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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 29, 2022 10:00am-10:31am GMT

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and around the world. the us warns the russian troop build—up near ukraine is the largest since the cold war — as attempts to find a diplomatic solution continue. here in kyiv, ukrainian say they have been living with this crisis for the last eight years and we will speak to a prominent mp to find out what they are looking for from nato. the downing street �*lockdown parties�* report is now expected to be delivered before the metropolitan police inquiry ends. tomorrow, events will be held in londonderry and around the world to mark the fiftieth anniversary of bloody sunday. five states declare emergencies and more than five thousand flights are cancelled, as the us east coast braces for a major blizzard to hit the region.
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# don't it always seem to go, you don't know what you've got till its gone". canadian singer—songwriter joni mitchell hasjoined neil young in calling for her music to be taken off spotify. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. america's top military general has warned that a russian invasion of ukraine would be "horrific" and would lead to significant casualties. general mark milley described the build—up of one—hundred—thousand russian troops near ukraine's border as the largest since the cold war. but the us defence secretary lloyd austin said conflict
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could still be avoided through the use of diplomacy. russia denies it plans to invade ukraine. here in the uk, downing street has announced plans for the prime minister to travel to eastern europe next week — as britain steps up diplomatic efforts to help resolve the crisis. borisjohnson is also expected to speak, by phone, to russian president, vladimir putin. simonjones has this report. preparing for a possible war. britain is already bolstering ukraine's defences. ukrainian soldiers are being trained to use anti—tank missiles provided by the uk. borisjohnson says he's determined to do all he can to avoid bloodshed. he'll visit the region in the coming days, and he'll call president putin with the message russia needs to "step back" and engage diplomatically. at a meeting here at the ministry of defence, top officials outlined a range of options to counter what's being described as growing russian aggression in the region.
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one option would see more british troops sent to reinforce nato defences. that's something borisjohnson will consider over the weekend. the us, too, is sending equipment to ukraine, and some soldiers will shortly be moved to eastern europe. the us says the russian troop build—up on ukraine's border is the largest since the cold war. given the type of forces that are arrayed — the ground manoeuvre forces, the artillery, the ballistic missiles, the air forces, all of it packaged together — if that was unleashed on ukraine, it would be significant, it would be horrific, it would be terrible. and it's not necessary, and we think a diplomatic outcome is the way to go here. but russian training exercises continue. president putin reportedly told the french president that he had no plans for an offensive, but he said the us and nato had failed to address russia's main demands: for nato forces to withdraw
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from eastern europe. borisjohnson, though, is warning that if diplomacy fails, thousands of lives could be lost. simon jones, bbc news. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in kyiv. yes. what a moment in ukraine and the surrounding region, russian troops are said to be building up and a diplomatic momentum is also building up, a flurry of telephone calls with president putin, first it was president biden and yesterday it was president biden and yesterday it was emmanuel macron and soon we expect it will be borisjohnson picking up the phone and yesterday here, an extraordinary press conference by the ukrainian president saying, calm down. he says the crisis now is no different from
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what it was one year ago, but he did not dismiss the threat posed by russian troops and heavy weaponry massing along the border. what does ukraine want from nato allies? we arejoined by a prominent member of parliament, the chairman of the parliamentary delegation to nato and welcome to the programme. what are welcome to the programme. what are we to make by the comments yesterday by president zelensky? do you think the comments by the us president and other world leaders are worsening the crisis? ., ~ ., ~ the crisis? no. i think that mr zelensky as — the crisis? no. i think that mr zelensky as the _ the crisis? no. i think that mr zelensky as the president - the crisis? no. i think that mr zelensky as the president of i the crisis? no. i think that mr - zelensky as the president of ukraine should _ zelensky as the president of ukraine should think not only about the build-up— should think not only about the build—up and the probable invasion of ukraine — build—up and the probable invasion of ukraine but also about the economy— of ukraine but also about the economy and these messages are more for our_ economy and these messages are more for our internal audience, calm down, _ for our internal audience, calm down, do — for our internal audience, calm down, do not panic, we have already
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a huge _ down, do not panic, we have already a huge amount... we should leave this to _ a huge amount... we should leave this to ukraine from foreign investors. we have a pressure to our currency _ investors. we have a pressure to our currency because we have right now, our currency — currency because we have right now, our currency is depreciating. these problems— our currency is depreciating. these problems are real influence on our economy— problems are real influence on our economy in— problems are real influence on our economy in this difficult situation. it is economy in this difficult situation. it is also _ economy in this difficult situation. it is also political, he said, you know very well that this crisis did not start last month or even last year, it has been ongoing for a long time. , ., ., ., , time. first of all, we have this unfortunately _ time. first of all, we have this unfortunately for _ time. first of all, we have this unfortunately for eight - time. first of all, we have this unfortunately for eight years l time. first of all, we have this i unfortunately for eight years and aciuaiiy — unfortunately for eight years and actually we have 15,000 people
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murdered, from ukraine. but also, and aciuaiiy — murdered, from ukraine. but also, and actually this number of troops near our— and actually this number of troops near our borders is approximately the same — near our borders is approximately the same as it was one year ago, but the same as it was one year ago, but the rhetoric— the same as it was one year ago, but the rhetoric of the kremlin is different— the rhetoric of the kremlin is different and their ultimatums, to the western world and to ukraine are quite. _ the western world and to ukraine are quite. quite _ the western world and to ukraine are quite, quite aggressive. that is why we have _ quite, quite aggressive. that is why we have to — quite, quite aggressive. that is why we have to react on the diplomatic ieyei— we have to react on the diplomatic level and _ we have to react on the diplomatic level and react through threatening our army— level and react through threatening our army and we do this, actually, right— our army and we do this, actually, right now— our army and we do this, actually, right now we are forming our territory _ right now we are forming our territory defence units. this is the main _ territory defence units. this is the main difference between the present situation _ main difference between the present situation and the past. will main difference between the present situation and the past.— situation and the past. will the visit of the _ situation and the past. will the visit of the british _ situation and the past. will the visit of the british prime - situation and the past. will the l visit of the british prime minister borisjohnson next week visit of the british prime minister boris johnson next week to this region also escalate the crisis in your mind or is it welcome? trio.
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region also escalate the crisis in your mind or is it welcome? no, it is a aood your mind or is it welcome? no, it is a good signal — your mind or is it welcome? no, it is a good signal for _ your mind or is it welcome? no, it is a good signal for us, _ your mind or is it welcome? no, it is a good signal for us, not - your mind or is it welcome? no, it is a good signal for us, not only i is a good signal for us, not only for us, — is a good signal for us, not only for us, but _ is a good signal for us, not only for us, but also to the russian federation, that we have strong partners — federation, that we have strong partners. we will not be alone with this, _ partners. we will not be alone with this, if— partners. we will not be alone with this, if the — partners. we will not be alone with this, if the invasion takes place. it is this, if the invasion takes place. it is a _ this, if the invasion takes place. it is a good _ this, if the invasion takes place. it is a good signal. also, there are signals— it is a good signal. also, there are signals about the creation, about the families, embassies... president zelensky was — the families, embassies... president zelensky was critical _ the families, embassies... president zelensky was critical about _ the families, embassies... president zelensky was critical about this. - the families, embassies... president zelensky was critical about this. it i zelensky was critical about this. it is a signal to russia first of all, our economy is under pressure, but the russian — our economy is under pressure, but the russian economy is in the worst position. _ the russian economy is in the worst position, because the stock market is decreasing right now, they are losing _ is decreasing right now, they are losing money and i think it is part of a game — losing money and i think it is part of a game between the western world
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and the _ of a game between the western world and the russian federation. it is a sto to and the russian federation. it is a story to watch- — and the russian federation. it is a story to watch. thank _ and the russian federation. it is a story to watch. thank you - and the russian federation. it is a story to watch. thank you for - story to watch. thank you for joining us here on another snowy morning here in ukraine. all eyes around the world seem to be on this growing crisis with ukraine and no one is really certain what lies ahead, so many scenarios being discussed, whether there will be some kind of an incursion or whether this will continue to simmer on as a crisis, notjust in ukraine but in the region and beyond.- crisis, notjust in ukraine but in the region and beyond. thank you very much- _ the region and beyond. thank you very much- lyse _ the region and beyond. thank you very much. lyse doucet. - the region and beyond. thank you very much. lyse doucet. if- the region and beyond. thank you very much. lyse doucet. if you i the region and beyond. thank you i very much. lyse doucet. if you want more information, you can go to the bbc news website for lots more information. bbc news has been told that the senior british civil servant, sue gray, will deliver her report on downing street lockdown parties to the prime minister soon, without waiting for the metropolitan police to conclude its inquiry. on friday, the force said it had asked that the report make "minimal
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reference" to the events it was investigating — causing confusion about when, and in what form, the document would appear. our political correspondent, helen catt reports. after weeks of waiting, sue gray's report still hasn't been delivered to number ten, but it will be shortly, before the metropolitan police have completed their work — which is raising questions about what may or may not be left out. it's understood sue grey had been keen not to have to redact or blank out large parts of it, but she will abide by the requirement not to jeaopardise the police investigation. last night the met police said they'd received all the material requested from the cabinet office to support its investigation, and will examine it in detail without fear or favour. they've asked that sue gray's report contains minimal reference to the events they're looking at, so that detectives are given the most reliable picture of what happened. some tory mps have joined the opposition in saying the full report needs to come out.
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i think number ten, the metropolitan police and sue gray should get round a table and work out a way so that this report can be published, infull, unredacted, so that notjust mps but our constituents, more importantly, can make a judgment on what's happened. as for what's likely to happen to anyone found to have broken rules, the met says if proven, the offences would usually result in a fixed penalty notice, and that its investigative actions would be proportionate to that. it has denied delaying the report and says the timing of its release is up to the cabinet office. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. )i�*m joined now by our uk political correspondent ione wells. are we any clearer when the report will be delivered? ihla are we any clearer when the report will be delivered?— are we any clearer when the report will be delivered? no one is exactly clear and we _ will be delivered? no one is exactly clear and we will— will be delivered? no one is exactly clear and we will not _ will be delivered? no one is exactly clear and we will not know - will be delivered? no one is exactly clear and we will not know until- will be delivered? no one is exactly clear and we will not know until it i clear and we will not know until it has been handed until number 10, but
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we know it is likely to be some point next week and that sue gray's team will not wait for the police inquiry to finish before they submit their report, which means it can be made public. we know that because they are not waiting for the police inquiry and because the police have said they would like her team to make minimal references to some of the events they are investigating, this may mean that certain omissions and changes may have to be made. hora and changes may have to be made. how do ou and changes may have to be made. how do you think _ and changes may have to be made. how do you think mps, both conservatives unhappy with boris johnson's leadership unhappy with borisjohnson's leadership and the opposition mps are starting to recalibrate their response to this report when it bite come and as you explain, it is likely not to be in full form? this makes it tricky _ likely not to be in full form? this makes it tricky for _ likely not to be in full form? try 3 makes it tricky for mps who were waiting on the report to essentially cast theirjudgment about waiting on the report to essentially cast their judgment about boris johnson and the facts of what happened. coming to the opposition, if we see anything other than the
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full report, opposition parties will be calling to see it at some point in the future. also, some critical voices already from the opposition saying this is buying borisjohnson more time and on the conservative benches, a bit of recalibration. some were waiting for the report to give them the cover they wanted to call for the prime minister to go and some of those voices, if they do not get the full facts, may decide to sit on their hands and wait for the police investigation, but others are already coming out and saying they still want the full report published, with some saying it would help draw a line under all of this while others say if it is not published, it will start to erode public trust in politics and accountability. taste public trust in politics and accountability.— public trust in politics and accountability. public trust in politics and accountabili . ~ ., , , accountability. we are seeing this mornin: accountability. we are seeing this morning in _ accountability. we are seeing this morning in the — accountability. we are seeing this morning in the uk _ accountability. we are seeing this morning in the uk that _ accountability. we are seeing this morning in the uk that tom - accountability. we are seeing this morning in the uk that tom took| accountability. we are seeing this l morning in the uk that tom took an act, a conservative politician throwing his hat into the ring in any future leadership contest. firstly, there is no sign at the
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moment of an imminent tory leadership contest and firstly that would rue acquire 50 mps sending a letter of no confidence in and require the prior minister to lose a vote of no confidence and there are a lot of questions, but tom tughehat, a senior tory mp, chair of the foreign affairs committee, told the foreign affairs committee, told the times today that if there was a leadership contest, he would consider putting himself forward, this is not something he has shied away from same before and he has said that colleagues should not be embarrassed about admitting their ambitions. he has not gone as far as to say he is launching a leadership campaign at this stage, but we know that privately there are other tory mps who may not have said this publicly, but have privately been sounding out colleagues for support, including the foreign secretary and rishi sunak as well.—
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rishi sunak as well. thank you for that. i'm joined now byjohn rentoul, the chief political commentator at the independent. john, hello and if i can begin with picking up on the point i was discussing about mps beginning to recalibrate their response to the sue gray report when it does come, it does not look as though they will get the full report, but many of them will not want to wait until the metropolitan police have finished their investigation, will they? the . uestion their investigation, will they? the question is _ their investigation, will they? tie: question is how their investigation, will they? t'te: question is how many their investigation, will they? tt9: question is how many will their investigation, will they? tt9 question is how many will want their investigation, will they? t“t9 question is how many will want to go before the police investigation is complete, because the sue gray report, which looks as though it will be published in reduced form, may not provide them with the moment of clarity they expected, but it is not actually going to go into any detail with the most serious work events, as the prime minister called them, during lockdowns. so,
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conservative mps are probably going to have to wait until the fixed penalty notices it started being issued and there is no reason why that should not happen fairly quickly, although who knows? everything seems to take much longer than we impatientjournalists than we impatient journalists expect. than we impatientjournalists expect. to than we impatient “ournalists exect. :, :, , expect. to what extent does this take the heat — expect. to what extent does this take the heat out _ expect. to what extent does this take the heat out of— expect. to what extent does this take the heat out of the - expect. to what extent does this| take the heat out of the situation for borisjohnson, do you think? it is a temporary reprieve. he was described as a greased piglet by david cameron and once again he has escaped the clutches of the people who want to bring him down on his own party. it is only a temporary reprieve and i think the public anger at the facts that they were asked to make sacrifices during these lockdowns and it does not appear that the prime minister and his staff were making, where sharing
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the sacrifices, that anger has not gone anyway and it will continue to be reflected in the opinion polls and that will scare conservative mps. they are cowards and i am not sure if there are 5a of them who are prepared to try and get him out. t prepared to try and get him out. i am sure that they would deny that they are cowards, that isherwood they are cowards, that isherwood they —— you have chosen to use, they are waiting for the report and now the police report, they are waiting on that as well, but i wanted to ask about what tom tughehat said, that is reported in the times, it does suggest that there are some mps, regardless of what the report says or what the police report says, who have lost patience with the prime minister, is that a fair interpretation of what he is saying? yes. i think that is right and he is only saying what a lot of
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conservative mps are saying in private, which is that the leadership election to replace boris johnson is already under way, that does not mean that borisjohnson is going to be prised out of office soon, although it could be very quick. politics can be brutal. if there is a vote of confidence in his leadership of the conservative party, i am leadership of the conservative party, iam not leadership of the conservative party, i am not at all sure that he would win it and i think that there will be a leadership election, probably this year, and if it is not the fixed penalty notices going out that trigger it, it might be the may local elections.— local elections. john, good to talk to ou. local elections. john, good to talk to you- just _ local elections. john, good to talk to you. just before _ local elections. john, good to talk to you. just before we _ local elections. john, good to talk to you. just before we go - local elections. john, good to talk to you. just before we go to - local elections. john, good to talk to you. just before we go to the i to you. just before we go to the headlines, let me bring you the news that ash barty has won the woman's
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australian open title, beating danielle collins to become the first home winner in 44 years. no need for me to tell you how popular that will be in australia, ash barty winning the women's title in the australian open. the headlines on bbc news... the us warns the russian troop build—up near ukraine is the largest since the cold war — as attempts to find a diplomatic solution continue. the downing street �*lockdown parties' report is now expected to be delivered before the metropolitan police inquiry ends. five states declare emergencies and more than five thousand flights are cancelled —— as the us east coast braces for a major blizzard to hit the region. britain's met office is warning of power cuts, damage to buildings and disruption to transport in eastern scotland because of storm malik. high winds are also expected in rest of scotland, northern ireland and northern england. and the us east coast is also bracing for a major
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blizzard to hit the region. our weather presenter nick miller is here. let us talk about the storm, what can you tell us, a stormy start here in the uk particularly in scotland, there are met office warnings and for scotland and northern ireland and parts of england. this for scotland and northern ireland and parts of england.— for scotland and northern ireland and parts of england. this storm was named by the — and parts of england. this storm was named by the danish _ and parts of england. this storm was named by the danish weather - and parts of england. this storm wasj named by the danish weather service for impacts there. it is sweeping into the scandinavian and baltic countries. we can look at the weather warnings which are out at the moment and a large part of the uk, as you can say is covered by warnings, but all of scotland and parts of northern ireland and the north of england, gusts of up to 60 mph but we are now getting stronger gusts, one close to 85 mph in
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aberdeenshire already today and there gusts, one close to 85 mph in aberdeenshire already today and there is gusts, one close to 85 mph in aberdeenshire already today and there is an gusts, one close to 85 mph in aberdeenshire already today and there is an amber gusts, one close to 85 mph in aberdeenshire already today and there is an amber warning gusts, one close to 85 mph in aberdeenshire already today and there is an amber warning there gusts, one close to 85 mph in aberdeenshire already today and there is an amber warning there in parts of the east of scotland and into north—east england and for a time, winds gusting 80 mph or more and this is where we could see the largest impact from those winds. in terms of travel and potential power outages, as we go into tonight, the winds will gradually ease. ads, winds will gradually ease. a reminder for people to take care during the day and as we mentioned, the us east coast is bracing itself for what looks like a major blizzard. what is the status of that weather front right now? it is weather front right now? it is settin: weather front right now? it is setting in _ weather front right now? it is setting in now _ weather front right now? it is setting in now and _ weather front right now? it is setting in now and it - weather front right now? it 3 setting in now and it is an area of low pressure which had not formed and has been deepening significantly off the east coast of the usa. it is an area of low pressure dragging in from the atlantic lots of moisture into cold air and the white you can say is snow that will be following through the north—east usa and pushing into north—east canada, is accompanied by strong winds, that is
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why there are winter storm and blizzard warnings in case and are brutal wind chill and we could see historic amounts of snow falling here. there is a forecast in boston of 2a inches of snow, the 24—hour record there is 27 and we will see how it goes, we can never be properly exact going into a snowstorm of how much we will get, but it could be up to 30 inches, three quarters of a metre of snow in other areas of massachusetts and rhode island and a huge cover in new york as well. major disruption from a system like this which is out of the way very quickly tomorrow, but leaves a lot of very cold air. t leaves a lot of very cold air. i know you will be keeping a nigh on that. thank you very much. tomorrow, events will be held in londonderry and around the world to mark the fiftieth anniversary of bloody sunday — when the army shot dead thirteen civilians during a civil rights demonstration. a new theatre production, called the white handkerchief, is having its premiere in derry.
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the writer, liam campbell, who died last month, spoke to our ireland correspondent chris page about the production. this image is a defining symbol of humanity amidst the horror of bloondy sunday. the priest, father edward daly, waving a handkerchief as a white flag to try to protect jackie duddy, whose wounds turned out to be fatal. the stage show, which gets its name from the picture, is moving, evocative and compelling. we take back the streets, we take back law and order! you murder innocent men, and boys! it was conceived over several years by the late liam campbell. as a writer, the first challenge for me was not so much, - what do you write, - but what do you leave out? because in almost every aspect, | every microcosm of the stories, | when you begin to do your research, behind the headlines, _ if you like, of bloody sunday, every story is a play- in and of itself. this scene depicts peggy deery,
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a widowed mother of ia children who was injured. her pleading with a soldier is a particularly powerful moment. do not murder me and orphan my children! stop talking at me — lie down! we don't want this to be simply a story of tragedy and sorrow. and loss, but of course it is. we want to bring more to it, and we want to step out - from the chronological nature i of the events that happened that day, and offer a more universal reflection upon the nature - of conflict, upon the nature l of injustice and on the nature of innocence. # why have you come here to this land? the arts can help to heal the hurts of history. the director of the white handkerchief is reminded of a quote. "grief is love that i has nowhere to go." and the kind of stories that existed there, if a writer puts that story- to paper, and it takes from page - to stage, then perhaps that love has
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somewhere to go. the sense of trauma remains sharp for bereaved relatives like jackie duddy�*s sister, kay. he was a great amateur boxer, he loved bringing home his trophies and that. me dad, he was so proud. you often wonder, would he have boxed in the olympics? would he have turned professional? would he have married? itjust left so many unanswered questions. it's just — it's just too sad for words. the consequences of bloody sunday are felt most profoundly, of course, by the families of those who were shot dead on the streets half a century ago. but the killings also deepened divisions, and — many would say — lengthened the conflict here in northern ireland. in that sense, the impact is still strongly felt today. # you stand here with gun drawn... the anniversary has generated renewed pledges to build peace, not least from the writer of this, his final work.
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coming from derry myself, i you know it's in the common consciousness of derry, l but it's also quite literally written on the walls around you. it's on the murals, i it's in the memorials. and part of our task, i believe, | is to keep those stories alive. | the singer—songwriter, joni mitchell, has said she will remove her music from the streaming service, spotify, in a row about coronavirus misinformation on a podcast. # don't it always seem to go, you don't know what you've got till it's gone. in a statement on her website, she said she stood in solidarity with neil young who withdrew his music this week — and that lies were costing people their lives. joe rogan, whose podcast appears exclusively on spotify, has been criticised for interviewing an infectious disease specialist
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who is critical of covid vaccines. scientists believe they've made a breakthrough in explaining why many of the i—point—3 million people in the uk living with long covid experience breathlessness. doctors using traditional ct scans to examine the lungs have been unable to identify the cause of the problem, but researchers on a small study in oxford have seen changes in lung function by using a different technique. our health correspondent, catharine burns reports. flo van diemen van thor was never one forjust sitting down inside, but she says long covid has been a horror show. it was not just a breathlessness, that was really hard. it was muscle weakness, so legs like jelly and just thinking if i try to go down the stairs they might not carry me. but this is the ct scan of flo's lungs and like so many long covid patients, everything looks normal and healthy. these are my lungs, i've had them all my life.
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i know there's something wrong with them. flo is taking part in a study in oxford. breathe in, and out. researchers think they're the first in the world to be able to show abnormalities in the lungs of long covid patients. flo and the other volunteers have an mri scan as they suck in xenon gas. it behaves like oxygen and should cross from their lungs into the bloodstream. the numbers are small so far — 36 patients, 11 who didn't need hospital care when they were first infected but went on to get long covid. it's a very exciting and very encouraging first step. - so what we have here is one. of the patients from our trial, and the ct scan is entirely normal. |they've then gone on and had a xenonj gas mri, and xenon behaves the same as oxygen, and you can see here — this is the xenon— getting through normally into the bloodstream - from their lungs and the blacker areas are where the xenon gas i or oxygen would struggle to get through. _
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it's early days for this study and there are still lots of questions including exactly what is causing these abnormal lung scans. in the meantime there aren't many of these specially adapted mri scanners across the country. if this research proves they're worthwhile, it would take some serious investment and several months to scale them up across the nhs. and breathe out. lovely, really good, really good. flo says this was the turning point for her — learning breathing techniques with a respiratory physiotherapist. try and slow... it might take a longer to recover after exercise now, but she's moved up a level in karate. she's not back to normal yet but thinks she will get there. catherine burns, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. hello. it has been an extremely windy start to the weekend across the northern half of the uk, we have seen severe gales in place and there is still a met office amber warning for parts of the east of scotland and the far
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north—east of england. gusts of up to 80 mph, but generally very windy across the northern half of the uk. further south we have got a band of cloud, patchy rain thinking its way south, turning quite breezy here as well. sunny spells returning from the north, albeit with one or two showers and after a very mild start, temperatures will be dropping away as the day wears on. through this evening and tonight, as the winds ease, the skies will clear and we will see one or two fog patches and a touch of frost for some as well. temperatures in towns and cities probably just above freezing for the moment for the most part, out in the countryside dropping down below. so, a frosty start to sunday, but quite a calm start to the day. england and wales seeing sunny spells, more cloud rolling in from the west, cloud and rain for northern ireland and scotland, snow over higher ground, wins strengthening once again and temperatures of between five and 10 degrees.

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