Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 30, 2022 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

10:30 pm
hello. this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment. first the headlines. hundreds more british troops could be sent to eastern europe amid fears russia is preparing to invade ukraine. manchester united footballer mason greenwood has been arrested on suspicion of rape and assault following allegations on social media.
10:31 pm
thousands of people in scotland and northern england are still without power, following storm malik on saturday. another powerful storm is forecast to hit tonight, with winds of up to 90 miles an hour. remembering the dead of �*bloody sunday.�* 50 years on, after 13 where killed by the british army, in londonderry. and rafael nadal has claimed a record 21st grand slam men's tennis title with his victory in the australian open final. he came from two sets down to beat daniil medvedev of russia. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me arejo kiernan, former welsh labour adviser & broadcaster and annabel denham, director of communications
10:32 pm
for the iea.tomorrow�*s front pages...starting with... the guardian reports that boris johnson is launching a policy blitz, aiming to divert attention from the row over parties in number 10. the same story is on the front page of the i. the newspaper reports that the prime minister's fightback includes announcements on tax, brexit and the nhs. according to the metro, the prime minister is facing another backlash from his own mps, after he insisted the national insurance rise will go ahead. the daily mail focuses on the announcements on brexit. it says borisjohnson is promising to move faster, and to boost trade. the telegraph says mandatory covid jabs for nhs and social care workers are to be scrapped, amid fears of staff shortages if the plans went ahead. a different story in the financial times. it carries a warning from the head of a majorfund, that investors face years of low returns due to surging inflation.
10:33 pm
so, let's begin... the daily telegraph. u—turn on mandatoryjobs for nhs workers. this has been left a bit last minute and some people have already left their jobs in the nhs and social care because they knew this was looming. absolutely. talk about an 11th hour u—turn. these changes, the mandatory covid vaccination for nhs and social care workers was due to coming in a few days, february three, i think, and it isjust few days, february three, i think, and it is just extraordinary, the royal colleges have been warning that it would leave a massive shortfall in the number of nhs workers in england and i want to make that in wales, i am speaking from cardiff, the welsh government did not go down this road. withjust days to go, now we are told that sajid javid is having an emergency meeting tomorrow to rubber—stamp
10:34 pm
this, goodness knows when it will be announced. in this story, it refers to the 40,000 social care workers that you just mentioned, who left at the care sector, because these changes came in earlierfor them and they are now saying, you would be welcome to come back, you really wonder how many of them will go back, want to go back now. it is surprising. _ back, want to go back now. it is surprising, surely _ back, want to go back now. it is surprising, surely this could have been foreseen that there was going to be a shortage, there was already a shortage of nhs and care workers and it was only going to exacerbate the problem and i wonder if there could be legal challenges from --eole? ~ could be legal challenges from --eole?~ _ ., people? well, quite possibly, and there was an _ people? well, quite possibly, and there was an announcement - people? well, quite possibly, and there was an announcement that. there was an announcement that furner_ there was an announcement that furner would be reinstated after that and — furner would be reinstated after that and a — furner would be reinstated after that and a lot of people lost their 'obs that and a lot of people lost their jobs and — that and a lot of people lost their jobs and did not have that safety net and — jobs and did not have that safety net and that is precisely what it was designed for. this u—turn was absolutely— was designed for. this u—turn was absolutely inevitable but of all the u-turns _ absolutely inevitable but of all the u—turns this government has
10:35 pm
performed, it may have been their slowest— performed, it may have been their slowest and they are trying to pin it on_ slowest and they are trying to pin it on the — slowest and they are trying to pin it on the omicron variant, saying this is— it on the omicron variant, saying this is a — it on the omicron variant, saying this is a lot — it on the omicron variant, saying this is a lot less deadly, of course it is still— this is a lot less deadly, of course it is still our— this is a lot less deadly, of course it is still our variant of great concern, _ it is still our variant of great concern, but they are trying to pin the reason — concern, but they are trying to pin the reason for this change on the fact that — the reason for this change on the fact that omicron is now the dominant variant and the fact it is mitder~ _ dominant variant and the fact it is milder. manage —— mandatory vaccinations in any sector did not sit well_ vaccinations in any sector did not sit well with me, workers should not be sit well with me, workers should not he design _ sit well with me, workers should not he design -- — sit well with me, workers should not be design —— back to decide between bodily— be design —— back to decide between bodily autonomy and theirjobs there is significant variation in vaccination uptake, 31% of the unvaccinated are black, 50% south asian. _ unvaccinated are black, 50% south asian. 6% — unvaccinated are black, 50% south asian, 6% are white. there is a huge amount— asian, 6% are white. there is a huge amount of— asian, 6% are white. there is a huge amount of data out there, telling you how — amount of data out there, telling you how many from various different ethnic— you how many from various different ethnic groups are vaccination hesitant, _ ethnic groups are vaccination hesitant, it is not a covid phenomenon, there is clear evidence
10:36 pm
that some _ phenomenon, there is clear evidence that some children from ethnic minorities are much less likely to be immunised than others and i think the government has got to change tactic— the government has got to change tactic and — the government has got to change tactic and try and communicate and really— tactic and try and communicate and really understand why it is that there _ really understand why it is that there is— really understand why it is that there is this vaccination hesitant say, _ there is this vaccination hesitant say, otherwise we risk shoring up problems— say, otherwise we risk shoring up problems for the future. chris whitty— problems for the future. chris whitty expressed concern that mandatory vaccinations may deter people _ mandatory vaccinations may deter people from getting vaccinations in future _ people from getting vaccinations in future. let— people from getting vaccinations in future. , ., ., ~' people from getting vaccinations in future. , ., ., ~ ., future. let us look at the i, the prime minister's _ future. let us look at the i, the prime minister's policy - future. let us look at the i, the prime minister's policy blitz - future. let us look at the i, the prime minister's policy blitz not enough to silence critics. another crunch week for borisjohnson. crunch week for boris johnson. annabel, crunch week for borisjohnson. annabel, weekends must fail tremendously short in number 10 at the moment. tremendously short in number 10 at the moment-— little respite really, because mps io little respite really, because mps go from — little respite really, because mps go from perhaps plotting in the corridors— go from perhaps plotting in the corridors of westminster to being back in_ corridors of westminster to being back in their constituencies, where they are _ back in their constituencies, where they are meeting with their constituents and hearing their concern — constituents and hearing their concern and their anger, quite frankly, — concern and their anger, quite frankly, at— concern and their anger, quite frankly, at all of the stories that are emerging, of partygate, this
10:37 pm
culture _ are emerging, of partygate, this culture of— are emerging, of partygate, this culture of drinking and number 10 and i_ culture of drinking and number 10 and i don't — culture of drinking and number 10 and i don't know how many of these we will_ and i don't know how many of these we will he _ and i don't know how many of these we will be reading about. there is certainly— we will be reading about. there is certainly a — we will be reading about. there is certainly a sense that the pressure might— certainly a sense that the pressure might be _ certainly a sense that the pressure might be slightly easing on partygate, that borisjohnson has been _ partygate, that borisjohnson has been bought sometime, but i am douhtful— been bought sometime, but i am doubtful of the idea that this operation will succeed in placating the public. we are on the cusp of a cost crisis. — the public. we are on the cusp of a cost crisis, inflation is over 5%, energy— cost crisis, inflation is over 5%, energy bills _ cost crisis, inflation is over 5%, energy bills are set to double, and there _ energy bills are set to double, and there are — energy bills are set to double, and there are all sorts of proposals that have — there are all sorts of proposals that have been put forward and i do not think— that have been put forward and i do not think they will be enough. we still don't — not think they will be enough. we still don't really know what levelling up means, there has been criticism _ levelling up means, there has been criticism that the government is simply— criticism that the government is simply trying to manipulate announcements on extra funding for poorer— announcements on extra funding for poorer parts of the uk in some desperate attempt to save boris johnson's premiership, of course there _ johnson's premiership, of course there is— johnson's premiership, of course there is the — johnson's premiership, of course there is the fact that more money alone _ there is the fact that more money alone is— there is the fact that more money alone is not— there is the fact that more money alone is not going to fix the issue that we _ alone is not going to fix the issue that we have in this country,
10:38 pm
economically speaking, we are two nations _ economically speaking, we are two nations. when it comes to the economy, _ nations. when it comes to the economy, there is a huge amount of wort— economy, there is a huge amount of work to— economy, there is a huge amount of work to he _ economy, there is a huge amount of work to be done and we know that the chancellor _ work to be done and we know that the chancellor and prime minister have no intention of backtracking on than national— no intention of backtracking on than national insurance hike which will further— national insurance hike which will further squeeze households and i am douhtful— further squeeze households and i am doubtful of these high—profile announcements are really going to make _ announcements are really going to make much difference. jo, announcements are really going to make much difference.— make much difference. 10, what is our make much difference. 10, what is your view? — make much difference. 10, what is your view? how— make much difference. 10, what is your view? how swayed _ make much difference. 10, what is your view? how swayed do - make much difference. 10, what is your view? how swayed do you . make much difference. 10, what is i your view? how swayed do you think people will be, will it take our minds of partygate? the people will be, will it take our minds of partygate? the pressure is sliuhtl minds of partygate? the pressure is sliahtl off minds of partygate? the pressure is slightly off boris _ minds of partygate? the pressure is slightly off boris johnson, _ minds of partygate? the pressure is slightly off boris johnson, but - minds of partygate? the pressure is slightly off boris johnson, but i - minds of partygate? the pressure is slightly off boris johnson, but i am | slightly off borisjohnson, but i am not convinced that this flurry of activity, it looks fairly miserable on one of the front pages of the pages that back of the papers tomorrow. he is desperately trying tomorrow. he is desperately trying to take attention away from booze in suitcases, cakes and goodness knows what else. people are really struggling, whether it is the cost
10:39 pm
of food, the cost of energy, the fear of a national insurance hike and even with that, you get the impression that borisjohnson was held hostage by his chancellor and will do anything to save his premiership and we will have the levelling up white paper, the flying visit to ukraine, whether it is enough to stop the backbenchers who will have been back in their constituencies this weekend, i don't think it is over for constituencies this weekend, i don't think it is overfor him. frankly, with the levelling up agenda, i am very cynical. wales was pom promised £375 million as a result of the brexit dividend, to help the poorest regions and in fact the welsh government got 47 million this year. he has got a long way to go to prove to people that his words are backed up to people that his words are backed up with action. you have probably answered our question because the guardian says he tries to take back control amid
10:40 pm
party outrage, jo, it is notjust the opposition who are hopping mad, it is some of his own backbenchers. there are parts of the country that you can identify that have received this money that was meant to be invested in towns and cities, but it is not everyone who wants it, there will be even more haves and have—nots from it. will be even more haves and have-nots from it.— will be even more haves and have-nots from it. also, i think that if there _ have-nots from it. also, i think that if there are _ have-nots from it. also, i think that if there are strings - have-nots from it. also, i think l that if there are strings attached, we heard of a procession of mps going to downing street and being promised money if they actually shut up, kept quiet and let boris plod along. that can only continue for so long and i think that we will see what happens with the levelling up white paper, the brexit bill later this week, but i am not convinced that people are going to get enough satisfaction, to make up for the hardship they are failing, daily struggles and paying their bills at the moment.
10:41 pm
let us look at the financial times, annabel. this new sanctions rules which will leave kremlin oligarchs know to hide, says liz truss. there has been a lot of talk about how sanctions could be used to try to dissuade russia from invading ukraine. president putin said i have got 100,000 troops on the border but thatis got 100,000 troops on the border but that is not my intention. this is a different focus for the sanctions. absolutely. the west can impose serious _ absolutely. the west can impose serious economic pain on russia and it is ripe _ serious economic pain on russia and it is ripe to— serious economic pain on russia and it is ripe to explore various avenues _ it is ripe to explore various avenues with which to do this, but we have _ avenues with which to do this, but we have to — avenues with which to do this, but we have to bear in mind that because ukraine _ we have to bear in mind that because ukraine is— we have to bear in mind that because ukraine is important to russia, they will take _ ukraine is important to russia, they will take that economic pain, however— will take that economic pain, however it comes if they need to. the fundamental fact of this escalating situation in eastern europe — escalating situation in eastern europe is— escalating situation in eastern europe is that ukraine is not a vital— europe is that ukraine is not a vital strategic interest for nato but it _
10:42 pm
vital strategic interest for nato but it is — vital strategic interest for nato but it is for russia, any russian government, for reasons of geography and history. _ government, for reasons of geography and history, which means that the stand-off. — and history, which means that the stand—off, much more is at stake for the russians— stand—off, much more is at stake for the russians than the west, which means— the russians than the west, which means vladimir putin is prepared to id means vladimir putin is prepared to go further— means vladimir putin is prepared to go further and risk more. the west is not _ go further and risk more. the west is not going — go further and risk more. the west is not going to use military force, in my— is not going to use military force, in my view, — is not going to use military force, in my view, because it is divided. many— in my view, because it is divided. many countries but above all germany, are dependent on russian -as germany, are dependent on russian gas and _ germany, are dependent on russian gas and it— germany, are dependent on russian gas and it has no treaty obligation and i_ gas and it has no treaty obligation and i think— gas and it has no treaty obligation and i think that vladimir putin knows — and i think that vladimir putin knows this, that sending military equipment is not the equivalent to starting _ equipment is not the equivalent to starting a — equipment is not the equivalent to starting a war with russia. the uk is right— starting a war with russia. the uk is right to — starting a war with russia. the uk is right to be exploring different ways _ is right to be exploring different ways that we can put on the pressure and respond, but i think we have to be realistic— and respond, but i think we have to be realistic that strategically ukraine _ be realistic that strategically ukraine is of less importance to nato _ ukraine is of less importance to nato than — ukraine is of less importance to nato than it is to russia. nato has not a lot nato than it is to russia. nato has got a lotto _ nato than it is to russia. nato has got a lot to balance _ nato than it is to russia. nato has got a lot to balance here, - nato than it is to russia. nato has got a lot to balance here, hasn't i got a lot to balance here, hasn't it, jo, it has to be seen to be making sure that it bolsters its
10:43 pm
members in the furthest eastern reaches of the alliance without causing more instant security and a backlash by russia? it is causing more instant security and a backlash by russia?— backlash by russia? it is a very fine line that _ backlash by russia? it is a very fine line that everyone - backlash by russia? it is a very fine line that everyone is - backlash by russia? it is a very i fine line that everyone is treading at the moment. everyone is exploring avenues to restrain president putin, it is really important, but i agree, i wonder how much he actually worries about this. i think it will be interesting to see what sanctions the us puts in place, but without military action, it is a huge gas. i suppose, jo, if it is sanctions against the oligarchs, at least it the russian public would not suffer. it is an interesting tactic that she is taking. from the little that i know about the nature of russian
10:44 pm
oligarchs in london, it could pinch hugely. quite how they go down this road of deciding which individuals, which companies, have close links with president putin, is an interesting one. i suspect that she might not be able to go quite as far as she hoped to.— might not be able to go quite as far as she hoped to. some work for some forensic accountants _ as she hoped to. some work for some forensic accountants if _ as she hoped to. some work for some forensic accountants if you _ know any. let us finish with the i, the sports pages and a picture of a victorious rafael nadal, the greatest, claiming his 21st grand slam title, annabel, but of course, not having to contend with novak djokovic at the australian open. yes. it is obviously an immense achievement for rafael nadal, but it does come _ achievement for rafael nadal, but it does come with one real niggle, at least _ does come with one real niggle, at least to— does come with one real niggle, at least to the — does come with one real niggle, at least to the outside observer, whether— least to the outside observer, whether he thinks of it that way, i could _ whether he thinks of it that way, i could not— whether he thinks of it that way, i could not possibly say. ultimately in sport. — could not possibly say. ultimately in sport. i— could not possibly say. ultimately in sport, i think that to be the
10:45 pm
best. — in sport, i think that to be the best. you _ in sport, i think that to be the best, you have to beat the best and his greatest threat to 21 grand slam titles was— his greatest threat to 21 grand slam titles was sitting 9500 miles away in belgrade, the number one was nowhere — in belgrade, the number one was nowhere to be saying. i don't think we should — nowhere to be saying. i don't think we should take too much away from this astonishing achievement, but ultimately we would have liked to have had — ultimately we would have liked to have had novak djokovic in the tournament, contesting against rafael— tournament, contesting against rafael nadal and that really would have positioned him, had he won as the outright— have positioned him, had he won as the outright tennis champion, at least _ the outright tennis champion, at least for— the outright tennis champion, at least for the moment. at the outright tennis champion, at least for the moment.— the outright tennis champion, at least for the moment. at least for the moment. _ least for the moment. at least for the moment, indeed, _ least for the moment. at least for the moment, indeed, because - least for the moment. at least for the moment, indeed, because i l least for the moment. at least for. the moment, indeed, because i am sure that novak djokovic, being as competitive as he is, jo, will not let it rest, he will want that record for himself.- let it rest, he will want that record for himself. , ., , , record for himself. yes, absolutely. listen, record for himself. yes, absolutely. listen. we — record for himself. yes, absolutely. listen, we were _ record for himself. yes, absolutely. listen, we were where _ record for himself. yes, absolutely. listen, we were where we - record for himself. yes, absolutely. listen, we were where we were, - record for himself. yes, absolutely. listen, we were where we were, we had the tournament we had and i was absolutely delighted for rafael nadal. i am a massive tennis fan. just weeks ago, he was not even sure
10:46 pm
he will get to this

34 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on