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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 27, 2022 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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the headlines — the russian foreign minister, sergei lavrov, says russia's main security concerns over ukraine have not been met by the united states, but mr lavrov says there is room to continue dialogue. six months since the taliban swept to power in afghanistan, the country's economy is close to collapse, with millions facing an ongoing threat of terrorism and looming starvation. joe biden has confirmed that he will make an african—american woman his first nomination to the supreme court. the president said a decision will be announced by the end of february. on holocaust memorial day, survivors of the nazi concentration camp at auschwitz are among those who have gathered there to mark the anniversary of its liberation in 1916.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are rachel watson, deputy political editor of the scottish daily mail, and kevin schofield, political editor of huffpost uk. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the guardian reports increasing alarm at the treasury that the prime minister might be preparing to scrap the national insurance rise. according to the i, talks between ministers over dealing with the cost of living crisis have been delayed because of uncertainty over boris johnson's future. the daily express says rebel tories are warned of the consequences of "plotting against" borisjohnson in what they call the "thatcher betrayal". the telegraph says a "work from home tax loophole" that cost the treasury nearly £500 million is to be closed.
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the picture is of barry cryer, the comedian who's died at the age of 86. the daily mail lead with 600 whitehall "fat cats" are paid over £150,000 despite not being back in the office full—time. the times reports that the us cannot impose effective sanctions on putin because of "russian cash in london". the ft reports that new russian gas projects face sanctions if ukraine is invaded. the daily mirror reports of prince andrew's "ultimate gamble" as the palace fears he could damage the monarchy. so, let's begin. focusing very much on the politics of what's going on and let's start with you, kevin, and the guardian story and should mention also written in the times about whether this national insurance rise that has been the subject of a lot of
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discussion whether it's coming at this difficult time for many households, was that it is actually going to go ahead and the politics between number ten and number 11 over it. is between number ten and number“ over it. , ., ,. ., between number ten and number“ over it. , . ,. ., ., over it. is quite fascinating and there is a _ over it. is quite fascinating and there is a 1.2596 _ over it. is quite fascinating and there is a 1.25% percentage - over it. is quite fascinating and l there is a 1.2596 percentage point there is a 1.25% percentage point rise in national insurance do in the beginning of april to pay to clear the backlog in the nhs caused by the pandemic, and then going forward to find a new social care package for england. now this is i say had been earmarked that it was going to take place in april but early this week borisjohnson starters lay place in april but early this week boris johnson starters lay the groundwork for a climb down. borisjohnson starters lay the groundwork for a climb down. he is under enough a lot of pressure from conservative mps and particularly lately who are low tax
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conservatives. they don't intuitively like putting taxes up and they don't think it conservative prime ministers should be putting taxes up and number ten said it would go ahead but boris refused to confirm. he said investment needed but he would not confirm it will be definitely paid for by this next rise due in april. and as the weeks progressed, the science of a climb—down have only been more noticeable as a premise or has been repeatedly asked every time he is in front of the camera whether he can guarantee it and he won't guarantee it. so that is the thing that is concerning with the chancellor,
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rishi sunak, have to find the money to pay for the social care promises and i guess he would rightly ask if you are not going to put up national insurance to pay for it then where is money going to come from? boris johnson has not got that basically a lot of conservative mps to the price of their support is him scrapping this national insurance rise. so fascinating dynamic playing out between number ten and number 11 and worth bearing in mind that rishi sunak we all know would dearly love to be prime minister, soaked through the end as well and will be interesting to watch how this plays out over the next couple of months. and i can bring that in the next couple of stories as we look at plans for the cost of living in christ and downing street turmoil and also the story that kevin has written with more shots and accused
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of leading a zombie government over the party gate row. that's the huffington post i should say. that's a very acute difficulty people are facing now that looks like he is going to get worse and is there political priority here and all the tory party pitching in where they think taxes and policy plans should go? is dentistry in charge of making the decisions it wants to?— the decisions it wants to? there is a real fear — the decisions it wants to? there is a real fear that _ the decisions it wants to? there is a real fear that seem _ the decisions it wants to? there is a real fear that seem to _ the decisions it wants to? there is a real fear that seem to be - a real fear that seem to be going the government is in paralysis at the government is in paralysis at the moment and you can see that in the moment and you can see that in the i and _ the moment and you can see that in the i and the — the moment and you can see that in the i and the huffington post and it brings— the i and the huffington post and it brings enough questions around the nationat— brings enough questions around the national insurance rise as well. what _ national insurance rise as well. what can— national insurance rise as well. what can this government do? because borisjohnson, a lot of the attention of the media and the public— attention of the media and the public has been around party gate, will he _ public has been around party gate, will he survive and will he not and what _ will he survive and will he not and
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what are — will he survive and will he not and what are mps thinking? what splits are there _ what are mps thinking? what splits are there in the conservatives right now and _ are there in the conservatives right now and what is the suit great report — now and what is the suit great report a — now and what is the suit great report a way to say and that may investigation this is been a drip feed _ investigation this is been a drip feed over— investigation this is been a drip feed over the next couple of weeks and this— feed over the next couple of weeks and this has been coming out over a lon- and this has been coming out over a long period — and this has been coming out over a long period of time. the quite slowly— long period of time. the quite slowly and it has started to scoop up slowly and it has started to scoop up a lot _ slowly and it has started to scoop up a lot of— slowly and it has started to scoop up a lot of time and as we heard from _ up a lot of time and as we heard from kevin — up a lot of time and as we heard from kevin there, borisjohnson is very concerned with making sure he's -ot very concerned with making sure he's got those _ very concerned with making sure he's got those numbers to save his job. and referring back to the times and the guardian, if it comes down to it, the guardian, if it comes down to it. a _ the guardian, if it comes down to it. a source — the guardian, if it comes down to it, a source claimed borisjohnson will scrap — it, a source claimed borisjohnson will scrap this national insurance rise despite claiming that finding that cash— rise despite claiming that finding that cash for the nhs is vital. so where _ that cash for the nhs is vital. so where will— that cash for the nhs is vital. so where will he find that money from, especially_ where will he find that money from, especially when it seems like there is a real— especially when it seems like there is a real paralysis across governmentjust now. we spoken about issues _ governmentjust now. we spoken about issues around cost of living, for example. — issues around cost of living, for example, the ukraine, other issues with the _ example, the ukraine, other issues with the uk— example, the ukraine, other issues
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with the uk at the moment, with covid-i9 — with the uk at the moment, with covid—19 recovery and pushing forward — covid—19 recovery and pushing forward with the nhs, with this getting — forward with the nhs, with this getting back to work and there are so many— getting back to work and there are so many issues for the government to be looking _ so many issues for the government to be looking at — so many issues for the government to be looking at but everybody is looking — be looking at but everybody is looking at and talking about party -ate looking at and talking about party gate and — looking at and talking about party gate and what this report is going to say— gate and what this report is going to say in— gate and what this report is going to say in whether the prime minister will survive — to say in whether the prime minister will survive the next week, the next few months. what will he do? but as is pointed out in the huffington post _ is pointed out in the huffington post story, there are so many things this government has pledged to do and actually not that long left in the parliamentary term and general election— the parliamentary term and general election 2024 potentially and there are hills _ election 2024 potentially and there are bills that were promised in the queen— are bills that were promised in the queen speech have not gone through yet queen speech have not gone through vet the _ queen speech have not gone through yet the government needs to start moving _ yet the government needs to start moving forward on and how will this affect— moving forward on and how will this affect those plans? what legislation we see _ affect those plans? what legislation we see go that we should have seen io we see go that we should have seen go through— we see go that we should have seen go through in this parliamentary term? _ go through in this parliamentary term? and this has been a couple of months _ term? and this has been a couple of months now— term? and this has been a couple of months now all the way back to november when the ellen patterson scandal— november when the ellen patterson scandal broke and we almost went straight _ scandal broke and we almost went straight into party gate and its
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continued from there. so when can the government start getting back to the government start getting back to the day— the government start getting back to the dayjob that we are not talking about— the dayjob that we are not talking about who — the dayjob that we are not talking about who is going to be the next conservative leader and maybe we will have _ conservative leader and maybe we will have another conservative leader — will have another conservative leader and premise of this government does have a real serious issues _ government does have a real serious issues affecting household of another — issues affecting household of another country, particularly the cost—of—living crisis, fuel prices and they— cost—of—living crisis, fuel prices and they have to get back to doing that day— and they have to get back to doing that dayjob. and they have to get back to doing that day job-— that day “oh. briefly given us a sto that day job. briefly given us a story you _ that day job. briefly given us a story you have _ that day job. briefly given us a story you have written - that day job. briefly given us a story you have written up, - that day job. briefly given us a story you have written up, do| that day job. briefly given us a i story you have written up, do you have evidence that borisjohnson is so heavily distracted that he is not fixing these very major issues with him the media might be focusing on it but how do we know what the government is focusing on? i think the roof government is focusing on? i think the proof in _ government is focusing on? i think the proof in the _ government is focusing on? i think the proof in the pudding _ government is focusing on? i think the proof in the pudding is - government is focusing on? i think the proof in the pudding is in - government is focusing on? i think the proof in the pudding is in the i the proof in the pudding is in the eating and they are not looking forward any concrete proposals to deal with the cost of living crisis. yes, there is the crisis in ukraine which is obviously an enormous story that we could be on the brink of a war and we are covering from the pandemic and these are important things but there are a lot of other
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issues the government to be focusing on that they are not. we know for a fact that never to confirm today the prime minister is spending an awful lot of his time speaking to conservative mps who are telling him recently what the price is of their support and one of this process as she was saying is overturning of the national insurance rise. you bet your bottom dollar if borisjohnson thinks that will save his job, then he will push very hard for that to happen. so i think there is clear evidence that the government is not pushing forward with the stuff that they should be doing and as i said earlier as well the house of commons is rising early on a regular basis and certainly because there is not any government business for mps to speak about. so there are lots of things government can be doing that they are not right now because they are innocent of paralysis essentially because no one knows whether boris johnson essentially because no one knows whether borisjohnson is going to be
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the prime minister in a couple of weeks' time or not. so until i line is drawn under party gate one way or another, i think it will be very difficult for the government to get back onto the agenda that the voters expect to be following. if i back onto the agenda that the voters expect to be following.— expect to be following. if i can “ust expect to be following. if i can just bring _ expect to be following. if i can just bring in — expect to be following. if i can just bring in a _ expect to be following. if i can just bring in a couple - expect to be following. if i can just bring in a couple of- expect to be following. if i can just bring in a couple of morel just bring in a couple of more stories on politics we move on to something else, the independent has got liz truss spending half £1 million on a private jet to australia. angela rayner in saying this is like a respect for taxpayer money but the fight back line from the boris camp is in terms of defending the government as a whole is boris ellis don't repeat that your betrayal and linking those because obviously liz truss is a potential leadership candidate. has a story been breached by someone who is a to liz truss who knows and the boris backers are still clearly out there trying to defend him? politics
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clearly under display onto front pages there. i clearly under display onto front pages there-— clearly under display onto front pages there. i think so and there will be this _ pages there. i think so and there will be this place _ pages there. i think so and there will be this place because - pages there. i think so and there will be this place because as - pages there. i think so and there l will be this place because as kevin said there — will be this place because as kevin said there is not being a line drawn under this— said there is not being a line drawn under this yet so we could be very close _ under this yet so we could be very close to _ under this yet so we could be very close to eight leadership campaign potentially and it will be interesting to see how close ministers and how close and your tories _ ministers and how close and your tories actually think we could be to that and _ tories actually think we could be to that and whether this, not saying this was— that and whether this, not saying this was breached by a third party or a certain — this was breached by a third party ora certain member of this was breached by a third party or a certain member of the conservative party, but will be start _ conservative party, but will be start to — conservative party, but will be start to see that kind of story emerge — start to see that kind of story emerge about potential leadership candidates, liz truss very high on the list _ candidates, liz truss very high on the list that — candidates, liz truss very high on the list that we might expect to make _ the list that we might expect to make it — the list that we might expect to make it into the campaign along with rishi sunak for example, so i think there _ rishi sunak for example, so i think there is that and as you say politics— there is that and as you say politics is— there is that and as you say politics is very much on display here _ politics is very much on display here with — politics is very much on display here with that story. because it does _ here with that story. because it does raise _ here with that story. because it does raise a number of questions about— does raise a number of questions about taxpayer money but also as we face a _ about taxpayer money but also as we
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face a cost—of—living crisis but also _ face a cost—of—living crisis but also emissions and the work the government did a couple of months a-o government did a couple of months ago was _ government did a couple of months ago was very focused on talking about— ago was very focused on talking about cutting would do on fuel and hosted cop26. within the next express front pages well you _ within the next express front pages well you say we have heard over the last two _ well you say we have heard over the last two weeks that the potential or alleged _ last two weeks that the potential or alleged manoeuvres some of the conservatives are doing to try and shore _ conservatives are doing to try and shore up — conservatives are doing to try and shore up that support for boris johnson — shore up that support for boris johnson and this is another play of that _ johnson and this is another play of that a_ johnson and this is another play of that. a message is apparently circulating according to the daily express— circulating according to the daily express of a front page they ran in 1990 _ express of a front page they ran in 1990 when— express of a front page they ran in 1990 when margaret thatcher left office _ 1990 when margaret thatcher left office and said what have they done? potential _ office and said what have they done? potential warning to those who might be looking _ potential warning to those who might be looking to step out and either send _ be looking to step out and either send those letters no—confidence to the 9022 _ send those letters no—confidence to the 9022 committee, to sir graham brady, _ the 9022 committee, to sir graham brady, or— the 9022 committee, to sir graham bradv, or to— the 9022 committee, to sir graham brady, or to people who are on the edge _ brady, or to people who are on the edge of— brady, or to people who are on the edge of thinking should we back boris _ edge of thinking should we back boris or— edge of thinking should we back boris or should we not and this is another— boris or should we not and this is another one _ boris or should we not and this is another one of those areas where
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politics _ another one of those areas where politics are — another one of those areas where politics are clearly at play here and will — politics are clearly at play here and will have to be when we get to the situation because we just don't know— the situation because we just don't know whether boris johnson will be prime _ know whether boris johnson will be prime minister in a couple of weeks or couple _ prime minister in a couple of weeks or couple of— prime minister in a couple of weeks or couple of months and what is happening and it will all come down to whether we see this report, the med investigation and when people take that _ med investigation and when people take that final stance on where they are in— take that final stance on where they are in this — take that final stance on where they are in this l— take that final stance on where they are in this. ., ., , , are in this. i will move on briefly from the political _ are in this. i will move on briefly from the political swirl— are in this. i will move on briefly from the political swirl that - are in this. i will move on briefly from the political swirl that you | from the political swirl that you are both very much across to a really interesting story on the front page of the times with us sounds alarm over russian cash in london and they have said american officials figure they will be unable to impose effective sanctions on vladimir putin if russia invades ukraine because of years of british tolerance of suspect money flooding into london, kevin. the tolerance of suspect money flooding into london, kevin.— into london, kevin. the times has ut into a into london, kevin. the times has put into a us _ into london, kevin. the times has put into a us telematics _ into london, kevin. the times has put into a us telematics source . into london, kevin. the times has| put into a us telematics source and clearly there is an awful lot of discussion at the moment in the west as to what the west response should be if russia does invade ukraine.
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and all the talk is about economic sanctions and what form those may take. now one suggestion is that there could be a clamp down on russian money outside of russia, and the us are concerned that london and the us are concerned that london and the uk has essentially turned a blind eye to all the money, millions if not billions of pounds worth of russian money which is been invested in the property market, very high end properties in london. and they said that that is basically removing the leverage that the west may have in terms of trying to clamp down on russian financial interests abroad. basically because we have allowed for the suggestion is the uk has allowed russian money to flood the uk and london in particular and therefore how can you then turn around and say we are going to put a stop to it now when you allowed it
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to happen for years and years? so there is clearly tensions there between the uk in the us as to what the best response economically anyway as opposed to militarily would be where russia to invade ukraine. ., ~ would be where russia to invade ukraine. . ~ ., ., , ., ukraine. talking about lots of russian money _ ukraine. talking about lots of russian money in _ ukraine. talking about lots of russian money in belgravia . ukraine. talking about lots of l russian money in belgravia and briefly lots of concern about the ukraine situation and how much the uk is going to be brought into this. but london has long been talked of certainly compare with new york as being something much more open to international money and that has the effect of boosting the economy because you get a lot of people here doing lots of big business but there is also questions. i doing lots of big business but there is also questions.— is also questions. i think that's the focus _ is also questions. i think that's the focus of — is also questions. i think that's the focus of a _ is also questions. i think that's the focus of a lot _ is also questions. i think that's the focus of a lot of _ is also questions. i think that's the focus of a lot of reporting i is also questions. i think that's| the focus of a lot of reporting in the focus of a lot of reporting in the coming days about the us
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government talking up sanctions particular— government talking up sanctions particular late today around the pipeline — particular late today around the pipeline between russia and germany that they— pipeline between russia and germany that they want to say that if russia invades _ that they want to say that if russia invades ukraine, that will happen but how— invades ukraine, that will happen but how can the us government make that happen? germany have not been as tough— that happen? germany have not been as tough on— that happen? germany have not been as tough on that and they have said that is— as tough on that and they have said that is something they are open to looking _ that is something they are open to looking at— that is something they are open to looking at sanctions but not stopping it completely and i think this is— stopping it completely and i think this is a _ stopping it completely and i think this is a discussion that we will see in— this is a discussion that we will see in the _ this is a discussion that we will see in the coming days and regarding the crisis _ see in the coming days and regarding the crisis in _ see in the coming days and regarding the crisis in ukraine, discussions with— the crisis in ukraine, discussions with the — the crisis in ukraine, discussions with the western allies on exactly how they — with the western allies on exactly how they may implement sanctions and how they may implement sanctions and how that _ how they may implement sanctions and how that could take place because as you say, _ how that could take place because as you say, over the years the times story— you say, over the years the times story about — you say, over the years the times story about russian money coming into the _ story about russian money coming into the uk, london in particular, and other— into the uk, london in particular, and other relationship russia has with other— and other relationship russia has with other countries, those will all have _ with other countries, those will all have to _ with other countries, those will all have to come to discussions here because — have to come to discussions here because it — have to come to discussions here because it is not as easy as saying this is what— because it is not as easy as saying this is what we are going to do and this is what we are going to do and this is— this is what we are going to do and this is how— this is what we are going to do and this is how it's going to happen and that's— this is how it's going to happen and that's a _ this is how it's going to happen and that's a discussion that we seem to
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be seeing _ that's a discussion that we seem to be seeing over quite a few different outlets already.— outlets already. final story i want to have a look _ outlets already. final story i want to have a look at _ outlets already. final story i want to have a look at is _ outlets already. final story i want to have a look at is on _ outlets already. final story i want to have a look at is on the - outlets already. final story i want to have a look at is on the daily i to have a look at is on the daily telegraph and i think we have got it as well in the guardian with most women delaying children until after the age of 30. now i don't know if this is a good thing or a bad thing but what is your take? i this is a good thing or a bad thing but what is your take?— this is a good thing or a bad thing but what is your take? i don't think it's that surprising. _ but what is your take? i don't think it's that surprising. we _ but what is your take? i don't think it's that surprising. we have - but what is your take? i don't think it's that surprising. we have all - it's that surprising. we have all well known that not women but also men are living it much later now than previous generations, like our parents did, to have children now. women born in 1975 on average don't have a first good until they are about 32 and previous generation was born the after world war ii, it was 22 when they had their first children to clearly this is a social phenomenon which has been going on for quite some time. to be honest with you i don't get terribly hung
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up with you i don't get terribly hung up about this in the papers think is wishing that i think most people think because this is something that has been going on for quite some time and women having careers, choosing not to have kids until they are older and until maybe they have lived a bit more of a life before they decide to have kids but as i say it's notjust women, is meant as well. it say it's not “ust women, is meant as well. ., , ., say it's not “ust women, is meant as well. . , . ~' ~' say it's not “ust women, is meant as well. ., ,, ., ., well. it has a knock on, though, in terms of the _ well. it has a knock on, though, in terms of the safety _ well. it has a knock on, though, in terms of the safety of _ terms of the safety of having children if you leave it to let you have any children you can have but of course people are educating themselves more and wanting to have careers before maybe they start a family. this careers before maybe they start a famil. r ., careers before maybe they start a famil . ~ , ., ., careers before maybe they start a famil. a ., ., ,;~,:: family. as someone who is 30, i don't find _ family. as someone who is 30, i don't find it _ family. as someone who is 30, i don't find it all— family. as someone who is 30, i don't find it all that _ family. as someone who is 30, i don't find it all that surprising i don't find it all that surprising because — don't find it all that surprising because people are on the same age among _ because people are on the same age among friends went up on it messily surprising _ among friends went up on it messily surprising because there is a discussion now and people know more and they— discussion now and people know more and they want to have careers and they want— and they want to have careers and they want to live their lives before they want to live their lives before they have — they want to live their lives before they have children and there are more _ they have children and there are
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more as— they have children and there are more as i— they have children and there are more as i mentioned open discussions on peoples _ more as i mentioned open discussions on peoples lives so not something you have — on peoples lives so not something you have to kind of do at a certain time there — you have to kind of do at a certain time. there obviously concerned people _ time. there obviously concerned people leave it too late but i think we are _ people leave it too late but i think we are a _ people leave it too late but i think we are a lot more open to talking about think— we are a lot more open to talking about think about this more and talking about different options and science _ talking about different options and science so i think i don't find it massively— science so i think i don't find it massively surprising and i agree with kevin— massively surprising and i agree with kevin that something the papers find interesting and it's a good talker— find interesting and it's a good talker of— find interesting and it's a good talker of a story but it's not something i find massively surprising as i think you can see it in society— surprising as i think you can see it in society and as he said it's changed _ in society and as he said it's changed over generations. | in society and as he said it's changed over generations. i wish we had more time _ changed over generations. i wish we had more time on _ changed over generations. i wish we had more time on that. _ changed over generations. i wish we had more time on that. i _ changed over generations. i wish we had more time on that. i personally| had more time on that. i personally wish i had children when i was younger some of you have a lot more but you cannot do everything. i am just going to finish with some one who lives a long, long and wonderful life and that is barry cryer who died a day and his faith in the front page of so many papers and in the you're supposed because he was yorkshire born. a phenomenon of a
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tablet and some of his time as we did not quite realise. i tablet and some of his time as we did not quite realise.— did not quite realise. i feel personally. _ did not quite realise. i feel personally, i'm _ did not quite realise. i feel personally, i'm 47 - did not quite realise. i feel personally, i'm 47 now- did not quite realise. i feel| personally, i'm 47 now and did not quite realise. i feel- personally, i'm 47 now and he's did not quite realise. i feel— personally, i'm 47 now and he's been around obviously through my life and i feel like around obviously through my life and ifeel like i'm kind of grown up watching barry cryer and listening to him on the radio but a remarkable cv, wrote for the two runs in morecambe and wise in monty python and appeared in new numerous primary sketches and just an incredibly well loved and well respected man and i don't think anyone had a bad word to say about him and i one of those guys it was a natural comedic ability but married with a modesty in just a really nice ability but married with a modesty injust a really nice person ability but married with a modesty in just a really nice person and ability but married with a modesty injust a really nice person and he died making people laugh which is a fantastic thing.— fantastic thing. thank you both so much to me _ fantastic thing. thank you both so much to me at — fantastic thing. thank you both so much to me at the _ fantastic thing. thank you both so much to me at the leave - fantastic thing. thank you both so much to me at the leave it - fantastic thing. thank you both so much to me at the leave it there i fantastic thing. thank you both so i much to me at the leave it there and people want a smile, they can read some of thosejokes people want a smile, they can read some of those jokes i think in the papers tomorrow morning, thank you both very muchjoining papers tomorrow morning, thank you both very much joining us tonight.
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that's it for the papers this hour. the papers will be back again tomorrow evening. dojoin us then if you can, but for now, goodnight. good evening. this is your update from the bbc sport centre. we start with football, and the women's super league leaders arsenal came from behind to beat brighton 2—1. brighton took an early lead. emma koivisto headed past mauela zinsberger, ending a run of seven games without a goal. a different story in the second half. vivienne miedema with a close range finish here brought arsenal level. and a superb free kick from beth mead gave them the win. they're now four points clear at the top after four games without a win. staying with women's football, players in the wsl and championship will have guaranteed maternity and long—term sickness cover written into their contracts after the fa and pfa agreed to the change. west ham's dagny brynjarsdottir is one of the few mothers to have played in wsl,
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and because maternity cover has previously been at the discretion of clubs, many have decided to wait until they've retired before starting a family. fifa have introduced similar rules. some transfer news for you. defender callum chambers hasjoined aston villa on a free transfer from arsenal. chambers joined arsenal in 2014 and has made just five appearences for the club this season. he joins steven gerrard's villa on a 3.5—year deal. barcelona are in talks with wolves to sign forward adama traore, which seems to end tottenham's chances of bringing him in. barca are offering to take their former player back on loan with the option to buy for around £29 million at the end of the season. spurs had a £15 million bid rejected earlier this month. premiership rugby club exeter chiefs will drop all references to native americans in their branding after it provoked significant criticism. they'll still be called the chiefs, but have changed their logo, which from this summer will use imagery from a celtic iron age tribe, the dumnonii,
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which encompassed a large area in the south west, including devon. we're absolutely thrilled. we're just so relieved that it's been done, but so excited that it's been done so well. throughout the campaign, we've been saying the name doesn't need to change, its about the image that you associate it with. we've had lots of different people suggesting different historical chiefs from the devon area and mocking up logos that looked similar. it's literally everything we could have dreamed of. we're thrilled and we are beyond excited about being able to fully support our club and be doubly proud of everything they achieve on the pitch. now we can be super proud of them off the pitch as well, and at the same time we're celebrating devon, the area we all come from and we're all so proud of. england captain eoin morgan will miss the final two matches of their t20 series with west indies in barbados. he has what the ecb have described as a low—grade quadriceps
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injury and missed last night's 20—run defeat. that leaves england 2—1 down in the five—match series heading into saturday's fourth game. there'll be a couple of first times being celebrated in the women's australian open final on saturday, with the home crowd particularly invested in one of them. ash barty�*s appearance will mark the first in 42 years of an australian woman in her home grand slam final, while her opponent will be danielle collins, who's never reached this stage before. both won in straight sets in their semifinals today. honestly, it'sjust incredible. i love this tournament, i love coming out here and playing in australia. as an aussie, we're extremely spoiled. we're a grand slam nation, we get to play in our backyard. i am happy to play my best tennis here, i have done well before and now i have a chance to play for a title. it's unreal. it feels amazing, it's been such a journey and it doesn't happen overnight. so many years of hard work from an early age on court. yesterday, i was talking
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about all the early mornings my dad would get up with me and practise with me before school. it'sjust incredible to be on this stage, especially with the health challenges, i'm just so grateful. i couldn't be happier. british boxer galal yafai, who won flyweight gold at the tokyo 0lympics for team gb, has announced that he's going to turn professional. speaking to sport today earlier, he said it was an easy decision to make. it was easy decision for me to go pro, but tough to actually choose who to go with. but i'm here today. you have signed with very prestigious, very well—known promoter, eddie hearn. what did he say to convince you? a few things, like, i think it was mainly the fact he's got a lot of clout. he's a massive promoter. massive boxing promotional company.
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as an amateur, your goal was obviously to win a gold medal at the olympics. you've done that, so now that you've turned professional, whatare youraims? to be a world champion, it's as simple as that. i know there aren't many olympic and world champions in british boxing history, joshua, james, probably a handful. if i can add my name to that list, i'd be over the moon. and irish fighter katie taylor will make history in april as part of the first ever women's bout to top the bill at madison square garden in new york. the undisputed lightweight world champion will put her belts on the line against amanda serrano of puerto rico, a seven—weight world champion, saying that a "fight of this magnitude is the pinnacle of the sport". the iconic venue is 140 years old and has been the scene of many of boxing's most famous fights. and that's all the sport for now.
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hello there. it's quite chilly at the moment, especially further east across the uk with some clearer skies and light winds, so a few mist and fog patches to start the day across england and wales — those will lift. some early sunshine as well, but it will continue to cloud over more and more from the west, and we will see some outbreaks of rain pushing eastwards across scotland, maybe a little drizzle across some other western areas as well, but we are drying in milder air as those south—westerly winds strengthen, temperatures typically in double figures. those temperatures won't drop very much overnight, it will be very mild overnight, it will also be windy, especially gusty winds across scotland and northern england. some more rain for scotland. as that weather front move southwards, the rain clears away in the rain becomes light and patchy as it moves down across the uk. southern parts of england may well stay dry. after the rain, we are going to find sunshine following from the north with a few blustery showers. it's going to be a windy day on saturday, especially in scotland, and also some gusty winds
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in northern england. we are drawing down cooler air from the north through the day, but across my southern parts of england and wales, it's still very mild.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... russia readies for possible conflict over ukraine, but says there is room, for further dialogue with the west. vaccine—maker moderna says an 0micron specific shot is on the horizon but can drug makers really keep pace with new variants? two weeks after a devastating under—sea volcanic eruption devastated the island of tonga, we'll find out how the clear up operation is progressing. and to mark holocaust memorial day — prince charles unveils portraits of seven holocaust survivors — the paintings will go on display in buckingham palace. in singapore... live from our studio

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