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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 30, 2022 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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good afternoon. nato�*s secretary—general told the bbc today that should russia decide to invade ukraine, there will be a "huge price to pay." butjens stoltenberg admitted nato had no plans to deploy troops to the country if such
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an invasion took place. moscow — which is unhappy about nato�*s eastward expansion in europe — has denied it plans to invade. here's our diplomatic correspondent, caroline hawley. nato is beefing up its deterrent tos in eastern europe with every passing day. this is the worst part is my continuing counter build—up in the face of what downing street is calling rising russian aggression. the aim is to show moscow the price it could pay if it does invade ukraine. to it could pay if it does invade ukraine. ., , ., , it could pay if it does invade ukraine. ., , ., ., it could pay if it does invade ukraine. . ., ., ukraine. to send a message to roger that they will — ukraine. to send a message to roger that they will be _ ukraine. to send a message to roger that they will be severe _ that they will be severe consequences but, of course, the most important thing to prevent military action by russia against ukraine. and so we need to work hard for the best but be prepared for the worst. �* , , , ., worst. and this is why there are fears for the — worst. and this is why there are fears for the worst. _ worst. and this is why there are fears for the worst. over - worst. and this is why there are fears for the worst. over the i worst. and this is why there are i fears for the worst. over the past few days, there have been russian
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military exercises by land, air and sea. moscow still insists it has no plans to invade ukraine, accusing the west of fuelling tensions. but this level of military build—up has caused international alarm. there is no talk from any western country of sending troops to fight to defend ukraine itself, but a small contingent of british troops is in the country, here helping train ukrainian forces to repel any attack. ~ ., , , , ukrainian forces to repel any attack. . , ,, ., ., ~ attack. we have supplied anti-tank missiles, defensive _ attack. we have supplied anti-tank missiles, defensive weapons. - attack. we have supplied anti-tank missiles, defensive weapons. we l attack. we have supplied anti-tank. missiles, defensive weapons. we are giving _ missiles, defensive weapons. we are giving support to the ukrainian navy, — giving support to the ukrainian navy, we — giving support to the ukrainian navy, we are giving support to the ukrainian — navy, we are giving support to the ukrainian energy sector to help them become _ ukrainian energy sector to help them become more energy independent, so we really— become more energy independent, so we really are giving every possible support _ we really are giving every possible support we can to ukraine and we are one support we canto ukraine and we are one of— support we can to ukraine and we are one of the _ support we can to ukraine and we are one of the leading donors of lethal aid to— one of the leading donors of lethal aid to ukraine to make sure that they— aid to ukraine to make sure that they are — aid to ukraine to make sure that theyare in— aid to ukraine to make sure that they are in the best possible position— they are in the best possible position to defend themselves. these ukrainian troops _ position to defend themselves. these ukrainian troops on _ position to defend themselves. these ukrainian troops on the _ position to defend themselves. tie"? ukrainian troops on the border of russia, preparing for the worst. they will be the ones on the
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frontline if russia does invade. but alongside the deterrents and defence this week, expect a flurry of diplomatic activity, too, to try to prevent a war that no one says they want. a war that would have consequences far beyond ukraine's borders. caroline hawley, bbc news. here, both the chancellor and borisjohnson have confirmed that the rise in national insurance will go ahead in april. with me is our political correspondent, ione wells. so the government's sticking to its guns. that's right, it had been quite widely reported that borisjohnson was wobbling a little bit over this tax rise after a backlash from some backbench conservative mps, calling for him to either pause or even scrapped completely this tax rise, at a time when he was also fighting fires with some tory mps on the downing street parties. this puts that speculation to bed a little bit, perhaps suggesting as well the prime minister is confident enough in his position at the moment that
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he doesn't need to entertain the prospect of caving to pressure from some of those more critical mps. also, i think, some of those more critical mps. also, ithink, really some of those more critical mps. also, i think, really interesting that, after weeks where we know the chancellor has been privately sending out colleagues over supporting any potential leadership contest in future, we have seen them penned this joint article together committing to the tax rise showing that, at least publicly, they are on the same page, the prime minister is on the same page as the chancellor who he, of course, will be relying on for support when the sue gray report on parties he said. that isn't to say the pressure from backbenchers has gone away and even this morning, the conservative mp robert halpin was saying he wants a commitment from both the pm and the chancellor that they will make the cost of living going forward. ione, thank you. 18,000 homes are without power in scotland after the damage and destruction of storm malik yesterday, a storm in which two people died. today, weather warnings are in place across the whole of scotland and parts of england, wales and northern ireland as another storm moves in.
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phil bodmer reports from bishop auckland. the calm between the storms, after malik and before corrie. in south church, county durham, power has been off for a number of homes since midnight. for racheljohnson, who farms at pigdon, near morpeth, it's the second time without electricity. she was last without power for 11 days following storm storm arwen in november. last time, we were off power for ii last time, we were off power for 11 days and we still haven't had all of the compensation and payment is fulfilled by northern power grid, i think we are in for a situation with a repeat of last time. engineers from northern power grid have been working through the night to try to restore supplies. the damage caused by the storm has really— the damage caused by the storm has really been _ the damage caused by the storm has really been to overhead power lines and infrastructure by the wind, so it has_ and infrastructure by the wind, so it has either— and infrastructure by the wind, so
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it has either dislodged some of our wires _ it has either dislodged some of our wires which — it has either dislodged some of our wires which are on top of wood poles or its— wires which are on top of wood poles or its caused — wires which are on top of wood poles or its caused trees to fall into the tines _ or its caused trees to fall into the lines or— or its caused trees to fall into the lines or windblown debris to come through— lines or windblown debris to come through as — lines or windblown debris to come through as well, so that has really been _ through as well, so that has really been the — through as well, so that has really been the sort of point of damage that we _ been the sort of point of damage that we see on a network affecting our customers. much of northern scotland bore the brunt of storm malik. a 60—year—old woman from aberdeen died after being hit by falling trees. an amber warning remains in place for much of the north of the country as storm corrie is due to sweep in overnight. britain is bracing itself for further disruption. phil bodmer, bbc news, county durham. relatives of those who were killed in londonderry, on what became known as bloody sunday, today held a walk of remembrance in the city to mark the 50th anniversary of the shootings. members of the army's parachute regiment opened fire on a civil rights march, killing 13 people. an inquiry found the marchers had posed no threat. chris page reports. bernard mcguigan... this is a day of remembrance and reflection.
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in a city which was the crucible of the conflict in northern ireland. bloody sunday was one of the most horrific and consequential acts of violence during the troubles. the parachute regiment killed 13 people within half an hour in the bogside area. the victims had been demonstrating against a law that allowed the security forces to imprison suspects without a trial. 50 years on, bereaved families are leading this march retracing the steps of their relatives who were shot dead on the streets. although half a century has passed, the mood is still sorrowful, a sense of grief remains very real. the children, brothers and sisters of those who died, say history will always hurt. i feel strange today. i feel apprehensive, my stomach's in butterflies. i don't know if it's the 50th, or what it is, or, you know, that it's been so long,
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it's been half a century now. it's just amazing to think we've survived this long afterwards. after the shootings, soldiers claimed they'd been fired at first, but families were determined to have the victims declared innocent. they succeeded 12 years ago, when a public inquiry found that the killings were unjustified. today, the civilians who lost their lives were honoured with music, silence and applause. the irish prime minister, the taoiseach micheal martin, is among the political leaders who paid tributes. was among the political leaders who laid tributes. the legacy of the past in northern ireland is complex and contentious. but, as thousands contemplate the memory of bloody sunday, the desire to strengthen the peace is ever—growing. chris page, bbc news, derry. now, it's the men's final of the australian open.
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highlights are on bbc one at 1:55pm, so if you don't want to know how it's been going — it's still ongoing — now is the time to turn down the sound and look away. austin halewood has this report. as the sun sets on another australian open, the crowd in melbourne were looking for one final piece of magic. rafa nadal knew he could leave the rod laver arena as the most successful singles player in men's history. right now, daniil medvedev is right at the top of his game. it didn't take the russian long to seal the first set. nadal immediately on the back foot. into the second, he found his game. and his touch, and forced a tie—break. but the resistance didn't faze medvedev. the us open champion already has that important first grand slam title. he calmly powered his way to a two—set lead.
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so many times in his career, rafa has seemingly done the impossible and into the third, an unlikely comeback looked on. nadal pulling one back. at 35, after months out injured, just reaching the final is up there with the best in nadal�*s achievements but with an early break in the fourth, we could be heading for a decider. austin halewood, bbc news. that's it for now. the next news on bbc one is at 4:45pm. bye for now. good afternoon. as you've just seen, the men's final at the australian open has gone to a deciding set, rafael nadal coming from two sets down against daniil medvedev to level.
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in the meantime, ash barty has been reflecting on her victory yesterday. she's been showing off her trophy in melbourne after becoming the first australian in 44 years to win the singles title. a straight sets win over danielle collins means the us open is now the only slam missing from her collection but despite the magnititude of her achievement, she said there was no wild celebration. it was pretty quiet, actually, i was pretty wrecked so i had a couple of beers and i was in bed, not too bad at all but it was nice just to be able to take a moment with my team and extended team, family, and have a good time. it was good fun. it is important to celebrate the journey along the way and important to realise how cool some moments are and i think this is going to be a big one for us when we can sit down and take a breath and absorb all of this and enjoy it before we kind of rush into what is next.
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the one—off women's ashes test produced one of the most thrilling finishes you'll see in cricket. australia declared just before tea on the last day in canberra, setting england a victory target of 257. and they were on course for a victory — 45 runs required from 60 balls with seven wickets left — sophia dunkley with a valuable contribution of a5. nat sciver looked strong and a remarkable win was within sight when she went for 58 — a great catch by australia captain meg lanning — and the wickets started to fall — six forjust 26 runs. that left kate cross to bat out for the draw, to keep england in the series — but they'll have to win the three remaining one—day matches to regain the ashes — and australia are dominant in that format of the game. and we could be in line for a thriller in the final of the men's t20 series with west indies after a moeen alli
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masterclass set up a winner takes all in the final match of the series tonight. the stand—in skipper struck 63 from 28 balls to put england on their way. and he then took two wickets as the west indies fell short of their target, england winning by 3a runs. moeen says he feels far more relaxed, now he's retired from test cricket. it is a lot more clearer now and you can kind of work on one part of the game and just test cricket is different and you kind of work on skills and different type of technique and all that kind of stuff so i would just say things are a lot more clearfor me. i think, it's difficult, with the amount of tests we play as well as to keep switching over and stuff, keeps it simple for me. they're into a play—off at the dubai desert classic after an incredible final round. richard bland had a stunning finish, birdying the last two holes to go level with viktor
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hovland at i2—under par. rory mcilroy was out in front on and off throughout the day — and he had a share of the lead on the last hole — but he hit into the water and finished a shot behind. so bland and hovland are back on the course. team gb freestyle skier izzy atkin has withdrawn from the big air competition at the winter olympics, which start on friday. she's still recovering after breaking her pelvis in a competition six weeks ago. atkin won slopestyle bronze at the pyeonchang games four years ago and she still aims to compete in that event in beijing, although she needs clearance from her doctor. she said she'd been giving rehab everything she's got and pulling out of the big air would give her more time at home to strengthen and prepare for the slopestyle. and medvedev taking that first game
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in the deciding set at the australian open. that's all the sport for now but there's more on the bbc sport website, including the latest transfer news and live coverage of today's women's fa cup games. i'll be back with more later. relatives of those killed and injured in one of the most notorious atrocities of the troubles in northern ireland have marched to commemorate the 50th anniversary of what became known as bloody sunday. the families retraced the steps of a civil rights march in the city of londonderry, at which british soldiers shot dead 13 people and injured at least 15 others. among those who laid wreaths at a memorial in derry was the irish prime minister, micheal martin. twelve years ago, the british government apologised for the killings after a public inquiry found the victims had posed no threat. earlier, i spoke to denis murray who, for decades, covered the troubles for the bbc. he looked back on the events of that day. it was such a shock at the time. and for a variety of reasons.
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one of them was that these were the people who were there to protect life, were taking life. it was british soldiers firing on a civil rights march, a civil rights march. it did britain's reputation around the world, terrible damage and i think it continues to do so and i think it was a terrible shock to the british public because that did not happen here, it happened elsewhere, it was the sort of thing that happened in czechoslovakia and in poland when risings were put down by the soviet state. and it was a terrible shock to everybody. many years after the event, i met a former parachute regiment officer from northern ireland who had been in the regiment at the time, he was not on duty that day and he said it was a blot on the escutcheon, was the phrase he used, did terrible damage as well to an elite, the elite regiment, if you like, of the british army
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and the british army itself. and what then compounded it was the widgery tribunal, the original inquiry into bloody sunday which was shown to be a bunch of lies, frankly, when the saville report came out. it did not tell the truth. and what happened at the time was as well the british army insisted there was a gun battle which there demonstrably was not and that all the dead had been carrying weapons or nail bombs which they demonstrably did not. so the saville inquiry was a brilliant thing in many ways because it did what a lot of the families were looking for, what all the families were looking for which was the truth. i think the hillsborough families will tell you the same thing, thatjust hearing the truth told on their behalf because the victims there were blamed as well. that is a liberation but when you getjustice as a result of it, in terms of someday being prosecuted, i doubt that is ever
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going to happen now. 50 years on with the saville inquiry, as you say, having uncovered the truth, and there have been government apologies, david cameron apologised on behalf of, of the government. in london. where do emotions sit today? it's still very raw. ironically, this isn't terribly well known in britain but the bloody sunday we are talking about came 52 years after the first bloody sunday when british forces again fired on an unarmed crowd at a sports stadium in dublin, croke park, 1a people killed that day as well. here, you and i, 50 years on talking about bloody sunday in derry, derry is a very resilient place, the people are resilient as well, and there is a unique atmosphere to that city, there always has been.
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and i think the city has bounced back very well. nato's secretary general has told the bbc that if russia decides to invade ukraine there will be a "huge price to pay." the british foreign secretary liz truss has warned there is a "real threat" of russia invading ukraine, but she said it was "very unlikely" that british soldiers would be deployed to fight in any conflict. we can cross live to kyiv and our chief international correspondent lyse doucet. good afternoon. will we heard from the president _ good afternoon. will we heard from the president a _ good afternoon. will we heard from the president a few— good afternoon. will we heard from the president a few days _ good afternoon. will we heard from the president a few days ago - good afternoon. will we heard from the president a few days ago telling the president a few days ago telling the world to calm down, saying in his mind, and i've heard this from other ukrainians since he spoke, that the situation now is not that different from what it was a year ago. you must understand the ukraine crisis with russia is not simply a
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question of fighting in the trenches, it is woven through all aspects of life here, through people, what language they use, how they spend their time, culturally, buildings that they frequent, this morning, we were at saint michael's cathedral that you can see behind us, it was completely destroyed by the soviets in the 1930s and rebuilt at the turn of the century. and when we went to mass there this morning, the priest was talking about in his words, the terrorists, in other words, the terrorists, in other words, the terrorists, in other words, the russians in eastern ukraine so they have lived with this war in its many dimensions for a very long time but they are mindful that when you have more than 100,000 russian troops massing on different points on your border, when you have heavy weaponry, you do have to worry because the president made it clear if the war does ratchet up another
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notch, it will be ukrainians that will be on the front line but they are grateful for the support that will come on their borders and in terms of military and technical support, to their own ukrainian forces. ~ ., support, to their own ukrainian forces. ~ . ., , forces. what reaction is there in ukraine to _ forces. what reaction is there in ukraine to what _ forces. what reaction is there in ukraine to what is _ forces. what reaction is there in ukraine to what is being - forces. what reaction is there in ukraine to what is being said . forces. what reaction is there in | ukraine to what is being said and specifically today, by the uk foreign secretary and also the nato secretary—general? timer;r foreign secretary and also the nato secretary-general?— foreign secretary and also the nato secretary-general? they welcome the ex - ressions secretary-general? they welcome the exnressions of — secretary-general? they welcome the expressions of support. _ secretary-general? they welcome the expressions of support. they - secretary-general? they welcome the | expressions of support. they welcome the actual concrete manifestations of support, not a day goes by without military hardware, ammunition, weapons, some training, arriving for the ukrainian forces. they need that, they are in a much better at military position now than they were in 2014 when russian forces first invaded, annex in crimea, backing separatists in eastern ukraine so they feel much more confident and that is what you also sense when you talk to
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ukrainians. they are resigned to their aggressive neighbour but they are defiant that russia will not defeat them, not culturally, psychologically, security wise but they have to know that nato has their back. they have to know that nato has their back-— the nhs covid vaccination programme in england has been extended to vulnerable children aged between 5 and 11—years—old. eligible children include those with diabetes, epilepsy and learning disabilities or those who live with somebody who immunosuppressed. here's our science correspondent, pallab ghosh. xavier is 11 and he's among the first in his age group to have a covid jab at the emberbrook health centre in surrey. he has epilepsy, which makes him more vulnerable to the virus. the overwhelming majority of children have only mild symptoms, but there are around 500,000 5—to—11—year—old who are more at risk, and the government has decided that they should be vaccinated. more than 850 sites have been set up across england, and this is xavier's message to any
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young children worried about having a jab. it's not as stressful as you may think. everybody here is quite nice, and you get a sticker at the end. children will get two ten microgram doses of the pfizer vaccine at the centre, eight weeks apart — a third of the amount used for adults. well, i think it is very important for them to be brought in and to be seen, so that they can regain some sort of social interaction, they can get back to the normal activities and daily living that the rest of us take for granted. the scottish government has also started to send letters to parents of at—risk children, inviting them to be vaccinated. they're also being asked to come forward in northern ireland. pallab ghosh, bbc news. london's delayed crossrail project, which stretches from reading to shenfield in essex, is an estimated £4—billion over budget. it was due to open in 2018.
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but completion could now finally be in sight. tom edwards reports. it's already being run as a railway, the only thing that is missing is passengers. welcome to crossrail where trains are now running every few minutes. we were given the first look at the new trains that now speed underneath the capital. it's all very new, very shiny, and very big. really early on, i was down here in the tunnels as they were boring underneath london and to see trains running through here is incredibly impressive. we cannot forget that this project is three—and—a—half years late, it's billions of pounds over budget. there have been serious problems. but it looks like this scheme is in its final stretch. when it opens, it will be known as the elizabeth line. tannoy: good afternoon, guests, those travelling with us _ please board this train.
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thank you. for the first time, we are allowed on the trains that use the tunnels under central london, ourjourney from paddington to liverpool streetjust 12 minutes. what you notice about these trains is they are big and also very fast and it will add 10% to the rail capacity in central london, it's also going to ease overcrowding in some of the tube stations. we haven't got an exact date yet for opening but it will not be far off. the cost of crossrail is now nearly 19 billion, the initial budget 15. it stretches from berkshire in the west to essex in the east. the scheme is so big so it can cope with population growth. the scheme is so big so it can cope with imputation growth-— population growth. the plan was alwa s population growth. the plan was always that _ population growth. the plan was always that london _ population growth. the plan was always that london is _ population growth. the plan was always that london is a - population growth. the plan was always that london is a growing | population growth. the plan was i always that london is a growing city and whatever we are building new, going forward, it has to accommodate and pre—pandemic, protections were
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large and we will get there one day but for now, these stations, i think they will look very busy when people start using them.— start using them. crossrail are now car in: start using them. crossrail are now carrying out _ start using them. crossrail are now carrying out what _ start using them. crossrail are now carrying out what is _ start using them. crossrail are now carrying out what is called - start using them. crossrail are now carrying out what is called trial- carrying out what is called trial operation so they are going through 150 scenarios to see if their systems will work, things like getting passengers off platforms safely. once those have been checked off we might get a start date. this is bond street station, it's not completely finished. it is three months behind. the rest of the line will have to open without it. when the line opens, initially, it will be in three sections. the big question is when. billion dollar question. a date, can you give us a date? it question. a date, can you give us a date? , , ., , question. a date, can you give us a date? , , . , . , date? it is sin, that is the closest i will live date? it is sin, that is the closest i will give yom — date? it is sin, that is the closest i will give you. i _ date? it is sin, that is the closest i will give you. i will— date? it is sin, that is the closest i will give you. i will give - date? it is sin, that is the closest i will give you. i will give you - date? it is sin, that is the closest i will give you. i will give you the| i will give you. i will give you the first have a 2022, i am not trying to be coy, i want to get the trial operation survey is finished and once that is done, i want is to be
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certain we can operate this thing to a very high level of reliability so rest assured, as soon as i am ready to give the go or no—go, we will let people know. we know people want to use the railways but people will not thank us if it is anything less than super reliable? br; thank us if it is anything less than super reliable?— thank us if it is anything less than suer reliable? j ., . super reliable? by the end of march? the first have — super reliable? by the end of march? the first have a _ super reliable? by the end of march? the first have a 2022, _ super reliable? by the end of march? the first have a 2022, | _ super reliable? by the end of march? the first have a 2022, i guarantee - the first have a 2022, i guarantee that but it will be as soon as possible, obviously i am putting the team to achieve the earliest possible date but i don't want to rush things, i would rather take a few extra weeks to make sure we are super reliable. few extra weeks to make sure we are soper reliable-— super reliable. with passenger numbers are — super reliable. with passenger numbers are still _ super reliable. with passenger numbers are still down - super reliable. with passenger numbers are still down and - super reliable. with passenger. numbers are still down and with super reliable. with passenger- numbers are still down and with the rise of working from home it is not clear yet how many will return to public transport. and the mayor hopes this line will play a part in rejuvenating london. it’s hopes this line will play a part in rejuvenating london.— rejuvenating london. it's really important _ rejuvenating london. it's really important we _ rejuvenating london. it's really important we entice _ rejuvenating london. it's really important we entice people - rejuvenating london. it's really i important we entice people away rejuvenating london. it's really - important we entice people away from working from home to working in the office but also, that we can increase our public transport capacity by more than 10%. this line
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is important for capacity, for connectivity, for regenerating the city but also to give city a feel—good factor. we will have a really good recovery after this pandemic and this new line will help. pandemic and this new line will hel. , pandemic and this new line will hel, , ., , pandemic and this new line will hel _ , ., , ., . pandemic and this new line will hel. , .,. ., , help. this was once the largest infrastructure _ help. this was once the largest infrastructure project _ help. this was once the largest infrastructure project in - help. this was once the largest| infrastructure project in europe. light and over budget, the transport bosses are adamant it is opening and it is not far away. that was tom edwards reporting. south korea and japan have reported another north korean ballistic missile launch — the seventh missile test in the space of a month. pyongyang has not tested its long—range intercontinental ballistic missiles or nuclear weapons for nearly five years, but has instead launched an array of sophisticated shorter range projectiles, including hypersonic and cruise missiles. the country's leader, kimjong un, called on the military to develop its technology and capabilities, ignoring us calls for talks on denuclearisation.
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japan has strongly protested against the launch. translation: the series of actions by north korea, including the repeated launches of ballistic missiles, threaten the peace and security of japan, the region and the international community. such intense ballistic missile launches are in violation of security council resolutions. and japan has made a strong protest to north korea. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. hello. while many people are still picking up the pieces from storm malik, the weather's set to cause more disruption later today as storm corrie moves in from the northwest. before it arrives much of the uk seeing quite a dry, quiet sort of day, some sunshine holding on all day towards the south and the east, but cloud and rain moving in from the northwest, heading particularly windy for northern ireland and western scotland later on. and the rain will be preceded by some snowfall over the higher ground, too. here is storm corrie — quite an active, potent area of low pressure moving across scotland. lots of isobars on the map. so particularly windy spell
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of weather for the northern half of the uk. we've got a yellow warning for 50 to 60 mile per hour gusts, but across the north of scotland, an amber wind warning from the met office gusts could reach 80 or possibly even 90 miles per hour — enough to cause some significant disruption sunday night, particularly and into monday morning. the main area of strong winds and rain slowly clears to the east during monday morning, still further blustery showers around, too. bye for now. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... britain is proposing to double the number of soldiers deployed in eastern europe, to increase pressure on russia's president amid heightened tensions over ukraine.. we think it is highly likely that he is looking to invade ukraine, that is why we are doing all we can through deterrence and diplomacy, to urge him to desist.
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both the uk prime minister boris johnson and the chancellor say

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