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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 30, 2022 1:00am-1:31am GMT

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hello, this is bbc news. i'm rich preston. our top stories: historic blizzards in the united states as a fierce winter storm with high winds and heavy snowfall hits the east coast. storm malik batters northern britain, leaving two people dead. thousands are without power as forecasters warn of further high winds on sunday. downing street is considering sending more british troops and military hardware to eastern europe, as nato weighs up options to increase pressure on russia. the medical trial which is throwing new light on why some people experience breathlessness after covid. and reports that one of the biggest stars in world sport, wuarterback tom brady, is to retire from the nfl after 22 seasons and 7
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super bowl titles. let's begin in the united states, where a fierce storm is sweeping across the east coast of the country. flood warnings have been issued and people have been told to stay at home. there've been predictions of some 60 centimetres, or two feet, of snow. with more, here's our north america correspondent peter bowes. a blanket of snow covers times square in new york city. the streets largely deserted as most people hunker down at home. this has been a colossal storm, a bomb cyclone, as it's
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known, a combination of heavy snow and strong winds approaching the strength of a hurricane. this winter wonderland and heart of new york city is fun for some, but heading out for a healthy moment is not advised by the authorities. —— selfie moment. the blizzard conditions can be extremely dangerous. the snow scapes in new york are repeated across great swathes of the eastern united states. boston airport in massachusetts is under a thick layer. across the region, around 6000 we flights have been cancelled. in many neighbourhoods, snowploughs and salts but as have been working for hours to try to clear the roads. ~ . , for hours to try to clear the roads. a , ., , for hours to try to clear the roads. a, , ., , ., ., roads. many homes are without ower. roads. many homes are without power- you _ roads. many homes are without power- you get _ roads. many homes are without power. you get the _ roads. many homes are without power. you get the prevailing l power. you get the prevailing north—east winds, it really impacts the coastal areas as you get that strong wind coming of the ocean, so in addition to having to deal with borderline historic amounts of snow, you get to the winds that push all of that water onshore.-
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of that water onshore. along the coast. — of that water onshore. along the coast, battered - of that water onshore. along the coast, battered by - of that water onshore. along | the coast, battered by strong winds, flood warnings have been issued as the storm that northwards. with frigid, potentially life—threatening temperatures overnight, officials are urging people to stay indoors until the storm passes. stay indoors until the storm asses. , , ., passes. this is the danger we are talking — passes. this is the danger we are talking about, _ passes. this is the danger we are talking about, we - passes. this is the danger we are talking about, we are - are talking about, we are expecting temperatures in the single digits tonight into tomorrow morning, and this is when frostbite kicks in. look at how serious that can be. take this very seriously. the worst of the _ take this very seriously. the worst of the snowfall - take this very seriously. the worst of the snowfall is almost over. but the dangers posed by the extreme conditions will linger, a huge cleanup operation likely to last several days. peter bowes, bbc news. one of the areas worst affected by the storm is cape cod in massachusetts, where some meteorologists have been to measure the weather. indistinct shouting.
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if you can make him out, this is matthew cappucci capturing the situation on the coast on cape cod earlier, and being knocked over by the conditions. well, matthew is now safely back on his feet and inside somewhere warm, and hejoins us now. matthew, welcome to the programme. tell us, how bad is this storm? you say one welcome, it doesn't feel long! this storm is a pretty nasty one, it explosively intensified. think of a storm is like a vacuum cleaner, it sacked in so much air very quickly, it went from virtually nothing on the one up to a hurricane force low system with a 130 michael or kliment an hour wind gust in about 2k hours time, really going into that injust one hours time, really going into that in just one day's time, really impressive stuff. 0ne that in just one day's time, really impressive stuff. one of the most interesting elements of this was the rapidity with which the snow came down, upwards of ten centimetres an hour at times. boston's logan international airport saw about 60 centimetres worth of snow, the snowy is january day on
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record. ~ ., , the snowy is january day on record. a, , ., record. matthew, it is not unusual— record. matthew, it is not unusual for _ record. matthew, it is not unusual for us _ record. matthew, it is not unusual for us to - record. matthew, it is not unusual for us to have - record. matthew, it is not- unusual for us to have stories about bad weather at this time of the year, that's because it is winter. is this normal weather behaviour, would you say? one thing we are seeing in recent years is less low overall thanks to climate change, obviously it is getting warmer in many areas like boston, but every so often, but increasing temperature allows us to have a bit more moisture in the air, so that when you get the blockbuster events, we get the blockbuster events, we get a bit more snow, because of all that extra moisture translates to more snowfall. i am right out of cape cod, massachusetts, whether winds were hurricane force, but behind me you can see about 50 or 60 centimetres worth of snowfall. i have here a very long time and i can say this is probably our heaviest snow locally since 2005, and they were even a few reports of thunder snow.— were even a few reports of thunder snow. a, .,, ., thunder snow. matthew, those of us, thunder snow. matthew, those of us. myself _ thunder snow. matthew, those of us, myself included, _ thunder snow. matthew, those of us, myself included, who - us, myself included, who actually prefer winter weather, might look in and at all that snow and wind and cold but you've got, but actually this can be life—threatening, can't
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it? can be life-threatening, can't it? , , ., ., it? definitely. one of the more challenging _ it? definitely. one of the more challenging elements - it? definitely. one of the more challenging elements of - it? definitely. one of the more challenging elements of this i challenging elements of this particular storm is the fact that players couldn't keep up. 0rdinarily with storms like this we might get five or seven centimetres per hour but we had an extended period of about six hours long where we were getting 8—10 centimetres per hour. snowploughs were not able to keep up, no road crew in the world could handle this, so that means all the roadways are essentially shut down, many folks are losing power and conditions make a challenging, especially the elderly, vulnerable populations who can't really handle the elements like this. so unfortunately, while the snow is pretty underfunded for the kiddos, especially folks like myself, this will cause a toll on a human standpoint and economically as well. find economically as well. and matthew. _ economically as well. and matthew, briefly, - economically as well. and matthew, briefly, do - economically as well. and matthew, briefly, do we l economically as well. and matthew, briefly, do we have any idea when it might come down? ., , , down? right now it is pulling away from — down? right now it is pulling away from the _ down? right now it is pulling away from the coast - down? right now it is pulling away from the coast into - down? right now it is pulling away from the coast into the | away from the coast into the gulf and towards the canadian maritimes, so we are seeing the last of the snow right now. we have something called diamond dust, temperatures are so cold outside, any of the remnant
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moisture india is coming down like confetti. so it is basically done along the new hampshire coast of south—east maine, but boston proper, we're good to go, all done.— good to go, all done. matthew, warm and _ good to go, all done. matthew, warm and stay _ good to go, all done. matthew, warm and stay safe. _ good to go, all done. matthew, warm and stay safe. there - here in the uk, a 9—year—old boy and a 60—year—old woman there have died after being hit by falling trees during storm malik. the boy was killed after a tree fell staffordshire, while the woman was killed in aberdeen. power lines have also been affected with thousands of homes in scotland and england without electricity. a second storm, storm corrie, is expected to bring further high winds to scotland. catriona renton has this report. widespread disruption as storm malik swept its way into northern parts of the uk. the north—east of scotland took a battering. in bradford lee warner and his friend richard had been packing up their gear after a bike ride. we were sat between the two back seats, just crouching down, really.
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pushed me further down. i lay down on the my floor. my friend pulled me out of the back. an almighty crash. to be honest, i thought my friend were dead, i think he has been really lucky. northern powergrid says tens of thousands of customers are still without power, mostly in northumberland and county durham. tonight, county durham county council has declared a major incident following the impact of the storm. this is just day one, storm arwen lasted more than a week, ten days for some people. so we are not in the same position now as we were then, thankfully. the numbers we are dealing with are much smaller this time but, of course, for anyone affected by it, it is a significant disruption. this afternoon in staffordshire police were called after a tree fell in winnothdale near stoke—on—trent. a nine—year—old boy later died in hospital. and in aberdeen in north east scotland, emergency services were called at 10:30am
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to the place where this tree had fallen. but sadly, a 60—year—old woman had died. gusts of 85mph were recorded on the aberdeenshire coast. at one point, more than 80,000 homes in scotland were without power, and transport was disrupted. a second storm, storm corrie, is now on its way, expected to bring further high winds, especially to northern scotland tomorrow. catriona renton, bbc news. britain says it's preparing a series of diplomatic and military initiatives in europe next week in the wake of growing tensions with russia. the prime minister, borisjohnson, has issued a statement saying the uk is willing to double its nato troop contingent in the baltic states and eastern europe, as well as send defensive weapons to estonia. mrjohnson is also due to go to eastern europe in the coming days as part of diplomatic efforts to prevent russia invading ukraine.
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0ur political correspondent jonathan blake explained the uk response to the crisis in ukraine. what we have tonight is some more detail on what boris johnson said mps and house of commons a few days ago, and it was that britain was prepared to deploy troops to protect nato allies in europe if russia invades ukraine. it nato allies in europe if russia invades ukraine.— nato allies in europe if russia invades ukraine. it seems this ossible invades ukraine. it seems this possible move _ invades ukraine. it seems this possible move to _ invades ukraine. it seems this possible move to double - invades ukraine. it seems this possible move to double the l possible move to double the number of uk forces in estonia, which currently stands at around 900 or so, so that would put it at around 2000, would be a pre—emptive move, not necessarily in response to any russian invasion. downing street is talking about this as an example of the biggest possible offer to nato that the uk is willing and able to make to step up its presence in the region, to protect nato allies and to help ukraine itself bolster its defences. this is
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not necessarily definitely going to happen. we are told diplomats will go to brussels this week to finalise the details, of course it will have to be signed off, you would imagine, by other members of nato as well. and the prime minister will go to the region this week, he will talk to vladimir putin, and in contrast to this, or alongside this, if you like, this pre—emptive move to send extra uk troops, we are told he will reiterate the need for russia to re—engage diplomatically, as the uk sees it, and to attempt to persuade russia to step back from any potential aggressive moves. at the same time, russia has now gathered more than 100,000 troops, tanks and missiles on its border with ukraine, but has repeatedly denies it's planning any sort of invasaion. 0ur chief international correspondent lyse doucet has more from kyiv. ukrainians have long lived with war. dozens of british soldiers, here since 2015, not long after russia first invaded. but with more of moscow's troops and weapons now massed
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along the border, diplomacy builds, too. next week, boris johnson's visit to this region takes it up a notch. here in kyiv, there's concern that too much talk of war can be risky, too, but they need their friends. it's a good signal for us, not only for us, not only for ukraine, but also to russian federations, that we have strong partners. we will not be alone with this, if the invasion comes to be, so it's a good signal. moscow sends conflicting signals. more troops, more weaponry moving in, but its door still open to find a way out. washington does the same — talking to allies in moscow, too, while readying military reinforcements and warnings about any war. it would be horrific,
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it would be terrible and it's not necessary, and we think a diplomatic outcome is the way to go here. this is what it looks like now... russia released these images of its anti—aircraft missiles arriving in neighbouring belarus for next month's military exercises. a month fraught with ever—growing risk. lyse doucet, bbc news, kyiv. matthew 0rr is a eurasia analyst at the risk consultancy rane. he joins us live now from houston, texas. a very good evening to you. what do you make of this announcement by the british government? i announcement by the british government?— government? i think it is a significant _ government? i think it is a significant announcement. j government? i think it is a l significant announcement. i think, significantannouncement. i think, you know, it is an example, a signal to vladimir putin of the kinds of things you should expect, not only if he follows through with this possible invasion plan, although we think that is pretty unlikely, but even if russia forgoes an invasion, it
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is an example of the kinds of things nato will have to do to respond to the continued buildup that's going on in the western part of russia, and something that we think could be part of russia's response, basically as a substitute for invasion, as part of its response, its military and technical response that it has been warning of in recent weeks. ., , , , , weeks. there have been pushers for diplomacy— weeks. there have been pushers for diplomacy tour _ weeks. there have been pushers for diplomacy tour of _ weeks. there have been pushers for diplomacy tour of -- - for diplomacy tour of —— prevail, from the likes of france, germany, in china. at the same time 900 british troops potentially being doubled, long—range rockets, raf jets flying doubled, long—range rockets, rafjets flying over the region. arguably, isn't this just going to antagonise russia at a time when people should be talking? at a time when people should be talkin: ? ~ ., ., �* talking? well, i mean, i don't thinkthat— talking? well, i mean, i don't think that this _ talking? well, i mean, i don't think that this was _ talking? well, i mean, i don't think that this was all - talking? well, i mean, i don't think that this was all part - talking? well, i mean, i don't think that this was all part of| think that this was all part of russia's calculus. it knows that if it continues its buildup near nato countries, nato is essentially obligated to respond. therefore it is in line with steps already taken by washington to put thousands of troops on alert to deploy to
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the western countries of the nato alliance, should russia's buildup continue. so it isn't necessarily something that will provoke additional russian action, although you hit on a good point, which is that only some countries within nato are prepared to lead on this response, because as we know there are big divisions within there are big divisions within the german government about possibly provoking russia, there are similar concerns and other western european countries. it is really an example of countries like the us and the uk doing things, kind of leading within nato, and taking steps that others might be afraid to do. some western officials have said they would expect an invasion possibly february but ukrainian officials say the west is overplaying this and they do not think there is any threat of an invasion. how do you see this playing out? we don't think— you see this playing out? we don't think an _ you see this playing out? - don't think an invasion, while certainly possible, is not the most likely scenario for how this resolves. russia will take this resolves. russia will take this military tactical response
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but it is wandahl, it could contain several measures but likely to contain not only military steps but diplomatic measures so militarily it is likely to move additional trips to the western part of its country, possibly new troops and missile systems to belarus close to the baltic stakes, washable him to closer military cooperation with china as well and this is clear from an upcoming meeting between the russian foreign minister and chinese foreign minister, as well as the meeting between president priddin and president xi at the olympics so we think this build—up will continue but it is not going to boil over into a full stage for —— putin. matthew 0rr, thank you. let's get some of the day's other news. mps in italy have re—elected sergio mattarella as the country's president after failing to agree on an alternative candidate.
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the 80—year—old had said he didn't want a second term but was persuaded to stay on after a week of inconclusive votes in parliament. clashes have continued between us—backed kurdish forces and islamic state group fighters in and around a prison in the north—east of syria. kurdish fighters had claimed to have retaken the jail near hasakah on wednesday after it was attacked nearly a week earlier by scores of is insurgents. 13 people have been killed and another ten injured in mexico after a a vehicle overturned in mexico. emergency services from jalisco state said the truck flipped into a ditch on a highway often used by catholic pilgrims visiting a local shrine. libya's interior ministry has received nearly $47 million worth of new equipment from italy to help the country combat illegal immigration to europe. the eu—funded hardware includes spare parts for coast guard boats, mobile administrative offices and logistical support. after a week—long drive across canada, a convoy of trucks has arrived in ottawa to protest against vaccine mandates and covid—19 measures.
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the movement was sparked by new rules for truckers crossing the us—canada border, implemented byjustin trudeau's liberal government earlier this month. this is bbc news. the headlines: a powerful winter storm is battering the east coast of the united states. forecasters are warning of historic blizzards, deep snowfall, power cuts and travel chaos. two people have been killed in the uk by falling trees during storm malik. a nine—year—old boy died in staffordshire while a 60—year—old woman was killed in aberdeen. it's thought that 1.3 million people in the uk are living with long covid, and hundreds of thousands of them experience breathlessness. traditional lung scans often appear to be normal, though. but researchers in oxford are using a different technique in a clinical trial which does show problems in these patients' lungs. they hope that understanding
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the problem will lead to better treatment options. 0ur health correspondent catherine burns explains. flo van diemen van thor was never one for just sitting down inside but she says long covid has been a horror show. it was not just the breathlessness that was really hard, it was the muscle weakness — legs like jelly and just thinking, "if i try to go down the stairs, they might not carry me". but this is the ct scan of flo's lungs and, like so many long covid patients, everything looks normal and healthy. these are my lungs. i've had them all my life. i know there's something wrong with them. flo is taking part in a study in oxford. breathe in and out. researchers think they're the first in the world to be able to show abnormalities in the lungs of long covid patients. flo and the other volunteers have an mri scan as they suck in xenon gas. it behaves like oxygen and
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should cross from their lungs into their bloodstream. the numbers are small so far. 36 patients — 11 who didn't need hospital care when they were first infected but went on to get long covid. it's a very exciting and very encouraging first step. so what we have here is one of the patients from our trial and the ct scan is entirely normal. they have then gone on and had a xenon gas mri. this is the xenon getting through normally into their bloodstream from their lungs and the blacker areas are where the xenon gas or oxygen would struggle to get through. it's early days for this study and there are still lots of questions, including exactly what is causing these abnormal lung scans. in the meantime, there aren't many of these specially adapted mri scanners across the country. if this research proves they are worthwhile, it would take some serious investment and several months to scale them up across the nhs. and breathe out... lovely.
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really good. flo says this was the turning point for her, learning breathing techniques with a respiratory physiotherapist. i just want you to try and slow... it might take her longer to recover after exercise now, but she's moved up a level in karate. she's not back to normal yet, but thinks she will get there. catherine burns, bbc news. a clean—up operation is under way in thailand after a leak in an underwater oil pipeline sent oil washing ashore onto beaches in rayong province. officials say around 50,000 litres of oil leaked from the pipeline and has already spread over 50 square kilometres — over 19 square miles — in the gulf of thailand. 12 navy ships and three civilian ships, along with several aircraft, are also working to contain the spill at sea with booms and dispersant spray. us media say one of the biggest stars in world sport, the american football quarterback tom brady,
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is expected to announce his retirement after 22 seasons. he's considered by many to be the best nfl quarterback player in the history of the game. he won six superbowls with the new england patriots —— he won six super bowls with the new england patriots before joining the tampa bay buccaneers and winning a seventh in his first season there. nick hamilton is a reporter and host at nitecast media and siriusxm. hejoins us now from la. good to see you, good to have you. there have been some mixed messages about this. what do we know? fits messages about this. what do we know? �* , ., messages about this. what do we know? ~ , ., ., know? as of right now, the early reports _ know? as of right now, the early reports came - know? as of right now, the early reports came out - know? as of right now, thej early reports came out that know? as of right now, the - early reports came out that tom brady was leaning more towards retirement and would announce his retirement in the last couple days but as of the few hours, his agent, along with his dad, thomas brady senior, came out and said tom brady has not made an official announcement yet, which more than likely will probably be coming in sometime in the coming in sometime in the coming days of this week. i cannot see tom brady allowing
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something as significant as the his retirement getting up before he had the opportunity to do it himself. for before he had the opportunity to do it himself.— before he had the opportunity to do it himself. for those who are not nfl— to do it himself. for those who are not nfl fans _ to do it himself. for those who are not nfl fans watching - are not nfl fans watching across the world, give us a sense of tom brady and some of the high point of his career. tom brady is arguably the goat, the greatest of all time when it comes to the world of nfl and football, a guy who has thrown for 80 4000 yards, but 80 4000 yards, 6000 touchdown, seven time nfl champion and personified greatness. this is the guy who was not overly athletically gifted but he had away and a will to win. we have been talking about kobe bryant and his mentality or michael jordan, this is how we talk about tom brady, his willingness to win and make other players around him better and he expected nothing less than success and excellence and this is exactly what tom brake —— brady was about, winning at all costs. this is a guy who actually had different instruments as far as exercise
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equipment, he hired a nutritionist, to make sure he was available and ready for the next season and so at 44 years of age, 22 year season, sorry, 22 years in the nfl, this is a guy who has accomplished it all and i don't see anyone eclipsing his effort anywhere in my lifetime. he eclipsing his effort anywhere in my lifetime.— in my lifetime. he has been billed as — in my lifetime. he has been billed as the _ in my lifetime. he has been billed as the greatest - billed as the greatest quarterback of all time, so what makes someone, or him, such a great quarterback in particular?— particular? his drive, his preparation, _ particular? his drive, his preparation, his - particular? his drive, his i preparation, his willingness particular? his drive, his - preparation, his willingness to win at all costs. this is a guy who was sorry brawl, highly intelligent when it comes to the game, a guy who doesn't back down. as we saw last week against the los angeles rams, he was a field goal or a touchdown short of coming back and moving on to the championship. this is a guy you cannot leave too much time on the clock for, on a care if it is 28 degrees as we saw the atlanta falcons in the super bowl, he could come back and
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eclipse it and he was the same guy who made sure he was going to make his team win, no matter what it took or takes, tom brady said we are going to win this in every aspect of the game and it's what he did and that's why he became a seven time champion.— that's why he became a seven time champion. nick, thank you so much for— time champion. nick, thank you so much for being _ time champion. nick, thank you so much for being with - time champion. nick, thank you so much for being with us. - a reminder of our top story, a fierce storm is sweeping across the east coast of the united states. flood warnings have been issued and people have been issued and people have been told to stay at home. there have been predictions of some 60 centimetres or two feet of snow, and nearly 11 million people on the east coast remain under blizzard warnings from the storm. new york city experienced several snowfall and several states declared emergencies in response to this storm which formed the atlantic of the carolinas and is forecast to continue well into sunday. we shall leave it there, thanks for being with us. you can reach me on twitter. i'm @richpreston.
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from me and the rest of the team here in london, goodbye for now. hello there. the winds from storm malik eased down quite quickly during the latter part of saturday and we saw a ridge of high pressure build in to give us a fine start for sunday morning — cold, frosty and sunny for many — but conditions will deteriorate across the north and the west of the country later as the next deepening area of low pressure hurtles in off the atlantic. this has been named by the uk met office as storm corrie, and that'll arrive later on sunday across scotland, northern ireland, northern england. but we start the day off largely fine and settled with lots of sunshine around. the sunshine will hold on across central, southern and eastern parts of england through the day. cloud will build up further north and west and it'll start turning wetter and windier for northern ireland. northern and western scotland, some snow developing on the hills. gales developing across the western isles. it's going to be a chilly day
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across the board for sunday — highs of 5 to 9 degrees. and then through sunday evening and overnight as storm corrie moves across the north of the uk, a real squeeze in the isobars behind this system as it pushes out into the north sea, so i think some of the greatest impacts will be felt once again across scotland. but we have a blanket yellow warning of wind gusts for the northern half of the uk — 50—60 mph gusts here — and an amberwarning for the northern half of scotland, where we could see gusts 70—80 mph, maybe even stronger than that for a time across the north—west of the country. along with that, there'll be some heavy rain and mountain snow which will clear away and then, in the early hours of monday, we'll see a rash of blustery showers pushing down from the north—west with clear spells in between, some wintriness over the higher ground. a chilly night to come, but not as cold as the previous night. so we start monday, then, off on a chilly note. there will be some sunshine around across eastern areas. the strong winds will have cleared away by this point but it will be a breezy day with further showers packing to northern and western areas.
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again, some of these will be wintry on the hills. and another fairly cool day to come — 6—9 degrees. we could just make 10 degrees across south wales, south west england. beyond then, as we move through the week, we'll see further wet and windy weather affecting northern and eastern parts of the country around this area of high pressure. not as windy as what we've had over the weekend, but with higher pressure always towards the south, many southern areas will tend to stay a lot calmer. and there will be some milder air moving in from the south—west for a time. most of the rain in the north. signs of it turning chillier for all by the end of the week.
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this is bbc news,
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the headlines: a powerful winter storm is battering the east coast of the united states. forecasters are warning of "historic" blizzards, deep snowfall, power cuts and travel chaos. the governors of new york, newjersey, massachusetts and virginia have declared emergencies and urged people to stay home. two people have been killed in the uk by falling trees during storm malik. a 9—year—old boy died in staffordshire while a 60—year—old woman was killed in aberdeen. thousands of homes are without power along the east coast of england and the north east of scotland. britain says it's preparing a series of diplomatic and military initiatives in europe next week in the wake of growing tension between ukraine and russia. the prime minister, borisjohnson, issued a statement saying the uk was willing to double its nato troop contingent in eastern europe. the world premiere of a major new musical composition to mark
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the 60th anniversary of coventry cathedral has taken place.

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