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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 28, 2022 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm anita mcveigh. the headlines: confusion about the fate of the sue gray report on lockdown gatherings at downing street after the police say key details should be left out to avoid prejudicing their investigation. the government says the dual inquiries will get to the truth but labour insists some urgency is needed. i think what is clear is that, between sue gray's report and the police investigation, everything will be fully covered and that will give parliament and indeed the public all of the information they need about these incidents. he has paralysed government so the sooner we get both the full report and the investigation complete, the better. pressure on borisjohnson from his party to delay april's rise in national insurance — but the government says it's needed to fund health and social care.
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russia and the us continue a war of words over ukraine amid a warning about possible cyber attacks in the uk. social distancing rules are lifted in wales as limits on numbers in pubs and restaurants are scrapped and nightclubs can reopen. british sign language is on course to becoming a legally recognised language in england, which would see it being more widely used and promoted. and questions over the timing of a positive covid test used by novak djokovic to enter australia. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news.
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there's confusion around the publication of the civil servant sue gray's report into lockdown parties in downing street this morning after the metropolitan police revealed they've asked her to make "minimal reference" to events which they are investigating. her report had been due to be released this week, with many mps saying they were waiting for its contents before taking a firm position on the prime minister's future. now the met has asked ms gray to leave out key details to avoid prejudicing their investigation — although they say they are not asking for its release to be delayed. our political correspondent nick eardley has the latest. getting answers around here isn't always straightforward. what went on in downing street? were covid rules broken? this woman, sue gray, had been expected to deliver her report this week but now it is unclear what happens next after the metropolitan police launched its own investigation and told sue gray to limit what she published. in a statement, the force said...
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what i want to see is sue gray's report in full and the investigation finished as quickly as possible because we are in this situation where the whole of government is paralysed because the police are now looking at what the prime minister was getting up to in downing street. downing street says they are not involved but the liberal democrat leader has suggested there had been a stitch—up, which could damage politics for generations. sue gray and her team had been speaking with the met to try to figure out what could and could not be put in the public domain. but that process has now been thrown into chaos. the cabinet office was caught by surprise by the statement this morning and now it is not totally clear what can be published, and when that might happen. i think the sue gray report is independent, the government are not interfering with it which is exactly as it should be, and i'm completely
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confident that between the sue gray investigation and the police, everything will be covered. it's important we move on and draw a line under this because there are very important things the government is working on. the political pressure continues. borisjohnson�*s predecessor has added her voice, saying in a letter that nobody is above the law and she was angry to hear stories about people at number 10 not properly following the rules. the government wants to move on but this row has dominated at westminster for weeks. after this morning's developments, it's not clear when we will get answers and what it will mean for borisjohnson and his government. we can speak to nick now. what is the latest we are hearing from number ten about this? this has caused a huge amount of consternation.— caused a huge amount of consternation. , , ., , , consternation. number ten say they aren't involved _
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consternation. number ten say they aren't involved in _ consternation. number ten say they aren't involved in this, _ consternation. number ten say they aren't involved in this, they - consternation. number ten say they aren't involved in this, they aren't i aren't involved in this, they aren't part of negotiations that have been going on between the cabinet office and the metropolitan police but i think one reason this has taken people by surprise and has been seen as such a grenade thrown into the process is that the mat and the cabinet office have been speaking for the last three weeks about what could and could not be in this report. it was thought they were pretty close to coming to an arrangement that would allow it to get over the line but this statement this morning talking about only minimal references to the cases that the metropolitan police are looking into raises all these big questions about whether the report that would be published, if it was published before the police investigation, would be worth it because presumably it wouldn't be looking into the most serious allegations of real braking in downing street. it has led to some in the snp and liberal democrats are raising the fear it
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could be a whitewash so there will be pressure on the cabinet office to come up with an answer about what sue gray will do next. at the moment it doesn't seem clear. this took them unawares this morning, they didn't know the statement was coming and the ramifications of it are still being worked out which is why we cannot give you any firm answers at the moment on what happens next. definitely confusion over all of this. thank you, nick eardley. i'm joined now by our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. when we watched cressida dick on tuesday talking to the london assembly and announcing the investigation of events in downing street there was no mention of sue gray being asked to make animal references to any part of her report, yet now a couple of days later that is what the met are asking her to do. it’s
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later that is what the met are asking her to do.— later that is what the met are asking her to do. it's worse than that because _ asking her to do. it's worse than that because a _ asking her to do. it's worse than that because a lot _ asking her to do. it's worse than that because a lot of— asking her to do. it's worse than that because a lot of us - asking her to do. it's worse than that because a lot of us were - that because a lot of us were immediately asking does this mean sue gray's report has to be delayed if there is potential risk of prejudice to the investigation and the message we got on tuesday was that the report doesn't need to be delayed so we assumed it were any differences between the cabinet office and the metropolitan police over what would be published they would be small and it would be fine and all week there has been that sense of crossing of teas and dotting of eyes, earning it problematic wording and then the newspaper started this idea that the met work dealing sue gray's report and in response the met put out a statement saying they are asking for minimal references and that seems to have taken the cabinet office by surprise. have taken the cabinet office by surrise. ~ , , ., ., .,
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surprise. the met must be aware that oliticall surprise. the met must be aware that politically there _ surprise. the met must be aware that politically there is _ surprise. the met must be aware that politically there is this _ surprise. the met must be aware that politically there is this demand - politically there is this demand for the report to be published in full and that the result of them saying they want her to make minimal references to some aspect of what they are investigating, the net result would be potentially the report not being published in full. this goes back to the misunderstanding because by all accounts and appearances, the met have not given interviews about this so it felt there was a sensible negotiation going on, they put out a statement this morning they felt reflected the position and are surprised, the cabinet office are surprised, the cabinet office are surprised by what they said. clearly in the end sue gray can do what she wants in terms of publishing the report but if you ask a police officer who was about to go to an important stage of investigation, however much these are summary offences, is it all right if we put out a detailed account of what you are about to investigate them they
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will always say we would rather you put a smaller account, so the differences seem to be that the met thought that sue gray's report would beat summaries of each of the events, a view on whether or not each of those was appropriate, that kind of thing, so they felt that what they were dealing with was, as there are white we could not give too much away about where we might be going with our investigation and now it turns out the rest of the world are expecting a detailed forensic report and sue gray's team seem to be feeling they have been let down by what the met said publicly. let down by what the met said ublicl . ., . ., ., , ., ., ., publicly. how much of a reputational risk is there — publicly. how much of a reputational risk is there here _ publicly. how much of a reputational risk is there here for _ publicly. how much of a reputational risk is there here for the _ publicly. how much of a reputational risk is there here for the match, - risk is there here for the match, already under heavy criticism for not having invested this sooner? this is where the workers get very muddy because there are newspapers that have been campaigning for commissioner cressida dick to resign for some time, her position was in
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jeopardy last year so it's difficult to separate those who were criticising the met and cressida dick with good reason and those who were criticising her because they want her gone, so that makes things difficult. there is no doubt the met had been in a difficult position from the start because they haven't wanted to unfairly retrospectively investigate reasonably minor offences but have found themselves in a position where they felt because of the evidence in front of them they help to investigate and now they have been criticised for the results of starting that investigation so they have been losing at every stage of the process so it has been a damaging time for them. joining me now is the former director of public prosecutions, lord macdonald. thank you for your time this afternoon. what do you make of this particular intervention by the metropolitan police? this particular intervention by the metropolitan police? as daniel said it has come —
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metropolitan police? as daniel said it has come as _ metropolitan police? as daniel said it has come as a _ metropolitan police? as daniel said it has come as a considerable - it has come as a considerable surprise. the police had been signalling until this morning they would not stand in the wake of a full publication of sue gray's findings. if what we are talking about is a police investigation into lockdown breaches which is overwhelmingly likely to result in fixed penalty notices like parking tickets for those involved, then today like the publication of this report when there seems to be such a strong public interest in it being revealed would seem to be disproportionate. on the other hand if sue gray has uncovered, and this is speculation but if she has uncovered more complicated evidence around deletion of e—mails or something of that sort, the police may take the view this is more sensitive than the anticipated and they would prefer to conduct an investigation and affected by publication of a report such as the one being prepared by sue gray but
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if we arejust one being prepared by sue gray but if we are just talking about the likelihood of fixed penalty notices, entry level crime the lowest form of offending that doesn't even go to court for resolution, to use an inquiry of that sort is a reason to block the publication of the report seems a bit of a stretch. so block the publication of the report seems a bit of a stretch.— block the publication of the report seems a bit of a stretch. so does it su: est seems a bit of a stretch. so does it suggest to — seems a bit of a stretch. so does it suggest to you _ seems a bit of a stretch. so does it suggest to you that _ seems a bit of a stretch. so does it suggest to you that the _ seems a bit of a stretch. so does it suggest to you that the police - seems a bit of a stretch. so does it suggest to you that the police may | suggest to you that the police may be looking at some offences beyond fixed penalty notices? i’ge be looking at some offences beyond fixed penalty notices?— fixed penalty notices? i've no idea, ma be fixed penalty notices? i've no idea, maybe you're _ fixed penalty notices? i've no idea, maybe you're just _ fixed penalty notices? i've no idea, maybe you're just being _ fixed penalty notices? i've no idea, maybe you're just being cautious i fixed penalty notices? i've no idea, | maybe you're just being cautious or have taken advice from outside counsel, are all sorts of possibilities but i think it's an unfortunate sequence of events and will hardly build public confidence in the process that there has been this chopping and changing. i would like to talk to _ this chopping and changing. i would like to talk to you _ this chopping and changing. i would like to talk to you more _ this chopping and changing. i would like to talk to you more about - this chopping and changing. i would like to talk to you more about the l like to talk to you more about the risk of prejudicing an investigation versus public interest. can you think of any other examples of where the public interest in something
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overrides that risk of prejudice? this is a balance and the police are conducting a balancing exercise and have come to this conclusion. most people would agree we had been through quite a serious political crisis and most people would also a great public confidence in some of our national institutions has been badly shaken so it's highly undesirable for this to be left hanging in the air and if the report isn't published it means matters will be hanging in the airfor weeks and probably months. against that the investigation perhaps into what is very minor offending in terms of the calendar of criminal offences, it that sort of balance that i think would lead more naturally to the conclusion that public confidence demands the publication of the report and the police investigation would not be hampered by it. there
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were either parties or their want and people either attended or they didn't. everyone being looked at by sue gray all knows what they did and it's difficult to see how they could suddenly start changing their stories before being spoken to by the police. it is all now a matter of record so if we are talking about minor offences, this looks disproportionate. if the more more serious offences in prospect then the approach taken by the police becomes more understandable. d0 the approach taken by the police becomes more understandable. do you think sue gray — becomes more understandable. do you think sue gray could _ becomes more understandable. do you think sue gray could choose _ becomes more understandable. do you think sue gray could choose to - becomes more understandable. do you think sue gray could choose to not - think sue gray could choose to not comply with this request from the police? comply with this request from the olice? ,, , ._ , comply with this request from the olice? ,, , , ., comply with this request from the olice? ,, , police? sue gray is a very determined _ police? sue gray is a very determined and _ police? sue gray is a very. determined and formidable police? sue gray is a very - determined and formidable person police? sue gray is a very _ determined and formidable person but that would be difficult for a senior civil servant in receipt of a request by the police. i think the police have put her in a difficult position and she will probably have to comply with this request if the police maintain it. whether they
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maintain it or not is something we will discover over the next few hours and days.— will discover over the next few hours and days. thank you for your thou~hts hours and days. thank you for your thoughts on _ hours and days. thank you for your thoughts on that, _ hours and days. thank you for your thoughts on that, lord _ hours and days. thank you for your thoughts on that, lord macdonald, j thoughts on that, lord macdonald, former director of public prosecutions. theresa may has said she is "angry" at the allegations of parties held in downing street during coronavirus restrictions. the former prime minister in a letter to a constituent said that "nobody is above the law" according to reports in her local newspaper the maindenhead advertiser. she added... well, we can speak now to ian blackford, who is the westminster leader of the snp. thank you for your time this afternoon. just your broad reaction to all of these developments? we have been expecting the report but we still don't have it.— we still don't have it. indeed, there have — we still don't have it. indeed, there have been _ we still don't have it. indeed, there have been lots - we still don't have it. indeed, there have been lots of - we still don't have it. indeed, j there have been lots of twists we still don't have it. indeed, - there have been lots of twists and
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turns over the week. we all had the news on tuesday that the met will investigate this. goodness knows why it has taken so long to get to that point because this scenario, the knowledge of these parties has been with us for two months and many of us had asked them to look at this much earlier and one of the factors thatis much earlier and one of the factors that is significant here is that we were told on tuesday that the metropolitan police were comfortable with this report being released. much of what has happened here, perhaps not all but the fact that parties have been taking place in the borisjohnson was at some of them, i think the public want parliament to get on and do its job. we need this report published. we cannot have a situation that the salient facts are missing, it's like asking for a fact—finding report and missing the facts. we need to be able to hold the prime minister to account and to do that we need sue
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gray to publish this account in full and she needs to get on the phone to the police and say this isn't in public interest. [30 the police and say this isn't in public interest.— public interest. do you fear a scenario where _ public interest. do you fear a scenario where we _ public interest. do you fear a scenario where we never- public interest. do you fear a - scenario where we never actually get to see the sue gray report because of the ongoing police investigation crusher of course, that has to be a consideration at this point. we crusher of course, that has to be a consideration at this point.- consideration at this point. we are used to itoris _ consideration at this point. we are used to boris johnson _ consideration at this point. we are used to boris johnson wriggling i consideration at this point. we are | used to boris johnson wriggling out used to borisjohnson wriggling out of tight situations can we know about his character, we now everything that has happened under his premiership and it is notjust about the parties and the culture at downing street but everything that has gone under his readership, the prorogation of parliament, dodgy contracts for covert equipment which has been up in court. this prime minister is using the office as a private plaything and we were looking forward at least in this situation to holding him to account for everything that has gone on and
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that public anger, that real anger about people not being able to beat with their loved ones could not being able to visit care homes or have properfunerals can people not celebrating birthdays and cancelling weddings and it's been one rule for the prime minister and anotherfor the prime minister and anotherfor the rest of us. what we see today is the rest of us. what we see today is the prime minister getting away with it again and this is not acceptable. we need this report, it should be parliament should be sitting on a monday to discuss this. boris johnson's time should be up as prime minister and on the basis of what the metropolitan police have done it looks like he's getting away with it. ., looks like he's getting away with it. . , ., looks like he's getting away with it. . , looks like he's getting away with it. have you considered the police ma be it. have you considered the police may be considering _ it. have you considered the police may be considering offences - it. have you considered the police| may be considering offences which it. have you considered the police i may be considering offences which in their level of serious go beyond fixed penalty notices can that may be the reason for the apparent change in the message coming from the met between tuesday and today
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crusher all we know is what is in their statement and they talk about their statement and they talk about the collusion between the cabinet office and the met. what the collusion between the cabinet office and the met.— the collusion between the cabinet office and the met. what has changed since tuesday? _ office and the met. what has changed since tuesday? they _ office and the met. what has changed since tuesday? they need _ office and the met. what has changed since tuesday? they need to - office and the met. what has changed since tuesday? they need to explain i since tuesday? they need to explain and they need to explain why they waited until tuesday to announce they were conducting an investigation into allegations around 10 downing street because this has been known for some time. this does look like it has been a stitch up and the only person who benefits is borisjohnson. stitch up and the only person who benefits is boris johnson.- benefits is boris johnson. finally, are ou benefits is boris johnson. finally, are you clear— benefits is boris johnson. finally, are you clear it's _ benefits is boris johnson. finally, are you clear it's not _ benefits is boris johnson. finally, are you clear it's not worth - benefits is boris johnson. finally, | are you clear it's not worth getting the sue gray report unless you get the sue gray report unless you get the entire unabridged version? {iii the entire unabridged version? of course because we end up in a situation where it's supposed to be a fact—finding report but the facts are omitted and borisjohnson would under those circumstances come to the house of commons and we could have a debate but the substance of what has gone on the misbehaviour and rule breaking that as
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parliamentarians we cannot get to. that uk parliament is supposed to be sovereign but parliament is not getting the information it needs to do its job on getting the information it needs to do itsjob on behalf of getting the information it needs to do its job on behalf of the electorate. this man should not be in office, to hold him to account. ian blackford, leader of the snp at westminster, thank you for your time. we will cover this latest statement on the sue gray report this afternoon but for now let's move on to other stories. the government has again insisted that it will put up national insurance in april as planned — despite reports that borisjohnson is considering a u—turn. ministers say the extra money raised is needed to help clear a backlog of nhs operations in england and to fund social care. some conservative mps want the rise scrapped. a teenager has appeared in court, charged after twojewish men were violently attacked in north london. the police said the incident
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is being treated as a hate crime. our correspondent james reynolds is at highbury corner magistrates in north london. james, takea james, take a straight what has been happening in court. the james, take a straight what has been happening in court.— happening in court. the hearing took about 25 minutes. _ happening in court. the hearing took about 25 minutes. 18-year-old - happening in court. the hearing took| about 25 minutes. 18-year-old malaki about 25 minutes. 18—year—old malaki thorpe spoke only to confirm his name, date of birth and address. he has been charged with two counts of racially or religiously aggravated bodily harm and one count of possession of an offensive weapon. it relates to an incident on wednesday in haringey in which two jewish men were attacked. they were treated in hospitalfor injuries. malaki thorpe indicated not guilty pleas on all counts. the court remanded him into custody in that case has been sent to it green crown court for trial in march.— court for trial in march. james reynolds. _ court for trial in march. james reynolds, thank— court for trial in march. james
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reynolds, thank you. - some measures put in place to tackle coronavirus are easing today in wales. there are changes for people wishing to go to nightclubs and restaurants — and social distancing rules have also been relaxed. our wales correspondent tomos morgan is in cardiff with further details: today is the last stage of the road map set out by first minister at mark drakeford in bringing wales back to alert level zero, so the main points, social distancing measures have not social distancing measures have now been scrapped in wales, much to the delight of hospitality and workplaces, and the rule of six has been scrapped along with nightclubs being able to reopen. they were the first, the last to reopen last year and the first shut and now they can reopen just in time for the six nations in a few weeks here in wales. and of course the work from home rule, which was still a legal requirement, has now been made just guidance only. a few things remain in place, those been that masks
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will still need to be worn in shops and hospitals and public transport and vaccine passes will still be needed in cinemas and theatres and for large events. mark drakeford has said they have been able to ease the restrictions because the peak of the omicron wave has passed here and the number of cases has been reducing more rapidly than the rest of the uk. the next review into the covid measures, into masks and passes, will be on the 10th of february. scientists have warned the government that allowing large numbers of people in lower—income countries to go unvaccinated is "reckless" and could lead to new covid variants. more than 320 experts have written to the prime minister, calling for urgent action. they say more than three billion people globally have not had a first dose. tensions over ukraine remain high with russia's foreign minister this morning saying his country's interests couldn't be ignored, while insisting moscow did not want war. earlier, presidentjoe biden warned
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there is a "distinct possibility" that russia might invade ukraine next month. it comes as uk businesses and organisations are being urged to boost their defences in case cyber attacks linked to the conflict over ukraine have an impact here. our diplomatic correspondentjames landale explains the situation. the russian foreign minister said this morning that russia doesn't want war and if it is up to them, but the troop build up continues. the us ambassador said that is the equivalent of man putting a gun on a table and say let's talk peace. the rhetoric is there but the diplomacy continues as well. president macron of france spent an hour on the phone to president putin and he will talk to president zelenskiy who spoke to president biden last night and the german foreign minister spoke to our foreign minister and is talking to her russian counterpart. so talks are continuing. that is the first point.
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the second is that the dialogue between the us and the russians over security continues and this morning the russian foreign minister said the latest us proposals had a resilience, grains of rationality, on issues of secondary importance. that might be faint praise but it is at least praise. nato secretary—generaljens stoltenberg says that the alliance was ready to increase its troop presence in eastern europe and was watching very closely as russia moves soldiers and weapons in belarus. we are also ready to step up, as we actually now do, our presence in the eastern part of the alliance to prevent any misunderstanding or room for miscalculations about need to's ability and readiness to protect all allies. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in kyiv.
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i was listening to vox pops among ukrainians earlier and one described ukraine as being a ball in a game. give mea ukraine as being a ball in a game. give me a sense how ordinary ukrainians feel about the situation. a ball in a game being batted back and forth. you heard from james how phone lines are burning between different capitals and that includes kyiv, but even president zelensky has warned his european allies can if you escalate too much or talk of escalation, that in itself can if a further escalation so the idea, temperature is already cold enough but bring temperatures down. we understand president zelensky is meeting the press in ukraine so we will see what message she has. ukrainians i got used to this tension, which is not to say they like living with it but this crisis has been going on for many years to
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even though they are mindful there is a risk it could intensify even more. ~ ., , is a risk it could intensify even more. ~ . , ., ., more. what is your reading of those talks earlier — more. what is your reading of those talks earlier between _ more. what is your reading of those talks earlier between emmanuel - talks earlier between emmanuel macron and vladimir putin and the words being fired back and forth between east and west?- words being fired back and forth between east and west? there has onl been between east and west? there has only been a — between east and west? there has only been a short _ between east and west? there has only been a short readout - between east and west? there has only been a short readout from - only been a short readout from moscow so far about that our long—term call and the gist of it was contained in what sergei lavrov said and what russia has said to nato, which as you have fundamentally misunderstood art security concerns when it comes to ukraine and they have to be addressed if there is to be any possibility of resolving this crisis, but that phone call also underlines and for president macron and other european leaders but in particular president macron, they believe europe should play a leading role in resolving this crisis. they are geographically much closer to russia and ukraine but this is a
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crisis for america is playing a decisive role and president biden seems very much engaged. despite the us saint ukraine _ seems very much engaged. despite the us saint ukraine has _ seems very much engaged. despite the us saint ukraine has a _ seems very much engaged. despite the us saint ukraine has a right _ seems very much engaged. despite the us saint ukraine has a right to - us saint ukraine has a right to determine its own future, do you think ultimately it may have to put its ambitions to join nato on the back burner in order to avert an escalation of this crisis? ukraine's ambition to _ escalation of this crisis? ukraine's ambition to possibly _ escalation of this crisis? ukraine's ambition to possibly join - escalation of this crisis? ukraine's ambition to possibly join the - ambition to possiblyjoin the military alliance is very much on the back burner anyway. if you ask any expert on what ukraine has to do to fulfil the demands to join the nato military alliance can it is nowhere near meeting those requirements can so it still is a distant possibility can which is why the kind of information were getting about the talks going on behind the scenes between moscow and washington, saying we will delay for a decade or a quarter—century any
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possibility of you tried joining nato, president putin wants it off the table altogether. lyse doucet, thank ou the table altogether. lyse doucet, thank you very _ the table altogether. lyse doucet, thank you very much. _ the table altogether. lyse doucet, thank you very much. in _ the table altogether. lyse doucet, thank you very much. in the - thank you very much. in the ukrainian capital, kyiv. prince andrew has given up his honorary membership at the prestigious home of golf. a spokesperson for the royal and ancient golf club of st andrews confirmed this saying �*the duke of york will relinquish his honorary membership. we respect and appreciate his decision." prince andrew had been an honorary member of the club since 1992. the royal patron of the club is the queen. it's almost to 30 pm. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. hello. a little bit of bright weather out there today. not an awful lot. and the weekend is looking quite mixed. it really will be quite windy, stormy, in fact, across the north of scotland into tomorrow. and that's because just off the west
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coast of scotland later tonight, a storm will be developing. you can see this circulation here. a lot of isobars, very strong winds. south of that, it should be much calmer. and also with this storm approaching, very mild weather, first thing in the morning, temperatures will be into double figures in many parts of the country. let's focus on those winds through tomorrow. so the north of scotland, the met office warns 80 mile an hour gusts, really rough weather, 70 a little bit further south and gale force winds also expected around the irish sea and northern parts of england. not so windy in the south. and the weather? well, i think, generally speaking, a bright day for many of us tomorrow with some showers in the north. hello, this is bbc news. the headline: confusion about the fate
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of the sue gray report on lockdown gatherings at downing street — after the police say key details should be left out to avoid prejudicing their investigation. the government says the dual inquiries will get to the truth — but labour insists some urgency is needed. pressure on borisjohnson from his party to delay april's rise in national insurance — but the government says it's needed to fund health and social care. russia and the us continue a war of words over ukraine — amid a warning about possible cyber attacks in the uk. social distancing rules are lifted in wales, as limits on numbers in pubs and restaurants are scrapped — and nightclubs can reopen. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. we now know the line up for the men's final at the australian open. rafael nadal will take on daniil medvedev on sunday, as the spaniard attempts to win
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a record—breaking 2ist grand slam title. nadal raced through the first two sets of his semi—final against matteo berrettini and said it was some of the best tennis he'd played for a long time. he then had to dig deep after dropping the third set against the italian. but his experience came through and he took the match in four sets. it clearly meant so much to him after issues with his foot put him out of action for much of last year. at 35, nadal could now go on to make history in the final on sunday. as i said, a couple of days ago, i have been a little bit unlucky in my career with injuries. in all the time i have played amazing finals with good chances, against novak in 2012, and roger in 2017. i was close a couple of times. i feel lucky i won once in my career
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in 2009 but i never thought about another chance in 2022. it means a lot to be in the final again here. and he will meet medvedev who came through a tight match against stefanos tsitsipas in four sets. he had to compose himself after a mid—match meltdown, in which he directed an angry tirade towards the umpire, accusing tsitsipas's father of coaching from the crowd. medvedev is going for a second grand slam title in a row, after beating novak djokovic to win the us open last september. i will play again against one of the greatest and what is funny that again i am again playing someone going for the 21st grand slam. i guess last time rafa was watching it near the tv. i don't know who he was cheering for but i think
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novak will be watching this in two days also. tomorrow will be a crucial day for england women in their must win test match against australia. captain heather knight kept her side in it with an unbeaten century on day two in canberra. it started well for england with katherine brunt getting them off to a good start, taking her tally to five wickets, before australia declared on 337—9. however, england's openers put onjust nine runs between them. and, as the batting line—up crumbled around her, knight came to the rescue for england, hitting an unbeaten century. they closed on 235—8 — that's 102 runs behind. tyrrell hatton has stormed up the leaderboard in the second round of the dubai desert classic. he opened with a bogey, but then produced four birdies in a row and added three more to move to 9—under par —
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he's just two shots behind the leader, south africa's justin harding. there's a strong british contingent in the chasing pack with rory mcilroy 5 shots off the pace with a bogey free second round. he had an eagle at the 14th. lee westwood, paul casey and tommy fleetwood are also in the top 10. wayne rooney has confirmed he was approached by everton to interview for the vacant managers job, but that he turned the opportunity down, saying he has an importantjob as boss of derby county. the former blues player said he believed he would be a premier league manager one day, and that everton had contacted his agent, and that it was a difficult decision, but that being at derby county was important to him. rooney was speaking ahead of derby's championship match against birmingham — and amid their financial difficulties. the efl have granted them a one—month extension to provide proof of funds for the remainder of the season after they went
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into administration. that's all the sport for now. but more details are available on the bbc sport website including wayne rooney turn down the interview for the vacant everton manager's job. studio: thanks forjoining us. doubts have emerged about the timing of a positive covid test novak djokovic used to enter australia, to defend his australian open title. the world men's no1 was originally given an exemption from rules which bar unvaccinated people — after he produced evidence of having had covid in december. but the bbc has found a discrepancy on the serial numbers of his test certificates. matt graveling has the details. this was novak djokovic's chance to win his tenth australian open, and with it the most grand slams ever achieved in men's tennis. upon arrival in melbourne onjanuary 5th, and confirming
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he was unvaccinated, his visa was revoked by the government. the serbian was given an exemption to play, having tested positive for coronavirus in mid—december. in an attempt to overturn the decision, djokovic's legal team presented two covid test certificates to a federal court in australia. the first, shown to be taken on december 16th, shows a positive result. the second, taken six days later, shows a negative result. a german research company questioned why the unique confirmation code on the earlier test was higher than the later one. the bbc has investigated if codes on tests done in serbia are generated in a chronological order. a total of 56 test certificates were collected, and their unique confirmation codes plotted against the date of each result. in all cases studied, the earlier the result,
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the lower the unique code for the corresponding test. the only outlier of the codes plotted was novak djokovic's positive test on december 16th. according to the bbc�*s graph, this confirmation code would suggest a test sometime between the 25th and december 28th. one data specialist said, "there is always the possibility for a glitch, but if this was the case, i don't know why the authorities would not say that." to try and explain this discrepancy, the bbc has approached novak djokovic's team, serbia's institute of public health, and its office of information technology, but has yet to have a response. matt graveling, bbc news. a bridge has collapsed in pittsburgh in the us. emergency services were on the scene this morning where a bus was found upright on a section. three injuries and no fatalities were reported. a gas leak was found and local authorities have cut the supply.
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presidentjoe biden is due to arrive in the former steel city later today to highlight his efforts to strengthen infrastructure, supply chains and revitalize the us. british sign language is on course to becoming a legally recognised language in england, with the government saying it will back a new bill which is being debated in the house of commons this afternoon. campaigners, including rose ayling—ellis — the first deaf contestant on strictly come dancing — say they hope the change will see it more widely used and promoted. jonathan blake has this report. for centuries, british sign language has been used by deaf people in the uk as an essential tool to communicate. but while it's recognised as a language, it has no legal status. campaigners, including the strictly winner rose ayling—ellis, are calling for a change in the law to ensure bsl becomes more widely used, improving accessibility for deaf people. if i go to the doctor and there's no interpreter, it means i have to bring a family
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member with me. but i don't want that, i want privacy. the labour mp rosie cooper, whose parents are both deaf, has proposed new laws, which the government is now backing. deaf people can do anything but you have to help them by removing communication barriers. remove those communication barriers and the world is their oyster. that is what today will begin. once passed into law, government departments will be required to report their use of bsl, and a panel of bsl users will be set up to advise ministers and officials. it's hoped this will lead to bsl being more widely used in public settings, like this monthly signed service at manchester cathedral, and more interpreters being employed as a result. scotland already has a law promoting the use of bsl. there are campaigns for similar changes in wales and northern ireland. the new law in england is being described as a watershed moment for the deaf community, and the hope is that the estimated
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quarter of a million people who use bsl in some form every day will be able to play a more prominent role in society. jonathan blake, bbc news. the housing secretary michael gove has asked the financial conduct authority to investigate the insurance industry following complaints of huge rises in premiums for people living in blocks of flats with flammable cladding and other fire safety issues. the bbc has reported on annual increases of several hundred percent — which flat owners say are disproportionate. they accuse insurers of excessive profiteerering. insurers reject that and say the increases reflect increased risk. the fca will report within six months. millions of people across the uk rely on homecare in order to live independently into old age. but a staffing crisis in the sector means that support is being rationed. and, with rates of pay remaining low, the number of vacancies is continuing to rise. jayne mccubbin has been to meet
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people on both sides of the crisis — those unable to deliver care and those desperate to receive it. the last 18 months have been such a struggle, it's a constant battle to try and get staff to come and work for us. firefighting every day. we are lying awake at night wondering who is actually going to turn up for work. social care has cried out for years for more funding. when we saw that video of you crying... yeah. that was october. that, yeah. and it's worse now? it's worse now, yeah. suzanne's facebook message was recorded in desperation. her sector unable to compete with better paid jobs in retail is in crisis. a year ago her company had 30 carers like tanya, today only 20. i'm scrolling through the screen now on the database that we use. this is our local council. there are about eight pages of names, but these people
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are still waiting for care. suzanne and kerry's vacancies are just some of the 100,000 advertised in the sector every single day. i'm looking up at the recruitment board and we've got one on the board at the moment. right, so new staff. one. new clients, three. and they are pending? yeah. you can't do them yet? we can't take them on, yeah. that breaks my heart cos i can't do myjob properly. on the other side of the social care crisis are people like this... my name is susie and i have somehow accidentally become a full—time carer for my grandmother. susie's work day now starts earlier so she can then go to her 93—year—old gran's house to help her start the day. just getting these opened. her gran was assessed as being eligible for support last autumn but she is still waiting. so susie nowjuggles working from her gran's home with being a carer. lunchtime. thank you.
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and coping with her own fibromyalgia. and coping with her for me, trying to manage my pain levels and energy levels, as well as trying to do everything that is involved in caring for someone, is really difficult. see you tomorrow, then. bye for now. i don't know how we do this for months and months longer, ijust don't know how we do. hello! the association of directors of adult social services say councils have commissioned 15% more home care in recent months but it still isn't enough to meet rising demand. the department of health and social care told us they are investing half a billion pounds in workforce recruitment, but right now there aren't enough tanyas to go around. you're on about £10 an hour. just over. it is an importantjob. yeah. this job is a vocation. when you see clients that are poorly and things like that you are attached to them. but it's a poorly paid vocation. the sector is fighting for staff
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and it will get worse as the cost of living rises, and worse again, they expect, when vaccines become mandatory in april. barnard castle in county durham was visted by more people than ever last year. the english heritage site became notorious for a trip made during lockdown by the prime minister's then chief adviser — dominic cummings — which he said was to test his eyesight. the castle attracted 20% more visitors in 2021. the charity says last year was also a bumper year for people exploring many other places in their own areas for the first time. a man who was pulled over by police has admitted he'd been driving with no licence or insurance for more than 70 years. police stopped the man, who was born in 1938, in nottingham on wednesday evening. he told officers he'd been driving with no licence or insurance since he was 12. the headlines on bbc news... confusion about the fate
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of the report on lockdown gatherings at downing street — after the police say key details should be left out to avoid prejudicing their investigation. the government says the dual inquiries will get to the truth. pressure on borisjohnson from his party to delay april's rise in national insurance — but the government says it's needed to fund health and social care. social distancing rules are lifted in wales, as limits on numbers in pubs and restaurants are scrapped — and nightclubs can reopen four weeks ago, new post—brexit border rules came into force for trade between britain and the eu. many companies — especially smaller ones — say they've been struggling to cope. the added bureaucracy is also being blamed — in part — for long queues of trucks outside the port of dover. our global trade correspondent, chris morris, has been finding out more.
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driving into dover, past queues of lorries stretching for miles. they're being held here to avoid congesting the town. queues are not uncommon in these parts, but they've been particularly bad in recent weeks. drivers are fed up waiting for hours and sometimes days. when we are waiting, it's no money. they blame cancelled ferry crossings and post—brexit bureaucracy. john shirley has run a freight—forwarding company in dover for 25 years, but this is new territory. customs documents now have to be completed in full before thousands of lorries can board ferries heading for europe every day. that's caused all sorts of headaches for people. people don't know the paperwork properly, haven't prepared themselves. and so that's why there's delays here. i mean, we found a driver here four days — four days! — with a load from germany. won't it get better with time as people get used to a new system? i don't know.
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i suspect it won't do. and it's notjust exporters. people bringing goods into the country from europe have also been dealing with new bureaucracy since january 1st. david pavon runs this small deli in bristol. each individual consignment he imports now needs separate customs forms — where there used to be none. and later in the year, some of these products will need to be physically inspected when they arrive in the uk. we will need to do more paperwork. we will need to pay more money. we might need to increase the prices, but at the end of the day, that's what we do. it's certainly more difficult, but unless we close the doors and shut the business, we need to do it. so what happens in places like dover will have a wider impact. many companies are changing the way they do business across the channel in order to cope with new bureaucracy and delays. but others have simply stopped trading between britain and the eu altogether. while global trade in general
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rebounded pretty well last year from the covid hits of 2020, trade between the uk and the eu did not — and it's almost certainly going to stay that way. the government says traders need to get used to new rules and focus on new trade deals — on the other side of the world. but two years after britain left the eu, the idea of seamless trade across this narrow stretch of water — that ship has already sailed. chris morris, bbc news, dover. a proposal a proposal to give british sign language legal recognition and enhanced status has been given approval in the house of commons, the measures include a private members bill, and it had the backing of the eastenders actress rose
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ayling—ellis. another reading has taken place. although bsl was recognised as a language in its own right in 2003, it had no legal protection, but now it is a legally recognised language and rosie cooper, the mp, she said it will send a clear message to every deaf person that their language is equal and should be treated as equal. so, news that the proposal to give british sign language legal recognition and enhance its use in public services has been backed in the house of commons. the winter olympic games are normally a huge marketing opportunity for sponsors — a showcase for global brands. however, beijing 2022 is causing a huge headache for the 13 official corporate partners of the olympics. the us, uk, australia and canada are among the countries that have announced a diplomatic boycott of the games due to accusations of human rights abuses — though their athletes will still participate.
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and many sponsors are deciding it's saferjust to keep quiet — as our silicon valley correspondent james clayton has been finding out. china's winter olympics may have a shortage of snow, but there's been something else missing too. many of the olympics' big sponsors have been unusually quiet. in december, presidentjoe biden announced a diplomatic boycott of the games, just a few weeks after discussions with the chinese president. us diplomatic or official representation would treat these games as business as usual in the face of the prc's egregious human rights abuses and atrocities in xinjiang. the criticism — china's treatment of its minority uygur population. the boycott has left multinational companies that have sponsored the games in the middle of a diplomatic spat between the us and china. bbc analysis of the olympics' 13 official partners�* social media
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feeds has found that many sponsors have barely posted about the beijing winter olympics compared with last summer's games in tokyo. french giant atos, for example, tweeted about the olympics last year dozens of times on its twitter accounts, yet has posted almost nothing in the lead—up to the games in beijing. i don't think that any of them as global brands can afford or are willing to insult the chinese government or the chinese people, they feel they're walking on a tightrope. the problem that many of these companies face that do business in both china and here in the us is actually pretty simple. they don't want to offend either side. so best not to say very much. that's what zumretay arkin from the world uyghur congress found when she approached the olympic partners. some of these companies, you know, always promote their own company and values, saying that they're aiming for inclusivity and human rights and all these beautiful values. but when it comes to china, it'sjust, it's crazy
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how silent they become. the bbc invited all 13 official olympic partners to comment on china's treatment of uyghurs. none took up the bbc�*s offer. the beijing winter olympics will be a showcase for athletes competing at the highest level. but a showcase for global brands? well, that's a more complex story. james clayton, bbc news. the uk has lost 38 million birds from its skies over the last 50 years — and this weekend we're all being encouraged to join the rspb�*s annual big garden birdwatch — and count the birds we see around us. it's the biggest wildlife survey of its kind on the planet, and aimed at fighting the bird population decline. our climate editor justin rowlatt reports. who doesn't like to see and, of course, hear wild birds? but britain's wild bird
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populations are under assault. changing farming practices, pollution and climate change are all taking their toll, says the bird protection charity the rspb. we do a piece of work called the state of nature which is a report on all the reasons for this decline. we've lost about 38 million birds over the last 50 years, that's about a fifth of our breeding bird population here in the uk. and not every species is declining, but overall more species are declining than others, particularly farmland birds. woodland birds aren't doing very well. can you hear that? loads of birds there, and that is what this is all about. this is about us all going into our gardens, looking out of our windows, on our balconies, counting the birds we can see to survey the bird population. really important information about what is happening to the country's birds. and the rspb wants you to help them by taking part in their big garden bird watch. it is the biggest citizens�* survey anywhere in the world and all they are asking
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is for an hour of your time. it's very easy. indy greene is 16, he has been doing this survey since he was 11. wherever you are, no matter where you live, there are always birds around and a huge variation of species as well. so i thinkjust get involved and just enjoy them and take the time to just sit down and look at your window and see what you can spot. so an hour of your time today or over the weekend and all you have to do is sit and watch the birds. justin rowlatt, bbc news, sherwood forest. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. hello. for some of us, a very windy weekend on the way, but there'll be some good weather around too with some sunshine, but i think overall we'll call it a mixed bag. so, yeah, a bit of everything thrown in. let's have a look at the picture right nowjust to the west of our neighbourhood in the north atlantic. a storm is forming right now and it is heading for scotland.
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but to the south we have a high pressure. so that means settled conditions for most of england, wales, really much of the country through today, but it is quite cloudy. these are the evening temperatures, around 8—11 degrees and then off the west coast of scotland, this storm forms tonight. the gales start to develop in the western isles. the rain spreads in, but with this also mild air overnight, so temperatures first thing on saturday morning around double figures in some areas. really quite a mild start to the morning and day. so here's that very stormy weather across the north. you can see a lot of isobars here. i think the worst of the weather will be around the middle of the day on saturday. now, in terms of the winds, the met office warns gusts of 80mph in some northern parts of scotland, 70 a little bit further south and the gales will be felt around the irish sea and also to an extent around northern england. but in the south, not quite so windy, although a bit of a breeze. 13 in london, seven degrees
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in aberdeen, six in stornoway with a rash of showers and i think overall a relatively bright, if not sunny day for many of us on saturday, despite the strong wind. now, another low pressure comes our way, so this is round two of gale force winds for sunday. this next one you can see again forms to the west of the hebrides here, again vicious gusts of wind, heavy rain, some mountain snow there. we could see those gales strengthening through the day into sunday evening. south of that, it should be much drier, brighter. in fact, some sunshine for london and norwich. but sunday night into monday, gale force winds with some rain across northern england and again those winds 70 to 80mph in the west. the weekend looks pretty rough for folks in scotland, but the further south you are, the better it'll be. next week we'll see rounds of low pressures with wind and rain sweeping our way. so i think unsettled weather for next week. bye bye.
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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines: confusion about the fate of the sue gray report on lockdown gatherings at downing street after the police say key details should be left out to avoid prejudicing their investigation. the government says the dual inquiries will get to the truth but labour insists some urgency is needed. he has paralysed government so the sooner we get both the full report and the investigation completed, the better. a key government figure has dismissed the idea that the police intervention was helpful to borisjohnson i would say it would be a very stretching conspiracy theorist who thought— stretching conspiracy theorist who thought the prime minister of being investigated by the police was beneficial to the prime minister.
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pressure on borisjohnson from his party to delay april's rise in national insurance — but ministers says it's needed to fund health and social care. russia and the us continue a war of words over ukraine amid a warning about possible cyber attacks in the uk. social distancing rules are lifted in wales, as limits on numbers in pubs and restaurants are scrapped — and nightclubs can reopen. mps have backed plans to make british sign language a legally recognised language in england. and questions over the timing of a positive covid test used by novak djokovic to enter australia. hello and welcome to bbc news. there's confusion around the publication of the civil servant
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sue gray's report into lockdown parties in downing street this morning after the metropolitan police revealed they've asked her to make "minimal reference" to events which they are investigating. her report had been due to be released this week, with many mps saying they were waiting for its contents before taking a firm position on the prime minister's future. now the met has asked ms gray to leave out key details to avoid prejudicing their investigation — although they say they are not asking for its release to be delayed. our political correspondent nick eardley has the latest. getting answers around here isn't always straightforward. what went on in downing street? were covid rules broken? this woman, sue gray, had been expected to deliver her report this week but now it is unclear what happens next after the metropolitan police launched its own investigation and told ms gray to limit what she published. in a statement, the force said...
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what i want to see is sue gray's report in full and the investigation finished as quickly as possible because we are in this situation where the whole of government is paralysed because the police are now looking at what the prime minister was getting up to in downing street. downing street says they are not involved but the liberal democrat leader has suggested there had been a stitch—up which could damage politics for generations. sue gray and her team had been speaking with the met to try to figure out what could and could not be put in the public domain. but that process has now been thrown into chaos. the cabinet office was caught by surprise by the statement this morning and now it is not totally clear what can be published, and when that might happen. i think the sue gray report is independent, the government are not interfering with it which is exactly as it should be, and i'm completely confident that between the sue gray
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investigation and the police, everything will be covered. it's important we move on and draw a line under this because there are very important things the government is working on. the political pressure continues. borisjohnson's predecessor has added her voice, saying in a letter that nobody is above the law and she was angry to hear stories about people at number 10 not properly following the rules. the government wants to move on but this row has dominated at westminster for weeks. after this morning's developments, it's not clear when we will get answers and what it will mean for borisjohnson and his government. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. and as nick eardley explained earlier, downing street say they aren't involved in the discussions around what should be released and when. number 10 say they aren't involved in this, they aren't part of negotiations that have been going on between the cabinet office and the metropolitan police but i think one reason this has
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taken people by surprise and has been seen as such a grenade thrown into the process is that the met and the cabinet office have been speaking for the last three weeks about what could and could not be in this report. it was thought they were pretty close to coming to an arrangement that would allow it to get over the line but this statement this morning talking about only minimal references to the cases that the metropolitan police are looking into raises all these big questions about whether the report that would be published, if it was published before the police investigation, would be worth it because presumably it wouldn't be looking into the most serious allegations of rule breaking in downing street. it has led to some in the snp and liberal democrats raising the fear it could be a whitewash so there will be pressure on the cabinet office to come up with an answer about what sue gray will do next. at the moment it doesn't seem clear.
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this took them unawares this morning, they didn't know the statement was coming and the ramifications of it are still being worked out which is why we cannot give you any firm answers at the moment on what happens next. the leader of the house of commons jacob rees mogg has dismissed suggestions the met police's intervention has helped the prime minister. he was speaking to nick robinson on the political thinking podcast. the the political thinking podcast. tue: government's the political thinking podcast. tta: government's position the political thinking podcast. "tt2 government's position is the political thinking podcast. tt2 government's position is that what is given to him by sue gray will be published and that is right and sensible. people outside government are entitled to raise questions about the police and that is part of about the police and that is part of a vibrant democracy and freedom of speech. i would say it would be a very eccentric conspiracy theorist who thought the prime minister being invested by the police was
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beneficial to the prime minister, thatis beneficial to the prime minister, that is parallel universe stuff. really? the argument is eight wins delay, _ really? the argument is eight wins delay, it _ really? the argument is eight wins delay, it gives him a breathing space — delay, it gives him a breathing space |— delay, it gives him a breathing sace. ., �* ~ . y space. i don't think any prime minister would _ space. i don't think any prime minister would think - space. i don't think any prime minister would think it - space. i don't think any prime minister would think it was i space. i don't think any prime minister would think it was a l space. i don't think any prime - minister would think it was a good idea to be interviewed by the police. i know people get excited by dead cat strategies but this is a sort of trophy hunted dead lion been slammed on the table which i think is hard to say is helpful. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford explained why this delay is happening now given the met always knew sue gray's report could include details of incidents they could be involved in investigating. a lot of us were immediately asking does this mean sue gray's report has to be delayed if there is potential risk of prejudice to the investigation and the message we got on tuesday was that the report doesn't need to be delayed so we assumed if there were any differences between the cabinet
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office and the metropolitan police over what would be published they would be small and it would be fine and all week there has been that sense of crossing of ts and dotting of is, ironing out problematic wording and then the newspapers started this idea that the met were dealing sue gray's report and in response the met put out a statement saying they are asking for minimal references and that seems to have taken the cabinet office by surprise. the met must be aware that politically there is this demand for the report to be published in full and that the result of them saying they want her to make minimal references to some aspect of what they are investigating, the net result would be potentially the report not being published in full. this goes back to the misunderstanding because by all accounts and appearances, the met have not given interviews
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about this so it felt there was a sensible negotiation going on, they put out a statement this morning they felt reflected the position and are surprised, the cabinet office are surprised by what they said. clearly in the end sue gray can do what she wants in terms of publishing the report but if you ask a police officer who is about to go to an important stage of an investigation, however much these are summary offences, is it all right if we put out a detailed account of what you are about to investigate they will always say we would rather you put a smaller account out, so the differences seem to be that the met thought that sue gray's report would be summaries of each of the events, a view on whether or not each of those was appropriate, that kind of thing, so they felt that what they were dealing
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with was, is there a way we could not give too much away about where we might be going with our investigation and now it turns out the rest of the world are expecting a detailed forensic report and sue gray's team seem to be feeling they have been let down by what the met said publicly. how much of a reputational risk is there here for the met, already under heavy criticism for not having investigated this sooner? this is where the waters get very muddy because there are newspapers that have been campaigning for commissioner cressida dick to resign for some time, her position was in jeopardy last year so it's difficult to separate those who were criticising the met and cressida dick with good reason and those who were criticising her because they want her gone, so that makes things difficult. there is no doubt the met had been in a difficult position from the start because they haven't wanted to unfairly retrospectively investigate reasonably minor
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offences but have found themselves in a position where they felt because of the evidence in front of them they had to investigate and now they have been criticised for the results of starting that investigation so they have been losing at every stage of the process so it has been a damaging time for them. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford. the former director of public prosecutions, lord macdonald, gave me his reaction to the intervention by the metroplitian police. it has come as a considerable surprise. the police had been signalling until this morning they would not stand in the way of a full publication of sue gray's findings. i think this is unfortunate. if what we are talking about is a police investigation into lockdown breaches which is overwhelmingly likely to result in fixed penalty notices like parking tickets for those
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tickets for those involved, then to delay the publication of this report when there seems to be such a strong public interest in it being revealed would seem to be disproportionate. on the other hand if sue gray has uncovered, and this is speculation but if she has uncovered more complicated evidence around deletion of e—mails or something of that sort, the police may take the view this is more sensitive than they anticipated and they would prefer to conduct an investigation unaffected by publication of a report such as the one being prepared by sue gray but if we are just talking about the likelihood of fixed penalty notices, entry level crime, the lowest form of offending that doesn't even go to court for resolution, to use an inquiry of that sort is a reason to block the publication of the report seems a bit of a stretch. so does it suggest to you that the police may be looking at some offences beyond fixed penalty notices?
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i've no idea, maybe they'rejust being cautious or have taken advice from outside counsel, there are all sorts of possibilities but i think it's an unfortunate sequence of events and will hardly build public confidence in the process that there has been this chopping and changing. lord macdonald there. a conservative mp has accused the metropolitan police of usurping its position. sir christopher chopra said there was no reason for the metropolitan police to require so great not to issue her report in an unamended way. —— sir christopher chopra. we will continue
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our coverage of the sue gray report or the reasons we have not yet got it this afternoon but for now, moving on to other news. the government has again insisted that it will put up national insurance in april as planned — despite reports that borisjohnson is considering a u—turn. ministers say the extra money raised is needed to help clear a backlog of nhs operations in england and to fund social care. some conservative mps want the rise scrapped. the leader of the house of commons, jacob rees mogg, has been speaking to the political thinking podcast on the subject and he said the money was much needed. it isa it is a difficult choice for the chancellor but we do need to raise funds to pay for the extra 9 million scans to get rid of the backlog in the nhs and all those sorts of things. the nhs and all those sorts of thins. �* , ., the nhs and all those sorts of thins. �* i. ., �* the nhs and all those sorts of thins. �* ., �* , things. but you wouldn't weep if he --ostoned things. but you wouldn't weep if he postponed it- _ things. but you wouldn't weep if he postponed it- i— things. but you wouldn't weep if he postponed it. i think— things. but you wouldn't weep if he postponed it. i think governments. postponed it. i think governments have to have _ postponed it. i think governments have to have a _ postponed it. i think governments have to have a set _ postponed it. i think governments have to have a set purpose - postponed it. i think governments have to have a set purpose and i postponed it. i think governments have to have a set purpose and al have to have a set purpose and a clear course and we cannot be
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buffeted by every wind, so it's important to recognise the need to raise the money that we are determined to spend. matthew taylor is chief executive of the nhs confederation. thanks forjoining us this afternoon and without this extra money for health and social care, what's going to happen given that there are already record waits for both services? t already record waits for both services?— already record waits for both services? ~' ., , services? i think we need to be clear that _ services? i think we need to be clear that the _ services? i think we need to be clear that the commitment - services? i think we need to be clear that the commitment to l clear that the commitment to additionalfunding for clear that the commitment to additional funding for health and a commitment to a cap on the cost that people contribute to their social care is a spending review commitment. the issue is how that's paid for and in a sense from the perspective of the nhs, the government's issue not ours. there are a spending review commitment is, there is not as much money as we would like for health but if covid goes away there is enough money for
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us to start making inroads into that backlog and the cost of the cap on social care is substantial so if the government chooses not to raise this levy it will have to increase borrowing but if we work to get into the situation of saying we are not raising this money so we have to reduce spending on health and social care, we would be in a very difficult situation.— care, we would be in a very difficult situation. some of boris johnson's mps — difficult situation. some of boris johnson's mps are _ difficult situation. some of boris johnson's mps are saying - difficult situation. some of boris johnson's mps are saying don't i difficult situation. some of boris i johnson's mps are saying don't put up johnson's mps are saying don't put up national insurance, think about the cost of living crisis that so many people are trying to cope with but if you look at cost of living and the massive backlog in health care, it shouldn't be an either or, should it?— should it? no, and i think the fundamental _ should it? no, and i think the fundamental issue _ should it? no, and i think the fundamental issue is - should it? no, and i think the fundamental issue is whetherj should it? no, and i think the - fundamental issue is whether the government wants to raise money through the national insurance increase or whether it wants to increase or whether it wants to increase borrowing and that is a judgment of the chancellor has to make. the important thing is from the perspective of the health care system, we are in the position we
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are in because we suffered ten years of the lowest growth in health service panic we have seen in its creation and that is one reason we went into this crisis with up to 100,000 vacancies, or capital stock crumbling and one reason it has been so difficult. there is extra monday in the spending review and if covid goes away we can make inroads into the backlog but if we don't have that money we will not make a difference. whether the money comes from national insurance or boring or whatever is up the government. in whatever is up the government. in your discussions with government officials can have any other means officials can have any other means of paying for this been discussed apart from the increase in national insurance? ., ., ., , apart from the increase in national insurance? ., ., ., insurance? no, and at this stage it's difficult _ insurance? no, and at this stage it's difficult to _ insurance? no, and at this stage it's difficult to see _ insurance? no, and at this stage it's difficult to see how _ insurance? no, and at this stage it's difficult to see how you - insurance? no, and at this stage| it's difficult to see how you would do anything other than increase your borrowing rate to pay for it, so that appears to be the choice the government has to press on with the levy or to increase borrowing. i don't think that reducing the
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funding to the whole service or reducing funding to social kit is an option because even now with the money raised by the levy, we only have just enough to stop making inroads into the backlog and even with the money available for social care, it isn't nearly enough to reconstruct our social care system which as we all know, the fragmented nature of that system is one of the reasons we found it so difficult to cope with covid.— cope with covid. matthew taylor, chief executive _ cope with covid. matthew taylor, chief executive of _ cope with covid. matthew taylor, chief executive of the _ cope with covid. matthew taylor, chief executive of the nhs - chief executive of the nhs confederation, thank you very much. some measures put in place to tackle coronavirus are easing today in wales. there are changes for people wishing to go to nightclubs and restaurants and social distancing rules have also been relaxed. our wales correspondent tomos morgan is in cardiff with further details. today is the last stage of the road map set out by first minister mark drakeford in bringing wales back to alert level zero, so the main points, social distancing measures have now been scrapped in wales, much to the delight of hospitality and workplaces, and the rule of six
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has been scrapped along with nightclubs being able to reopen. they were the first, the last to reopen last year and the first shut and now they can reopenjust in time for the six nations in a few weeks here in wales. and of course the work from home rule, which was still a legal requirement, has now been made just guidance only. a few things remain in place, those being that masks will still need to be worn in shops and hospitals and public transport, and vaccine passes will still be needed in cinemas and theatres and for large events. first minister mark drakeford has said they have been able to ease the restrictions because the peak of the omicron wave has passed here and the number of cases has been reducing more rapidly than the rest of the uk. the next review into the covid measures, into masks and vaccination passes, will be on the 10th of february.
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scientists have warned the government that allowing large numbers of people in lower—income countries to go unvaccinated is "reckless" and could lead to new covid variants. more than 320 experts have written to the prime minister, calling for urgent action. they say more than three billion people globally have not had a first dose. a teenager has appeared in court, charged after twojewish men were violently attacked in north london. the police said the incident is being treated as a hate crime. the hearing took about 25 minutes. 18—year—old malaki thorpe spoke only to confirm his name, date of birth and address. he has been charged with two counts of racially or religiously aggravated bodily harm and one count of possession of an offensive weapon.
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it relates to an incident on wednesday night in haringey in which twojewish men were attacked. they were each treated in hospital for injuries. malaki thorpe indicated not guilty pleas on all counts. the court remanded him into custody and the case has been sent to wood green crown court for trial in march. british sign language has taken a step closer to becoming a legally recognised language in england, after a bill proposing the changes was backed in the house of commons. the measures were included in a private member's bill which has the backing of strictly come dancing champion and eastenders actress rose ayling—ellis. our correspondentjean mackenzie is with me now. tell us more about what happened in the commons. this tell us more about what happened in the commons-— the commons. this was the second readin: of the commons. this was the second reading of the _ the commons. this was the second reading of the belt _ the commons. this was the second reading of the belt so _ the commons. this was the second reading of the belt so it _ the commons. this was the second reading of the belt so it still - the commons. this was the second reading of the belt so it still has i reading of the belt so it still has a few more stages until british sign language officially becomes law but it was given unanimous support by
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the government and mps so it was brought by a laser mp, rosie cooper. both her parents were born deaf so she grew up with two deaf parents and this is something she wanted to see past that the whole house got behind. she gave an emotional statement in the commons talking about what it was like as a child growing up with two deaf parents, how she remembered her parents not being understood or not being able to understand. she recounted a story when she had to book the family holiday when she was four years old so this was a momentous occasion but she also praised the winner of strictly, rows, for her amazing work to raise awareness. tt’s strictly, rows, for her amazing work to raise awareness.— to raise awareness. it's difficult to raise awareness. it's difficult to underestimate _ to raise awareness. it's difficult to underestimate the _ to raise awareness. it's difficult to underestimate the impact i to raise awareness. it's difficult i to underestimate the impact rose ayling ellis has had on bringing this issue to the public�*s attention and increasing the pressure to change the law. qt and increasing the pressure to change the law.— and increasing the pressure to change the law. of course and she has thrown — change the law. of course and she has thrown herself _
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change the law. of course and she has thrown herself behind - change the law. of course and she has thrown herself behind this i change the law. of course and she| has thrown herself behind this belt and there was incredible performances on strictly come dancing focused the public�*s mine. rosie cooper paid tribute to her in the commons today, saying she had shown the uk that what her dad had always told her, that deaf people can do anything, even the impossible.— can do anything, even the imossible. ~ . , ., impossible. what will this mean in terms of practical _ impossible. what will this mean in terms of practical differences? i terms of practical differences? essentially why they wanted this bill brought in is that people who use british sign language say they still were not getting equal access to information and services as the hearing population so even though the equalities act suggests people have to be treated as equals, in practice they were not seeing the support they needed, whereas now this will force the government and other public organisations to provide those interpreters and to implement and use this language. jean mckenzie, thank you.
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tensions over ukraine remain high with russia's foreign minister saying his country's interests couldn't be ignored — while insisting moscow did not want war. earlier, presidentjoe biden warned there is a "distinct possibility" that russia might invade ukraine next month. it comes as uk businesses and organisations are being urged to boost their defences in case cyber attacks linked to the conflict over ukraine have an impact here. our diplomatic correspondent james landale explained the current situation. the russian foreign minister said this morning that russia doesn't want war if it is up to them, but the troop build—up continues. the us ambassador said that is the equivalent of a man putting a gun on a table and say let's talk peace. the rhetoric is there but the diplomacy continues as well. president macron of france spent an hour on the phone to president putin and he will talk later to president zelensky, who spoke to president biden last night and the german foreign minister spoke to our foreign minister and is talking to her russian counterpart. so talks are continuing. that is the first point.
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the second is that the dialogue between the us and the russians over security continues and this morning the russian foreign minister said the latest us proposals had, and i quote, a "resilience, grains of rationality", on issues of secondary importance. that might be faint praise but it is at least praise. and we are getting in a briefing note from the elysee palace about those talks are taking place earlier between emmanuel macron and vladimir putin. that says the elysee palace is describing the discussion between the two leaders is serious and respectful. vladimir putin said he is not looking for confrontation, thatis is not looking for confrontation, that is something moscow has continually said, he doesn't want an escalation and he wants to continue negotiations. vladimir putin also
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told emmanuel macron he wants to work together on the implementation of the minsk agreement and from the elysee's perspective they say the dialogue with russia is complicated that communication channels remain open. the elysee palace also say president macron will go out to ukraine at some point but the date is not determined yet and one phone call cannot resolve all the issues surrounding that ukraine— russia tensions so that is the briefing note coming through from the elysee palace on that phone call that lasted about one are between vladimir putin and emmanuel macron this morning. nato secretary—generaljens stoltenberg says that the alliance was ready to increase its troop presence in eastern europe and was watching very closely as russia moves soldiers and weapons in belarus. we are also ready to step up, as we actually now do, our presence in the eastern part
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of the alliance to prevent any misunderstanding or room for miscalculations about nato's ability and readiness to protect all allies. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in kyiv, and she gave us a sense of how people are feeling there. you heard from james how phone lines are burning between different capitals and that includes kyiv, but even president zelensky has warned his european allies, if you escalate too much or talk of escalation, that in itself can fuel further escalation so the idea, temperatures are already cold enough but bring temperatures down. we understand president zelensky is meeting the press in ukraine so we will see what message he has. ukrainians have got used to this tension, which is not to say they like living with it but this
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crisis has been going on for many going on for many years, even though they are mindful there is a risk it could intensify even more. what is your reading of those talks earlier between emmanuel macron and vladimir putin and the words being fired back and forth between east and west? there has only been a short readout from moscow so far about that hour long phone call and the gist of it was contained in what sergei lavrov said and what russia has said to nato, which is you have fundamentally misunderstood our security concerns when it comes to ukraine and they have to be addressed if there is to be any possibility of resolving this crisis, but that phone call also underlines, and for president macron and other european leaders but in particular president macron, they believe europe should play a leading role in resolving this crisis. they are geographically much closer to russia and ukraine but this
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is a crisis where america is playing a decisive role and president biden seems very much engaged. and of course he has to be. despite the us saying ukraine has a right to determine its own future, do you think ultimately it may have to put its ambitions to join nato on the back burner in order to avert an escalation of this crisis? ukraine's ambition to possiblyjoin the military alliance is very much on the back burner anyway. if you ask any expert on what ukraine has to do to fulfil the demands to join the nato military alliance, it is nowhere near meeting those requirements, so it still is a distant possibility which is why the kind of information we're getting about the talks going on behind the scenes between moscow and washington, saying we will delay for a decade or a quarter—century
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any possibility of you tried joining nato, president putin wants it any possibility of ukraine joining nato, president putin wants it off the table altogether. lyse doucet there. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. hello. a little bit of bright weather out there today. not an awful lot. and the weekend is looking quite mixed. it really will be quite windy, stormy, in fact, across the north of scotland into tomorrow. and that's because just off the west coast of scotland later tonight, a storm will be developing. you can see this circulation here. a lot of isobars, very strong winds. south of that, it should be much calmer. and also with this storm approaching, very mild weather, first thing in the morning, temperatures will be into double figures in many parts of the country. let's focus on those winds through tomorrow. so the north of scotland, the met office warns 80 mile an hour gusts, really rough weather, 70 a little bit further south
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and gale force winds also expected around the irish sea and northern parts of england. not so windy in the south. and the weather? well, i think, generally speaking, a bright day for many of us tomorrow with some showers in the north. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: confusion about the fate of the sue gray report on lockdown gatherings at downing street — after the police say key details should be left out to avoid prejudicing their investigation. the government says the dual inquiries will get to the truth. pressure on borisjohnson from his party to delay april's rise in national insurance — but ministers says it's needed to fund health and social care. the french president emanuel macron has told vladimir putin that russia needs to respect the sovereignty of its neighbours — as western allies seek to defuse
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tensions over ukraine. social distancing rules are lifted in wales, as limits on numbers in pubs and restaurants are scrapped — and nightclubs can reopen. mps have backed plans to make british sign language a legally recognised language in england. sport now and a full round up from the bbc. good afternoon. wayne rooney has confirmed he was approached by everton to interview for the vacant managers job, but that he turned the opportunity down, saying he has an importantjob as boss of derby county. rooney has been in charge since january 2020, but derby is now in admistration after experiencing major financial difficulies. rooney — who played in two seperate spells for everton — didn't rule out ever managing his boyhood club — but confirmed he had said no on this occasion.
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everton no on this occasion. approached my agent and asked everton approached my agent and asked me to interview for the vacant job. i turned asked me to interview for the vacant job. iturned it asked me to interview for the vacant job. i turned it down, asked me to interview for the vacant job. iturned it down, because asked me to interview for the vacant job. i turned it down, because as i have said, i believe i will be a premier league manager, i believe i'm ready for that, 100%, and if thatis i'm ready for that, 100%, and if that is with everton one day in the future, that would be absolutely great. rafael nadal said he felt he was back to his best after beating matteo berretini to make it into the final of the australian open. he now has a chance of winning a record—breaking 21st grand slam title. the spaniard comfortably won the first two sets. but berretini came back to take the third. nadal�*s experience was evident in the fourth, which he won 6—3. he said it meant a lot to be in the final again, especially after the problems he's had with an injured foot — and at the age of 35, he could now go on to make history
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in the final on sunday. as i said, a couple of days ago, i have been a little bit unlucky in my career with injuries. in all the time i have played amazing finals with good chances, against novak in 2012, and roger in 2017. i was close a couple of times. i feel lucky i won once in my career in 2009 but i never thought about another chance in 2022. it means a lot to be in the final again here. well, nadalwill face the russian daniil medvedev, who had a mid—match meltdown before beating stefanos tsitsipas in four sets. he directed an angry tirade towards the umpire, accusing tsitsipas's father of coaching from the crowd. but he'll face nadal to push for a second grand slam title in a row, after winning the us open last summer. tomorrow will be a crucial day for england women in their must win test match against australia. captain heather knight kept her side in it with an unbeaten century
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on day two in canberra. katherine brunt got england off to a good start, taking her tally to five wickets, before australia declared on 337—9. however, england's openers put onjust nine runs between them. and as the batting line—up crumbled around her, knight came to the rescue for england, hitting an unbeaten century. they closed on 235—8 — that's 102 runs behind. it's taken a while, but one englishman has enjoyed some cricketing success down under. surrey batsman laurie evans top scored as perth scorchers won the australian big bash league final. evans smashed 76 not out, offjust 41 deliveries, as the scorchers set a covid—hit sydney sixers 172 to win. they fell well short as the scorchers lifted the trophy for the fourth time.
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tyrrell hatton has stormed up the leaderboard in the second round of the dubai desert classic. he's two shots behind leader justin harding at the halfway mark. he's two shots behind leader there's a strong british contingent in the chasing pack with rory mcilroy 4 shots off the pace with a bogey free second round. lee westwood, paul casey and tommy fleetwood are also in the top 10. saracens have confirmed their director of rugby mark mccall will take a break from the sport for medical reasons. in a statement saracens said... "people will always come first at our club and mark will be given all of the support and time he needs". mccall's coaching staff, lead by head coachjoe shaw, will take over in his absence, starting with sunday's game at wasps in the premiership. that's all the sport for now. doubts have emerged about the timing of a positive covid test novak djokovic used to enter
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australia, to defend his australian open title. the world men's no1 was originally given an exemption from rules which bar unvaccinated people — after he produced evidence of having had covid in december. but the bbc has found a discrepancy on the serial numbers of his test certificates. matt graveling has the details. this was novak djokovic's chance to win his tenth australian open, and with it the most grand slams ever achieved in men's tennis. upon arrival in melbourne onjanuary 5th, and confirming he was unvaccinated, his visa was revoked by the government. the serbian was given an exemption to play, having tested positive for coronavirus in mid—december. in an attempt to overturn the decision, djokovic's legal team presented two covid test certificates to a federal court in australia. the first, shown to be taken on december 16th,
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shows a positive result. the second, taken six days later, shows a negative result. a german research company questioned why the unique confirmation code on the earlier test was higher than the later one. the bbc has investigated if codes on tests done in serbia are generated in a chronological order. a total of 56 test certificates were collected, and their unique confirmation codes plotted against the date of each result. in all cases studied, the earlier the result, the lower the unique code for the corresponding test. the only outlier of the codes plotted was novak djokovic's positive test on december 16th. according to the bbc�*s graph, this confirmation code would suggest a test sometime between the 25th and december 28th. one data specialist said, "there is always the possibility for a glitch, but if this was the case, i don't know why
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the authorities would not say that." to try and explain this discrepancy, the bbc has approached novak djokovic's team, serbia's institute of public health, and its office of information technology, but has yet to have a response. matt graveling, bbc news. the housing secretary michael gove has asked the financial conduct authority to investigate the insurance industry following complaints of huge rises in premiums for people living in blocks of flats with flammable cladding and other fire safety issues. the bbc has reported on annual increases of several hundred percent — which flat owners say are disproportionate. they accuse insurers of excessive profiteerering. insurers reject that and say the increases reflect increased risk. the fca will report within six months.
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exam chiefs have said upcoming changes to gcse�*s and a—levels wont mean they are easier. under new rules designed to tackle gaps in learning caused by the pandemic, pupils in england will be able to choose topics on some papers, as well as being given advanced warnings on the focus of some content. critics say the new system will actually be most beneficial to students who suffered the least disruption, rather than those hardest hit. more people than ever visited barnard castle in county durham last year, in the wake of the notorious lockdown trip by the prime minister's then chief adviser dominic cummings. figures released by english heritage show that the castle attracted 20% more visitors than usual. it was among a number of "hidden local gems" which saw a boom in visitor numbers compared to pre—pandemic levels. we asked people in the town of barnard castle what they thought about the rise in tourism there. i'm from the cotswolds so it is very much nice to have a look at the
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older side of things. we much nice to have a look at the older side of things.— much nice to have a look at the older side of things. we ought to thank dominic— older side of things. we ought to thank dominic cummings - older side of things. we ought to | thank dominic cummings because older side of things. we ought to i thank dominic cummings because he certainly— thank dominic cummings because he certainly has brought hordes of tourists — certainly has brought hordes of tourists. see them standing at the names_ tourists. see them standing at the names of— tourists. see them standing at the names of barnard castle and all sorts— names of barnard castle and all sorts and — names of barnard castle and all sorts and all of our coffee shops have _ sorts and all of our coffee shops have really done well as a result. the business people have done well. there's_ the business people have done well. there's is— the business people have done well. there's is parking _ the business people have done well. there's is parking spots. _ the business people have done well. there's is parking spots. it— the business people have done well. there's is parking spots. it has - the business people have done well. there's is parking spots.— there's is parking spots. it has put it on the map. _ there's is parking spots. it has put it on the map, has _ there's is parking spots. it has put it on the map, has it? _ there's is parking spots. it has put it on the map, has it? you - there's is parking spots. it has put it on the map, has it? you think i it on the map, has it? you think that is why _ it on the map, has it? you think that is why people _ it on the map, has it? you think that is why people come - it on the map, has it? you think that is why people come here? | it on the map, has it? you think| that is why people come here? it it on the map, has it? you think i that is why people come here? it has ut it in that is why people come here? it has put it in the — that is why people come here? it has put it in the back _ that is why people come here? it has put it in the back of _ that is why people come here? it has put it in the back of people's - put it in the back of people's minds, yeah. joining me now isjuliet fellows—smith, property manager for english heritage and works at barnard castle. the notary strip by dominic cummings seems to have had an impact on the
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barnard castle and the town, it has done it some favours? —— the notorious trip. we done it some favours? -- the notorious trip.— done it some favours? -- the notorious trip. we have benefited from a high _ notorious trip. we have benefited from a high media _ notorious trip. we have benefited from a high media profile - notorious trip. we have benefited from a high media profile than i from a high media profile than normal and we certainly saw a few more magnets bearing the words barnard castle and we saw a few people taking selfies in front of the castle, sometimes with their spectacles, but we have seen a national trend in english heritage, a lot of our smaller sites really getting increased visits. a lot of love from local people. i think people have taken the mandate to stay—at—home very seriously and have visited their local gems. many towns have a 900—year—old cars or abbey just around the corner and we are seeing people visit them —— 900—year—old castle. seeing people visit them -- 900-year-old castle.- seeing people visit them -- 900-year-old castle. yes, as you sa , it is 900-year-old castle. yes, as you say. it is not _ 900-year-old castle. yes, as you say, it is notjust _ 900-year-old castle. yes, as you say, it is notjust your— 900-year-old castle. yes, as you say, it is notjust your area, i 900-year-old castle. yes, as you say, it is notjust your area, but l say, it is notjust your area, but it is about people finding it more difficult to travel abroad and are looking to what is at home and what
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is potentially on their doorstep. that is true. the other thing, and english heritage we offer a very covid safe visit with lots of outdoor areas and people find it comforting to stand in a historic ruin and to look at a castle or an abbey and think of the things that structure has seen over the years. our sites have seen the plagues and wars and famines, huge world events, and it is very humbling to stand in and it is very humbling to stand in a structure which has endured for hundreds if not thousands of years. it helps to put our troubles into perspective in some ways. iloathed it helps to put our troubles into perspective in some ways. what is en . lish perspective in some ways. what is english heritage _ perspective in some ways. what is english heritage doing _ perspective in some ways. what is english heritage doing to - perspective in some ways. what is| english heritage doing to capitalise on the increased visitor numbers and to keep visitors coming? taste on the increased visitor numbers and to keep visitors coming?— to keep visitors coming? we are doinu our to keep visitors coming? we are doing our best _ to keep visitors coming? we are doing our best to _ to keep visitors coming? we are doing our best to give _ to keep visitors coming? we are doing our best to give a - to keep visitors coming? we are doing our best to give a really i doing our best to give a really great visit and throughout the
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pandemic we have been open as much as we possibly can with all the measures in place to make sure people are safe and we are really trying to give people the best possible experience of these wonderful sites. at barnard castle we are a 12th century castle with connections to richard iii. on a roman fort. it is a wonderful place, place where you can step into english history and really understand the events that have shaped this country. [30 understand the events that have shaped this country.— understand the events that have shaped this country. do you worry, as it becomes _ shaped this country. do you worry, as it becomes easier— shaped this country. do you worry, as it becomes easier for _ shaped this country. do you worry, as it becomes easier for people i shaped this country. do you worry, as it becomes easier for people to | as it becomes easier for people to travel further afield and travel abroad, that visitor numbers might drop? taste abroad, that visitor numbers might dro - ? ~ ., abroad, that visitor numbers might dro? . ., ., abroad, that visitor numbers might dro? ., ., . drop? we are not too concerned. i think during _ drop? we are not too concerned. i think during this _ drop? we are not too concerned. i think during this last _ drop? we are not too concerned. i think during this last period - drop? we are not too concerned. i| think during this last period people have become aware of the treasures on their doorstep and they have perhaps explored at sites they might not have explored before, and there is a real awareness now about what we have in this country and how you can step out of the ordinary without going very far at all. we think
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word—of—mouth on the visits we have had over the last record—breaking year will make sure that we continue to be busy for many years to come. juliet, at english heritage, at barnard castle, thanks forjoining us. the headlines on bbc news... confusion about the fate of the report on lockdown gatherings at downing street — after the police say key details should be left out to avoid prejudicing their investigation. the government says the dual inquiries will get to the truth. pressure on borisjohnson from his party to delay april's rise in national insurance — but the government says it's needed to fund health and social care. social distancing rules are lifted in wales, as limits on numbers in pubs and restaurants are scrapped — and nightclubs can reopen. more women are waiting until their 30s to have a child,
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that's according to new data. findings from the office for national statistics say women born in 1990 are becoming the first cohort where half of the women remain childless by their 30th birthday. here with us now is drjo mountfield, who is the vice president of the royal college of obstertricians and gynaecologist and is also a consultant obstetrician herself. thanks forjoining us. there has been a general trend of women choosing to have children later than women of previous generations but also a growing number of women deciding to have few or no children? that is right. it is the way society has developed over the last 20 or more years, and contraception was a wonderful invention and it is pretty reliable if you use it well so people can now choose as to when they wish to have their families.
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women have that choice and they can think about their careers and when they want to have their children, andindeed they want to have their children, and indeed some women they don't wish to have children, and it comes down to that choice for women, a positive step forward for them and their families. positive step forward for them and theirfamilies. th positive step forward for them and their families.— their families. in 1971 'ust18% of so-year-ous h their families. in 1971 'ust18% of 30-year-olds had i their families. in 1971 'ust 1896 of 30-year-olds had no i their families. in 1971 just 1896 of 30-year-olds had no children i their families. in 1971 just 1896 of i 30-year-olds had no children about 30—year—olds had no children about today figure is now 50%. that is a pretty striking statistic, isn't it? it is. what we want to make sure is that women understand as they get older and become pregnant, so not necessarily at 30, but once you reach your late 30s, your fertility starts to decrease and there are some risks associated with being an older mother and although it is understandable that people have changed their opinion, it is also about them being well informed about
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what are the pros and cons of getting pregnant at different ages in their lives. and what are the alternatives for those people who are may be running into problems who are may be running into problems who are trying to get pregnant because we have positive steps forward in terms of treatments if you —— treatments for infertility, as well. do you think women know enough about fertility issues and is there enough awareness of that, and i'll be seeing a corresponding rise in the number of people seeking help with fertility? —— are we. t number of people seeking help with fertility? -- are we.— fertility? -- are we. i would not we are seeing — fertility? -- are we. i would not we are seeing a _ fertility? -- are we. i would not we are seeing a corresponding - fertility? -- are we. i would not we are seeing a corresponding rise, i fertility? -- are we. i would not we| are seeing a corresponding rise, not as simple as that, but do i think people are well educated? it is variable and i think we could do more to get the messages out there, that there is a fall of infertility and there are extra risks as you become an older mother. increase
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risk of all sorts of complications, of miscarriages, of having a baby that has a chromosome disorder, for example, and it is beholden on us as professionals to give that information to women and to discuss that with them when they are talking about contraception. if you are getting contraception from your gp or another source, getting contraception from your gp oranothersource, have getting contraception from your gp or another source, have those conversations so women have the information they need to make an informed choice they don't get into their late 30s not realising that actually, the consequences if they don't immediately fall pregnant, that actually that can be an issue and can be more problematic the older you are, so i think we could definitely do more but as i say, women are able to have a choice and thatis women are able to have a choice and that is really important. tlat women are able to have a choice and that is really important.— that is really important. not your area of expertise, _ that is really important. not your area of expertise, i _ that is really important. not your area of expertise, i realise, i that is really important. not your area of expertise, i realise, but l area of expertise, i realise, but this raises questions about
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demographics and as we look towards the future, how many people will there be to pay tax and help look after potentially the older population which is living for longer? population which is living for loner? ~ , , ., population which is living for longer? absolutely. it is not my area of expertise _ longer? absolutely. it is not my area of expertise as _ longer? absolutely. it is not my area of expertise as you - longer? absolutely. it is not my area of expertise as you said i longer? absolutely. it is not my| area of expertise as you said but longer? absolutely. it is not my i area of expertise as you said but we area of expertise as you said but we are all acutely aware of the ageing population and we are in health care because my gynaecology colleagues are also looking after women who are going through the menopause and later in life where they get cancers more commonly, and other problems, and if you have not got, there is an explosion of the older generation and i'm rapidly becoming one of those and it is important that we have enough young people who are around who can actually want to work and contribute to society and society as a whole that we have the means to support the whole range of
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people from the oldest of the youngest in society.— youngest in society. really interesting _ youngest in society. really interesting to _ youngest in society. really interesting to talk - youngest in society. really interesting to talk to i youngest in society. really interesting to talk to you i youngest in society. really i interesting to talk to you about that. thanks forjoining us. a man who was pulled over by police has admitted he'd been driving with no licence or insurance for more than 70 years. police stopped the man, who was born in 1938, in nottingham on wednesday evening. he told officers he'd been driving with no licence or insurance since he was 12. four weeks ago, new post—brexit border rules came into force for trade between britain and the eu. many companie, especially smaller ones, say they've been struggling to cope. the added bureaucracy is also being blamed — in part — for long queues of trucks outside the port of dover. our global trade correspondent, chris morris, has been finding out more. driving into dover, past queues of lorries stretching for miles. they're being held here to avoid congesting the town. queues are not uncommon in these parts, but they've been particularly bad in recent weeks.
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drivers are fed up waiting for hours and sometimes days. when we are waiting, it's no money. they blame cancelled ferry crossings and post—brexit bureaucracy. john shirley has run a freight—forwarding company in dover for 25 years, but this is new territory. customs documents now have to be completed in full before thousands of lorries can board ferries heading for europe every day. that's caused all sorts of headaches for people. people don't know the paperwork properly, haven't prepared themselves. and so that's why there's delays here. i mean, we found a driver here four days — four days! — with a load from germany. won't it get better with time as people get used to a new system? i don't know. i suspect it won't do. and it's notjust exporters. people bringing goods into the country from europe have also been dealing with new bureaucracy since january 1st.
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david pavon runs this small deli in bristol. each individual consignment he imports now needs separate customs forms — where there used to be none. and later in the year, some of these products will need to be physically inspected when they arrive in the uk. we will need to do more paperwork. we will need to pay more money. we might need to increase the prices, but at the end of the day, that's what we do. it's certainly more difficult, but unless we close the doors and shut the business, we need to do it. so what happens in places like dover will have a wider impact. many companies are changing the way they do business across the channel in order to cope with new bureaucracy and delays. but others have simply stopped trading between britain and the eu altogether. while global trade in general rebounded pretty well last year from the covid hits of 2020, trade between the uk and the eu did not — and it's almost certainly going to stay that way. the government says traders need
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to get used to new rules and focus on new trade deals — on the other side of the world. but two years after britain left the eu, the idea of seamless trade across this narrow stretch of water — that ship has already sailed. chris morris, bbc news, dover. the uk has lost 38 million birds from its skies over the last 50 years — and this weekend we're all being encouraged to join the rspb�*s annual big garden birdwatch — and count the birds we see around us. it's the biggest wildlife survey of its kind on the planet, and aimed at fighting the bird population decline. our climate editor justin rowlatt reports. who doesn't like to see and, of course, hear wild birds?
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but britain's wild bird populations are under assault. changing farming practices, pollution and climate change are all taking their toll, says the bird protection charity the rspb. we do a piece of work called the state of nature which is a report on all the reasons for this decline. we've lost about 38 million birds over the last 50 years, that's about a fifth of our breeding bird population here in the uk. and not every species is declining, but overall more species are declining than others, particularly farmland birds. woodland birds aren't doing very well. birdsong. can you hear that? loads of birds there, and that is what this is all about. this is about us all going into our gardens, looking out of our windows, on our balconies, counting the birds we can see to survey the bird population. really important information about what is happening to the country's birds. and the rspb wants you to help them by taking part
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in their big garden bird watch. it is the biggest citizens�* survey anywhere in the world and all they are asking is for an hour of your time. it�*s very easy. indy greene is 16, he has been doing this survey since he was 11. wherever you are, no matter where you live, there are always birds around and a huge variation of species as well. so i thinkjust get involved and just enjoy them and take the time to just sit down and look at your window and see what you can spot. so an hour of your time today or over the weekend and all you have to do is sit and watch the birds. justin rowlatt, bbc news, sherwood forest. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker hello. for some of us, a very windy weekend on the way, but there�*ll be some good weather around too with some sunshine, but i think overall we�*ll call it a mixed bag. so, yeah, a bit of everything thrown in. let�*s have a look at the picture
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right nowjust to the west of our neighbourhood in the north atlantic. a storm is forming right now and it is heading for scotland. but to the south we have a high pressure. so that means settled conditions for most of england, wales, really much of the country through today, but it is quite cloudy. these are the evening temperatures, around 8—11 degrees and then off the west coast of scotland, this storm forms tonight. the gales start to develop in the western isles. the rain spreads in, but with this also mild air overnight, so temperatures first thing on saturday morning around double figures in some areas. really quite a mild start to the morning and day. so here�*s that very stormy weather across the north. you can see a lot of isobars here. i think the worst of the weather will be around the middle of the day on saturday. now, in terms of the winds, the met office warns gusts of 80mph in some northern parts of scotland, 70 a little bit further south and the gales will be felt around the irish sea and also
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to an extent around northern england. but in the south, not quite so windy, although a bit of a breeze. 13 in london, seven degrees in aberdeen, six in stornoway with a rash of showers and i think overall a relatively bright, if not sunny day for many of us on saturday, despite the strong wind. now, another low pressure comes our way, so this is round two of gale force winds for sunday. this next one you can see again forms to the west of the hebrides here, again vicious gusts of wind, heavy rain, some mountain snow there. we could see those gales strengthening through the day into sunday evening. south of that, it should be much drier, brighter. in fact, some sunshine for london and norwich. but sunday night into monday, gale force winds with some rain across northern england and again those winds 70 to 80mph in the western isles. the weekend looks pretty rough for folks in scotland, but the further south you are,
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the better it�*ll be. next week we�*ll see rounds of low pressures with wind and rain sweeping our way. so i think unsettled weather for next week. bye bye.
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this is bbc news. i�*m annita mcveigh. the headlines: confusion about the fate of the sue gray report on lockdown gatherings at downing street — after the police say key details should be left out to avoid prejudicing their investigation. the government says the dual inquiries will get to the truth but labour insists some urgency is needed. and condemnation from those who lost loved ones to covid. fran hall�*s late husband spent 30 years as a police officer. he would be watching what�*s unfolding now with despair because the police police by consent and what�*s happening at the moment is like a circus. a key government figure has dismissed the idea that the police intervention was helpful to borisjohnson.
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i would say it would be a very eccentric conspiracy theorist who thought the prime minister being investigated by the police was beneficial to the prime minister. pressure on borisjohnson from his party to delay april�*s rise in national insurance but ministers says it�*s needed to fund health and social care. the french president emanuel macron has told vladimir putin that russia needs to respect the sovereignty of its neighbours as western allies seek to defuse tensions over ukraine. social distancing rules are lifted in wales, as limits on numbers in pubs and restaurants are scrapped and nightclubs can reopen. mps have backed plans to make british sign language a legally recognised language in england. and questions over the timing of a positive covid test used by novak djokovic to enter australia.
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hello, good afternoon. there�*s confusion around the publication of the civil servant sue gray�*s report into lockdown parties in downing street this morning after the metropolitan police revealed they�*ve asked her to make "minimal reference" to events which they are investigating. her report had been due to be released this week with many mps saying they were waiting for its contents before taking a firm position on the prime minister�*s future. now the met has asked ms gray to leave out key details to avoid prejudicing their investigation although they say they are not asking for its release to be delayed. our political correspondent nick eardley has the latest. getting answers around here isn�*t always straightforward. what went on in downing street? were covid rules broken? this woman, sue gray, had been expected to deliver her report
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this week but now it is unclear what happens next after the metropolitan police launched its own investigation and told ms gray to limit what she published. in a statement, the force said... what i want to see is sue gray�*s report in full and the investigation finished as quickly as possible because we are in this situation where the whole of government is paralysed because the police are now looking at what the prime minister was getting up to in downing street. downing street says they are not involved but the liberal democrat leader has suggested there had been a stitch—up which could damage politics for generations. sue gray and her team had been speaking with the met to try to figure out what could and could not be put in the public domain. but that process has now been thrown into chaos. the cabinet office was caught
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by surprise by the statement this morning and now it is not totally clear what can be published, and when that might happen. i think the sue gray report is independent, the government are not interfering with it which is exactly as it should be, and i'm completely confident that between the sue gray report and the police investigation, everything will be covered. it's important we move on and draw a line under this because there are very important things the government is working on. the political pressure continues, though. borisjohnson�*s predecessor has added her voice, saying in a letter that nobody is above the law and she was angry to hear stories about people at number 10 not properly following the rules. the government wants to move on but this row has dominated at westminster for weeks. after this morning�*s developments, it�*s not clear when we will get answers and what it will mean for borisjohnson and his government. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster.
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let�*s ta ke let�*s take a moment to look at today�*s covid figures. there were 89,176 new positive cases reported in the past 26 hours. sadly 277 deaths within 28 days of a positive covid test have also been recorded in the past day and on vaccinations, 37,000,150 people have not received their boosterjab, that 64.6% of those aged 12 and over. earlier we spoke to fran hall from the covid—19 bereaved families forjustice group — she told us she�*s disappointed the publication has been delayed. incredibly frustrating and enraging to be where we are now this far down the line, still waiting for a date
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for the public inquiry to start. knowing that everything is not being protected because we haven�*t got a date and to hear that the metropolitan police have asked the sue gray team to withhold information which we have all been told to wait for for the last several weeks, we have been told to wait for the sue gray inquiry to come out and now we are not going to be told anything we don�*t already know because the met have asked them to withhold that specific information.— to withhold that specific information. �* , ., ., information. it's infuriating. your husband was _ information. it's infuriating. your husband was a _ information. it's infuriating. your husband was a policeman, - information. it's infuriating. your husband was a policeman, so i information. it's infuriating. your. husband was a policeman, so does that make you feel in two minds about whether it should be the police taking over the strength and stopping the report coming out? t stopping the report coming out? i think what it makes me feel is stopping the report coming out? t think what it makes me feel is that he would have been horrified to see this. he served with the met and he believed injustice more than anything. he was a really good police officer. he would be watching what�*s unfolding now with despair
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because the police police by consent and what�*s happening at the moment is like a circus. all i have heard today is, it�*s a cover—up, the police are acting for the government, boris is happy this is being kept quiet, kicking it down the road. the feeling is that people hoped the anger will dissipate and the mood will move onto something else and if you�*re a people felt when they understood people in government were not following the rules will just government were not following the rules willjust ebb away but for the people who are here at the wall every week with empty hearts for the people who have died from covid, we cannot move on. it�*s infuriating, it�*s distressing, it�*s really disappointing. fran halsall from the bereaved
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families group forjustice speaking to us earlier. a conservative mp has accused the metropolitan police of "usurping its position" in relation to the publication of the sue gray report. here�*s what sir christopher chope had to say in the commons earlier this afternoon. i thought that it was this house which held the government to account for its policies and not the metropolitan police, and as i made clear earlier, there is no reason for the metropolitan police to be able to require sue gray not to issue her report in an unamended way for the benefit of the prime minister who ordered that report and for this house which is eager to see that report, and it seems that the metropolitan police is usurping its position by seeking to interfere in the affairs of state without there being any criminal offences or any grounds for them carrying out such interference.
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the leader of the house of commons, jacob rees—mogg, has dismissed suggestions the met police�*s intervention has helped the prime minister. the prime minister�*s position and the government�*s position is that what is given to him by sue gray will be published and that is right and sensible. people outside government are entitled to raise questions about the police and that is part of a vibrant democracy and freedom of speech. i would say it would be a very eccentric conspiracy theorist who thought the prime minister being investigated by the police was beneficial to the prime minister, that is parallel universe stuff. really? the argument is it wins him delay, it gives him a breathing space. i don�*t think any prime minister would think it was a good idea to be interviewed by the police. i know people get excited by dead cat strategies but this is a sort of trophy—hunted dead lion being slammed on the table which i think is hard
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to say is helpful. the labour mp neil coyle referred the parties to the metropolitan police before christmas right back at the beginning of december. hejoins me now. thank you for your time. when you approached the police at the beginning of december, what did they say? the beginning of december, what did they sa ? ,., . beginning of december, what did they sa ? . ., , , say? the police initially said they wouldn't be _ say? the police initially said they wouldn't be investigating, - say? the police initially said they wouldn't be investigating, then l say? the police initially said they i wouldn't be investigating, then they wouldn�*t be investigating, then they said if the sue gray report revealed the law was broken, they would then open an investigation, they called it a matrix for how they would pursue an investigation if there was evidence to do so so they met that threshold and since i first wrote to the commissioner on the 3rd of december we have had an admission from the prime minister that he attended one of the parties, at least one of the parties in downing street but for two months we have this drip feed of different parties
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to different people involved in downing street and elsewhere. if the maps had done theirjob to begin with we wouldn�*t be in a situation we face today were the sue gray report appears to be delayed because of the metropolitan police. [30 report appears to be delayed because of the metropolitan police.— of the metropolitan police. do you think that is _ of the metropolitan police. do you think that is the _ of the metropolitan police. do you think that is the inevitable - think that is the inevitable conclusion of what has happened, this latest intervention that sue gray�*s report is now on hold? taste gray's report is now on hold? we don't gray's report is now on hold? 2 don't know exactly what the police don�*t know exactly what the police have requested to be withheld but if it�*s crucial to a prosecution or involve someone who may have attempted to delete or destroy evidence it could result in a prosecution, that is serious in its own right and the met need to investigate that but they should have done this at the start. it was clear they would have to do this and vast majority of my constituents followed the rules, those who didn�*t were prosecuted and it�*s been astonishing for the public and
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bereaved families that the police haven�*t begun an investigation until now. it�*s far too late for them to do this and they have lots of questions to answer about their competence on this issue. t questions to answer about their competence on this issue. i guess it's confusing _ competence on this issue. i guess it's confusing that _ competence on this issue. i guess it's confusing that we _ competence on this issue. i guess it's confusing that we heard - competence on this issue. i guess it's confusing that we heard from | it�*s confusing that we heard from cressida dick on tuesday when she didn�*t say anything at that stage to indicate that the metropolitan police wanted sue gray to make minimal reference to any aspects of what she was saying and now they do want that, so there are big questions of trust here and certainly lots of people full of consternation about what�*s going on. there is a lot of anger from bereaved families and across political parties, you heard from conservative mps who were also angry but there is only one person who was responsible for all of this, it is borisjohnson�*s home and office, he
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has taken —— broken the rules when he should take responsibility. the police are facing a lot of criticism when the lawbreaking was done in downing street. haifa when the lawbreaking was done in downing street.— when the lawbreaking was done in downin: street. ., . , , ., downing street. how much disruption is it to the normal _ downing street. how much disruption is it to the normal business _ downing street. how much disruption is it to the normal business of - is it to the normal business of government?— is it to the normal business of government? is it to the normal business of rovernment? , ., ., ., government? there is not a date when we aren't focused _ government? there is not a date when we aren't focused on _ government? there is not a date when we aren't focused on this _ government? there is not a date when we aren't focused on this issue - government? there is not a date when we aren't focused on this issue and i we aren�*t focused on this issue and it�*s toxic, it has poisoned trust in government, public confidence in their ability to govern and set the rules they are supposed to stick by it when they haven�*t been following the rules at the very heart of the johnson regime. i think the public want to move on but we are stuck in a situation where we are meeting for the police and for the sue gray report and for the tories to get do theirjob and get rid of an irresponsible leader. t theirjob and get rid of an irresponsible leader. i earlier did an interview _ irresponsible leader. i earlier did an interview with _ irresponsible leader. i earlier did an interview with the _ irresponsible leader. i earlier did an interview with the former i an interview with the former director of public prosecutions lord macdonald who said he found the
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match�*s intervention surprising and unhelpful. he said the conventional argument is a behaviours whose behaviour was in question should not behaviour was in question should not be tipped off about sue gray�*s findings but this is a stretch in this situation, these people all know what they have done and he doubts that sue gray�*s conclusions will come as a surprise to any of the protagonist. is there any possibility that sue gray could say i will hand over my report in full irrespective of what the police are saying? t irrespective of what the police are sa in: ? ., , irrespective of what the police are sa in: ? ~ , , ., irrespective of what the police are sa inc? «a , ., ., saying? i think she should and i think we need _ saying? i think she should and i think we need it _ saying? i think she should and i think we need it in _ saying? i think she should and i think we need it in full - saying? i think she should and i think we need it in full for i saying? i think she should and i think we need it in full for the l think we need it in full for the public to be sure the job has been done. the only proviso i would give to that is if the met believe the report would pronounce on criminality before they have had a chance to interview those in question, that could be problematic but we need the sue gray report in full, that met should have done is
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an investigation back when these allegations were first made. it�*s disappointing they haven�*t but it�*s not them who were at fault for sue gray, it�*s the government who made the rules and broke the rules and we are all waiting for a report when they have admitted they haven�*t taken responsibility for doing so. neil coyle, thank you, and the government saying that the two investigations can sue gray�*s and the metropolitan police will get to the metropolitan police will get to the truth of the matter. the government has again insisted that it will put up national insurance in april as planned despite reports that borisjohnson is considering a u—turn. ministers say the extra money raised is needed to help clear a backlog of nhs operations in england and to fund social care. some conservative mps want the rise scrapped. well, i�*ve been speaking to matthew taylor who�*s chief executive of the nhs confederation which represents health trusts across the england and wales. i asked him what the likely impact could be if there wasn�*t the planned extra money for health and social care. i think we need to be clear
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that the commitment to additional to additional funding for health and the commitment to a cap on the cost that people contribute to their social care is a spending review commitment. the issue is how that�*s paid for and in a sense from the perspective of the nhs, it�*s the government�*s issue not ours. there are spending review commitments, there is not as much money as we would like for health but if covid goes away there is enough money for us to start making inroads into that backlog and the cost of the cap on social care is substantial so if the government chooses not to raise this levy it will have to increase borrowing but if we were to get into the situation of saying we are not raising this money so we have to reduce spending on health and social care, we would be in a very difficult situation. some of borisjohnson�*s mps are saying don�*t put up national insurance, think about the cost of living crisis that so many people are trying to cope with
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but if you look at cost of living and the massive backlog in health care, it shouldn�*t be it shouldn�*t be an either/or, should it? no, and i think the fundamental issue is whether the government wants to raise money through the national insurance increase or whether it wants to increase borrowing and that is a judgment the chancellor has to make. the important thing is from the perspective of the health care system, we are in the position we are in because we suffered ten years of the lowest growth in health service spending we have seen in its creation and that is one reason we went into this crisis with up to 100,000 vacancies, our capital stock crumbling and one reason it has been so difficult. there is extra money in the spending review and if covid goes away we can make inroads into the backlog but if we don�*t have that money we will not make a difference. whether the money comes from national insurance or borrowing or whatever is up the government.
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in your discussions with government officials have any other means of paying for this been discussed apart from the increase in national insurance? no, and at this stage it�*s difficult to see how you would do anything other than increase your borrowing rate to pay for it, so that appears to be the choice the government has to press on with the levy or to increase borrowing. i don�*t think that reducing the funding to the whole service or reducing funding to social care is an option because even now with the money raised by the levy, we only have just enough to stop we only have just enough to start making inroads into the backlog and even with the money available for social care, it isn�*t nearly enough to reconstruct our social care system which as we all know, the fragmented nature of that system is one of the reasons we found it so difficult to cope with covid.
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matthew taylor, chief executive of the nhs confederation. the french president emmanuel macron has told his russian counterpart vladimir putin that russia needed to respect the sovereignty of its neighbours. the two leaders spoke in a phone call earlier today in an effort to defuse tensions over ukraine. earlier presidentjoe biden warned there is a "distinct possibility" russia might invade ukraine next month. russia denies it is planning an attack. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in kyiv. good to have you with us. president zelensky, the ukrainian president, has been talking about internal destabilisation being the biggest threat for ukraine right now. give us more detail on what he has said. the telephone line burns between many capitals around the world as they try to de—escalate these tensions over ukraine and big questions over what president
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putin�*s ambitions are, does he plan as president biden said to invade ukraine over the next month? these are big questions and they are on the minds of ukrainians most of all so the ukrainian president has been addressing the media in kyiv for the past hour, talking about their worry that one of russia�*s plans could be to try to destabilise ukraine internally but he also raised other issues. there had been reports of the phone call between president zelensky and president biden going well, that president zelensky was worried that this talk about escalation it was actually fuelling the escalation and when the press conference started that was one of his first points, in essence calm down. his mind he said the situation now it was not much different from last year, in other words we have
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been living with this crisis with russia up for a long time but he did have words about nato and the promised nato made that ukraine could eventuallyjoin the military alliance and said he needed more clarity. alliance and said he needed more clari . , ., , , . , clarity. there should be security guarantees. _ clarity. there should be security guarantees, when _ clarity. there should be security guarantees, when we _ clarity. there should be security guarantees, when we are - clarity. there should be security| guarantees, when we are talking about— guarantees, when we are talking about nato we should go deeper into detail~ _ about nato we should go deeper into detail~ i_ about nato we should go deeper into detail. i know that some members of nato don't _ detail. i know that some members of nato don't like is going into these details _ nato don't like is going into these details but we want to have something specific. we need to have something _ something specific. we need to have something we can count on. something we can count — something we can count on. something we can count on. _ something we can count on. something we can count on, says _ something we can count on. something we can count on, says president - we can count on, says president zelensky because he made it clear if there is an escalating war with russia, who will be fighting it? the ukrainian army. and as to whether there will be this work, he said it is a possibility but there is no certainty. t
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is a possibility but there is no certainty-— is a possibility but there is no certain . ., . ,, . ~' certainty. i wonder what you make, erha -s certainty. i wonder what you make, perhaps the — certainty. i wonder what you make, perhaps the unspoken _ certainty. i wonder what you make, perhaps the unspoken part - certainty. i wonder what you make, perhaps the unspoken part of- certainty. i wonder what you make, perhaps the unspoken part of whatl perhaps the unspoken part of what president zelensky said on that news conference, did you get a sense that he is weary of his country almost being a pawn in this bigger geopolitical battle between the west and russia? , ., , , ., ., and russia? everyone seems to have somethin: and russia? everyone seems to have something to — and russia? everyone seems to have something to say _ and russia? everyone seems to have something to say about _ and russia? everyone seems to have something to say about ukraine i and russia? everyone seems to havej something to say about ukraine now, and notjust to have a say, we have seen written in the us drawdown at their embassy staff, the us sending military assistance to you can, that is much appreciated by the ukrainians. when president zelensky was asked at the news conference whether he was playing down the threat from russia because he was worried about the economic impact here, he said of course not but we are the ones who will suffer most, we have to beat most aware of what is happening along our borders. he recognised there were these traps but said we have been living with them for the past eight years.
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thanks very much for that, lyse doucet in the ukrainian capital. some measures put in place to tackle coronavirus are easing today in wales. there are changes for people wishing to go to nightclubs and restaurants and social distancing rules have also been relaxed. our wales correspondent tomos morgan is in cardiff with further details. today is the last stage of the road map set out by first minister mark drakeford in bringing wales back to alert level zero, so the main points — social distancing measures have now been scrapped in wales, much to the delight of hospitality and workplaces, and the rule of six has been scrapped, and nightclubs are able to reopen. they were the first, the last to reopen last year and the first to shut and now they can reopen just in time for the six nations in a few weeks here in wales. and of course the work from home rule, which was still a legal requirement, has now been made just guidance only. a few things remain in place, those being that masks will still need to be worn in shops
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and hospitals and public transport, and vaccine passes will still be needed in cinemas and theatres and for large events. first minister mark drakeford has said they have been able to ease the restrictions because the peak of the omicron wave has passed here in wales and the number of cases has been reducing more rapidly than the rest of the uk. the next review into the covid measures, into masks and vaccine passes, will be on the 10th of february. a teenager has appeared in court, charged after twojewish men were violently attacked in north london. the police said the incident is being treated as a hate crime. james reynolds has more. the hearing took about 25 minutes. 18—year—old malaki thorpe spoke only to confirm his name, date of birth and address. he has been charged with two counts of racially or religiously aggravated bodily harm and one count of possession of an offensive weapon.
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it relates to an incident on wednesday night in haringey in which twojewish men were attacked. they were each treated in hospital for injuries. malaki thorpe indicated not guilty pleas on all counts. the court remanded him into custody and the case has been sent to wood green crown court for trial in march. a couple have beenjailed over the death of their eight—week old baby who died in south london with more than 60 broken bones in her body. naomijohnson and benjamin o�*shea claimed paramedics caused the injuries to amina—fayejohnson. she suffered 41 fractures to her ribs and 26 more to other limbs in what police described as "continued physical abuse". the pair were found guilty of causing or allowing her to suffer physical harm. a bridge has collapsed in pittsburgh in the us.
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emergency services were on the scene this morning where a bus was found upright on a section. three injuries and no fatalities were reported. a gas leak was found and local authorities have cut the supply. presidentjoe biden is due to arrive in the former steel city later today to highlight his efforts to strengthen infrastructure, supply chains and revitalise the us. doubts have emerged over the timing of the positive covid test novak djokovic used to enter australia to try to compete in the australian open. it was submitted to exempt him from rules barring unvaccinated people. the tennis star said he had a positive test on december 16th with a negative one six days later. but the unique confirmation codes on the tests suggest the positive result may have come after the negative one. mr djokovic has been approached for comment, but hasn�*t responded. our correspondent matt graveling has more on the bbc�*s investigation.
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this was novak djokovic�*s chance to win his tenth australian open, and with it the most grand slams ever achieved in men�*s tennis. upon arrival in melbourne onjanuary 5th, and confirming he was unvaccinated, his visa was revoked by the government. the serbian was given an exemption to play, having tested positive for coronavirus in mid—december. in an attempt to overturn the decision, djokovic�*s legal team presented two covid test certificates to a federal court in australia. the first, shown to be taken on december 16th, shows a positive result. the second, taken six days later, shows a negative result. a german research company questioned why the unique confirmation code on the earlier test was higher than the later one. the bbc has investigated if codes on tests done in serbia are generated in a chronological order. a total of 56 test certificates
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were collected, and their unique confirmation codes plotted against the date of each result. in all cases studied, the earlier the result, the lower the unique code for the corresponding test. the only outlier of the codes plotted was novak djokovic�*s positive test on december 16th. according to the bbc�*s graph, this confirmation code would suggest a test sometime between the 25th and december 28th. one data specialist said, "there is always the possibility for a glitch, but if this was the case, i don�*t know why the authorities would not say that." to try and explain this discrepancy, the bbc has approached novak djokovic�*s team, serbia�*s institute of public health, and its office of information technology, but has yet to have a response. matt graveling, bbc news. now it�*s time for a look
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at the weather with tomasz. hello. batten down the hatches in the north of the uk, we have stormy weather on the way, for most of us it won�*t be too bad but for pouts in scotland and parts of northern england a blustery weekend. some sunshine as well, a scattering of showers so quite a mixed bag on the way. this is the weather map for friday night into saturday, the storm forming to the west of scotland is cold storm malik, named by the danish weather service, severe gales will develop by the early hours in the western isles of scotland, strong winds will push in mount across the uk so morning temperatures will be around 10 degrees so let�*s focus on these warnings from the met office, yellow warnings from the met office, yellow warning is widely in northern england and an amber warning for eastern scotland, strong winds affecting aberdeen, perth and
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edinburgh so wince up to 80 mph in the north of scotland and gayle force through northern england but with that plenty of sunshine, the south of the country a little cloudy and temperatures mild, 7 stormy aberdeen. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: confusion about the fate of the sue gray report on lockdown gatherings at downing street — after the police say key details should be left out to avoid prejudicing their investigation. the government says the dual inquiries will get to the truth — but labour insists some urgency is needed. pressure on borisjohnson from his party to delay april�*s rise in national insurance — but ministers says it�*s needed to fund health and social care. the french president emanuel macron has told vladimir putin that russia needs to respect the sovereignty of its neighbours — as western allies seek to defuse
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tensions over ukraine. social distancing rules are lifted in wales, as limits on numbers in pubs and restaurants are scrapped — and nightclubs can reopen. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. the derby county manager wayne rooney has turned down the chance to be interviewed for the vacant everton job. he says that he has an importantjob to do at the championship side. derby are in the relegation zone after going into administartion everton is his boyhood club, and had two playing spells there, and hasn�*t ruled out managing there one day. i believe i will be a premier league manager, i believe i�*m ready for that, 100%, and if that is with everton
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one day in the future, that would be absolutely great. but i�*ve got a job here at derby county which is an importantjob to me and it means me getting the team ready for sunday. kyle walker will miss both legs of manchester city�*s champions league knock—out tie against sporting lisbon next month and also the first leg of their quarterfinal should they get there. uefa have increased the defender�*s automatic one match ban for the red card he picked up against leipzig in theirfinal group game to three. european football�*s governing body described his challenge on sporting�*s forward andre silva as "assault." rafael nadal is still on for a record 21st grand slam title after reaching sunday�*s australian open final. he fought past italy�*s matteo berretini and will face the us open champion daniil medvedev, who was also taken to four sets against stefanos tsitsipas. nadal will have huge support
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on sunday as he looks to make history but he�*s fallen short at melbourne park in the past. as i said, a couple of days ago, i have been a little bit unlucky in my career with injuries. in all the time i have played amazing finals with good chances, against novak in 2012, and roger in 2017. i was close a couple of times. i feel lucky i won once in my career in 2009 but i never thought about another chance in 2022. it means a lot to be in the final again here. i will play again against one of the greatest and what is funny that again i am again playing someone going for the 21st grand slam. i guess last time rafa was watching it near the tv. i don't know who he was cheering for, but i think novak will be watching this in two days also. captain heather knight came to the rescue for england on the second day of the women�*s ashes test in canberra. katherine brunt took claimed another five wicket haul before australia declared on 337—9.
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knight was the only batter who made a meaningful contribution knight was the only batter who made with an unbeaten century as they closed on 235—8 — that�*s 102 runs behind. australia will retain the ashes if they win. alex hartley is with the test match special team in canberra australian bowlers will want to get wickets early tomorrow and set a huge total for england. there is weather around as well so we will need to keep an eye on that. england have said they are confident they can still win, so that is the mood of the england camp. they would not turn up tomorrow if they didn�*t believe they could win. they have to go out and build as big a target as they can for australia and go from there. one english cricketer has had some joy in australia — surrey�*s laurie evans top scored as perth scorchers won the australian big bash league final. evans smashed an unbeaten 76
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offjust 41 deliveries, as the scorchers set a covid—hit sydney sixers 172 to win. they fell well short as the scorchers lifted the trophy for the fourth time. tyrrell hatton has stormed up the leaderboard in the second round of the dubai desert classic. he�*s two shots behind leader justin harding at the halfway mark. there�*s a strong british contingent in the chasing pack with rory mcilroy 4 shots off the pace with a bogey free second round. lee westwood, paul casey and tommy fleetwood are also in the top 10. saracens director of rugby mark mccall will take a break from the sport for medical reasons. in a statement saracens said: "people will always come first at our club and mark will be given all of the support and time he needs". mccall�*s coaching staff, lead by head coachjoe shaw, will take over in his absence, starting with sunday�*s game at wasps in the premiership. that�*s all the sport for now. more women are waiting
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until their 30s to have a child — that�*s according to new data. findings from the office for national statistics say women born in 1990 are becoming the first cohort where half of the women remain childless by their 30th birthday. earlier i spoke with drjo mountfield, who is the vice president of the royal college of obstertricians and gynaecologist — i asked her about the general trend of women choosing to have children later than women of previous generations but also a growing numbr of women choosing to have fewer or no children. yes, that�*s right. it is the way society has developed over the last 20 or more years, and contraception was a wonderful invention and it is pretty reliable if you use it well so people can now choose as to when they wish to have their families. women have that choice and they can think about their careers and when they want to have their children,
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and indeed for some women they don�*t wish to have children. it comes down to that choice for women, a positive step forward for them and their families. in 1971 just 18% of 30—year—olds had no children. today that figure is now 50%. that is a pretty striking statistic, isn�*t it? it is. what we want to make sure is that women understand as they get older and become pregnant, so not necessarily at 30, but once you reach your late 30s, your fertility starts to decrease and there are some risks associated with being an older mother. although it is understandable that people have changed their opinion, it is also about them being well informed about what are the pros and cons of getting pregnant at different ages in their lives. and what are the alternatives
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for those people who are may be running into problems who are trying to get pregnant because we have positive steps forward in terms of treatments for infertility, as well. do you think both men and women know enough about fertility issues? is there enough awareness of that, and are we seeing a corresponding rise in the number of people seeking help with fertility? i would not we are seeing a corresponding rise, it�*s not as simple as that, but do i think people are well educated? it�*s variable and i think we could do more to get the messages out there, that there is a fall off in fertility and there are extra risks as you become an older mother. increased risk of all sorts of complications, of miscarriages, or of having a baby that has
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a chromosome disorder, for example, and it is beholden on us as professionals to give that information to women and to discuss that with them when they are talking about contraception. if you�*re getting contraception from your gp, have those conversations so women have the information they need to make an informed choice so they don�*t get into their late 30s not realising that, actually, the consequences if they don�*t immediately fall pregnant, that actually that can be an issue and can be more problematic the older you are. so, i think we could definitely do more but as i say, women are able to have a choice and that�*s really important. not your area of expertise, i realise, but this raises questions about demographics, and as we look towards the future, how many people will there be to pay tax and help look after potentially the older population which is
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living for longer? yes, absolutely. it�*s not my area of expertise as you said but we are all acutely aware of the ageing population. we certainly are in health care because my gynaecology colleagues are also looking after women who are going through the menopause and later in life where they get cancers more commonly, and other problems. so, there is an explosion of the older generation and i�*m rapidly becoming one of those and it is important that we have enough young people who are around who can actually work and contribute to society and society as a whole that we have the means to support the whole range of people from the oldest to the youngest in society.
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british sign language has taken a step closer to becoming a legally recognised language in england, after a bill proposing the changes was backed in the house of commons. the measures were included in a private member�*s bill which has the backing of strictly come dancing champion and eastenders actress rose ayling—ellis. our correspondentjean mackenzie has been giving me more details. so it was brought by a labour mp, rosie cooper. both her parents were born deaf so she grew up with two deaf parents and this is something she wanted to see passed, that the whole house got behind. she gave an emotional statement in the commons talking about what it was like as a child growing up with two deaf parents, how she remembered her parents not
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being understood or not being able to understand. she recounted a story when she had to book the family holiday when she was four years old so this was a momentous occasion but she also praised the winner of strictly, rose, for her amazing work to raise awareness. it�*s difficult to underestimate the impact rose ayling ellis has had on bringing this issue to the public�*s attention and increasing the pressure to change the law. of course and she has thrown herself behind this bill and there was incredible performances on strictly come dancing that focused the public�*s mind. rosie cooper paid tribute to her in the commons today, saying she had shown the uk that what her dad had always told her, that deaf people can do anything, even the impossible. what will this mean in terms of practical differences? essentially, why they wanted this bill brought in is that people who use british sign language say they still were not getting equal access to information and services as the hearing population, so even though the equalities act suggests people have to be treated as equals,
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in practice they were not seeing the support they needed, whereas now this will force the government and other public organisations to provide those interpreters and to implement and use this language. jean mckenzie, there. the uk has lost 38 million birds from its skies over the last 50 years — and this weekend we�*re all being encouraged to join the rspb�*s annual big garden birdwatch — and count the birds we see around us. it�*s the biggest wildlife survey of its kind on the planet, and aimed at fighting the bird population decline. our climate editor justin rowlatt reports. who doesn�*t like to see and, of course, hear wild birds? but britain�*s wild bird populations are under assault. changing farming practices, pollution and climate change are all taking their toll, says the bird protection charity the rspb. we do a piece of work called the state of nature
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which is a report on all the reasons for this decline. we�*ve lost about 38 million birds over the last 50 years, that�*s about a fifth of our breeding bird population here in the uk. and not every species is declining, but overall more species are declining than others, particularly farmland birds. woodland birds aren�*t doing very well. birdsong. can you hear that? loads of birds there, and that is what this is all about. this is about us all going into our gardens, looking out of our windows, on our balconies, counting the birds we can see to survey the bird population. really important information about what is happening to the country�*s birds. and the rspb wants you to help them by taking part in their big garden bird watch. it is the biggest citizens�* survey anywhere in the world and all they are asking is for an hour of your time. it�*s very easy. indy greene is 16, he has been doing this survey since he was 11. wherever you are, no matter where you live, there are always birds around
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and a huge variation of species as well. so i thinkjust get involved and just enjoy them and take the time to just sit down and look at your window and see what you can spot. so an hour of your time today or over the weekend and all you have to do is sit and watch the birds. justin rowlatt, bbc news, sherwood forest. a man who was pulled over by police has admitted he�*d been driving with no licence or insurance for more than 70 years. police stopped the man, who was born in 1938, in nottingham on wednesday evening. he told officers he�*d been driving with no licence or insurance since he was 12. the headlines on bbc news... confusion about the fate of the report on lockdown gatherings at downing street — after the police say key details should be left out to avoid prejudicing their investigation. the government says the dual inquiries will get to the truth. pressure on borisjohnson from his party to delay april�*s rise in national insurance — but ministers say it�*s needed to fund health and social care.
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social distancing rules are lifted in wales, as limits on numbers in pubs and restaurants are scrapped — and nightclubs can reopen. four weeks ago, new post—brexit border rules came into force for trade between britain and the eu. many companies — especially smaller ones — say they�*ve been struggling to cope. the added bureaucracy is also being blamed — in part — for long queues of trucks outside the port of dover. our global trade correspondent, chris morris, has been finding out more. driving into dover, past queues of lorries stretching for miles. they�*re being held here to avoid congesting the town. queues are not uncommon in these parts, but they�*ve been particularly bad in recent weeks. drivers are fed up waiting for hours and sometimes days. when we are waiting, it�*s no money.
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they blame cancelled ferry crossings and post—brexit bureaucracy. john shirley has run a freight—forwarding company in dover for 25 years, but this is new territory. customs documents now have to be completed in full before thousands of lorries can board ferries heading for europe every day. that�*s caused all sorts of headaches for people. people don�*t know the paperwork properly, haven�*t prepared themselves. and so that�*s why there�*s delays here. i mean, we found a driver here four days — four days! — with a load from germany. won�*t it get better with time as people get used to a new system? i don�*t know. i suspect it won�*t do. and it�*s notjust exporters. people bringing goods into the country from europe have also been dealing with new bureaucracy since january 1st. david pavon runs this
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small deli in bristol. each individual consignment he imports now needs separate customs forms — where there used to be none. and later in the year, some of these products will need to be physically inspected when they arrive in the uk. we will need to do more paperwork. we will need to pay more money. we might need to increase the prices, but at the end of the day, that�*s what we do. it�*s certainly more difficult, but unless we close the doors and shut the business, we need to do it. so what happens in places like dover will have a wider impact. many companies are changing the way they do business across the channel in order to cope with new bureaucracy and delays. but others have simply stopped trading between britain and the eu altogether. while global trade in general rebounded pretty well last year from the covid hits of 2020, trade between the uk and the eu did not — and it�*s almost certainly going to stay that way. the government says traders need to get used to new rules and focus on new trade deals — on the other side of the world. but two years after britain left the eu, the idea of seamless trade
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across this narrow stretch of water — that ship has already sailed. chris morris, bbc news, dover. prince andrew has given up his honorary membership at the prestigious home of golf. a spokesperson for the royal and ancient golf club of st andrews confirmed saying... "the duke of york will relinquish his honorary membership. we respect and appreciate his decision." prince andrew had been an honorary member of the club since 1992. the royal patron of the club is the queen. more people than ever visited barnard castle in county durham last year, in the wake of the notorious lockdown trip by the prime minister�*s then chief adviser dominic cummings. figures released by english heritage show that the castle attracted 20% more visitors than usual. it was among a number of "hidden local gems" which saw a boom in visitor numbers compared to pre—pandemic levels. we asked people in the town of barnard castle what they thought about the rise in tourism there.
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i�*m from the cotswolds so it is very much nice to have a look at the older side of things. we ought to thank dominic because he certainly has brought hordes of tourists. we see them standing at the names of barnard castle and all sorts and all our coffee shops have really done well as a result. the shop owners and business people have done well. - there's less parking spots. the it has put it on the map, has it? you think that is why people come here? it has put it in the back
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of people�*s minds, yeah. juliet fellows—smith is property manager for english heritage at barnard castle — and she�*s been telling me about the increased interest from visitors. we have benefited from a higher media profile than normal and we certainly sold a few more magnets bearing the words barnard castle and we saw a few people taking selfies in front of the castle, sometimes with their spectacles, but we have seen a national trend in english heritage, a lot of our smaller sites really getting increased visits. a lot of love from local people. i think people have taken the mandate to stay—at—home very seriously and have visited their local gems. many towns have a 900—year—old cars or abbeyjust around the corner and we are seeing people visit them. — 900—year—old castle. yes, as you say, it is notjust your area, but it is about people finding it more difficult to travel abroad and looking to what is at home and what is potentially on their doorstep. that�*s true.
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the other thing, at english heritage we offer a very covid safe visit with lots of outdoor areas and people find it comforting to stand in a historic ruin and to look at a castle or an abbey and think of the things that structure has seen over the years. our sites have seen plagues and wars and famines, huge world events, and it is very humbling to stand in a structure which has endured for hundreds if not thousands of years. and to know the structure will continue to stand for hundreds more because of the work of english heritage, and it shows how small our troubles are in some ways. what is english heritage doing to capitalise on the increased visitor numbers and to keep visitors coming? we are doing our best to give a really great visit and throughout the pandemic we have been open as much as we possibly can with all the measures in place to make sure people are safe.
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we are really trying to give people the best possible experience of these wonderful sites. here at barnard castle we are a 12th century castle with connections to richard iii. on a roman fort. it�*s a wonderful place, place where you can step into english history and really understand the events that have shaped this country. do you worry, as it becomes easier for people to travel further afield and travel abroad, that visitor numbers might drop? we�*re not too concerned. i think during this last period people have become aware of the treasures on their doorstep and they have perhaps explored sites they might not have explored before. there is a real awareness now about what we have in this country and how you can step out of ordinary life without going very far at all. we think word—of—mouth on the visits we have had over the last
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record—breaking year will make sure that we continue to be busy for many years to come. most of us would probably admit to having too many carrier bags taking up space around our homes — many stuffed into the back of cupboards or buried deep in boxes. for one woman in south wales, collecting carrier bags has become her hobby. she�*s been building her collection for more than four decades, and is now the proud owner of 10,000 of them. tomos morgan has been to meet her. where is the first one that started your collection? one of the first will be thejubilee�*s. from 1977. so at that point, did you think, yes... yeah. ..i�*m going to keep them? i�*m going to keep them. you knew at that point? yeah, i did. for almost half a century now, angela clarke has been collecting carrier bags. my top five. i love these. they�*re so unique. i�*ve got quite an affinity with these. her 10,000—strong collection is thought to be the largest in the world. that�*s the actual bag.
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and here you are with noel edmonds, the man that never ages. he doesn�*t age. he looks no different. and it all spiralled as a 10—year—old, after an appearance on the �*70�*s children�*s tv show the multi—coloured swap shop. i only had about 200 at that point. and then, after that programme, you basically doubled your collection? yeah, i did, literally just doubled it. i had to go back on the show again two weeks after. how do you keep them? i keep them in plastic bags. they originally were in suitcases, which are now disintegrating because they�*re so old. the suitcases, but not the bags? well, the bags are old as well, aren�*t they? now, these haven�*t been disturbed for a while. and what�*s the long term plan? what do you want to do with them? what would you like to see done with this collection down the line? ijoke to my sons, it�*s their inheritance. one of these is going for £10 on ebay. another one is £30. some of them are going up to £300 because people are using the prada,
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etc, making bags out of them. so would you sell them? no. what i would love to see is these to be displayed somewhere, because everybody�*s connected with them. they go, "oh, look at that!" you know, it�*s a piece of their history, their childhood. so i�*d love to see them displayed. can i ask you, just to play devil�*s advocate? have you had anyone say to you, "why are you collecting plastic bags?" yeah, all the time. what do you say to them? all the time. because it�*s interesting. and then when you show them, they�*ll go, "oh yeah, i rememberthat! i remember that. i remember that place." 10,000 collected, and probably a few more thousand still to go. i do get bags, eh, arrive at my property here too, you know, "bag lady, aberdare" and they get to me! it�*s quite funny! tomos morgan, bbc news, aberdare. now it�*s time for a look at the weather. it isa it is a mixed bag this weekend and it will be very stormy in some parts
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of northern britain but not for everybody. and for some it will be a case of some sunshine, so this is the weekend headline overall, windy but with sunshine as well. the satellite picture shows the rest of us here, this is where a storm is forming, it has been named by the danish weather service, a lot of pressure lines here and this means the winds will be racing into the centre of the storm. very strong winds indeed and through the course of the night they will pick up in the western isles of scotland but all the while a relatively calm night for much of the country, certainly england and wales and often went storms approach we have very mild airfrom the often went storms approach we have very mild air from the southern climes so these are the temperatures on saturday morning. the met office has updated the actual warnings for the north of the uk so once you
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storm moves through the worst of the weather will be in the middle of the day on saturday. we have an amber warning across the east of scotland including aberdeenshire, perth, into edinburgh, very strong winds, damaging and destructive at the strength of the wind will be felt in northern england but the highest gustin northern england but the highest gust in the north of scotland. 80 mph, maybe even more in some areas, so a very rough day on saturday. very windy in northern england. much calmer in the south but it could be cloudy in the southern counties. sunday we have another area of low pressure heading our way, so we have two storms, store malik initially and then the next one coming in, and this one will bring severe gales later on sunday into monday, mountain snow and some rain, but for sunday and for many it will be a decent day with sunshine for hull,
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norwich and london, plymouth and southampton. winds up to 80 miles per are again southampton. winds up to 80 miles perare again on southampton. winds up to 80 miles per are again on sunday, blasting out of the north west. really rough weekend for the north of the uk. next week it will be a blustery one with frequently strong winds so the unsettled weather continues into next week.
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today at 5pm... the metropolitan police requests key details to be left out of a report into downing street parties, to avoid prejudicing its own investigation. allegations borisjohnson would benefit from scotland yard�*s intervention are dismissed by a cabinet minister. i would say it would be a very eccentric conspiracy theorist who thought the prime minister being investigated by the police was beneficial to the prime minister. condemnation from those who lost loved ones due to cronavirus. fran hall�*s late husband spent 30 years as a police officer. he would be watching what's unfolding now with despair because the police police by consent and what's happening at the moment is like a circus. in other news, re—newed pressure on borisjohnson

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