding in _ everyone. richard, i can see you nodding in agreement. - everyone. richard, i can see you nodding in agreement. it - everyone. richard, i can see you nodding in agreement. it is - nodding in agreement. it is something you feel strongly about too? ~ , ,., , something you feel strongly about too? ~ , , ~ something you feel strongly about too? ~ , , . . something you feel strongly about too? ~ , . . ., too? absolutely. we want to raise awareness — too? absolutely. we want to raise awareness of _ too? absolutely. we want to raise awareness of stalking. _ too? absolutely. we want to raise awareness of stalking. not - too? absolutely. we want to raise | awareness of stalking. not enough people _ awareness of stalking. not enough people are aware of it. we were not until this _ people are aware of it. we were not until this happened to gracie. what clive said _ until this happened to gracie. what clive said i— until this happened to gracie. what clive said i fully endorse. it is about— clive said i fully endorse. it is about the _ clive said i fully endorse. it is about the funding. i can't believe they didn't give funding the following year from the previous year. _ following year from the previous year. why— following year from the previous year, why they didn't carry it on. it year, why they didn't carry it on. itjust— year, why they didn't carry it on. itjust baffles me. that is what we are aiming — itjust baffles me. that is what we are aiming for, change. the advocate in each _ are aiming for, change. the advocate in each police force. like clive said. — in each police force. like clive said. it — in each police force. like clive said. it is _ in each police force. like clive said. it is a _ in each police force. like clive said, it is a postcode lottery. it has to— said, it is a postcode lottery. it has to be standardised across the country — has to be standardised across the country. the same levels of funding and training — country. the same levels of funding and training for officers and charity— and training for officers and charity workers and of the advocates. it has to be standardised. each department, each constabulary, has got to talk to each _ constabulary, has got to talk to each other. we have got to make a difference — each other. we have got to make a
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difference. this has got to happen. we will— difference. this has got to happen. we will not — difference. this has got to happen. we will not let it go.— we will not let it go. there will be so many peeple — we will not let it go. there will be so many people out _ we will not let it go. there will be so many people out there - we will not let it go. there will be so many people out there now- we will not let it go. there will be l so many people out there now may we will not let it go. there will be - so many people out there now may be watching _ so many people out there now may be watching this — so many people out there now may be watching this at — so many people out there now may be watching this at this _ so many people out there now may be watching this at this moment - so many people out there now may be watching this at this moment in - so many people out there now may be watching this at this moment in time i watching this at this moment in time who are _ watching this at this moment in time who are just— watching this at this moment in time who are just so — watching this at this moment in time who are just so frightened _ watching this at this moment in time who are just so frightened because l who are just so frightened because they are _ who are just so frightened because they are actually _ who are just so frightened because they are actually going _ who are just so frightened because they are actually going through - who are just so frightened because | they are actually going through this and experiencing _ they are actually going through this and experiencing this _ they are actually going through this and experiencing this at _ they are actually going through this and experiencing this at this - they are actually going through this l and experiencing this at this moment in time _ and experiencing this at this moment in time. , . , in time. listen, we really appreciate _ in time. listen, we really appreciate your - in time. listen, we really appreciate your time. - in time. listen, we really i appreciate your time. have in time. listen, we really - appreciate your time. have a safe trip to london today. thank you for your time, trip to london today. thank you for yourtime, richard trip to london today. thank you for your time, richard and alice. clive, lovely to have you. i know it is awful circumstances, but thank you for supporting their campaign and we will continue to follow it as well. it is 8:42am. carol has the weather. , ., ., it is 8:42am. carol has the weather. ,., ., ., carol has the weather. good morning. this morning — carol has the weather. good morning. this morning we _ carol has the weather. good morning. this morning we are _ carol has the weather. good morning. this morning we are still— carol has the weather. good morning. this morning we are still taking - carol has the weather. good morning. this morning we are still taking a - this morning we are still taking a bit of a battering across parts of eastern england from storm corrie. it will continue to push away into the north sea and into the near continent through the rest of the day. the strongest gusts of wind will ease. it is still going to be pretty windy. you can see what is happening. this is storm corrie moving away. look behind it. all those isobars coming from the
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north—west. that is a chilly direction. the met office still has a yellow weather warning across parts of eastern england for the gusty winds, gusting at 50 to 60 mph in the hills, and also down this north sea coastline. there will be some large waves around. in line we are looking at gusts of 40 to 45 mph. still the chance of some disruption. as we go through the rest of the day it will still be windy but the winds are easing. a lot of dry weather. wintry in the north of scotland first thing. ice on untreated surfaces. rain showers in parts of northern ireland, wales, cheshire and the northern counties. they will drift west in the afternoon. these black circles represent the strength of the wind gusts. we are looking at 40 to 47 mph in the north. 40 to 45 in parts of the east. it is coming from the north—west, a cold direction. when you add that onto those temperatures it will feel cold. this evening and
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overnight the weather front brings more rain. through northern ireland, scotland, england and wales. the cloud will sink eastwards. some clear skies behind. the lowest temperatures will be in the east, something milder is coming our way from the west. you can see that here quite nicely. here's the cold front sinking south. the yellow represents the milder air. we have still got windy conditions blustery winds. the cold front producing cloud in northern ireland, england and wales. some spots of rain. clear skies behind. some showers coming in on those blustery winds. temperatures are going to feel quite different tomorrow. these are the winds you can expect. still fairly windy. the temperatures are in double figures. that will be noticeable. ii to 13 widely that will be noticeable. 11 to 13 widely across the uk. into wednesday we hang on to the mild conditions. a lot of cloud. some spots of rain, england, wales and northern ireland
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in the morning, moving into southern scotland in the afternoon. it would be breezy. through the latter part of the working week you can see a cold front moves in and usurped all that cold air. —— milder. colder conditions. rain putting south and east. by the time we get to friday we will all be in the colder air and for some of us in the north there will also be for some of us in the north there will also be some for some of us in the north there will also be some wintry for some of us in the north there will also be some wintry showers. thank you, carol. have a lovely monday. are you on tomorrow? i'm. look forward to it. i wasjust checking. she might be going on holiday. i checking. she might be going on holida . , ., , ., ., holiday. i might you -- need you to do that sound _ holiday. i might you -- need you to do that sound again. _ holiday. i might you -- need you to do that sound again. breaking - do that sound again. breaking football transfer news. brentford have signed danish international midfielder christian eriksen is a free agent. he midfielder christian eriksen is a free agent-— midfielder christian eriksen is a free aent. .,, ., , , . free agent. he has not played since sufferin: a free agent. he has not played since suffering a cardiac _ free agent. he has not played since suffering a cardiac arrest _ free agent. he has not played since suffering a cardiac arrest where -- | suffering a cardiac arrest where —— would so many of us watched in the european championship lastjune. john is here with more. it is
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positive news, isn't it? it john is here with more. it is positive news, isn't it? it is, especially — positive news, isn't it? it is, especially when _ positive news, isn't it? it is, especially when you - positive news, isn't it? it is, | especially when you consider positive news, isn't it? it is, - especially when you consider how serious _ especially when you consider how serious it— especially when you consider how serious it looked last summer when he collapsed on the pitch played for denmari
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the world _ competing for denmark once again at the world cup, which is at the end of the _ the world cup, which is at the end of the year — the world cup, which is at the end of the year. and this is how the announcement was made on social media _ announcement was made on social media try— announcement was made on social media by the club. very exciting. all clubs are doing that now — very exciting. all clubs are doing that now. this is significant because _ that now. this is significant because he is a great player, christian— because he is a great player, christian eriksen. he spent seven seasons — christian eriksen. he spent seven seasons with tottenham. he was at the centre — seasons with tottenham. he was at the centre of everything they did creatively. he will have a big impact — creatively. he will have a big impact on brentford. it is a great signing _ impact on brentford. it is a great signing for them as well as they want _ signing for them as well as they want to— signing for them as well as they want to cement themselves within the premier— want to cement themselves within the premier league. inevitably, i guess, nice to _ premier league. inevitably, i guess, nice to hear— premier league. inevitably, i guess, nice to hear from the man himself. this is— nice to hear from the man himself. this is what— nice to hear from the man himself. this is what christian eriksen had to say _ to say. hi. - to say. hi, everyone. to say. — hi, everyone. it's christian eriksen. happy to announce that i have signed for brentford football club. i can't wait to get started and hopefully i will see you all very soon. yeah, he is excited, isn't it? as i think— yeah, he is excited, isn't it? as i think the — yeah, he is excited, isn't it? as i think the brentford fans will be. as
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football— think the brentford fans will be. as football fans generally will be. he will get _ football fans generally will be. he will get an amazing reception. he will get an amazing reception. he will do _ will get an amazing reception. he will do. and obviously we wait to see _ will do. and obviously we wait to see will— will do. and obviously we wait to see. will he achieve his ultimate dream, — see. will he achieve his ultimate dream, his— see. will he achieve his ultimate dream, his ultimate aim, to compete once again _ dream, his ultimate aim, to compete once again for denmark at the world cup later— once again for denmark at the world cup later this year? and after everything that happened at the euros _ everything that happened at the euros last summer, would you have ever predicted we would be seen that? _ ever predicted we would be seen that? ~ ., ever predicted we would be seen that? ~ . , , , that? what interesting is he is obviously mad _ that? what interesting is he is obviously mad keen _ that? what interesting is he is obviously mad keen to - that? what interesting is he is obviously mad keen to come l that? what interesting is he is - obviously mad keen to come back. you would think some players might think, i'm going to retire, i am to stop now. he is really determined. and he will have gone through every medical test necessary. he and he will have gone through every medical test necessary.— and he will have gone through every medical test necessary. he will have been through _ medical test necessary. he will have been through all— medical test necessary. he will have been through all the _ medical test necessary. he will have been through all the tests. - medical test necessary. he will have been through all the tests. he - medical test necessary. he will have | been through all the tests. he would not be _ been through all the tests. he would not be returning if he was not able to do _ not be returning if he was not able to do so _ not be returning if he was not able to do so. doctors will have advised against _ to do so. doctors will have advised against ever returning to play football — against ever returning to play football if they felt it was unsafe. but clearly with the guidance he has been through, the czechs, they feel it is fine _ been through, the czechs, they feel it is fine for— been through, the czechs, they feel it is fine for him to come back. different— it is fine for him to come back. different routes in italy as there are in— different routes in italy as there are in the — different routes in italy as there are in the premier league. making the return— are in the premier league. making the return to the premier league
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will be _ the return to the premier league will be exciting for christian eriksen— will be exciting for christian eriksen and the fans. as _ eriksen and the fans. as the _ eriksen and the fans. as the video showed. , as the video showed. thrilling. very dramatic. thank _ as the video showed. thrilling. very dramatic. thank you, _ as the video showed. thrilling. very dramatic. thank you, john. - we're going to show you some otters now, which are very cute, but sadly it's not good news. after decades of population growth, the number of otters in wales is now fallin, and experts fear it could be the same story in england and scotland. our environment correspondent steffan messenger has more on this. if you've ever come across an otter in the wild, count yourself very lucky. these elusive animals try their best to stay hidden. for ecologists like eleanor and nia, it means some detective work is required to get a sense of how the species is faring. oh yeah, definitely. yeah. mm hmm. yeah, definitely. delight at the discovery of an otters droppings. we call that sprint. it's got a very distinctive smell. and that's for otters to find other signs of other otters, but also helps us to track where
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they are in the field in the wild. national otter surveys started in wales in the 19705. then pesticide pollution had been blamed for nearly wiping the creatures out after the chemicals were banned. the otters had been bouncing back. that is until now. unfortunately, for the first time, we've seen a decline in otter signs across wales, so the last national survey in 2010 had a height of 90% of the survey sites had these signs for otters, so that was really good and really positive. unfortunately, this latest survey has shown that we've declined to 70% of those sites, so we've had quite a drop. the otters return to rivers like this one right across the uk in recent decades has been seen as a huge, and, let's face it, pretty rare. nature conservation success story. and that's why the experts are so worried by the findings of this survey. it is a bit of a warning to us that something might be going wrong. it could be habitat, it could be food, it could be pollutants.
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it could be the general sort of quality of the river. that's really the next step is try and understand what might be causing this and obviously what we can do about it as well. meanwhile, we've learnt a check up on otter populations across england has now been commissioned in response to the welsh survey, with calls for the same to happen in scotland and northern ireland, two in wales and scotland. we felt that the recovery was pretty much almost complete. i would like to think that the respective governments will will see the importance of the otter as a barometer of the health of the water environment and the need to get some more up to date information on status. 0h, kingfisher! wildlife aplenty. it seems that this survey site at least, but elsewhere the state of our rivers is causing a lot of debates with the plight of wales's otters. now another concern to add to the list. stefan messenger, bbc news cardiff.
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the uk's first ever national thank you day took place last summer, as a chance for people to get together and pay tribute to those who had helped us through the pandemic. well, it's back injune, and this time it's tying in with the final day of the queen's platinumjubilee. the actor turned documentary maker ross kemp is lending his support. ross joins us from windsor, along with lisa hunter, who is helping to plan something very special. lisa, i will come to you first of all. what a job you have got? not much pressure then?! trio. all. what a job you have got? not much pressure then?!— all. what a job you have got? not much pressure then?! no, none at all. much pressure then?! no, none at all- looking _ much pressure then?! no, none at all. looking forward _ much pressure then?! no, none at all. looking forward to _ much pressure then?! no, none at all. looking forward to it. - much pressure then?! no, none at all. looking forward to it. a - much pressure then?! no, none at all. looking forward to it. a walk i all. looking forward to it. a walk in the _ all. looking forward to it. a walk in the park _ all. looking forward to it. a walk in the park-— all. looking forward to it. a walk in the park. ross, the reason it is such a big — in the park. ross, the reason it is such a big job. — in the park. ross, the reason it is such a big job, hopefully - in the park. ross, the reason it is such a big job, hopefully there i in the park. ross, the reason it is| such a big job, hopefully there will be millions of people involved in this during the summer?- be millions of people involved in this during the summer? yeah, we are hoinu to this during the summer? yeah, we are hoping to get — this during the summer? yeah, we are hoping to get 10 _ this during the summer? yeah, we are hoping to get 10 million _ this during the summer? yeah, we are hoping to get 10 million people - hoping to get 10 million people involved — hoping to get 10 million people involved. that— hoping to get 10 million people involved. that would _ hoping to get 10 million people involved. that would be - hoping to get 10 million people involved. that would be a - hoping to get 10 million people . involved. that would be a record. like the _ involved. that would be a record. like the queen's _ involved. that would be a record. like the queen's rain _ involved. that would be a record. like the queen's rain has - involved. that would be a record. like the queen's rain has been. . involved. that would be a record. i like the queen's rain has been. no one has— like the queen's rain has been. no one has surpassed _ like the queen's rain has been. no one has surpassed in _ like the queen's rain has been. no one has surpassed in terms - like the queen's rain has been. no one has surpassed in terms of - like the queen's rain has been. no
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one has surpassed in terms of her| one has surpassed in terms of her duration— one has surpassed in terms of her duration as — one has surpassed in terms of her duration as queen, _ one has surpassed in terms of her duration as queen, or— one has surpassed in terms of her duration as queen, or king, - one has surpassed in terms of her duration as queen, or king, in- one has surpassed in terms of herj duration as queen, or king, in the history— duration as queen, or king, in the history of— duration as queen, or king, in the history of the _ duration as queen, or king, in the history of the british _ duration as queen, or king, in the history of the british isles. - duration as queen, or king, in the history of the british isles. we - duration as queen, or king, in the history of the british isles. we are hoping _ history of the british isles. we are hoping to— history of the british isles. we are hoping to make _ history of the british isles. we are hoping to make another— history of the british isles. we are hoping to make another record - history of the british isles. we are hoping to make another record on| history of the british isles. we are - hoping to make another record on the fifth. , , . ., hoping to make another record on the fifth. , ,. ., , fifth. lisa, 'ust explain to us if ou fifth. lisa, 'ust explain to us if you can. — fifth. lisa, 'ust explain to us if you can. if— fifth. lisa, just explain to us if you can. if you _ fifth. lisa, just explain to us if you can, if you are _ fifth. lisa, just explain to us if you can, if you are allowed - fifth. lisa, just explain to us ifj you can, if you are allowed to, fifth. lisa, just explain to us if - you can, if you are allowed to, what we can expect to see?— we can expect to see? right here in windsor we — we can expect to see? right here in windsor we have _ we can expect to see? right here in windsor we have got _ we can expect to see? right here in windsor we have got a _ we can expect to see? right here in windsor we have got a group - we can expect to see? right here in windsor we have got a group of- windsor we have got a group of volunteers organising a range of events, — volunteers organising a range of events, from concerts in st george's chapel. _ events, from concerts in st george's chapel. to _ events, from concerts in st george's chapel, to music marking the seven decades— chapel, to music marking the seven decades of— chapel, to music marking the seven decades of the queen's rule. and a bil decades of the queen's rule. and a big lunch~ — decades of the queen's rule. and a big lunch. we are hoping to get as many— big lunch. we are hoping to get as many people as we can on the long walk to _ many people as we can on the long walk to come together in celebration of the _ walk to come together in celebration of the queen's rain. what an opportunity to say thank you to neighbours, friends, family and the community — neighbours, friends, family and the community. | neighbours, friends, family and the community-— community. i think as well because of what everybody _ community. i think as well because of what everybody has _ community. i think as well because of what everybody has been - community. i think as well because | of what everybody has been through in the last 18 months to two years, the chance to get together in this way, hopefully outdoors, without masks and to celebrate something
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like this would be quite special, wouldn't it?— like this would be quite special, wouldn't it? ~ , , wouldn't it? absolutely. look, the queen is locked _ wouldn't it? absolutely. look, the queen is locked throughout - wouldn't it? absolutely. look, the queen is locked throughout this i queen is locked throughout this country. — queen is locked throughout this country, through— queen is locked throughout this country, through the _ queen is locked throughout this - country, through the commonwealth and probably— country, through the commonwealth and probably throughout _ country, through the commonwealth and probably throughout the - country, through the commonwealth and probably throughout the world, i country, through the commonwealthj and probably throughout the world, i would _ and probably throughout the world, i would suggest — and probably throughout the world, i would suggest -- _ and probably throughout the world, i would suggest. —— loved. _ and probably throughout the world, i would suggest. —— loved. her- would suggest. —— loved. her resilience— would suggest. —— loved. her resilience has— would suggest. —— loved. her resilience has been— would suggest. —— loved. her resilience has been our- would suggest. —— loved. her- resilience has been our resilience. her strength — resilience has been our resilience. her strength in _ resilience has been our resilience. her strength in times _ resilience has been our resilience. her strength in times of— resilience has been our resilience. her strength in times of trouble i resilience has been our resilience. i her strength in times of trouble has inspired _ her strength in times of trouble has inspired so— her strength in times of trouble has inspired so many— her strength in times of trouble has inspired so many others, _ inspired so many others, particularly _ inspired so many others, particularly in _ inspired so many others, particularly in the - inspired so many others, particularly in the past. inspired so many others, i particularly in the past two inspired so many others, - particularly in the past two years, to help _ particularly in the past two years, to help others _ particularly in the past two years, to help others. we _ particularly in the past two years, to help others. we want - particularly in the past two years, to help others. we want to - particularly in the past two years, to help others. we want to get i particularly in the past two years, to help others. we want to get as many— to help others. we want to get as many people _ to help others. we want to get as many people as _ to help others. we want to get as many people as possible. - to help others. we want to get as . many people as possible. hopefully it will— many people as possible. hopefully it will be _ many people as possible. hopefully it will be a — many people as possible. hopefully it will be a little — many people as possible. hopefully it will be a little warmer— many people as possible. hopefully it will be a little warmer than - many people as possible. hopefully it will be a little warmer than it - it will be a little warmer than it is today! — it will be a little warmer than it is today! we _ it will be a little warmer than it is today! we want _ it will be a little warmer than it is today! we want people - it will be a little warmer than it is today! we want people to i it will be a little warmer than iti is today! we want people to get it will be a little warmer than it - is today! we want people to get out into the _ is today! we want people to get out into the community _ is today! we want people to get out into the community with _ is today! we want people to get out into the community with friends - is today! we want people to get outj into the community with friends and families _ into the community with friends and families let's— into the community with friends and families. let's have _ into the community with friends and families. let's have a _ into the community with friends and families. let's have a party. - into the community with friends and families. let's have a party. you - families. let's have a party. you can bring — families. let's have a party. you can bring wine— families. let's have a party. you can bring wine and _ families. let's have a party. you can bring wine and cheese - families. let's have a party. you can bring wine and cheese if- families. let's have a party. you can bring wine and cheese if youj can bring wine and cheese if you wish _ can bring wine and cheese if you wish this — can bring wine and cheese if you wish this is _ can bring wine and cheese if you wish. this is not _ can bring wine and cheese if you wish. this is not a _ can bring wine and cheese if you wish. this is not a business - wish. this is not a business meeting _ wish. this is not a business meeting-— wish. this is not a business meetin._ , , ., , ~' meeting. this is a party. i think we all need a party- — meeting. this is a party. i think we all need a party. tell _ meeting. this is a party. i think we all need a party. tell me _ meeting. this is a party. i think we all need a party. tell me this... . meeting. this is a party. i think we| all need a party. tell me this... we certainly do. what's it like for you to get involved with things like this, to meet people in the community who perhaps have had a difficult time in the past couple of years, and celebrate something?
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absolutely. lisa and i met two years a -o absolutely. lisa and i met two years ago in _ absolutely. lisa and i met two years ago in her— absolutely. lisa and i met two years ago in her back— absolutely. lisa and i met two years ago in her back garden— absolutely. lisa and i met two years ago in her back garden filling - absolutely. lisa and i met two years ago in her back garden filling food . ago in her back garden filling food parcels _ ago in her back garden filling food parcels. they— ago in her back garden filling food parcels. they were _ ago in her back garden filling food parcels. they were desperately. parcels. they were desperately needed — parcels. they were desperately needed at _ parcels. they were desperately needed at the _ parcels. they were desperately needed at the time. _ parcels. they were desperately needed at the time. that - parcels. they were desperately needed at the time. that was i parcels. they were desperatelyl needed at the time. that was at parcels. they were desperately- needed at the time. that was at the beginning _ needed at the time. that was at the beginning of— needed at the time. that was at the beginning of the _ needed at the time. that was at the beginning of the pandemic. - needed at the time. that was at the beginning of the pandemic. there . needed at the time. that was at the i beginning of the pandemic. there are a lot of— beginning of the pandemic. there are a lot of people — beginning of the pandemic. there are a lot of people out _ beginning of the pandemic. there are a lot of people out there _ beginning of the pandemic. there are a lot of people out there who - beginning of the pandemic. there are a lot of people out there who have i a lot of people out there who have suffered _ a lot of people out there who have suffered greatly _ a lot of people out there who have suffered greatly over— a lot of people out there who have suffered greatly over the - a lot of people out there who have suffered greatly over the past - a lot of people out there who have suffered greatly over the past two| suffered greatly over the past two years _ suffered greatly over the past two years we — suffered greatly over the past two years. we would _ suffered greatly over the past two years. we would ask— suffered greatly over the past two years. we would ask people - suffered greatly over the past two years. we would ask people in - suffered greatly over the past two| years. we would ask people in the community— years. we would ask people in the community to _ years. we would ask people in the community to go _ years. we would ask people in the community to go around _ years. we would ask people in the community to go around and - years. we would ask people in the | community to go around and check years. we would ask people in the - community to go around and check on those _ community to go around and check on those people. — community to go around and check on those people, particularly— community to go around and check on those people, particularly people - those people, particularly people who may — those people, particularly people who may be _ those people, particularly people who may be feeling _ those people, particularly people who may be feeling very- those people, particularly people who may be feeling very lonely. i those people, particularly people - who may be feeling very lonely. who may have _ who may be feeling very lonely. who may have lost — who may be feeling very lonely. who may have lost loved _ who may be feeling very lonely. who may have lost loved ones. _ who may be feeling very lonely. who may have lost loved ones. and - who may be feeling very lonely. who may have lost loved ones. and try. who may be feeling very lonely. who may have lost loved ones. and try to encourage _ may have lost loved ones. and try to encourage them _ may have lost loved ones. and try to encourage them to _ may have lost loved ones. and try to encourage them to come _ may have lost loved ones. and try to encourage them to come out - may have lost loved ones. and try to encourage them to come out if- may have lost loved ones. and try to encourage them to come out if theyi encourage them to come out if they can. encourage them to come out if they can and _ encourage them to come out if they can and join— encourage them to come out if they can and join in— encourage them to come out if they can. and join in the _ encourage them to come out if they can. and join in the festivities. - can. and join in the festivities. the _ can. and join in the festivities. the celebration. _ can. and join in the festivities. the celebration. i— can. and join in the festivities. the celebration. i think, - can. and join in the festivities. the celebration. i think, you . can. and join in the festivities. - the celebration. ithink, you know, we have _ the celebration. ithink, you know, we have a — the celebration. ithink, you know, we have a magnificent _ the celebration. ithink, you know, we have a magnificent queen. - the celebration. ithink, you know, we have a magnificent queen. we i the celebration. i think, you know, . we have a magnificent queen. we are a magnificent— we have a magnificent queen. we are a magnificent country— we have a magnificent queen. we are a magnificent country and _ we have a magnificent queen. we are a magnificent country and we - we have a magnificent queen. we are a magnificent country and we should i a magnificent country and we should to celebrate — a magnificent country and we should to celebrate that, _ a magnificent country and we should to celebrate that, together. - a magnificent country and we should to celebrate that, together. as - a magnificent country and we should | to celebrate that, together. as much as we _ to celebrate that, together. as much as we possibly— to celebrate that, together. as much as we possibly can— to celebrate that, together. as much as we possibly can on _ to celebrate that, together. as much as we possibly can on the _ to celebrate that, together. as much as we possibly can on the 5th - to celebrate that, together. as much as we possibly can on the 5th of- as we possibly can on the 5th of june _ as we possibly can on the 5th of june. ., , as we possibly can on the 5th of june. . , ,., june. lisa, we are seeing some ictures june. lisa, we are seeing some pictures of— june. lisa, we are seeing some pictures of previous _ june. lisa, we are seeing somel pictures of previous celebrations around events like this. you talked about the enormity of putting it all together. but also, it will be something people are keen to get involved in?—
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something people are keen to get involved in? ~ , . . involved in? most definitely. i am a member of— involved in? most definitely. i am a member of a _ involved in? most definitely. i am a member of a rotary _ involved in? most definitely. i am a member of a rotary club _ involved in? most definitely. i am a member of a rotary club and - involved in? most definitely. i am a member of a rotary club and that i involved in? most definitely. i am a| member of a rotary club and that is how i_ member of a rotary club and that is how i got— member of a rotary club and that is how i got involved in this. rotary clubs— how i got involved in this. rotary clubs up— how i got involved in this. rotary clubs up and down the country are edging _ clubs up and down the country are edging to— clubs up and down the country are edging to get involved in events, as are street _ edging to get involved in events, as are street parties and things like that _ are street parties and things like that that— are street parties and things like that. that is what the faith that you will— that. that is what the faith that you will all be about. celebrating, having _ you will all be about. celebrating, having fun, — you will all be about. celebrating, having fun, saying thank you to the people _ having fun, saying thank you to the people around us and take in that time _ people around us and take in that time to— people around us and take in that time to remember this momentous occasion, _ time to remember this momentous occasion, because it is something that will— occasion, because it is something that will stay with us and future generations for years to come. its generations for years to come. history. she generations for years to come. its history. she is our history. so we are celebrating _ history. she is our history. so we are celebrating that. _ history. she is our history. so we are celebrating that. i— history. she is our history. so we are celebrating that.— are celebrating that. i am interested _ are celebrating that. i am interested to _ are celebrating that. i am interested to hear - are celebrating that. i am interested to hear from i are celebrating that. i am i interested to hear from both are celebrating that. i am - interested to hear from both of are celebrating that.“ interested to hear from both of you on this. how much will you be inspired from previous celebrations? the other big jubilees? ltrefoil. inspired from previous celebrations? the other big jubilees?_ the other big jubilees? well, yeah. 77 was a big — the other big jubilees? well, yeah. 77 was a big one — the other big jubilees? well, yeah. 77 was a big one for _ the other big jubilees? well, yeah. 77 was a big one for me _ the other big jubilees? well, yeah. 77 was a big one for me because i i the other big jubilees? well, yeah. i 77 was a big one for me because i am old! i_ 77 was a big one for me because i am old! i still— 77 was a big one for me because i am old! i still have — 77 was a big one for me because i am old! i still have my— 77 was a big one for me because i am old! i still have my glass _ 77 was a big one for me because i am old! i still have my glass mug. - 77 was a big one for me because i am old! i still have my glass mug. i- old! i still have my glass mug. i can remember— old! i still have my glass mug. i can remember it _ old! i still have my glass mug. i can remember it being - old! i still have my glass mug. i can remember it being such - old! i still have my glass mug. i can remember it being such a l old! i still have my glass mug. i- can remember it being such a special time _ can remember it being such a special time such _ can remember it being such a special time such a — can remember it being such a special time. such a joyous _ can remember it being such a special time. such a joyous time. _ can remember it being such a special time. such a joyous time. again, - time. such a joyous time. again, friends _ time. such a joyous time. again, friends and — time. such a joyous time. again, friends and family. _ time. such a joyous time. again, friends and family. i _ time. such a joyous time. again, friends and family. i lived - time. such a joyous time. again, friends and family. i lived in - time. such a joyous time. again, friends and family. i lived in a i friends and family. i lived in a close — friends and family. i lived in a close in— friends and family. i lived in a close in essex. _ friends and family. i lived in a
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close in essex. everybody- friends and family. i lived in a i close in essex. everybody came friends and family. i lived in a - close in essex. everybody came to it. everybody_ close in essex. everybody came to it. everybody came. _ close in essex. everybody came to it. everybody came. we _ close in essex. everybody came to it. everybody came. we had - close in essex. everybody came to it. everybody came. we had a - it. everybody came. we had a fantastic— it. everybody came. we had a fantastic time. _ it. everybody came. we had a fantastic time. i— it. everybody came. we had a fantastic time. i was - it. everybody came. we had a fantastic time. i was very - it. everybody came. we had a l fantastic time. i was very young then~ _ fantastic time. i was very young then i— fantastic time. i was very young then i was _ fantastic time. i was very young then i was a _ fantastic time. i was very young then. i was a kid. _ fantastic time. i was very young then. i was a kid. the _ fantastic time. i was very young i then. i was a kid. the grown—ups were _ then. i was a kid. the grown—ups were there — then. i was a kid. the grown—ups were there. everybody— then. i was a kid. the grown—ups were there. everybody enjoyed . then. i was a kid. the grown—upsi were there. everybody enjoyed it. then. i was a kid. the grown—ups- were there. everybody enjoyed it. we want as— were there. everybody enjoyed it. we want as many— were there. everybody enjoyed it. we want as many people _ were there. everybody enjoyed it. we want as many people as _ were there. everybody enjoyed it. we want as many people as possible - were there. everybody enjoyed it. we want as many people as possible to l want as many people as possible to .et want as many people as possible to get involved — want as many people as possible to get involved if— want as many people as possible to get involved. if you _ want as many people as possible to get involved. if you make _ want as many people as possible to get involved. if you make it - want as many people as possible to get involved. if you make it over. want as many people as possible to get involved. if you make it over ioj get involved. if you make it over 10 million. _ get involved. if you make it over 10 million. that— get involved. if you make it over 10 million, that is— get involved. if you make it over 10 million, that is a _ get involved. if you make it over 10 million, that is a national— get involved. if you make it over 10 million, that is a national record, . million, that is a national record, may— million, that is a national record, may be _ million, that is a national record, may be global _ million, that is a national record, may be global record, _ million, that is a national record, may be global record, i— million, that is a national record, may be global record, i suggest. | million, that is a national record, i may be global record, i suggest. it could may be global record, i suggest. could be an enormous celebration. lots of people will be thinking, during the fifth, lots of time to plan, it is yourjob to plan. some top tips if you are trying to organise a party in the back garden organise a party in the back garden or something grander in the street? if you're organising something bigger— if you're organising something bigger in— if you're organising something bigger in the street, speak to your local authority about road closure. they— local authority about road closure. they will— local authority about road closure. they will do what they can to that happen — they will do what they can to that happen. the biggest thing, get the dating _ happen. the biggest thing, get the dating people's diaries, that is why we are _ dating people's diaries, that is why we are here — dating people's diaries, that is why we are here this morning. get the 5th of— we are here this morning. get the 5th ofjune — we are here this morning. get the 5th ofjune in people's diary. talking — 5th ofjune in people's diary. talking to people about —— and inviting — talking to people about —— and inviting them along. get involved in the baking — inviting them along. get involved in the baking competition going on.
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bake _ the baking competition going on. bake it— the baking competition going on. bake it and bring along for everybody to enjoy.- bake it and bring along for everybody to enjoy. bake it and bring along for eve bod to en'o . ., everybody to en'oy. ross, one last cuestion everybody to en'oy. ross, one last question to — everybody to enjoy. ross, one last question to you. _ everybody to enjoy. ross, one last question to you. what _ everybody to enjoy. ross, one last question to you. what is _ everybody to enjoy. ross, one last question to you. what is your- everybody to enjoy. ross, one last question to you. what is your cake j question to you. what is your cake of choice? ., ., question to you. what is your cake of choice? ., . ., ., question to you. what is your cake ofchoice? ., . ., ., ., , of choice? you have to go victorious once, of choice? you have to go victorious once. haven't _ of choice? you have to go victorious once, haven't you? _ of choice? you have to go victorious once, haven't you? cake _ of choice? you have to go victorious once, haven't you? cake of - of choice? you have to go victorious once, haven't you? cake of choice, | once, haven't you? cake of choice, no question. _ once, haven't you? cake of choice, no question, chocolate. _ once, haven't you? cake of choice, no question, chocolate. chocolate | no question, chocolate. chocolate fudoe no question, chocolate. chocolate fudge cake- _ no question, chocolate. chocolate fudge cake. love _ no question, chocolate. chocolate fudge cake. love it. _ no question, chocolate. chocolate fudge cake. love it. keep - no question, chocolate. chocolate fudge cake. love it. keep it- no question, chocolate. chocolate i fudge cake. love it. keep it simple. thank you very much. good to talk to you. lovely to see you on the programme. during the fifth is the dead. i programme. during the fifth is the dead. ., ., programme. during the fifth is the dead. ., . ., dead. i would have said lemon drizzle. dead. i would have said lemon drizzle- are — dead. i would have said lemon drizzle. are you _ dead. i would have said lemon drizzle. are you victoria - dead. i would have said lemon i drizzle. are you victoria sponge? dead. i would have said lemon - drizzle. are you victoria sponge? it has got her royal connection. wasn't the victoria sponge invented for queen victoria? very posh cake. just trying to tie it in. thank you for all the comments by the way about those of you who watched the lovely film with amelia earlier today. if you missed it, it will be on the iplayer later and we will put some stuff on social media. essentially, a lovely 11 year ago we had only programmed ten days ago, she has cancer, she had to have her leg amputated, she loved to dance. we took a to c and 20 back in
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birmingham at the weekend and she went on stage. it’s birmingham at the weekend and she went on stage-— birmingham at the weekend and she went on stage._ if- birmingham at the weekend and she went on stage._ if you i went on stage. it's glorious. if you are having — went on stage. it's glorious. if you are having a _ went on stage. it's glorious. if you are having a bad _ went on stage. it's glorious. if you are having a bad week, _ went on stage. it's glorious. if you are having a bad week, look- went on stage. it's glorious. if you are having a bad week, look out i went on stage. it's glorious. if you l are having a bad week, look out for it. ., . . . r r are having a bad week, look out for
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs staff in england could be scrapped — ministers meet today to make the final decision. we have to try and balance our protections for public health purposes against our wider action to make sure that our infringements on liberty are as minimal as they can safely be. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood is questioned by police over allegations of rape and assault. streaming giant spotify announces plans to counter covid misinformation on its podcasts — users will be redirected to a hub of coronavirus facts. a warning that up to a million women are in danger
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of becoming problem gamblers — an awareness campaign

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