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tv   Context  BBC News  January 27, 2022 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching context on bbc news. the last ditch diplomacy continues over ukraine. the white house has tonight called on china to use its influence with moscow, russia's foreign ministry says despite the disagreements there is still some space for a negotiation. president biden says he'll announce his supreme court nominee in a month's time, and confirms it will be the first african american woman. and lifting covid restrictions , most of them in england ended today , many other countries are making similar moves. tonight with the context, nathalie tocci, political scientist and former adviser to the eu's foreign policy chief and the american entrepreneur and former white house communications director, anthony scaramucci —
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hello and welcome, the white house says an invasion of ukraine is imminent, the ukrainian government think the imminent nature of the threat is over dramatised, the russian foreign ministry suggest there is yet room for diaologue, despite the fact their main demands over ukraine have not been met. it is a high stakes game of cat and mouse, but the cat is wily and an instinctive predator which is why the nato members are twitchy. so here are the main developments on ukraine today. the german government, under considerable pressure from nato allies, have hardened their position regarding sanctions. we have made it clear that further military action against ukraine will have massive consequences for pressure. it is on this basis we are working on a strong package of
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sanctions in case of further aggression in the full range of responses are available including... the russian foreign ministry said the best way to reduce tensions was for nato to withdraw its forces from eastern europe, again insisting the kremlin has no plans for an invasion. we have already repeatedly stated that our country does not intend to —— anyone. we consider even the thought of war between our people to be unacceptable. not convinced, nato continues to bolster its defences in eastern europe, four danish f16's landed in lithuania today for enhanced air policing along the eu's eastern border. generally speaking, the republicans have encouraged jo biden to get tougher on russi, through immediate sanctions, but there are some on the party's far right that have questioned why the us would side with ukraine at all. driven by a diet of pro—russian or anti—interventionist rhetoric from the likes of tucker carlson on fox news, there are plenty of candidates now running in republican primaries, who are taking to social media,
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and undercutting not only us foreign policy, but also the positions of party's leaders like mitch mcconnell. this is blake masters, who is running for the us senate in arizona. here in the usjoe biden has given us a border crisis and an inflation crisis, skyrocketing crime, a supply—chain crisis, fentanyl supply—chain crisis, fenta nyl crisis, supply—chain crisis, fentanyl crisis, just one crisis after another. but instead of trying to fix these problems here at home they are looking thousands of miles away to shore up ukrainian democracy. do you want to get involved in a land war in asia in winter? the you want to get involved in a land war in asia in winter?— you want to get involved in a land war in asia in winter? the tough on russian rhetoric _ war in asia in winter? the tough on russian rhetoric always _ war in asia in winter? the tough on russian rhetoric always defined - war in asia in winter? the tough on russian rhetoric always defined the republican party but looking at some of these comments on social media and comments from a mild that sprang from the us senate asking why we are bolstering nato dependencies, our people on the outside bound to ask what it is if the new face of american far policy? it
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what it is if the new face of american far policy?- what it is if the new face of american far policy? it is the new face of a certain _ american far policy? it is the new face of a certain brand _ american far policy? it is the new face of a certain brand of - face of a certain brand of republicans. i am face of a certain brand of republicans. iam not face of a certain brand of republicans. i am not going to suggest it's the new face of american far policy. yes he had been successful at the defeating the kinds of people like blake but let us face it, the republicans a good portion of them now are anti—democratic and they are siding with authoritative and authoritative leadership around the world and for me this is an issue for republicans. did they want to preserve the american democracy and it's a public entity want to put that above everything else but are they looking for personal political advantage the way donald trump did and ultimately thatis way donald trump did and ultimately that is what it's going to come down to but i am going to think the us is holding in general the principles of the grand alliance that was set up after world war ii. [30 the grand alliance that was set up after world war ii.— after world war ii. do you still think the grand _ after world war ii. do you still think the grand principles - after world war ii. do you still think the grand principles are l after world war ii. do you still. think the grand principles are still intact? i think the grand principles are still intact? ~' ., think the grand principles are still intact? ~ ., ., , , ., intact? i think over the last year we have gone — intact? i think over the last year we have gone far _ intact? i think over the last year we have gone far in _ intact? i think over the last year
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we have gone far in rebuilding l intact? i think over the last year - we have gone far in rebuilding them and i_ we have gone far in rebuilding them and i think_ we have gone far in rebuilding them and i think the transatlantic relationship has gone back to having its ups— relationship has gone back to having its ups and _ relationship has gone back to having its ups and downs and there was never_ its ups and downs and there was never a — its ups and downs and there was never a golden era of transatlantic relations_ never a golden era of transatlantic relations but the different —— disagreements he may have of afghanistan or over may not take place _ afghanistan or over may not take place within a family in both the president— place within a family in both the president from any of values and those _ president from any of values and those values have to be repelled but in the _ those values have to be repelled but in the united states and in europe but at _ in the united states and in europe but at least we are back into that liberal_ but at least we are back into that liberal democratic family values. he is a liberal democratic family values. he: is a decorated green beret and the first to save up congress and he sits on the house armed services committee lovely to have you on the programme. referto committee lovely to have you on the programme. refer to those videos and those treats we have seen today. does it consume leadership in congress that there are republicans running for primaries who are undermining the party position?
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those candidates who are putting it in the _ those candidates who are putting it in the context— those candidates who are putting it in the context of— those candidates who are putting it in the context of the _ those candidates who are putting it in the context of the crisis - those candidates who are putting it in the context of the crisis that - those candidates who are putting it in the context of the crisis that we i in the context of the crisis that we are facing — in the context of the crisis that we are facing at — in the context of the crisis that we are facing at home _ in the context of the crisis that we are facing at home i— in the context of the crisis that we are facing at home i don't - in the context of the crisis that we are facing at home i don't think. in the context of the crisis that we are facing at home i don't think it| are facing at home i don't think it is hyperbolic— are facing at home i don't think it is hyperbolic to _ are facing at home i don't think it is hyperbolic to question - are facing at home i don't think it is hyperbolic to question whetherj is hyperbolic to question whether joe biden— is hyperbolic to question whether joe biden is— is hyperbolic to question whether joe biden is not— is hyperbolic to question whether joe biden is not concerned - is hyperbolic to question whether joe biden is not concerned about| is hyperbolic to question whether . joe biden is not concerned about our own borders — joe biden is not concerned about our own borders where _ joe biden is not concerned about our own borders where we _ joe biden is not concerned about our own borders where we have - joe biden is not concerned about our own borders where we have nearly . joe biden is not concerned about our own borders where we have nearly 2| own borders where we have nearly 2 million migrants. _ own borders where we have nearly 2 million migrants. imagine _ own borders where we have nearly 2 million migrants. imagine if- own borders where we have nearly 2 million migrants. imagine if that - million migrants. imagine if that was the — million migrants. imagine if that was the situation _ million migrants. imagine if that was the situation in _ million migrants. imagine if that was the situation in the - million migrants. imagine if that was the situation in the united l was the situation in the united kingdom — was the situation in the united kingdom or— was the situation in the united kingdom or any— was the situation in the united kingdom or any other- was the situation in the united kingdom or any other countryl was the situation in the united i kingdom or any other country in europe — kingdom or any other country in europe with _ kingdom or any other country in europe with 2 _ kingdom or any other country in europe with 2 million _ kingdom or any other country in europe with 2 million migrants. kingdom or any other country in . europe with 2 million migrants per year that— europe with 2 million migrants per year that we — europe with 2 million migrants per year that we are _ europe with 2 million migrants per year that we are coming _ europe with 2 million migrants per year that we are coming across - europe with 2 million migrants per year that we are coming across i. year that we are coming across i think— year that we are coming across i think it's — year that we are coming across i think it's a — year that we are coming across i think it's a very— year that we are coming across i think it's a very valid _ year that we are coming across i think it's a very valid question i year that we are coming across i. think it's a very valid question but also addressing _ think it's a very valid question but also addressing your— think it's a very valid question but also addressing your gusts - think it's a very valid question but also addressing your gusts who i think it's a very valid question but . also addressing your gusts who said they republicans _ also addressing your gusts who said they republicans are _ also addressing your gusts who said they republicans are moving - also addressing your gusts who said. they republicans are moving towards authoritarianism _ they republicans are moving towards authoritarianism and _ they republicans are moving towards authoritarianism and implied - they republicans are moving towards authoritarianism and implied that - authoritarianism and implied that trump _ authoritarianism and implied that trump or— authoritarianism and implied that trump or folks _ authoritarianism and implied that trump or folks will— authoritarianism and implied that trump or folks will agree - authoritarianism and implied that trump or folks will agree with - authoritarianism and implied thati trump or folks will agree with him are soft _ trump or folks will agree with him are soft on — trump or folks will agree with him are soft on pressure _ trump or folks will agree with him are soft on pressure but _ trump or folks will agree with him are soft on pressure but look- trump or folks will agree with him are soft on pressure but look at i are soft on pressure but look at the actual— are soft on pressure but look at the actual facts — are soft on pressure but look at the actual facts versus _ are soft on pressure but look at the actual facts versus what _ are soft on pressure but look at the actual facts versus what sounds - actual facts versus what sounds like actual facts versus what sounds like a partisan _ actual facts versus what sounds like a partisan narrative. _ actual facts versus what sounds like a partisan narrative. president- a partisan narrative. president trump — a partisan narrative. president trump with— a partisan narrative. president trump withjulie _ a partisan narrative. president trump with julie the _ a partisan narrative. president trump with julie the united i a partisan narrative. president- trump withjulie the united states from the treaty _ trump withjulie the united states from the treaty with _ trump withjulie the united states from the treaty with pressure - from the treaty with pressure because _ from the treaty with pressure because of— from the treaty with pressure because of russian _ from the treaty with pressure because of russian violations from the treaty with pressure - because of russian violations and he refuted _ because of russian violations and he refuted the _ because of russian violations and he refuted the united _ because of russian violations and he refuted the united states _ because of russian violations and he refuted the united states because i because of russian violations and he refuted the united states because of russian _ refuted the united states because of russian violations _ refuted the united states because of russian violations particularly- refuted the united states because of russian violations particularly with l russian violations particularly with intermediate — russian violations particularly with intermediate range _ russian violations particularly with intermediate range missiles - russian violations particularly with intermediate range missiles in - russian violations particularly with | intermediate range missiles in that year up _ intermediate range missiles in that year up that— intermediate range missiles in that
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year up that the _ intermediate range missiles in that year up that the russians - intermediate range missiles in that year up that the russians were - year up that the russians were fielding — year up that the russians were fielding irut— year up that the russians were fielding but the _ year up that the russians were fielding but the united - year up that the russians were fielding but the united states. year up that the russians were i fielding but the united states was not able _ fielding but the united states was not able to— fielding but the united states was not able to deploy _ fielding but the united states was not able to deploy and _ fielding but the united states was not able to deploy and feel- fielding but the united states wasi not able to deploy and feel in—kind and he _ not able to deploy and feel in—kind and he gave — not able to deploy and feel in—kind and he gave me _ not able to deploy and feel in—kind and he gave me for— not able to deploy and feel in—kind and he gave me for aid _ not able to deploy and feel in—kind and he gave me foraid ukraine- and he gave me for aid ukraine which they would _ and he gave me for aid ukraine which they would not— and he gave me for aid ukraine which they would not have _ and he gave me for aid ukraine which they would not have right— and he gave me for aid ukraine which they would not have right now- and he gave me for aid ukraine which they would not have right now if- they would not have right now if it weren't _ they would not have right now if it weren't for— they would not have right now if it weren't for president _ they would not have right now if it weren't for president trump - they would not have right now if it weren't for president trump and l they would not have right now if it. weren't for president trump and this was after— weren't for president trump and this was after the — weren't for president trump and this was after the obama _ weren't for president trump and this was after the obama administrationl was after the obama administration literally— was after the obama administration literallv threw— was after the obama administration literally threw the _ was after the obama administration literally threw the blanket _ was after the obama administration literally threw the blanket that - was after the obama administration literally threw the blanket that the i literally threw the blanket that the problem _ literally threw the blanket that the problem when _ literally threw the blanket that the problem when pressure _ literally threw the blanket that the problem when pressure invaded i problem when pressure invaded ukraine — problem when pressure invaded ukraine under— problem when pressure invaded ukraine under his _ problem when pressure invaded ukraine under his watch - problem when pressure invaded ukraine under his watch and - problem when pressure invaded ukraine under his watch and let| problem when pressure invaded . ukraine under his watch and let us not forget — ukraine under his watch and let us not forget svria _ ukraine under his watch and let us not forget syria where _ ukraine under his watch and let us not forget syria where over - ukraine under his watch and let us not forget syria where over 300 l not forget syria where over 300 russian — not forget syria where over 300 russian backed _ not forget syria where over 300 russian backed mercenaries- not forget syria where over 300| russian backed mercenaries day not forget syria where over 300 - russian backed mercenaries day when they dared _ russian backed mercenaries day when they dared to — russian backed mercenaries day when they dared to take _ russian backed mercenaries day when they dared to take on _ russian backed mercenaries day when they dared to take on coalition - they dared to take on coalition forces — they dared to take on coalition forces and _ they dared to take on coalition forces and more _ they dared to take on coalition forces and more russians - they dared to take on coalition forces and more russians dayl they dared to take on coalition - forces and more russians day under president _ forces and more russians day under president trump's _ forces and more russians day under president trump's more _ forces and more russians day under president trump's more watch - forces and more russians day under president trump's more watch than| president trump's more watch than any other— president trump's more watch than any other president _ president trump's more watch than any other president in _ president trump's more watch than any other president in modern - any other president in modern history— any other president in modern history so— any other president in modern history so that _ any other president in modern history so that is _ any other president in modern history so that is a _ any other president in modern history so that is a chilly- any other president in modern history so that is a chilly talk. history so that is a chilly talk facts — history so that is a chilly talk facts here _ history so that is a chilly talk facts here and _ history so that is a chilly talk facts here and not _ history so that is a chilly talk facts here and not these - history so that is a chilly talk. facts here and not these kinds history so that is a chilly talk- facts here and not these kinds of partisan — facts here and not these kinds of partisan narratives— facts here and not these kinds of partisan narratives and _ facts here and not these kinds of partisan narratives and let - facts here and not these kinds of partisan narratives and let many| partisan narratives and let many republicans, myself _ partisan narratives and let many republicans, myself and - partisan narratives and let many republicans, myself and many i republicans, myself and many senators— republicans, myself and many senators in— republicans, myself and many senators in office _ republicans, myself and many senators in office are - republicans, myself and many senators in office are calling. republicans, myself and many| senators in office are calling for and a _ senators in office are calling for and a tougher— senators in office are calling for and a tougher stand _ senators in office are calling for and a tougher stand from - senators in office are calling for l and a tougher stand from fighting and a tougher stand from fighting and sanctions _ and a tougher stand from fighting and sanctions should _ and a tougher stand from fighting and sanctions should be - and a tougher stand from fighting and sanctions should be in- and a tougher stand from fighting and sanctions should be in place. and a tougher stand from fighting. and sanctions should be in place now and sanctions should be in place now and the _ and sanctions should be in place now and the aid _ and sanctions should be in place now and the aid should _ and sanctions should be in place now and the aid should have _ and sanctions should be in place now and the aid should have been - and sanctions should be in place nowj and the aid should have been moving months _ and the aid should have been moving months ago — and the aid should have been moving months ago and _ and the aid should have been moving months ago and i— and the aid should have been moving months ago and i don't _ and the aid should have been moving months ago and i don't think there'sl months ago and i don't think there's anvone _ months ago and i don't think there's anyone in— months ago and i don't think there's anyone in our— months ago and i don't think there's anyone in our politics _ months ago and i don't think there's anyone in our politics that _ months ago and i don't think there's anyone in our politics that are - anyone in our politics that are calling — anyone in our politics that are calling for— anyone in our politics that are calling for large _ anyone in our politics that are calling for large amounts - anyone in our politics that are calling for large amounts of. calling for large amounts of american _ calling for large amounts of american boots _ calling for large amounts of american boots on - calling for large amounts of american boots on the - calling for large amounts of. american boots on the ground. calling for large amounts of- american boots on the ground. that's a different—
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american boots on the ground. that's a different issue _ american boots on the ground. that's a different issue but _ american boots on the ground. that's a different issue but we _ american boots on the ground. that's a different issue but we can— american boots on the ground. that's a different issue but we can and - a different issue but we can and should — a different issue but we can and should be — a different issue but we can and should be doing _ a different issue but we can and should be doing much - a different issue but we can and should be doing much more - a different issue but we can and should be doing much more to. a different issue but we can and - should be doing much more to help ukraine and — should be doing much more to help ukraine and to _ should be doing much more to help ukraine and to deter— should be doing much more to help ukraine and to deter pressure - should be doing much more to help ukraine and to deter pressure and i ukraine and to deter pressure and our european _ ukraine and to deter pressure and our european allies _ ukraine and to deter pressure and our european allies should - ukraine and to deter pressure and our european allies should be - ukraine and to deter pressure and i our european allies should be doing more _ our european allies should be doing more it— our european allies should be doing more it is— our european allies should be doing more. it is notable _ our european allies should be doing more. it is notable that _ our european allies should be doing more. it is notable that the - our european allies should be doing more. it is notable that the unitedl more. it is notable that the united kingdom _ more. it is notable that the united kingdom and — more. it is notable that the united kingdom and united _ more. it is notable that the united kingdom and united states - more. it is notable that the united kingdom and united states are - kingdom and united states are sending — kingdom and united states are sending me _ kingdom and united states are sending me for— kingdom and united states are sending me for aid _ kingdom and united states are sending me for aid but - kingdom and united states arel sending me for aid but germany kingdom and united states are . sending me for aid but germany is not. sending me for aid but germany is not i— sending me for aid but germany is not i have — sending me for aid but germany is not i have not _ sending me for aid but germany is not. i have not mentioned - sending me for aid but germany is not. i have not mentioned the - not. i have not mentioned the pipeline — not. i have not mentioned the pipeline which _ not. i have not mentioned the pipeline which president - not. i have not mentioned the. pipeline which president trump sanctioned _ pipeline which president trump sanctioned so— pipeline which president trump sanctioned so that _ pipeline which president trump sanctioned so that is _ pipeline which president trump sanctioned so that is put - pipeline which president trump sanctioned so that is put the i pipeline which president trump . sanctioned so that is put the facts on the _ sanctioned so that is put the facts on the table — sanctioned so that is put the facts on the table and _ sanctioned so that is put the facts on the table and discuss - sanctioned so that is put the facts on the table and discuss them. i sanctioned so that is put the facts| on the table and discuss them. on on the table and discuss them. theissue on the table and discuss them. the issue of germany... come in on that if you want to. i the issue of germany. .. come in on that if you want to.— that if you want to. i don't want to take but you _ that if you want to. i don't want to take but you see _ that if you want to. i don't want to take but you see he _ that if you want to. i don't want to take but you see he is _ that if you want to. i don't want to take but you see he is taking - that if you want to. i don't want to take but you see he is taking the i take but you see he is taking the facts and putting it through a sausage binder and carving them up in a revisionist way and leaving out the phone call that president trump had with the president of the ukraine how he was trying to manipulate him on the phone which got him impeached the first time and ease leaving out that there is a faction inside the republican party
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thatis faction inside the republican party that is disavowing the election and its known as the big lie and ease one of them are normal republicans but what i'm talking about is not partisan. what i'm talking about is in the interest of the united states the western alliance and the people of free forces around the world this is not a partisan debate, this is about what are we going to do for the world and is a group of republicans that have hyped themselves off of reality and the world and make needs to understand that and i'm sure he does. ease probably having a tough time with it himself. i probably having a tough time with it himself. :, :, , , probably having a tough time with it himself. :, , ., himself. i have openly debated and ruestioned himself. i have openly debated and questioned isolationist _ himself. i have openly debated and questioned isolationist who - himself. i have openly debated and questioned isolationist who have i himself. i have openly debated and questioned isolationist who have a | questioned isolationist who have a very isolationist view but let us be fair there — very isolationist view but let us be fairthere are very isolationist view but let us be fair there are progressives who share _ fair there are progressives who share the — fair there are progressives who share the same views and don't think we should _ share the same views and don't think we should be involved in ukraine at
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all and _ we should be involved in ukraine at all and that— we should be involved in ukraine at all and that was a withdrawal that would _ all and that was a withdrawal that would lead to the rise of terrorism and both— would lead to the rise of terrorism and both sides of the aisle supported the full withdrawal of coalition— supported the full withdrawal of coalition forces from iraq that led to the _ coalition forces from iraq that led to the rise — coalition forces from iraq that led to the rise of isis that was than the size — to the rise of isis that was than the size of— to the rise of isis that was than the size of austria and attacked both _ the size of austria and attacked both london, paris and inspired attacks— both london, paris and inspired attacks in— both london, paris and inspired attacks in the united states and there _ attacks in the united states and there is— attacks in the united states and there is an isolationist strain for sure _ there is an isolationist strain for sure and — there is an isolationist strain for sure and that us go back and look at what fdr had to deal with in the lead up — what fdr had to deal with in the lead up to— what fdr had to deal with in the lead up to world war ii that's been in the _ lead up to world war ii that's been in the political party... i lead up to world war ii that's been in the political party. . ._ in the political party... i don't want to go — in the political party... i don't want to go so _ in the political party... i don't want to go so far _ in the political party... i don't want to go so far back- in the political party... i don't want to go so far back in - want to go so far back in history but i take your point. you hear what the congressman is saying there is america sending anti—tank missiles to ukraine and lipo defence weapons and the germans are sending 5000 helmets. i and the germans are sending 5000 helmets. :, _ , , helmets. i would say firstly europeans _ helmets. i would say firstly europeans are _ helmets. i would say firstly europeans are not - helmets. i would say firstly europeans are notjust - helmets. i would say firstly - europeans are notjust germans.
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spaniards and baltic countries and polls have been sending ships, weapons, but you're absolutely right. weapons, but you're absolutely riuht. weapons, but you're absolutely ri. ht, ., ., :, weapons, but you're absolutely riuht. :, ., :, , , ., right. the allegation is they are undermining — right. the allegation is they are undermining the _ right. the allegation is they are undermining the nato - right. the allegation is they are l undermining the nato solidarity. germany when it comes to defence has been an issue and notjust on ukraine. this is a long—standing debate within germany and i would personally look upon very favourably the idea of germany moving forward on its defence policy. we know the reason they historical reasons why germany has been extremely cautious. at the same time i think germany really has the biggest chip on the table because we all know it's not really a military deterrence which given neither the united states nor europeans were willing to go to war and have made it abundantly unfortunately perhaps clear so it is an economic response that will make
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an economic response that will make a difference and the fact that germany has made it clear that it is on the table and the foreign minister has been very exquisite about this and it's a real turning point in this conflict.— point in this conflict. thank you for bein: point in this conflict. thank you for being on — point in this conflict. thank you for being on the _ point in this conflict. thank you for being on the programme. i as of today, most of the remaining covid restrictions have been lifted here in england. it's no longer �*legally�* compulsory to wearfacemasks in indoor venues including shops. ad that's part of a trend we're seeing across europe, restrictions are being eased in the netherlands, france and denmark. but with all these rules — there are a lots of grey areas. for instance here in the uk there are supermarkets, sainsbury�*s waitrose, who will continue to ask customers to wear masks in their stores. the same goes for rail operators. its mandatory to wear a face covering on london's transport services. and in northern ireland, scotland and wales masks will remain compulsory in all indoor settings.
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in america wearing a mask is a badge of politics and how you view the approach to covid—i9 but are you seeing changes, the people feel confused about where to wear a mask and when? i confused about where to wear a mask and when? ~' ~' confused about where to wear a mask and when? ,, ,:, ,, �*, and when? i think so. i think it's frustrating _ and when? i think so. i think it's frustrating and _ and when? i think so. i think it's frustrating and became - and when? i think so. i think it's frustrating and became culturall frustrating and became cultural and political and regional and i was in miami yesterday speaking at a conference and no one wears a mask and you arrive in new york and everyone is wearing a mask and what i would like to say is trust in science and try not to listen to the misinformation out there and ultimately we are at a phase of their pandemic wear masks are going to be warranted and we are getting to be warranted and we are getting to a milder strand of the virus and what concerns me more than anything else is the abundance of misinformation out there and a very good portion of my fellow countrymen that no longer trust the political,
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medical or business establishment and we have to figure out a way to bring them back into the fold and i hope we will. bring them back into the fold and i hope we will-— bring them back into the fold and i hope we will. when you fly down to miami or around _ hope we will. when you fly down to miami or around the _ hope we will. when you fly down to miami or around the united - hope we will. when you fly down to miami or around the united statesl miami or around the united states and all you do a lot of travel. do you encounter scenarios where passengers will not wear a mask and you see the row as we encounter on social media? i you see the row as we encounter on social media?— social media? i have personally not seeinu social media? i have personally not seeing that- _ social media? i have personally not seeing that- l _ social media? i have personally not seeing that. i have _ social media? i have personally not seeing that. i have seen _ social media? i have personally not seeing that. i have seen it - social media? i have personally not seeing that. i have seen it on - seeing that. i have seen it on social media but i fly regularly and i think people wear them once or twice and they put the mask on and the masks are more rls on inside the airport and making the assumption in the next four months those things will be relaxed and i think at this point people are learning to live with the risk and i certainly am and i think it's time we have to get the economy moving again because you have got suicide rates and mental hail diseases up and that is a
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balancing test that has to be made now to one half years this crisis and i hope we strike the right balance and intersect between what's good for the majority of citizens while keeping those that are at risk safe. i while keeping those that are at risk safe. , , ., :, safe. i get the sense that other eo - le safe. i get the sense that other people feel _ safe. i get the sense that other people feel the _ safe. i get the sense that other people feel the same _ safe. i get the sense that other people feel the same but - safe. i get the sense that other people feel the same but a - safe. i get the sense that other people feel the same but a wet safe. i get the sense that other. people feel the same but a wet to tuscany recently and i was quite surprised how cautious italians are. if that because of how the pandemic started in italy?— started in italy? yes. we cannot underestimate _ started in italy? yes. we cannot underestimate how _ started in italy? yes. we cannot underestimate how traumatic i started in italy? yes. we cannot underestimate how traumatic it | started in italy? yes. we cannot - underestimate how traumatic it was in italy. i think in general although you have had mentioned that his populist trying to exploit the pandemic it has not a chilly worked much. you do have no facts there is in italy but on a whole you have both on vaccine and mass clearing and following the rolls perhaps a later on italian behaviour and having said this i think there is an element of fatigue kate nash kicking
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in italy as well and there is the sense that we really need to get back to normal also because there needs to be a distinction between giving we have gone through the vaccine will not process that needs to be a return to normal otherwise the incentive of having done so diminishes.— the incentive of having done so diminishes. , :, , , , diminishes. obviously things will chance in diminishes. obviously things will change in the — diminishes. obviously things will change in the next _ diminishes. obviously things will change in the next two _ diminishes. obviously things will change in the next two months l diminishes. obviously things will l change in the next two months but diminishes. obviously things will. change in the next two months but it would be interesting to see how people react. most of them in england have ended today. we will talk in the next few minutes about their supreme court nomination at joe biden will make. stay with us for that. let's look at some of the other stories making headlines today. job—seekers will have to look for
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jobs outside theirfeel job—seekers will have to look for jobs outside their feel or face sanctions. payments have three months to five work —— find work but from thursday it's been reduced to four weeks and the opposition parties say they should be support for people to find the jobs they want. officials why they only have a few days to get their first dose or risk losing theirjobs and they have been caused by this hail request to been caused by this hail request to be delayed beyond the beginning of the deadline and it could make staff shortages worse. barry who has that at the age of 86 during a career that spanned 65 years and worked for the biggest names in the industry and was an institution here and he said he never met a nicer, crying their move more cheerful man.
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president biden says he will announce his nominee to replace supreme courtjustice stephen breyer by the end of february. and he's also confirmed today that he'll be nominating the first african american woman to the bench. justice breyer formally announced his retirement in the roosevelt room of the white house this afternoon. he will stand down he says when the court rises for the summer recess, assuming that by then, his successor has been nominated and confirmed. i have made no decision except one. the person i will nominate will be some one of extraordinary qualifications and character experience and integrity. that person will be the first black woman ever nominated to the united states supreme court. it's long overdue inmate view and i made that commitment during campaign for president and i will keep that commitment. joining us now is thiruvendran vignarajah — a lawyer — who served as a clerk forjustice stephen breyer.
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i will pull up a list of those on the shortlist on the and maybe you can pick two of them aims out of the seven who you think are the front runners. �* , :, . , seven who you think are the front runners. h :, : , ..,, seven who you think are the front runners. h :, . , ..,, :, runners. it's an incredible cast of options the _ runners. it's an incredible cast of options the president _ runners. it's an incredible cast of options the president has - runners. it's an incredible cast of options the president has and . runners. it's an incredible cast of options the president has and i l options the president has and i thinkjust as kruger and thejudge are the leading front runners for good reason there exceptionally well—qualified and considered measured and moderate and respected by their peers and the kind of italians within their feel that i think president biden would like to see on the supreme court and both of them would be ready successes to his legacy. them would be ready successes to his lea . ,, :, , ., them would be ready successes to his lea . ,, :, ,., ., them would be ready successes to his lea . ,, :, w :, . ,, them would be ready successes to his leua , ,, ., ., . ~' ., legacy. showers a former clerk for justice and — legacy. showers a former clerk for justice and she's _ legacy. showers a former clerk for justice and she's already - legacy. showers a former clerk for justice and she's already been - justice and she's already been through a vetting process because showers selected for the courts and she's been through the interviews and met the president and 51 i did have to say she really does take all the boxes if you want to do this
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quickly. in the boxes if you want to do this cuickl . :, , the boxes if you want to do this cuickl. :, , :, quickly. in many ways both of them do and there _ quickly. in many ways both of them do and there for— quickly. in many ways both of them do and there for are _ quickly. in many ways both of them do and there for are both _ do and there for are both exceptionally well—qualified and harvard and yale law school both of them on the supreme court and they have gone through this kind of thinking privately that the judge has gone to publicly and i think this is going to be done in a deliberate way that the justice has given president biden some runway and as an option to take this all the way for and i would imagine it would be a swift confirmation no matter who the nominee is. i was lookin: at matter who the nominee is. i was looking at the _ matter who the nominee is. i was looking at the nomination - matter who the nominee is. i was looking at the nomination of - matter who the nominee is. iwas looking at the nomination of the three donald trump pics that made it to the bench. age becomes a key factor because you don't want to be going to the process with a justice retiring from the bench too often.
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it is a modern trend in the us supreme court, the supreme court that hejoined when supreme court, the supreme court that he joined when he was nominated and confirmed in 1994 is different and confirmed in 1994 is different and not only were the justices confirmed by overwhelming margins many of them unanimously but it was the case that many of them were older and justice thurgood marshall what it was in his late 50s and that was very common back then and both confirmed unanimously but today we inherit a very different court and the president has to worry about the polarisation of each of those votes and it's become a modern—day trend and it's become a modern—day trend and democrats and republicans contributed to this and restarts flooring the appropriate age because we think that means he can count thatjustice is sitting on the court for that much longer. this thatjustice is sitting on the court for that much longer.— thatjustice is sitting on the court for that much longer. this is a very rare opportunity — for that much longer. this is a very rare opportunity for _ for that much longer. this is a very rare opportunity for a _ for that much longer. this is a very rare opportunity for a struggling i rare opportunity for a struggling president to re—energize his party.
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there is no question about that but i want to thank them because i noticed the baltimore boiled behind him. i noticed the baltimore boiled behind him. ., :, noticed the baltimore boiled behind him. ~ ., :, :, , him. i think we are going to end up with these situations _ him. i think we are going to end up with these situations where - him. i think we are going to end up with these situations where he - him. i think we are going to end up i with these situations where he asked one of— with these situations where he asked one of the _ with these situations where he asked one of the younger of those candidates and there's been speculation which i think is ridiculous about the vice president and i— ridiculous about the vice president and i think— ridiculous about the vice president and i think it's one of the two but i and i think it's one of the two but i had to— and i think it's one of the two but i had to guess given the political situation — i had to guess given the political situation we are in he is going to want _ situation we are in he is going to want to go— situation we are in he is going to want to go for somebody younger because _ want to go for somebody younger because he wants to last longer on the court — because he wants to last longer on the court. do because he wants to last longer on the court. ,, the court. do you think when you look at the _ the court. do you think when you look at the bench _ the court. do you think when you look at the bench at _ the court. do you think when you look at the bench at the - the court. do you think when you look at the bench at the momentj the court. do you think when you i look at the bench at the moment do you see this making any change to the way the court impacts the lives of american people and it's a conservative majority putting an african—american woman on the banks —— on the banks change things? i think it matters for a lot of different reasons. including the
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supreme court and let's be honest for a very long time in american history supreme court consisted of nine white then and i think president biden recognises that likely means there were many talented terrorists that were overlooked and talented lawyers that were overlooked and trying to correct that history not only makes the supreme court better but it sends a clear signal to the diverse nation we probably have that everybody�*s voice in many ways is represented on supreme court and that makes the legitimacy of the court stronger and that justice always lived and breathed the belief that the supreme court is an independent institution and more than any other and back for him is notjust a picture of constitutional design is a prerequisite for the people following the rule of law and
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following the supreme court decisions and i think having a diverse representative on the help stat. :, ., diverse representative on the help stat. :, ,, , :, diverse representative on the help stat. :, ~' , :, , diverse representative on the help stat. :, ,, i. , . diverse representative on the help stat. :, ,, , : :, diverse representative on the help stat. :, ,, , . :, ., stat. thank you very much for that. when ou stat. thank you very much for that. when you talk— stat. thank you very much for that. when you talk about _ stat. thank you very much for that. when you talk about the _ stat. thank you very much for that. when you talk about the courts i stat. thank you very much for that. when you talk about the courts it's| when you talk about the courts it's getting younger and the politicians are getting older and i will talk to you in a minute about your presidential election but nancy pelosi is running at the speaker and she is 81 and here is the president, the former president playing golf yesterday and he was president number 45 and if he was elected again he would be 77. have a listen to president trump. gem again he would be 77. have a listen to president trump.—
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that would suggest to me he raining again that the only question i have is where are all the young politicians in america? look what the do to politicians in america? look what they do to you — politicians in america? look what they do to you in _ politicians in america? look what they do to you in politics. i politicians in america? look what they do to you in politics. they i they do to you in politics. they frighten you. i have my inlet and a phd on what these people are like. a lot of people just opt out of the system the opportunity gusts are so high but i want to point out that president trump right now is putting 36% in the republican party and the republican party is losing registrations and they are down to about 27% sell his base is down to 10% maybe it was 30 a year ago but he has no chance of making it to be the 27th president. and not on the exact, that's a whole group of us that will be fighting every step of the way. i
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that will be fighting every step of the wa . :, :, that will be fighting every step of thewa. :, :, ., ,, ., the way. i want to talk about the italian interaction _ the way. i want to talk about the italian interaction presidential. l the way. i want to talk about the | italian interaction presidential. if he became the president that leaves a big hole in the government, does the italian parliament employed and cancer it comes down to distant woman down there in the bottom right corner, who is she? she is head of the intelligence services and she has she is a big match and ben secretary—general and she's highly competent and i have nothing to say against her she's a woman of the state and having said this i think it's problematic that parliament cannot come up with a politician that has, precisely. i think there's something odd to put as president which of course also an into the
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head of thejudiciary which of course also an into the head of the judiciary someone who is currently hitting the intelligence services. it's all about renewal. we will take a break and come back. we have more ahead. good evening. most of us saw a bit of blue sky around on thursday, and with those clear skies as we head through this evening and overnight, temperatures are falling fairly quickly. so, certainly a touch of frost around for many areas tonight and a few pockets of mist and fog here and there, too. the winds are falling light through the rest of this evening. we've got those clear skies, so you can see a bit of fogginess developing, particularly parts of england and wales, too. for scotland and northern ireland, the breeze is picking up from the northwest, a bit more cloud moving in, keeping temperatures around 4 degrees here. but for many of us, we're close to freezing, if not a few degrees below in more rural spots. heading on into friday, then — high pressure sits to the south of the uk. we've got weather fronts moving in from the northwest — quite a few isobars on the map
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in the north — and the winds are coming in from a south—westerly direction, rotating around that area of high pressure, so bringing that pretty mild air, that warm front moving across the uk. we'lljust hang onto the cooler conditions for parts of southeast england and east anglia. once mist and fog clears away from the south and east, some sunny spells here. elsewhere, a fairly cloudy day, outbreaks of rain heaviest across northern and western scotland, but perhaps a few splashes further south close to some of these irish sea coasts. 10 or 11 degrees for most of us, a little bit cooler for east anglia, as that mist and fog will be a little bit slow to clear away. now, moving through friday night and on into saturday — still, high pressure sets to the south and more weather fronts move in from the atlantic towards the northwest. it'll be quite a windy day on saturday. here's this fairly narrow band of patchy rain, you can see, pushing south across the uk, followed by clearer skies with blustery showers as well. so, it's going to be mild in the south, 13 or 14 degrees, but turning colder from the north with those showers. little bit wintry over the higher ground, and you will notice the strength of the wind on saturday.
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blustery wherever you are, 30 mph gusts in the south, but 60 mph towards western isles. a blustery sort of day. sunday, we have the next area of low pressure driving in rain initially for northern ireland, into scotland and perhaps fairly heavy snow over the mountains for a time on sunday. further south should be staying dry. a cooler day compared to saturday with temperatures across the board between 5—10 degrees. into next week in the south, it stays largely dry and settled, but further north and west, with outbreaks of rain, and things turning colder towards the end of next week. bye— bye.
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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching context on bbc news. a book tackling the horrors of the holocaust is removed from tennessee schools. on the day the world marks the liberation of auschwitz — the pulitzer prize—winning book maus is taken off schools shelves. estonia is top of the class in education. we will hear from the estonian foreign minister about what they are doing right. is tinned food back and fancy? michelin star chef raymond blanc thinks so — we'll give you our verdict. tonight with the context, nathalie tocci, political scientist and former advisor to the eu's foreign policy chief, and the american entrepreneur and former white house communications director, anthony scaramucci.
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welcome back. across the world, it is holocaust rememberance day. which always spurs the question how should we remember, and how should we teach the important lessons of the holocaust to a younger generation? well, right on cue, a school board in tennessee has banned from the classrooms the pulitzer prize—winning novel maus. it's a children book that casts the nazis as a cat, and thejews as mice, other nations as different animals, and it depicts how the author's father, a polishjew survived auschwitz. art speigelman said he was baffled by the decision to ban it. one member of the school board in tennassee said, "i am not denying the holocaust was horrible, brutal, and cruel," but this book, "it shows people hanging, it shows them killing kids, why does the educational system promote this kind of stuff? it is not wise or healthy." joining us now is professor gregory spinner. he teaches jewish studies
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at skidmore college in new york. professor, thanks very much for being with us. why don't you answer that question to that board member in tennessee? why do educational boards teach the holocaust, and why do they use this book was green well the choice of book, i think... maus is a masterpiece. _ the choice of book, i think... maus is a masterpiece. i— the choice of book, i think... maus is a masterpiece. i wouldn't i the choice of book, i think... maus is a masterpiece. i wouldn't say i the choice of book, i think... maus is a masterpiece. i wouldn't say was a is a masterpiece. iwouldn't say was a children's— is a masterpiece. i wouldn't say was a children's book, _ is a masterpiece. iwouldn't say was a children's book, it— is a masterpiece. iwouldn't say was a children's book, it wasn't- a children's book, it wasn't designed _ a children's book, it wasn't designed to— a children's book, it wasn't designed to be, _ a children's book, it wasn't designed to be, even- a children's book, it wasn't. designed to be, even though a children's book, it wasn't- designed to be, even though it's illustrated — designed to be, even though it's illustrated using _ designed to be, even though it's illustrated using animal - illustrated using animal protagonists. _ illustrated using animal protagonists. but- illustrated using animal protagonists. but i- illustrated using animali protagonists. but i think illustrated using animal i protagonists. but i think it is comparable _ protagonists. but i think it is comparable to— protagonists. but i think it is comparable to orwell's i protagonists. but i think it is. comparable to orwell's animal protagonists. but i think it is- comparable to orwell's animal farm. it is comparable to orwell's animal farm. it is a _ comparable to orwell's animal farm. it is a work— comparable to orwell's animal farm. it is a work that— comparable to orwell's animal farm. it is a work that grapples _ comparable to orwell's animal farm. it is a work that grapples with - it is a work that grapples with transgenerational_ it is a work that grapples with transgenerational trauma, i it is a work that grapples with| transgenerational trauma, and it is a work that grapples with i transgenerational trauma, and it can't ~~ — transgenerational trauma, and it can't~~~ you _ transgenerational trauma, and it can't... you cannot _ transgenerational trauma, and it can't... you cannot engage i transgenerational trauma, and it can't... you cannot engage a i transgenerational trauma, and it- can't... you cannot engage a subject like the _ can't... you cannot engage a subject like the show. — can't... you cannot engage a subject like the show, the _ can't... you cannot engage a subject like the show, the holocaust - can't... you cannot engage a subject like the show, the holocaust and i like the show, the holocaust and make _ like the show, the holocaust and make it — like the show, the holocaust and make it completely—
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like the show, the holocaust and make it completely sanitised,. . like the show, the holocaust and make it completely sanitised,. ifj make it completely sanitised,. if you just — make it completely sanitised,. if you just talk _ make it completely sanitised,. if you just talk away _ make it completely sanitised,. if you just talk away from - make it completely sanitised,. if you just talk away from the i make it completely sanitised,. if you just talk away from the fact. you just talk away from the fact that people _ you just talk away from the fact that people are _ you just talk away from the fact that people are being _ you just talk away from the fact. that people are being murdered, you're _ that people are being murdered, you're not— that people are being murdered, you're not actually— that people are being murdered, you're not actually teaching i that people are being murdered, you're not actually teaching the i you're not actually teaching the subject — you're not actually teaching the subject it _ you're not actually teaching the subject it is— you're not actually teaching the subject it is a _ you're not actually teaching the subject. it is a confrontation i you're not actually teaching the i subject. it is a confrontation with atrocity~ — subject. it is a confrontation with atrocity~ so — subject. it is a confrontation with atrocity. so you _ subject. it is a confrontation with atrocity. so you look— subject. it is a confrontation with atrocity. so you look to - subject. it is a confrontation with atrocity. so you look to a - subject. it is a confrontation with atrocity. so you look to a book. subject. it is a confrontation with i atrocity. so you look to a book like maus _ atrocity. so you look to a book like maus because _ atrocity. so you look to a book like maus because it— atrocity. so you look to a book like maus because it humanises - atrocity. so you look to a book like maus because it humanises and i maus because it humanises and complicates _ maus because it humanises and complicates the _ maus because it humanises and complicates the very _ maus because it humanises and complicates the very difficult i complicates the very difficult topic, — complicates the very difficult topic, a _ complicates the very difficult topic. a very— complicates the very difficult topic, a very unpleasant i complicates the very difficult i topic, a very unpleasant topic. but it cannot _ topic, a very unpleasant topic. but it cannot simply _ topic, a very unpleasant topic. but it cannot simply be _ topic, a very unpleasant topic. but it cannot simply be pleasing, i topic, a very unpleasant topic. but it cannot simply be pleasing, or. it cannot simply be pleasing, or it's not— it cannot simply be pleasing, or it's not actually— it cannot simply be pleasing, or it's not actually talking - it cannot simply be pleasing, or it's not actually talking about i it cannot simply be pleasing, or. it's not actually talking about the holocaust — it's not actually talking about the holocaust. its _ it's not actually talking about the holocaust. , :, ., ., holocaust. its rough language because it _ holocaust. its rough language because it is _ holocaust. its rough language because it is the _ holocaust. its rough language because it is the holocaust! . because it is the holocaust! sometimes you can't hide that from children, and that's part of the education. but is it part of a larger trend, we talked on the programme the other night, is it part of a trend of conservative states where certain books that begged questions about very difficult history are being banned? well, i'm notan difficult history are being banned? well, i'm not an expert on what's happening — well, i'm not an expert on what's happening across _
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well, i'm not an expert on what's happening across the _ well, i'm not an expert on what's happening across the united i well, i'm not an expert on what's l happening across the united states in terms _ happening across the united states in terms of— happening across the united states in terms of school _ happening across the united states in terms of school boards. - happening across the united states in terms of school boards. i- happening across the united states in terms of school boards. i do i in terms of school boards. i do think— in terms of school boards. i do think school— in terms of school boards. i do think school boards _ in terms of school boards. i do think school boards are - in terms of school boards. idol think school boards are entitled in terms of school boards. i do i think school boards are entitled to make _ think school boards are entitled to make decisions— think school boards are entitled to make decisions on— think school boards are entitled to make decisions on what _ think school boards are entitled to make decisions on what is - make decisions on what is age—appropriate. - make decisions on what is age—appropriate. i'm - make decisions on what is age—appropriate. i'm veryi make decisions on what is - age—appropriate. i'm very much appalled — age—appropriate. i'm very much appalled by— age—appropriate. i'm very much appalled by increasing - age—appropriate. i'm very much appalled by increasing banningi age—appropriate. i'm very much - appalled by increasing banning books - ithink_ appalled by increasing banning books - ithink it's— appalled by increasing banning books — i think it's maybe _ appalled by increasing banning books — i think it's maybe better— appalled by increasing banning books — i think it's maybe better to - — i think it's maybe better to reframe _ — i think it's maybe better to reframe it _ — i think it's maybe better to reframe it as, _ — i think it's maybe better to reframe it as, what - — i think it's maybe better to reframe it as, what is- reframe it as, what is age—appropriate - reframe it as, what is age—appropriate if. reframe it as, what isl age—appropriate if you reframe it as, what is- age—appropriate if you are reframe it as, what is— age—appropriate if you are worried about— age—appropriate if you are worried about children _ age—appropriate if you are worried about children being _ age—appropriate if you are worried about children being too _ age—appropriate if you are worried about children being too young - age—appropriate if you are worried about children being too young to| about children being too young to read this— about children being too young to read this particular— about children being too young to read this particular work, - about children being too young to read this particular work, lois - read this particular work, lois lowry— read this particular work, lois lowry wrote _ read this particular work, lois lowry wrote a _ read this particular work, lois lowry wrote a newberry- read this particular work, lois| lowry wrote a newberry metal read this particular work, lois - lowry wrote a newberry metal mike winning _ lowry wrote a newberry metal mike winning book— lowry wrote a newberry metal mike winning book - _ lowry wrote a newberry metal mike winning book — you're _ lowry wrote a newberry metal mike winning book — you're looking - lowry wrote a newberry metal mike winning book — you're looking at- winning book — you're looking at someone — winning book — you're looking at someone who— winning book — you're looking at someone who is _ winning book — you're looking at someone who is preteen - winning book — you're looking at| someone who is preteen wanting winning book — you're looking at. someone who is preteen wanting to talk about— someone who is preteen wanting to talk about the — someone who is preteen wanting to talk about the holocaust, _ someone who is preteen wanting to talk about the holocaust, it - someone who is preteen wanting to talk about the holocaust, it would i talk about the holocaust, it would be nialerial— talk about the holocaust, it would be material that _ talk about the holocaust, it would be material that i— talk about the holocaust, it would be material that i as _ talk about the holocaust, it would be material that i as a _ talk about the holocaust, it would be material that i as a parent- talk about the holocaust, it would i be material that i as a parent might find more _ be material that i as a parent might find more age—appropriate. - be material that i as a parent might find more age—appropriate. i- be material that i as a parent might find more age—appropriate. i think. find more age—appropriate. i think the idea _ find more age—appropriate. i think the idea of— find more age—appropriate. i think the idea of banning _ find more age—appropriate. i think the idea of banning books- find more age—appropriate. i think the idea of banning books has- find more age—appropriate. i think. the idea of banning books has always been bad _ the idea of banning books has always been bad. a, v the idea of banning books has always been bad. a, �* , a, the idea of banning books has always been bad. i, �*, i, i , been bad. that's what concerns me, i must sa . been bad. that's what concerns me, i must say. anthony, _ been bad. that's what concerns me, i must say. anthony, come _ been bad. that's what concerns me, i must say. anthony, come on - been bad. that's what concerns me, i must say. anthony, come on this, - must say. anthony, come on this, would you? it's amazing in america,
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and maybe we will speak about this internet story, but it's amazing in america how education has become so political. what do you make of this decision? i’m political. what do you make of this decision? �* , i, , , political. what do you make of this decision? �* , , i, decision? i'm probably a little stronuer decision? i'm probably a little stronger than _ decision? i'm probably a little stronger than professor - decision? i'm probably a little i stronger than professor spinner decision? i'm probably a little - stronger than professor spinner or even _ stronger than professor spinner or even the _ stronger than professor spinner or even the author — i'm not baffled, i find it— even the author — i'm not baffled, i find it tragic — even the author — i'm not baffled, i find it tragic. at the end of the day, _ find it tragic. at the end of the day, we — find it tragic. at the end of the day, we have to enlighten our people as early— day, we have to enlighten our people as early as _ day, we have to enlighten our people as early as possible to the potential for human on human crime in this— potential for human on human crime in this level — potential for human on human crime in this level of atrocity. so i think— in this level of atrocity. so i think that _ in this level of atrocity. so i think that book came out when i was 22—23, _ think that book came out when i was 22-23. i_ think that book came out when i was 22-23. ileft— think that book came out when i was 22—23, i left college on the way to law school — 22—23, i left college on the way to law school. i read it and shared it with people. my adult children have frankly— with people. my adult children have frankly read the book. the first time _ frankly read the book. the first time i— frankly read the book. the first time i was _ frankly read the book. the first time i was introduced to the holocaust was from a survivor who happened — holocaust was from a survivor who happened to be my social studies professor— happened to be my social studies professor in the tenth grade in an american — professor in the tenth grade in an american high school out here on long _ american high school out here on long island. and to me, you have to tell people _ long island. and to me, you have to tell people early, they have to be aware _ tell people early, they have to be aware of — tell people early, they have to be aware of this. this is the reason
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why i_ aware of this. this is the reason why i will— aware of this. this is the reason why i will fight forever against the forces of— why i will fight forever against the forces of people like donald trump and the _ forces of people like donald trump and the forces of demagoguery and autocracv — and the forces of demagoguery and autocracy. because we have to protect _ autocracy. because we have to protect the minorities in our society, _ protect the minorities in our society, and it starts with people ofjewish — society, and it starts with people ofjewish faith and other people. and i_ ofjewish faith and other people. and i find — ofjewish faith and other people. and i find it tragic. so baffled isn't — and i find it tragic. so baffled isn't even _ and i find it tragic. so baffled isn't even a strong enough word for me. �* i, i, me. i've lived in rome, i note there is difficult history _ me. i've lived in rome, i note there is difficult history there _ me. i've lived in rome, i note there is difficult history there of _ me. i've lived in rome, i note there is difficult history there of what - is difficult history there of what happened between the second world war... how do italians teach about it in history? war. .. how do italians teach about it in history?— it in history? historically this is a big day- _ it in history? historically this is a big day- this _ it in history? historically this is a big day. this is _ it in history? historically this is a big day. this is always - it in history? historically this is a big day. this is always a - it in history? historically this is i a big day. this is always a day for which the dust from the president of the republic to the prime minister, to both houses of parliament, all political leaders — what's become now the norm is that even leaders from extreme right wing parties, if we can come back to this, in words
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and on papers they all speak out about this mistake. so the country is constitutionally and politically united on this question. in rome alone, today we are still in covid times, there were 42 initiatives on this day. i think the question, and here we come back to the book issue, is how to make sure that this remains deeply embedded within the younger generations, and therefore through the education system. i completely agree with both panelists, one needs to say things as they are, it's not a question of sugar—coating an absolute atrocious reality, but at the same time doing it in a way that comes across to children. you need to do it in precisely the way that maus does. professor, it's been great to have
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your company, thanks very much for your company, thanks very much for your time. your company, thanks very much for our time. i, ~ your company, thanks very much for our time. i, ,, , i, your company, thanks very much for your time._ let's - your company, thanks very much for your time._ let's teach i your time. thank you. let's teach with dutch _ your time. thank you. let's teach with dutch stick _ your time. thank you. let's teach with dutch stick with _ your time. thank you. let's teach with dutch stick with teaching - your time. thank you. let's teach | with dutch stick with teaching and how we teach our children. in the baltic state of estonia, children learn robotics from the age of seven, and teachers use virtual reality to bring their lessons to life. exams are online, school work and homework is done digitially. there are no regular school inspections, head teachers are free to decide how they shape the curriculum. and you know what — they are now one of the top countries in the world in the three areas on which is—year—olds are assessed — maths, reading, and science. not only that, their education strategy is set until 2035. they are an example to follow. i have been speaking to the estonian foreign minister, eva maria limets. estonia's success in education comes, i would say, from small, smart choices. after regaining our independence in 1991, we had an opportunity to rebuild our educational system. and of course, it was a very difficult and challenging time, because we came out
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from the soviet occupation. but our politicians made, for example, digitalisation a priority for estonian schools. it seems to me, reading the story about estonia, that trust is a big thing — trusting teachers, trusting children, and a freedom to learn, and to set the curriculum without the interference of politicians and school inspectors. would that be right? of course, we have freedom of expression. all the fundamental freedoms are protected, and i'm glad to say that estonia also ranks on the second place in terms of internet freedom. and here, of course, the schools are also connected to the internet, the teaching materials are in the cloud, and they have a free choices in the educational system. of course, we have a ministry of education who also provides the curriculum for every age.
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but all in all, this system really provides good results — for example, estonia also has ranked on the first and second place in terms of pisa system. just on the conflict itself, i know you've been speaking to your counterpart in finland today — is there a conversation in the baltic states about what is coming? and are you worried about what an invasion in ukraine might mean for you? we follow these developments, which are a great concern, of course, in our region, because this security is not the only security threat to ukraine, but the whole of europe. and it would create very unstable security situation for the whole region. therefore, of course, we are worried in the region, and we all contribute to the diplomatic efforts to help to avoid this escalation that we're talking about, unfortunately. and just a final quick word
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on germany, because we've been talking about it on the programme. they're not sending arms, they've been criticised today for sending helmets, while other countries are sending anti—tank missiles. do you feel that you're getting support from the centre from the biggest members in the european union? i would say that all the countries have contributed to these diplomatic efforts, and we have had very strong and united messages out of both the european union and also nato. and this is very important — to keep this unity among allies. foreign minister, we're very grateful for your time this evening. thank you very much. thank you, have a good evening. it's really interesting, this, natalie, because she mentioned there... in the context of ukraine and what's happening in the context of their freedoms, there and what's happening in the context of theirfreedoms, there is and what's happening in the context of their freedoms, there is a country that's come out of the soviet union in 1991 and, in short
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years, they're leading the way in education, they have the freedom to decide the curriculum. what do you make of that? i decide the curriculum. what do you make of that?— make of that? i think estonia has been extremely _ make of that? i think estonia has been extremely smart, _ make of that? i think estonia has been extremely smart, as - make of that? i think estonia has been extremely smart, as a - make of that? i think estonia has| been extremely smart, as a small country, in picking one particular area where it really wanted to excel in. and you see this happening across the board. so whether it's e e—voting and democracy and the education system, and robotics, whether it's defence and cyber capabilities, there's obviously a silver lining connecting all these thoughts. so i think there is both the question of specialisation, and also nation—building and identity building around this question. but also, as the foreign minister was highlighting, the results are there. and i think it has both to do with
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method as well as the subjects that are taught, but also really putting the emphasis on individuals more thanjust the acute the emphasis on individuals more than just the acute relation of knowledge. than just the acute relation of knowledge-— than just the acute relation of knowledue. �* i, , �* , i, knowledge. anthony, i'll put on screen for _ knowledge. anthony, i'll put on screen for viewers _ knowledge. anthony, i'll put on screen for viewers what - knowledge. anthony, i'll put on - screen for viewers what businesses in the uk want. when you look at the demands they put on young people even universities, 92% say digital skills are important, at a basic level. young people recognise it, thejob level. young people recognise it, the job vacancies are for these skills, 82% of the job vacancies currently in the uk are for digital skills. are we following estonia's example? is your country teaching the skills that entrepreneurs like you need? i the skills that entrepreneurs like ou need? i, , i, i, , you need? i mean, the short answer is no. in you need? i mean, the short answer is n0- in many _ you need? i mean, the short answer is no. in many pots— you need? i mean, the short answer is no. in many pots pockets - you need? i mean, the short answer is no. in many pots pockets of- you need? i mean, the short answer is no. in many pots pockets of the i is no. in many pots pockets of the country _ is no. in many pots pockets of the country - — is no. in many pots pockets of the
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country - and _ is no. in many pots pockets of the country — and the longer answer is yes in— country — and the longer answer is yes in certain _ country — and the longer answer is yes in certain pockets. if you tell me the _ yes in certain pockets. if you tell me the zip— yes in certain pockets. if you tell me the zip code of the child in the united states, i can tell you whether— united states, i can tell you whether or not they are getting a good _ whether or not they are getting a good education. i think the most important — good education. i think the most important part of your story as it relates— important part of your story as it relates to — important part of your story as it relates to estonia is policy and culture — relates to estonia is policy and culture. ultimately senior leadership in estonia made a decision— leadership in estonia made a decision that they would push this intellectual capital growth on their people. _ intellectual capital growth on their people, and now they are seeing the results _ people, and now they are seeing the results i_ people, and now they are seeing the results. i would people, and now they are seeing the results. iwould implore people, and now they are seeing the results. i would implore the people of the _ results. i would implore the people of the uk _ results. i would implore the people of the uk and the us, it doesn't necessarily have to be here in the united _ necessarily have to be here in the united kingdom, let's draw from some of the _ united kingdom, let's draw from some of the trest— united kingdom, let's draw from some of the best practices around the world _ of the best practices around the world and — of the best practices around the world and import them into our countries — world and import them into our countries to help our young children _ countries to help our young children-— countries to help our young children. �*, i, i, , children. it's a really good point, that, children. it's a really good point, that. because — children. it's a really good point, that, because when _ children. it's a really good point, that, because when you - children. it's a really good point, that, because when you talk- children. it's a really good point, i that, because when you talk about culture — made in italy was a brand that made its way in goal in the 19705 and 805, but that's gone away as time is past. i
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1970s and 80s, but that's gone away as time is past-— as time is past. i think the problem is i don't think— as time is past. i think the problem is i don't think as _ as time is past. i think the problem is i don't think as much _ as time is past. i think the problem is i don't think as much about - as time is past. i think the problem is i don't think as much about the l is i don't think as much about the question of, our kids learning the digital skills that they need in order to make their way in the 21st century. i think here is why i keep coming back to the country of developing and an analytical capacity, creativity. going back to made in italy, it was all about creativity. the education system, more broadly in continental europe is that it's still very focused on learning notions, rather than developing your individual creativity. developing your individual creativity-— developing your individual creativi .~ i, i, ,, i, creativity. we have to think estonia for s , creativity. we have to think estonia for sky. we — creativity. we have to think estonia for sky. we are _ creativity. we have to think estonia for sky, we are indebted _ creativity. we have to think estonia for sky, we are indebted to - creativity. we have to think estonia for sky, we are indebted to them. i for sky, we are indebted to them. anthony, you've written a book on crypto currency which i'll put on the screen for people, free marketing for you. but i want to talk about el salvador because there is a president who thrown his lot in
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with new technology. that coin is legal tender in el salvador, and now bitcoin has absolutely plummeted in the last month or so. bitcoin has absolutely plummeted in the last month or 50. is that a sober lesson for countries who are looking at crypto currency as an alternative to the dollar? first off, i alternative to the dollar? first off. i want _ alternative to the dollar? first off. i want to _ alternative to the dollar? first off, i want to thank _ alternative to the dollar? first off, i want to thank you, - alternative to the dollar? first off, i want to thank you, you | off, i want to thank you, you couldn't— off, i want to thank you, you couldn't possibly dust you could've possibly— couldn't possibly dust you could've possibly triggered a book sale for that book, that could've been the first one — that book, that could've been the first one i— that book, that could've been the first one. i think they've made a great _ first one. i think they've made a great decision. ultimately he's making — great decision. ultimately he's making a — great decision. ultimately he's making a very long—term bet, if we are going _ making a very long—term bet, if we are going to— making a very long—term bet, if we are going to measure him day today, this is— are going to measure him day today, this is an _ are going to measure him day today, this is an early adopting technology, it won't work out day—to—day — he's down about $21 million. _ day—to—day — he's down about $21 million. but— day—to—day — he's down about $21 million, but if we are looking at this over— million, but if we are looking at this over 3—5 years, he's detaching himself— this over 3—5 years, he's detaching himself from dollarisation and the frankly— himself from dollarisation and the frankly mischief around dollarisation, and the malpractice.
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we've _ dollarisation, and the malpractice. we've increased 42% the money supply in the _ we've increased 42% the money supply in the united states over the last 22 months. i want to restate that, 41% more — 22 months. i want to restate that, 41% more dollars in m2, it's showing up in _ 41% more dollars in m2, it's showing up in inflation data all over the world, — up in inflation data all over the world, its— up in inflation data all over the world, its corrupting prices and is actually— world, its corrupting prices and is actually a — world, its corrupting prices and is actually a theft on people who have dollar _ actually a theft on people who have dollar assets, they're basically being — dollar assets, they're basically being taxed by the central bank. i like this— being taxed by the central bank. i like this strategy and if he can stay— like this strategy and if he can stay there — one of the things about politics— stay there — one of the things about politics particularly in the us and uk, it's very related to short termism~ _ uk, it's very related to short termism. if we can think in 3—5 year chunks _ termism. if we can think in 3—5 year chunks of— termism. if we can think in 3—5 year chunks of time, what he's doing in el salvador— chunks of time, what he's doing in el salvador could be transformative. 3-5 vears. _ el salvador could be transformative. 3—5 years, we cannot even think past next week. it’s 3-5 years, we cannot even think past next week. �* , i, , 3-5 years, we cannot even think past next week. �*, i, , , i, , next week. it's a big problem, christian- _ next week. it's a big problem, christian. i— next week. it's a big problem, christian. i scratch _ next week. it's a big problem, christian. i scratch your - next week. it's a big problem, christian. i scratch your back | next week. it's a big problem, i christian. i scratch your back with our christian. i scratch your back with your book. you — christian. i scratch your back with your book, you tell _ christian. i scratch your back with your book, you tell me _ christian. i scratch your back with your book, you tell me when - christian. i scratch your back with your book, you tell me when to l christian. i scratch your back with l your book, you tell me when to buy the dip on that coin, all right, and i'll see what i've got in the bottom of the pocket. it’s
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i'll see what i've got in the bottom of the pocket-— of the pocket. it's never a bad time, christian! _ of the pocket. it's never a bad time, christian! you _ of the pocket. it's never a bad time, christian! you heard - of the pocket. it's never a bad time, christian! you heard it | of the pocket. it's never a bad . time, christian! you heard it here first. we time, christian! you heard it here first- we will _ time, christian! you heard it here first. we will pile _ time, christian! you heard it here first. we will pile in. _ this is context on the bbc. still to come on the programme... a celebrated chef says to and food is the best offering. —— tend food. there are fears a dramatic 90—foot high railway viaduct in cumbria could be forced to close, if £100,000 can't be raised for urgent repairs. smardale gill, near kirkby stephen is regarded as a shining example of the country's victorian heritage. mark mcalindon reports. it's hard to prepare yourself for the splendour that awaits here. high above the narrow scandal beck valley, straddling 1a sandstone arches, with views stretching across the eden fells. but time and the weather are taking their toll. well, water's getting through the cracks and seams
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in the concrete surface, and destabilising the structure. putting it at risk? putting it at risk, absolutely. it's getting worse, you know, we've had an engineer's report, and they basically say the longer you leave it, the more it's going to cost to restore the rest of the viaduct. so we really need to get it surfaced as soon as we can. the viaduct was built in 1861 to carry coal from the north east to the steel furnaces of south and west cumbria. it's a wonderful example of victorian engineering. it was closed in 1962 and later given grade—ii listed status — which means that, while it can't be demolished, access could still be lost. and so, a fundraising campaign has been launched to save this place. 1a peaks for 1a arches is a 90—mile walking challenge taking in surrounding fells. it would be tragic if this viaduct was closed, because it's unsafe, and the only thirst for it to climb the 14 8,000—metre mountains, which is everest, k2, and all the others. and we've now got 14 mountains
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in cumbria to climb to help raise awareness and, well, help raise money to repair this. the walking challenge can be adapted by those who can't do 1a separate peaks — try it in your garden or street, neil says. whichever way you do it, though, there's a race on to save smardale gill. mark mcalindon, bbc look north, near kirkby stephen. i hesitate, in the company of an italian and a new yorker with italian heritage, to mention this last story. but i do want to discuss tinned food. when i were a lad, we ate pie from a tin, spam, and i was addicted — in fact i still am, to carnation milk. now you might look down your nose at me for that, but i am not alone. 99.4% of us brits buy tinned food. and guess what — there is one frenchman who thinks we are on the right path.
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the michelin—starred french chef, raymond blanc, says tinned food is "delicious" and from saturday, he will be showing his viewers all manner of recipe you can prepare with food from a can. i have this image of you picking your way through the fruit and veg in rome and not going anywhere near a tin of food. am i right?— a tin of food. am i right? you're riaht a tin of food. am i right? you're right because — a tin of food. am i right? you're right because that's _ a tin of food. am i right? you're right because that's exactly - a tin of food. am i right? you're l right because that's exactly where a tin of food. am i right? you're i right because that's exactly where i live! �* , live! laughter. i'm live! laughter. l'm not- live! laughter. i'm not sure i live! laughter. i'm not sure you| live! laughter. - i'm not sure you actually live! laughter. _ i'm not sure you actually knew live! laughter. — i'm not sure you actually knew this, i'm not sure you actually knew this, i literally live on the square. i i literally live on the square. i don't think i would do tinned food if i lived there either.— if i lived there either. number three, if i lived there either. number three. you _ if i lived there either. number three, you know— if i lived there either. number three, you know where - if i lived there either. number three, you know where to i if i lived there either. number three, you know where to find if i lived there either. number i three, you know where to find me. but that's exactly what i do, i go to the market and when i don't have veg being sent to my home, i can't member the last time — i don't think i've even bought tinned food, it must�*ve been a university. i was
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thinking about this having dinner and struggling to get my son to finish his veg, and i did actually — the thought did exley past my mind, "have i actually been wrong all along?" "have i actually been wrong all alon: ?" �* i, i along?" but through the pandemic, anthon , along?" but through the pandemic, anthony. 1796 _ along?" but through the pandemic, anthony. 1796 of _ along?" but through the pandemic, anthony, 1796 of us _ along?" but through the pandemic, anthony, 1796 of us here _ along?" but through the pandemic, anthony, 1796 of us here bought i along?" but through the pandemic, l anthony, 1796 of us here bought more anthony, 17% of us here bought more food in cans since the pandemic began. sales of tinned food went up almost 20% in the first year, it's the warm mentality were re—rushed out to get tens and toilet roll. what about you? all out to get tens and toilet roll. what about you?— out to get tens and toilet roll. what about you? at least you got a urowth what about you? at least you got a growth industry _ what about you? at least you got a growth industry cardiologist - what about you? at least you got a growth industry cardiologist in i what about you? at least you got a growth industry cardiologist in the l growth industry cardiologist in the uk, i'm _ growth industry cardiologist in the uk, i'm in— growth industry cardiologist in the uk, i'm in natalie's camp. my grandmothertrained me uk, i'm in natalie's camp. my grandmother trained me well, uk, i'm in natalie's camp. my grandmothertrained me well, she uk, i'm in natalie's camp. my grandmother trained me well, she was directly— grandmother trained me well, she was directly from italy and i teased my uk friends, you know, when you guys are hanging _ uk friends, you know, when you guys are hanging out with us in an italian condition, it's a form of social— italian condition, it's a form of social climbing for you guys. you may have — social climbing for you guys. you may have us on pomp and
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circumstance, but i'll sit with natalie — circumstance, but i'll sit with natalie and admire her kitchen over yours _ natalie and admire her kitchen over yours any— natalie and admire her kitchen over yours any day, christian. but natalie and admire her kitchen over yours any day, christian.— yours any day, christian. but it's not 'ust yours any day, christian. but it's rrot just pies _ yours any day, christian. but it's not just pies intends _ yours any day, christian. but it's notjust pies intends any - yours any day, christian. but it's notjust pies intends any more i yours any day, christian. but it's| notjust pies intends any more or spam, we now selljack fruit from the rain forests of malaysia in tin cans, and the sales object route went up 30% in the last months. that's the serious point, if you want exotic foods and you want to keep them, tinned food is the way to go. i keep them, tinned food is the way to to. ~' keep them, tinned food is the way to go. i think that's right, i'm sure there are _ go. i think that's right, i'm sure there are recipes _ go. i think that's right, i'm sure there are recipes that, - go. i think that's right, i'm sure there are recipes that, as the i there are recipes that, as the french chef was mentioning, that may use bits and bobs out of tinned food like exotic fruit. of course, if beyond the general fruit and veg, you also have, as i tend to organic meat, have a preference for fruit and veg that is actually grown relatively close. for health and environmental reasons — you may or
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shall prefer to have your recipes without that exotic fruit. speaking to my cardiologist, _ without that exotic fruit. speaking to my cardiologist, anthony, i without that exotic fruit. speaking to my cardiologist, anthony, 1. without that exotic fruit. speaking i to my cardiologist, anthony, i think i know that if i was eating a can of tender vegetables, that might not be the way to go. but i've seen programmes recently where they say that tend to fish keeps all its good properties, all the nutrients are there in the ten.— properties, all the nutrients are there in the ten. christian, believe whatever you _ there in the ten. christian, believe whatever you want, _ there in the ten. christian, believe whatever you want, but _ there in the ten. christian, believe whatever you want, but when i i whatever you want, but when i was looking _ whatever you want, but when i was looking at — whatever you want, but when i was looking at that k can, it said sweet and smoky. it should have added, "for the _ and smoky. it should have added, "for the tasteless bloke you." you guys _ "for the tasteless bloke you." you guys are _ "for the tasteless bloke you." you guys are ridiculous, get yourself some _ guys are ridiculous, get yourself some real— guys are ridiculous, get yourself some real food. we guys are ridiculous, get yourself some real food.— guys are ridiculous, get yourself some real food. we don't need a second invite- _ some real food. we don't need a second invite- i'll— some real food. we don't need a second invite- i'lljust_ some real food. we don't need a second invite- i'lljust watch, i some real food. we don't need a| second invite- i'lljust watch, and second invite— i'lljust watch, and who knows, may all the tens are there and i can make something good. you've clearly been outvoted on this. i you've clearly been outvoted on this. i, , you've clearly been outvoted on this. i,, i, , i, you've clearly been outvoted on this. i, , i, , i, i, you've clearly been outvoted on this. i, , i, i, this. i was always going to lose with the italians _ this. i was always going to lose with the italians on _ this. i was always going to lose with the italians on the - this. i was always going to lose i with the italians on the programme. it's been great having both of you.
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thank you for your company this evening, we will be back same time on monday, dojoin us for evening, we will be back same time on monday, do join us for that. thanks for watching, good night. with those clear skies as we head through this evening and overnight, temperatures are falling fairly quickly. so, certainly a touch of frost around for many areas tonight and a few pockets of mist and fog here and there, too. the winds are falling light through the rest of this evening. we've got those clear skies, so you can see a bit of fogginess developing, particularly parts of england and wales, too. for scotland and northern ireland, the breeze is picking up from the northwest, a bit more cloud moving in, keeping temperatures around 1! degrees here. but for many of us, we're close to freezing, if not a few degrees below in more rural spots. heading on into friday, then — high pressure sits to the south of the uk. we've got weather fronts moving in from the northwest — quite a few isobars
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on the map in the north — and the winds are coming in from a south—westerly direction, rotating around that area of high pressure, so bringing that pretty mild air, that warm front moving across the uk. we'lljust hang onto the cooler conditions for parts of southeast england and east anglia. once mist and fog clears away from the south and east, some sunny spells here. elsewhere, a fairly cloudy day, outbreaks of rain heaviest across northern and western scotland, but perhaps a few splashes further south close to some of these irish sea coasts. 10—11 degrees for most of us, a little bit cooler for east anglia, as that mist and fog will be a little bit slow to clear away. now, moving through friday night and on into saturday — still, high pressure sets to the south and more weather fronts move in from the atlantic towards the northwest. it'll be quite a windy day on saturday. here's this fairly narrow band of patchy rain, you can see, pushing south across the uk, followed by clearer skies with blustery showers as well. so, it's going to be mild in the south, 13—11! degrees, but turning colder from the north with those showers. little bit wintry over the higher ground, and you will notice the strength of the wind on saturday. blustery wherever you are, 30 mph gusts in the south, but 60 mph towards western isles.
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a blustery sort of day. sunday, we have the next area of low pressure driving in rain initially for northern ireland, into scotland and perhaps fairly heavy snow over the mountains for a time on sunday. further south should be staying dry. a cooler day compared to saturday with temperatures across the board between 5—10 degrees. into next week in the south, it stays largely dry and settled, but further north and west, with outbreaks of rain, and things turning colder towards the end of next week. bye— bye.
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tonight at ten: as rules on the wearing of face coverings in england are eased, the health secretary says the omicron variant of coronavirus is in retreat. but he argues more nhs staff in england need to be jabbed and mandatory vaccinations is the right policy. it mandatory vaccinations is the right oli . , mandatory vaccinations is the right policy. it is the professional duty of every health _ policy. it is the professional duty of every health care _ policy. it is the professional duty of every health care worker, i policy. it is the professional duty of every health care worker, of. policy. it is the professional duty of every health care worker, of aj of every health care worker, of a social care worker, to get vaccinated to not only protect themselves but most of all to protect the people that they look after everyday. there's just a week to go before the deadline for health care workers to get a firstjab, or be moved away from front—line roles. also tonight... russia readies for possible conflict over ukraine, but says there is room for further dialogue with the west. portraits go on show of some of the uk's last remaining
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survivors of the nazi death camps, on this, holocaust memorial day.

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