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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 27, 2022 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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tim muffet. thank you very evening. tim muffet. thank you very much indeed- _ this is bbc news, i'm geeta guru—murthy. the headlines at eight face coverings are no longer mandatory in england — but some big retailers ask customers to continue wearing them. campaign groups welcome the easing of care home restrictions in england, allowing for unlimited visits from today. borisjohnson says human beings were prioritised during the fall of kabul — it's after suggestions he was personally involved in rescuing animals from pen farthing's charity in afghanistan. this thing is total rhubarb. i was very proud of what our armed services dated. troops training on the border but russia tells the united states that there is still room
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for dialogue over ukraine. these are the images live from the centre of london. as many people gather around the country to remember 77 years since the liberation of the auschwitz birkenau camp on holocaust memorial day. one of the most influential figures in british comedy for the last six decades — barry cryer — has died at the age of 86. 77 years ago today the nazi concentration camp of auschwitz was liberated.
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more thani million people, most of them jewish, were murdered at the camp in occupied poland. today is holocaust memorial day. and to mark it, different artists have painted the portraits of some of the uk's last remaining holocaust survivors. the project was commissioned by prince charles and the people have been encouraged to light candles in their windows at eight o'clock tonightjust as candles in their windows at eight o'clock tonight just as we speak. and at gatherings including here in central london if you can see and we have seen shots all around the country with buildings as you can see from our shots across central london many, many taking part in this lighting up in purple to mark this lighting up in purple to mark this day. our correspondent is that one of those very special events at piccadilly circus innocenti —— centre of london.
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like the darkness is that the human that's what's been going on here. candles have been raped and five holocaust survivors are here and their family and friend as well. i'm delighted to talk to lara, the chair of the holocaust memorial day trust. how important is this event? this is terribly important. thank you for being here today is holocaust memorial day. the 27th of january and it's the daily concentration camp in auschwitz. an honour holocaust memorial day rethink about 6 million men, women and children, jewish people who are murdered by the nazis and the other people murdered by the nazis, the people who weren't black, gay, different, and then he did not end in 1945, he continued in my darfur, bosnia, and even today people are being persecuted for who they are. so today we have a national moment, we are asking people to put a candle in their windows and even despots for a
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moment and think about people who are facing persecution and have been persecuted in the past. it’s persecuted in the past. it's extraordinary _ persecuted in the past. it's extraordinary that we are joined by some holocaust survivors. you said before how important it is that younger people understand and know what went on. how hard it is to get that message across?— what went on. how hard it is to get that message across? there's lots of thin . s that that message across? there's lots of things that peeple — that message across? there's lots of things that people are _ that message across? there's lots of things that people are being - that message across? there's lots of things that people are being told - things that people are being told that they need to learn about but i can't think of anything more important than being talked about and learning about their hatred goes and the last couple of years with the pandemic has been the best of humanity and also the worst of humanity and also the worst of humanity and also the worst of humanity and people are looking for scapegoats modern day anti—semitism is still there and people are looking for people to blame whether it asian people they are blaming and it's really important that we remember that when hatred gets out of hand terrible things can happen. and sell at the holocaust memorial day trust we want everyone to encourage everybody to light the darkness. here we are there at piccadilly circus. we are at the
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centre of london. and all around the country buildings are lighting up in the piccadilly lights are lighting up the piccadilly lights are lighting up in cardiff, the candles, the castles lit up in edinboro and the castles lit up in edinboro and the castles lit up in edinboro and the castles lit up in london and there is buildings and the air saying let us think about bringing a little light so that one day and our theme is this year one day we will not need to do this because one day in the future things will be better. it's notjust about the future things will be better. it's not just about the the future things will be better. it's notjust about the past it about the present and the challenges which many people face today. that’s which many people face today. that's riuht. if which many people face today. that's right- if you — which many people face today. that's right- if you are _ which many people face today. that's right. if you are looking _ which many people face today. that's right. if you are looking at _ which many people face today. that's right. if you are looking at the - right. if you are looking at the muslims in china or the rohingya in myanmar or all around the world people are being persecuted if they are gay or from different faith groups are different ethnicities and it's not finished. he did not and in 1945. and so we are asking young people and older people to get involved. if you go to a ceremony,
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the ceremony hasjust involved. if you go to a ceremony, the ceremony has just finished on that you can pay it back on the website and hear the stories. we have got five wonderful survivors here with us. these are all holocaust survivors and survivors from the other genocides as well and they tell their stories and of course particularly with the holocaust these people are rare. most people who are targeted by the nazis did not survive. these people are very precious and you hear their stories and you go and you feel it and you learn more and you do something. so for example we have a score a muslim girls school where they heard from a bosnian survivor and afterwards they did a whole campaign about refugees because this man was a refugee and he came from bosnia and he was persecuted and he nearly lost his life and his aunt lost his life and he came here as a refugee so they were so inspired by history that they went on and did
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something about it. and what they're asking people to do even if what you do about it is like a candy —— light a candle and to think about it and go on to the website and read stories of people who survived the most horrific things or people who did not survive and learn a bit and think about what happens when hatred gets out of hand.— gets out of hand. thank you for shafinu gets out of hand. thank you for sharing that — gets out of hand. thank you for sharing that with _ gets out of hand. thank you for sharing that with us. _ gets out of hand. thank you for sharing that with us. it's - gets out of hand. thank you for sharing that with us. it's been i sharing that with us. it's been really profound to have holocaust survivors with us here as well. it's notjust survivors with us here as well. it's not just about picking survivors with us here as well. it's notjust about picking out survivors with us here as well. it's not just about picking out what happened in the past but also focusing on the present as well and making the darkness is the theme of this year is memorial day and that is precisely what's been happening here this evening. income has dropped the legal requirements that wear face coverings and indoor settings.
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many shops will still ask customers to wear masks as a courtesy to others and it remains mandatory to wear a face covering on transport for london services. face coverings are still required an indoor settings everywhere else in the uk. our current reports. it's been 18 months since we started wearing these, face coverings, to help fend off covid. so is this the beginning of the end of mask wearing, in england at least? here in st albans, as restrictions eased, commuters seemed keen to carry on wearing them, for now. {iii course on the train, on the underground, i think for the next few months, yeah, for sure, just to be safe and in supermarkets as well. i will be wearing a mask on the train, yeah, yeah. so i've decided that for the moment, with the numbers of cases, i would still rather protect myself and everyone else. the government is advising masks should still be used in - crowded and enclosed spaces, but the legal requirement has now gone.
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the health secretary says thanks to the vaccination programme, it's time to move on. we'll now be able to begin a new chapter. we see omicron in retreat and we begin the road of trying to find all the best ways of learning to live with covid. back in st albans, this gift shop isn't wasting an time. 3 . , ., , able to get a little bit of lipstick on again and not have to worry about _ having masks sticking to me. so today has felt quite liberating. so you think the time is right for change? definitely for us, we're ready to rip the masks off, of course while being really respectful of other people. but down the road, it's business as usual for this hairdressers. at the moment, we feel that it is better to stick with wearing the masks and we want people to come in and have their hair done feeling comfortable that we are still taking precautions, because it's a mixture of how people feel at the moment. ., ., ., , ., .,
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masks has been contentious throughout this pandemic. today's move — it's too early for some and for others, it can't come soon enough. so how are people likely to behave now?— difference. if you put in place regulations, people will do things and if you take them away, people are less likely to do things. but we still can be very clear about the messaging to say, look, it's important you do this, it's effective if you do it, it makes a difference. to wear or not to wear — in england it's now largely up to us to decide. emma simpson, bbc news, st albans. joining me now is the lincolnshire representative for the union of allied workers. thank you for joining us. do you support this change? joining us. do you support this chance? ., . ., , .,
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change? not particularly. ithink it is ill-conceived _ change? not particularly. ithink it is ill-conceived and _ change? not particularly. ithink it is ill-conceived and i _ change? not particularly. ithink it is ill-conceived and i think - is ill—conceived and i think unfortunately it's likely to cause problems for members working in retail further down problems for members working in retailfurther down the problems for members working in retail further down the line. as it stands presently the cases are still running high, nearly100,000 daily cases and we have 69,000 people currently in hospital with covid—19 related issues and we are still recording over 300 guests very and thatis recording over 300 guests very and that is quite worrying and for the sake of wearing masks in crowded public spaces i think the decision to remove them was premature. mould to remove them was premature. would ou not sa to remove them was premature. would you not say tonight _ to remove them was premature. would you not say tonight we _ to remove them was premature. would you not say tonight we have _ to remove them was premature. would you not say tonight we have seen - to remove them was premature. would you not say tonight we have seen a - you not say tonight we have seen a lot of businesses struggling throughout the last couple of years and it might give more confidence to some to feel that they can go out if the masks are removed? hat the masks are removed? not
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particularly _ the masks are removed? not particularly i— the masks are removed? not particularly. i think _ the masks are removed? iirrt particularly. i think people are able to write a to wear the masks set in the stages of the pandemic appears to be drop off when the government left such restrictions but then coincidently masks have to be reintroduced as part of the plan b anyway and those regulations and requirements for people to wear them i don't think people will continue to do that. ~ . i don't think people will continue to do that-— i don't think people will continue to do that. ~ ., ., , , to do that. what are your members sa in: ? to do that. what are your members saying? we — to do that. what are your members saying? we have — to do that. what are your members saying? we have seen _ to do that. what are your members saying? we have seen these - saying? we have seen these regulations repeatedly over the last couple of years. and be all going to the shops and we see signs saying please layer masks and inside some people do and some people don't and that obviously does put staff at risk potentially, there's not much there can do about it. it’s risk potentially, there's not much there can do about it.— there can do about it. it's very difficult and _ there can do about it. it's very difficult and they _ there can do about it. it's very difficult and they are - there can do about it. it's very i difficult and they are encouraged
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not to challenge directly for the avoidance of any further issues regarding that or worse in circumstances. i was reading some statistics the other day and it was indicated most likely the place for people to catch covid—19 was in the supermarkets while they were doing their shopping by definition obviously the members will be exposed to the greater risk as a result of that bearing in mind a number of people that they are coming across. the reason why people were encouraged to wear masks is not so much that it protected those individuals but it protected everybody else around them. it is reassuring based on some of the earlier box pops that people working to continue wearing them and the difficulty is for how long. in terms of absences _ difficulty is for how long. in terms of absences within _ difficulty is for how long. in terms of absences within the _ difficulty is for how long. in terms of absences within the economy, | difficulty is for how long. in terms - of absences within the economy, that is where are you worried for example that case numbers might go up now with all the restrictions falling
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and then again you see problems in the workforce? it’s and then again you see problems in the workforce?— the workforce? it's basically the last few weeks _ the workforce? it's basically the last few weeks i've _ the workforce? it's basically the last few weeks i've been - the workforce? it's basically the last few weeks i've been going l the workforce? it's basically the | last few weeks i've been going to the retail stores that cover them without exception and complaining about high levels of staff and a direct result of covid—19 cell i think supermarkets have a vested interest to encourage to wear masks not least because it enables their staff to be safe and work in regular places and keep people able to shop and buy food and it is necessary things. the other point of impact is i guess the pandemic does not happen in isolation, it's notjust that, as has been indicated in northern ireland and scotland they are all continuing to make a living masks in crowded public places mandate monetary and the other thingies as
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other restrictions become more relaxed not least the ability for people to travel people will be travelling to countries and there is a likelihood that there is vaccination that could be other strands of variance that people could bring back. causing high levels of infection. the headlines. face coverings are no longer mandatory in england but some big retailers are asking customers to continue wearing them. camping trips welcomed the easing of care home restrictions in england allowing for unlimited visits from today. candles lit across the uk as holocaust memorial day at mark's 77 years since the liberation of the auschwitz birkenau concentration camp. here is the full round up from
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the sportscenter. gavin is with us. we will start with football and the women's super league. arsenal are hosting brighton at the moment. brighton had been on a run of seven matches without a victory so the poor form looks to matches without a victory so the poorform looks to be ongoing matches without a victory so the poor form looks to be ongoing at the moment for arsenal. they have gone for a match is about a lien in competitions. fora match is about a lien in competitions. 1— for a match is about a lien in competitions. 1— 02 brighton. players in the ws l and championship would have guaranteed maternity and long—term sickness cover written into their contracts after the fda and pfa agreed to the change. one of the few mothers who played in ws l and because of maternity cover has been at the discretion of clubs. many decided to wait until they retired before starting a family. fifa introduced similar rules. callum chambers hasjoined aston villa on a free from arsenal. he
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joined in 2014 and made five appearances for the club this season. premiership rugby club exeter chiefs will drop references to native americans in their branding after it provoked criticism. they will still be called the chiefs but have changed their logo which from this summary will use imagery from a celtic iron age tribe which encompassed a large area in the southwest including devin. brute in the southwest including devin. we are in the southwest including devin. , are thrilled. it is so relieving that it's been done. but so excited that it's been done. but so excited that it's been done. but so excited that it's been done so well. throughout the campaign we have been saying the name does not need to change. it is about the image you associated with. we had lots of different people suggesting different people suggesting different historical chiefs in the devin area and marking up logos and things that look similar to what the club has now so it's everything we could have dreamed of and we are thrilled and we are beyond excited about being able to fully support
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our club and be proud of everything they achieve on the pitch and now we can be proud of them off the pitch as well and at the same time we celebrate devin the area we all come from and we are so proud of. in cricket the england captain the final two matches of their t20 series with west indies in barbados. he has a low—grade quadricep injury and missed the last 90 feet which leaves england to— one down in the series heading into the fourth game. they will be a couple of first time being celebrated in the lorain australians up and final on saturday. the first and 42 years about australian woman in her home grandson final while her opponent will be daniel collins who has never reached a stage before. post one in straight sets in the semifinals today. straight sets in the semifinals toda . �* , . , ., , today. it's incredible. i love this tournament— today. it's incredible. i love this tournament and _ today. it's incredible. i love this tournament and of— today. it's incredible. i love this tournament and of coming - today. it's incredible. i love this tournament and of coming out | today. it's incredible. i love this - tournament and of coming out here and playing in australia and as i
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know we are spoiled and weak at at home play in our backyard and i'm happy we get to play our best and is here and have done well before and i have a chance to play for a title. it feels amazing. it's been such a journey— it feels amazing. it's been such a journey and it does not happen overnight. semi —— so many years of hard _ overnight. semi —— so many years of hard work_ overnight. semi —— so many years of hard work and — overnight. semi —— so many years of hard work and hours on the court and yesterday _ hard work and hours on the court and yesterday i _ hard work and hours on the court and yesterday i was talking about the early _ yesterday i was talking about the early mornings my dad would get up with me _ early mornings my dad would get up with me and practice at me before school_ with me and practice at me before school and — with me and practice at me before school and it's incredible to be on the stage — school and it's incredible to be on the stage especially with the health challenges am so grateful and i could _ challenges am so grateful and i could not— challenges am so grateful and i could not be happier. irish fighter ka lee will could not be happier. irish fighter kaylee will make _ could not be happier. irish fighter kaylee will make history - could not be happier. irish fighter kaylee will make history in - could not be happier. irish fighter kaylee will make history in april i could not be happier. irish fighterl kaylee will make history in april as part of the first everyone then spouts the top the bail at madison square garden in new york. the lightweight world champion will put a belt on the line and a seven week
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12 champion saying the fight of this magnitude is the pinnacle of the sport. the venue is 140 years old and has been the scene of the famous fights. some of the tighest restrictions during this pandemic have been on care homes — with very few visitors allowed inside. but from next monday — covid guidance in england will be further eased with no limits on the number of visitors, self—isolation periods will be cut and there will be changes on how to manage covid outbreaks in a care home. here's our social affairs editor alison holt from monday, we have unlimited visiting. at quarry house care home in bristol, they're going through details of two day's announcement to make sure they are ready for monday. unlimited visiting is a welcome change, but it means having extra tests and ppe in place. should make a lot of people happy, fantastic. dorothy cook is one of the few family members who's been able to
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visit her sister regularly in recent weeks, so she can't wait for restrictions to be eased. it will make things a lot easier, absolutely. she hasn't seen her nephews and nieces for a while, so that will be really good, so we can all come and take it in turns. the new guidance means from monday in care homes in england, there will be no limit on the number of visitors that residents can have. if they go out on a day trip, they will no longer have to test or self—isolate when they return, and if there's a covid outbreak — so that means two or more staff or residents testing positive — then the length of time that the care home has to close its doors will be reduced from 28 days down to 14 days. at this care home, they believe vaccinations mean they can manage additional risk. so far, the guidance has been quite cautious on those measures, quite rightly. we're working with a vulnerable group of people. with all of those management processes we have put in place around risks, it
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feels right to bring those restrictions down. and visiting restrictions have taken their toll. kate believes her mum deteriorated when visits are like this — from behind a screen. now she's recognised as an essential caregiver, so come visit her mum whenever. she wants the role recognised in law. i've lost 18 months of her life - at a time when she needs her family around her most. so, it's vital that we have... that we get essential caregiver status put into law. _ visiting restrictions have already decreased in northern ireland. alison holt, bbc news.
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i have been lucky because i have been granted ecg status so i have been granted ecg status so i have been able to see him very regularly. changes bring a really welcome relief to families because many family members of residents have not been able to visit their loved ones in care homes. i think it's going to make an enormous difference as long as they care homes themselves can run it carefully and without too much stress and i think that is a really big issue for them and it is when i think we will recognise. hagar when i think we will recognise. how is our when i think we will recognise. how is your husband _ when i think we will recognise. how is your husband and how much have you been able to see or have contact with him? . . you been able to see or have contact with him? ,, . ., , , with him? since i have been his essential caregiver _ with him? since i have been his essential caregiver i've been i with him? since i have been his. essential caregiver i've been able to see him whenever i wanted. i've always booked i had and i think that
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is correct yes care home to do that. recently they had an outbreak of covid—19 in his home and i would have been able to go in as much as usual but chose not to because i could see how totally stressed out the staff was and i noticed when i was not able and felt i should not go to see him so often he really declined in that time shows how important it is to have that contact on a regular basis. that important it is to have that contact on a regular basis.— on a regular basis. that is a difficult balance _ on a regular basis. that is a difficult balance for- on a regular basis. that is a i difficult balance for everybody. what did you notice in the change in your husband when you weren't able to see him? he your husband when you weren't able to see him?— to see him? he became angry and resentful again _ to see him? he became angry and resentful again and _ to see him? he became angry and resentful again and quite - to see him? he became angry and i resentful again and quite depressed very quickly and although we've always maintained contact for face time he is not the same. it's absolutely not the same and although
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he could not verbalize it himself it was noticeable that his demeanour became far less johdi and he was noticeable that his demeanour became far lessjohdi and he became very sad. became far less 'ohdi and he became ve sad. ~ . ., became far less 'ohdi and he became ve sad. . ., ., became far less 'ohdi and he became ve sad. ~ . ., ., very sad. what about the risk that eo - le very sad. what about the risk that people back _ very sad. what about the risk that people back to — very sad. what about the risk that people back to staff _ very sad. what about the risk that people back to staff and _ very sad. what about the risk that people back to staff and other - people back to staff and other patients and families will feel and you do as well about more openness because the testing can never be 100% candidate? it because the testing can never be 100% candidate?— because the testing can never be 100% candidate? it cannot be 100% but if on the — 100% candidate? it cannot be 100% but if on the whole _ 100% candidate? it cannot be 100% but if on the whole people - 100% candidate? it cannot be 100% but if on the whole people are - but if on the whole people are vaccinated and all the residents have been triple vaccinated now i would imagine most families and all the staff have been regular testing is going to be as safe as it can get. and that's all you can do. they will always be risks. you could bring in any sort of bug and it will always be a risk about visiting a vulnerable person. and then your way up vulnerable person. and then your way up those risks with the dangers of not going. it’s
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up those risks with the dangers of notuaoin. h ., , not going. it's extraordinarily difficult. let— not going. it's extraordinarily difficult. let us _ not going. it's extraordinarily difficult. let us hope - not going. it's extraordinarily difficult. let us hope we - not going. it's extraordinarily difficult. let us hope we you | not going. it's extraordinarily . difficult. let us hope we you and your husband do as well as possible and everyone affected by this. the prime minister has rejected allegations that he personally authorised the airlift of cats and dogs from afghanistan, following the fall of kabul to the taliban. it comes after emails from officials published yesterday suggested borisjohnson intervened to help the animal charity nowzad. labour says mrjohnson has been "caught out lying". here's damian grammaticas. they were desperate days. british citizens, afghans who'd worked with the british army, thousands at risk from the taliban who never made it out. but pen farthing did, along with his animals. dogs and cats cared for by his rescue charity were on one of the last planes out. today, borisjohnson again denied he's had a hand in it. no, and this whole
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thing is total rhubarb. i was very proud of what our armed services did with op pitting and it was an amazing thing to move 15,000 people out of kabul in the way that we did. but an internal foreign office e—mail written at the time, leaked and relesaed yesterday sayes "the pm hasjust authorised the charity's staff and animals to be evacuated", and campaigners for the charity said mrjohnson agreed its staff were under threat. the prime minister understood those arguments, accepted them and did put those people on the evacuation list, working with the home secretary and the foreign secretary to get the wheels of whitehall moving. the evacuation, mrjohnson insists, was a success, it saved lives but left many others behind. so, once again, the issue is how truthful he's being now. somebody is lying about what happened during the events that led up to the evacuation of the animals from afghanistan and i think it's become increasingly
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clear that the prime minister's story is not credible. he has not told the truth. in wales today, he was perhaps hoping to escape questions about his probity but the focus, though, remains on this one issue. and that applies whether it's afghanistan or downing street parties. well meanwhile — the long awaited sue gray report into parties at downing street still hasn't been published , and questions have been asked about the foreign secretary liz truss using a private jet to fly to and from australia. what is the reason for the delay as far as we know and what is the expected release time now? this far as we know and what is the expected release time now? as they were expecting _ expected release time now? as they were expecting if— expected release time now? as they were expecting if it _ expected release time now? as they were expecting if it was _ expected release time now? as they were expecting if it was expected . expected release time now? as they were expecting if it was expected it | were expecting if it was expected it would be coming out yesterday and that did not happen. it's understood that did not happen. it's understood that some final things are being looked at on the big issue here is the fact that the metropolitan police have opened their own
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investigation and to some of the gatherings. downing street wanted reassurance that nothing that's going to be in the report is going to cut across the investigation and it's understood that sucre does not want to go ahead and publish airport that has to take some of those contentious gatherings out. so that is what's being looked out at the moment and in terms of what that means pertaining that it is feeding investments there is that we are probably looking at next week and it could come before then and of course the prime minister has committed to making a statement in the house of commons after it's been published and committed to swiftly publishing it as soon as it's received after it's received by 10 downing street but that the feeding investments there feels like that is more likely to happen the other side of the weekend. , ., , ., ,., weekend. the story emerging about the foreian weekend. the story emerging about the foreign secretary _ weekend. the story emerging about the foreign secretary causing - weekend. the story emerging about the foreign secretary causing primej the foreign secretary causing prime minutes —— if things do change in the coming days and weeks she has used a playing the government says
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it is a government claim but why she did not get a commercial flight is the question. did not get a commercial flight is the question-— did not get a commercial flight is the question. that is the question. if after the question. that is the question. if after there _ the question. that is the question. if after there were _ the question. that is the question. if after there were reports - the question. that is the question. if after there were reports in - the question. that is the question. if after there were reports in the l if after there were reports in the independent that the estimated cost of these flights to australia for her recent trip to australia could have been around £500,000. neighbour has said that that is obscene and government ministers are jet setting and hiking taxes and refusing to do anything to help working families. however the government has said they have the pain and needs trust was asked about it earlier. that have the pain and needs trust was asked about it earlier.— asked about it earlier. that is why we have a government _ asked about it earlier. that is why we have a government plane, - asked about it earlier. that is why we have a government plane, to i we have a government plane, to enable _ we have a government plane, to enable government ministers to conduct — enable government ministers to conduct government business and that's— conduct government business and that's where i flew to australia in. was it— that's where i flew to australia in. was it a _ that's where i flew to australia in. was it a good use of money? could you have not used a? irate was it a good use of money? could you have not used a?— you have not used a? we have a government plane _ you have not used a? we have a government plane precisely - you have not used a? we have a government plane precisely that you have not used a? we have a - government plane precisely that the government plane precisely that the government ministers can travel. but we did government ministers can travel. we did not government ministers can travel. emit we did not have been better to use a commercial airline rather than use something that is a lot more
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expensive? something that is a lot more “pensive?— something that is a lot more expensive? something that is a lot more exensive? , ., . , ., expensive? every government decision is based on value _ expensive? every government decision is based on value for— expensive? every government decision is based on value for money. _ expensive? every government decision is based on value for money. we - expensive? every government decision is based on value for money. we have| is based on value for money. we have a government plane specifically so ministers — a government plane specifically so ministers like me and my role as f0reign— ministers like me and my role as foreign secretary can go and do the work overseas which is ultimately delivering — work overseas which is ultimately delivering for the british people. there's— delivering for the british people. there's a — delivering for the british people. there's a question about cost, appropriateness, needed, the climate consequences of using a separate claim for a very long flight. where does this question go? the foreign office is saying _ does this question go? the foreign office is saying the _ does this question go? the foreign office is saying the trip _ does this question go? the foreign office is saying the trip was - does this question go? the foreign office is saying the trip was within l office is saying the trip was within the rules by the ministerial code and the officials said that the private jet allowed day trip dedication to travel together and have private discussions on substantive security matters and allowed her to come home early should she have needed to. and ministers have used raf planes in the past and the chancellor used is one and jeremy hunt when he was
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foreign secretary he sees them from time to time so it's not entirely out of the blue. it's whatever the cost of that would be angry don't actually have a firm figure on that. thank you very much. a reminder to stay with us because later this evening we will have a look at tomorrow's front pages at 10:30pm and 11:30pm tonight in the paper is and 11:30pm tonight in the paper is an error againstjoining me are rachel watson deputy political editor of the scottish daily mirror and kevin schofield. here is the weather. we had some clear skies on thursday so it brought some sunshine and blue skies by the day and beautiful pictures as the sunset a bit early on but tonight under clear skies and a touch of frost and pockets of mist and fog around. i across parts of england and wales for seven scotland in the ninth received the mist and fog practice developing turning mild from the
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northwest with the please pick up here. temperatures around 4 degrees but down to freezing in norwich and a touch colder in the countryside said a cold start to your friday morning with the frost and a bit of fog around. clearing away from parts of england and wales with the cool air here around eight and 10 degrees but we could see highs up to 11 or 12 towards the northwest with wet weather continuing across scotland. into the weekend it is mild and breezy on saturday and cold her on sunday with rain in the northwest. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... face coverings are no longer mandatory in england, but some big retailers ask customers to continue wearing them. campaign groups welcome the easing of care home restrictions in england, allowing
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for unlimited visits from today. borisjohnson for unlimited visits from today. boris johnson says for unlimited visits from today. borisjohnson says human beings were prioritised during the fall of kabul, after suggestions he was personally involved in rescuing farm animals from afghanistan. this whole thin is animals from afghanistan. this whole thing is total— animals from afghanistan. this whole thing is total rhubarb. _ animals from afghanistan. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i _ animals from afghanistan. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was _ animals from afghanistan. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was very - thing is total rhubarb. i was very proud of what the armed services did. ., ., , , proud of what the armed services did. ,, ., ., ,., did. troops training on the border, but russia tells _ did. troops training on the border, but russia tells the _ did. troops training on the border, but russia tells the united - did. troops training on the border, but russia tells the united states| but russia tells the united states that there is still room for dialogue over ukraine. candles are lit across the uk as holocaust memorial day marks a 77 years since the liberation of the auschwitz birkenau concentration camp. and one of the most influential figures birkenau concentration camp. and one of the most influentialfigures in british comedy for the last six decades. barry cryer has died at the eight of eight —— age of 86. john lennon's eldest son is selling
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several pieces of musical history from his personal collection. however he will keep the physical items because each piece of memorabilia will be sold as a non—token, more commonly known as an nft. it's something that only exists digitally. items include a black cape worn by his father. we can cross live to los angeles to speak to julian, cross live to los angeles to speak tojulian, thanks so much for speaking to us. mr; to julian, thanks so much for speaking to us. to julian, thanks so much for- speaking to us._ can you speaking to us. my pleasure. can you exlain to speaking to us. my pleasure. can you expiain to us — speaking to us. my pleasure. can you explain to us exactly _ speaking to us. my pleasure. can you explain to us exactly what _ speaking to us. my pleasure. can you explain to us exactly what it - speaking to us. my pleasure. can you explain to us exactly what it is - explain to us exactly what it is you're selling?— explain to us exactly what it is ou're sellina? �* , . , you're selling? there's a few items, it's a digital— you're selling? there's a few items, it's a digital one _ you're selling? there's a few items, it's a digital one of _ you're selling? there's a few items, it's a digital one of one, _ you're selling? there's a few items, it's a digital one of one, and - you're selling? there's a few items, it's a digital one of one, and they i it's a digital one of one, and they are probably some of the most treasured memorabilia that i have that i've collected myself over 30
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years of doing this, like three of the guitars that were handed down to me over the years. so for me, this is a new way to share things that i have. it's a new art form, it's very intriguing. i learnt the majority of what i know about nfts and beyond from my brother, sean. we are dear friends, and always have been, by the way, but he's enlightened me about the universe that we now live in, and it's quite a unique one. and from my perspective, i see it as not only sharing precious items of mine, but i have a foundation called the white feather foundation and we try to do a lot of good around the world. so a portion of those proceeds will be going to that, and i thought that was a win—win for everyone in that regard. share
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i thought that was a win-win for everyone in that regard. are you able to enlighten _ everyone in that regard. are you able to enlighten us _ everyone in that regard. are you able to enlighten us about - everyone in that regard. are you able to enlighten us about what| everyone in that regard. are you i able to enlighten us about what an nft is? why would someone buy it? you have to consider it as a digital art piece. it's as simple as that. you can do any number of them or keep them as a one of one, which makes them far, far more rare. without going into the deep bit coin universe — i don't think we have time for that, and i'm not enough of a specialist, i have a good understanding, but to relate to you in layman terms would be very difficult. it is digital art you can buy, just as any other art— and once you have it, it is yours and yours only. you have it, it is yours and yours onl . you have it, it is yours and yours onl _ �* , you have it, it is yours and yours onl _ f ., you have it, it is yours and yours onl. , . ., only. so it's a unique piece that nobody else _ only. so it's a unique piece that nobody else can _ only. so it's a unique piece that nobody else can have. - only. so it's a unique piece that i nobody else can have. absolutely.
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i'm nobody else can have. absolutely. i'm intrigued _ nobody else can have. absolutely. i'm intrigued by — nobody else can have. absolutely. i'm intrigued by the _ nobody else can have. absolutely. i'm intrigued by the lyrics - nobody else can have. absolutely. i'm intrigued by the lyrics that - i'm intrigued by the lyrics that you're selling for heyjude, just tell us a little bit about why you chose that and why those are so special. chose that and why those are so secial. ~ �* ., ., ._ special. well, i'd have to say probably _ special. well, i'd have to say probably the _ special. well, i'd have to say probably the majority - special. well, i'd have to say probably the majority of - special. well, i'd have to say probably the majority of the | special. well, i'd have to say - probably the majority of the world who know of the beatles would know that "heyjude", they know the back story of it. "heyjude" was written for me by uncle paul — mccartney, thatis, for me by uncle paul — mccartney, that is, when he was coming over to console my mum and i come up my mum, cynthia, when they were separating when i was a young kid. and paul was singing something, "heyjules", and he had remarked that that title didn't sit so well with him
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melodically and "heyjude" was better. and i think pretty much everyone in the world has known about that song now. i did check in with him personally to see if he was - i with him personally to see if he was — i got his approval on this moving forward, he absolutely said yes, for which i'm forever thankful. the "heyjude" has always meant a great deal to me, i think it's relatable to many, many people whose families have broken apart. it's about reminding yourself to stay strong. so it's a very special song, and these are the notes that he scribbled down and jotted down whilst he was trying to bring this long to light. whilst he was trying to bring this long to light-— whilst he was trying to bring this lona to liaht. ~ ,. ., ., long to light. when you hear it, do ou sin long to light. when you hear it, do you sing along _ long to light. when you hear it, do you sing along to _ long to light. when you hear it, do you sing along to it _ long to light. when you hear it, do you sing along to it like _ long to light. when you hear it, do you sing along to it like the - long to light. when you hear it, do you sing along to it like the rest i you sing along to it like the rest of us do? i you sing along to it like the rest of us do? . ., ., ., of us do? i have a love-hate relationship _ of us do? i have a love-hate relationship with _
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of us do? i have a love-hate relationship with it, - of us do? i have a love-hate relationship with it, you - of us do? i have a love-hate i relationship with it, you know, of us do? i have a love-hate - relationship with it, you know, it's a great song, no question about it, an incredible song. but i've heard it a few times now... an incredible song. but i've heard it a few times now. . ._ it a few times now... laughter. i think it a few times now... laughter. i think the _ it a few times now... laughter. i think the other _ it a few times now... laughter. i think the other side _ it a few times now... laughter. i think the other side of - it a few times now... laughter. i think the other side of the - it a few times now... laughter. i think the other side of the coin | i think the other side of the coin here, which a lot of people don't really think about, is that every time i hear it, i also am reminded of course of very, very upsetting time in my life and my mum's life. so it's a reminder of days gone by that weren't the greatest. so it has good and bad connotations, it's like life itself, you just have to balance. life itself, you 'ust have to month life itself, you 'ust have to balance. ~ , ., . life itself, you 'ust have to balance. , ., ., ., balance. absolutely. you are also choosina balance. absolutely. you are also choosing this _ balance. absolutely. you are also choosing this black— balance. absolutely. you are also choosing this black cape - balance. absolutely. you are also choosing this black cape worn - balance. absolutely. you are also choosing this black cape worn by | choosing this black cape worn by your father. choosing this black cape worn by yourfather. why choosing this black cape worn by your father. why did you choose that was back there must�*ve been such a huge choice for you to think about. you know, again, nothing was really passed down to me, so initiallyjust
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started collecting very personal items that were dad to's, you know, because i still plan to have a family one day and i'd love to be able to pass all that stuff down to my kids, you know? so i'm just slowly doing my best, slowly and surely, to get pieces for my family. but the thing is, slowly but surely, quite a few people's items came about and ijust quite a few people's items came about and i just thought, quite a few people's items came about and ijust thought, well, i'd like to get the pieces that remind me of certain times and places. and i know mum told me stories of when she went to austria where the beatles were filming help?, that's where they learned to ski together. so again, it comes from a personal
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story that i hold through my mother. that's really what all the memorabilia stuff that i have is truly all about. there is a personal, personal attachment to it, it's notjust collecting for the sake of it. do it's notjust collecting for the sake of it-— it's notjust collecting for the sake of it. ., ., , ., sake of it. do you have any idea how much ou sake of it. do you have any idea how much you might _ sake of it. do you have any idea how much you might raise _ sake of it. do you have any idea how much you might raise from - sake of it. do you have any idea how much you might raise from this? - sake of it. do you have any idea how much you might raise from this? i i much you might raise from this? i know you said you want to raise money for your charity. and if it goes well, would you consider doing this again? goes well, would you consider doing this auain? ~ ,., ~ ., this again? well, you know, never say never. — this again? well, you know, never say never, that's _ this again? well, you know, never say never, that's all— this again? well, you know, never say never, that's all i'll _ this again? well, you know, never say never, that's all i'll say. - say never, that's all i'll say. never say never. but if i can do some good out of this and make a few people happy at the same time, and fans happy by sharing this, that i can't see any wrong in that. so i think it's a unique position to be in and i'm pleasantly surprised by the response so far. so i'm very
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thankful. ~ . , ., ~ the response so far. so i'm very thankful. ~ . , ., ,, ., thankful. we are very thankful to ou for thankful. we are very thankful to you for sharing — thankful. we are very thankful to you for sharing your— thankful. we are very thankful to you for sharing your time - thankful. we are very thankful to you for sharing your time and - you for sharing your time and thoughts with us today on bbc news, all the best with this, sadly i think will be well beyond my budget but i'll see if i can get together in the newsroom behind me and raise a few bob to see if we can bid. thanks so much forjoining us. mr; thanks so much forjoining us. mr pleasure. thanks so much for 'oining us. my pleasure. thank — thanks so much forjoining us. my pleasure. thank you. _ thanks so much forjoining us. my pleasure. thank you. back- thanks so much forjoining us. my pleasure. thank you. back to - thanks so much forjoining us. my pleasure. thank you. back to one | thanks so much forjoining us. my l pleasure. thank you. back to one of our top stories. _ pleasure. thank you. back to one of our top stories. changes _ pleasure. thank you. back to one of our top stories. changes to - pleasure. thank you. back to one of our top stories. changes to the - pleasure. thank you. back to one of our top stories. changes to the face j our top stories. changes to the face covering rule here. joining me now is professor of social psychology at the university of st andrews, stephen reicher. thanks forjoining me today. these rules will be welcomed by sun and seen as far too premature by others. what's your view? i seen as far too premature by others. what's your view?— what's your view? i think the really im ortant what's your view? i think the really important thing _ what's your view? i think the really important thing at _ what's your view? i think the really important thing at the _ what's your view? i think the really important thing at the moment - what's your view? i think the really important thing at the moment is l what's your view? i think the really | important thing at the moment is to understand that things are going in the right direction, we are over the peak of omicron, and infections have been going down — stalled a bit, but
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at the same time we still have over 100,000 cases a day or so, we still have about 300 people a day dying. we are still in the middle of a pandemic. and it's very dangerous if we come to the conclusion that it's all over, because if we come to that conclusion, then we will stop doing all the things that have actually put us on this road to a good place. that would be a huge danger and a huge sacrifice, a waste of all the sacrifices we've been making over the last weeks, months and years. there is advice still in some places to continue wearing masks. what is the evidence so far about people's behaviour changing when the government position goes from rules to just government position goes from rules tojust advice? government position goes from rules to just advice?— to just advice? let's look at what ha--ened to just advice? let's look at what happened the — to just advice? let's look at what happened the other _ to just advice? let's look at what happened the other way - to just advice? let's look at what happened the other way round i to just advice? let's look at what i happened the other way round when masks were produced back in 2020. there were attempts to persuade
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people, to urge people that nothing much happened in about 20% of people who are masks. but as soon as he became a regulation, that set an incredibly strong message, it wasn't about the law enforcing it, it was much more about the policy was a message, a strong message that this matters. in very quickly, mask wearing went up to 80% and even higher in subsequent months, and stayed high for a long time. so the danger is that reversing the regulations, saying you don't have to do it sends a very strong message that it's not important, it drowns the comments which say we should still be a bit careful. so i do think it is really important now to be very clear about why it's important to wear masks, why masks are still a critical intervention when we are in the middle of a pandemic. when we are in the middle of a pandemic-—
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when we are in the middle of a pandemic. when we are in the middle of a andemic. . , ., , ., pandemic. that is the opposite of the message _ pandemic. that is the opposite of the message that, _ pandemic. that is the opposite of the message that, in _ pandemic. that is the opposite of the message that, in a _ pandemic. that is the opposite of the message that, in a way, - pandemic. that is the opposite of l the message that, in a way, people are getting in terms of what they are being forced to do now. you're recisel are being forced to do now. you're precisely right- — are being forced to do now. you're precisely right. many _ are being forced to do now. you're precisely right. many people - are being forced to do now. you're precisely right. many people have| precisely right. many people have been saying — the who have been making the point we are still in the midst of a pandemic and it's premature to stop. but the other thing that is critical for people to carry on wearing masks is to understand that actually, behaviours make a difference. one of the reasons why we are in a relatively good place right now is that over christmas, people were actually very responsible. they were so responsible. they were so responsible it didn't lead to the level of infections we feared. so many, many people, like your listeners, will not have gone to parties, limited their socialising so they could see a healthy relative at christmas, they'll have taken lateral flow tests to make sure they were infected, it was actually quite remarkable. scottish data shows that on christmas week, 85% of people
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took lateral flow tests, and on christmas week, 85% of people took lateralflow tests, and half on christmas week, 85% of people took lateral flow tests, and half of those, 47% took them mobile times a week. people were very careful and wore masks, as well. and those behaviours work. because of those behaviours, we are in a good place now. so it would be tragic to waste all that by reversing behaviours, increasing the infections. so i think people will need to know there's good reason, because we are still obviously in a pandemic, still high levels of infection, and that their behaviours make a difference. so the really important message that we need to observe.— we need to observe. thank you very much. we need to observe. thank you very much- 0ne — we need to observe. thank you very much- one of _ we need to observe. thank you very much. one of the _ we need to observe. thank you very much. one of the men _ we need to observe. thank you very much. one of the men suffered - much. one of the men suffered bruising and a fractured bone in his hand while the second also suffered bruising and has an eye injury. the metropolitan police are hate to make her treating it as a hate crime. priti patel said it is an absolutely despicable attack. a warning that
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this report contains some distressing scenes. this report contains some distressin: scenes. �* , , ., distressing scenes. there's been a very strong — distressing scenes. there's been a very strong reaction _ distressing scenes. there's been a very strong reaction to _ distressing scenes. there's been a very strong reaction to this - distressing scenes. there's been a very strong reaction to this today, | very strong reaction to this today, the prime minister in the last hour has said, "i am appalled by this despicable footage. it's a terrible reminder on holocaust memorial day that such prejudice is not consigned to history. we must stamp out anti—semitism." what you see in that footage is two men knocking up a bakery at about 9:50pm last night. a young man starts punching them, pauses a bit, then knocks one of them into the ground. he then punches the other man several times, both men ended up in hospital, one with a broken nose and fractured risk. the 18—year—old man was arrested nearby and he remains in custody. it's a really shocking bit of footage, but a reminder that these casual attacks still happen in britain. .,
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the project, costing more than £8 billion finished last september, but still awaiting approval from european regulators. the us has threatened to halt opening a key energy pipeline, if russia decides to invade ukraine. the nord stream ii pipeline between russia and germany is set to supply natural gas to western europe. the project costing more than eight billion pounds finished last september, but is still awaiting approval from european regulators. let's speak to drjack sharples, research fellow at the oxford institute for energy studies. ina way, in a way, this is an extraordinary intervention by the us, but this pipeline has really been at the centre of clinical difficulty between europe, germany in particular and russia. absolutely, - re particular and russia. absolutely, pretty much _ particular and russia. absolutely, pretty much since _ particular and russia. absolutely, pretty much since its _ particular and russia. absolutely, pretty much since its inception, i particular and russia. absolutely, i pretty much since its inception, the construction itself was beset by sanctions by the us, the targeted vessels being used to lay the pipeline. the construction was halted for months and months until recently, now there's battles over whether the pipeline can actually
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enter into operation. i5 whether the pipeline can actually enter into operation.— enter into operation. is what the osition enter into operation. is what the position of _ enter into operation. is what the position of germany _ enter into operation. is what the position of germany on - enter into operation. is what the position of germany on this? - enter into operation. is what the - position of germany on this? germany is rather dependent _ position of germany on this? germany is rather dependent on _ position of germany on this? germany is rather dependent on russian - position of germany on this? germany is rather dependent on russian gas, i is rather dependent on russian gas, but the government also has a policy of phasing out its nuclear energy and nuclear power plants. and in the longer terms, and nuclear power plants. and in the longerterms, phasing and nuclear power plants. and in the longer terms, phasing out its use of coals, replacing those with renewables. but in doing so, they increase their dependency on natural gas in germany is very dependent on imports to meet its gas demand, with russia being its major supplier. what about the rest of europe, which countries will benefit from this if it does open?— countries will benefit from this if it does open? natural gas is first and foremost _ it does open? natural gas is first and foremost a _ it does open? natural gas is first and foremost a very _ it does open? natural gas is first and foremost a very important i it does open? natural gas is first l and foremost a very important fuel for europe as a whole, accounting for europe as a whole, accounting for a quarter of the energy we consume every year. europe is more independent, so we import about 80-85% of independent, so we import about 80—85% of all the gas we consume. most of that arrives by pipeline and russia is the largest supplier. so
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russia is the largest supplier. so russia alone provides around 35% of our imports, which equates to around 30% of all the gas we consume in a given year. that russian gas arrives through multiple pipelines — there is the north stream one pipeline, to which nord stream ii will run in parallel, there's a pipeline through belarus which hits poland and goes to germany, there is transit from ukraine to central europe, than italy, then there's pipelines in turkey which have connections to southeast europe. so russian gas arrives in europe by multiple roots in the levels of dependency on russian gas really very from one eu member state to the other. generally speaking, those who are closer to russia geographically depend on russian gas to a greater extent. what about the uk? 50 russian gas to a greater extent. what about the uk?— russian gas to a greater extent. what about the uk? so the uk is in a fortunate position, _ what about the uk? so the uk is in a fortunate position, most _ what about the uk? so the uk is in a fortunate position, most of _ what about the uk? so the uk is in a fortunate position, most of the - what about the uk? so the uk is in a fortunate position, most of the gas l fortunate position, most of the gas we can soon is either produced here in the uk, orwe we can soon is either produced here in the uk, or we import it directly from norway via pipelines under the north sea, or we get it in the form of liquefied natural gas from the
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global market. so direct dependence on russian gas is very limited. but the challenge is that the uk market is very closely aligned to the order european market. so if there are any shortage or interruption of russian gas on the european market, then those price spikes that would accompany that would filter through to the uk market, then you have the scenario of energy companies buying gas on the international market trying to pass those costs through to british consumers and bumping up against the price cap that is likely to be raised on the 1st of april in any casejust to be raised on the 1st of april in any case just because of the very tight market situation we have in the very high prices we have currently. the very high prices we have currently-— the very high prices we have currentl . . ~' , ., , . currently. thank you very much. thank you- _ tributes have been paid to comedian and writer barry cryer, who has died at the age of 86. he worked with a number of star names and was known to many as part
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of i'm sorry, i haven't a clue. if you heard or saw a great sketch, it was always a good chance barry was behind it. david sillito looks back at his life. # i know a fat old policeman # he's always on our street... barry cryer, a mainstay of radio's i'm sorry i haven't a clue, but that was only the beginning. what a lovely audience! morecambe and wise... never mind, they'll do. i saw them arriving on the coaches. did you really? yeah, with their blankets over their heads. kenny everett, les dawson, frankie howard, the two ronnies — he wrote for them all, and on radio 4, a 50—year comedy partnership with graeme garden. he was very convivial, very funny, loved telling jokes. and he loved to laugh and he loved the sound of laughter and i had many conversations with him when he'd call about something else, orjust to say hi and how are you, and we'd always end up by, "by the way, have you heard...?"
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he'd regale me this... his latest. born in leeds, he'd started out in stand—up at the city variety theatre, after failing his university exams. more than 50 years later, he was finally given an honorary degree. my academic cv, it was touched upon earlier, ends with ba english lit, failed. i also failed due to the outbreak of the second world war, which was 16 years before but upset me very deeply. in the '60s, the comedy writer occasionally appeared on the screen, here pouring the wine in the famous four yorkshiremen sketch. very passable, not bad at all. in the '70s and '80s, he was a regular on tv but this stalwart of old school comedy was also a generous friend to the next generation. he was genuine, one of those people who could, well, light up
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a cigarette and a room at exactly the same time. he was just a joy to be around and he had a joke for every single occasion. even if he told you the same one six times, it would remain funny throughout. # my short—term memory�*s shot to pieces # and i'll tell you something else # my short—term memory�*s shot to pieces... it was, he said, a life dogged by good luck. barry cryer — a friendly, generous cornerstone of british comedy. # ha—ha—ha... applause barry cryer there being remembered on the day that his debt has been announced. well, joining me in the studio is paddy o'connell, who's the presenter of bbc radio 4's broadcasting house. he made barry cryer on as a guest over many years, and became a close friend. thanks very much forjoining us, how are you feeling today? incredibly sad. i are you feeling today? incredibly sad. ., , ., , ., are you feeling today? incredibly sad. .,, .,, ., are you feeling today? incredibly sad. ., sad. i hoped it was a bad 'oke, but it's interesting * sad. i hoped it was a bad 'oke, but it's interesting how _ sad. i hoped it was a bad 'oke, but it's interesting how many]- sad. i hoped it was a bad joke, but it's interesting how many great - sad. i hoped it was a bad joke, but i it's interesting how many great ones
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he made and we were just it's interesting how many great ones he made and we werejust laughing in the studio about the short term memory gag. they'll come back. he says "hang on, it's a small bathroom." hejust kept says "hang on, it's a small bathroom." he just kept going there, he had permission to do it from everyone who heard them. hour he had permission to do it from everyone who heard them. how did you become friends? _ everyone who heard them. how did you become friends? he _ everyone who heard them. how did you become friends? he came _ everyone who heard them. how did you become friends? he came on _ everyone who heard them. how did you become friends? he came on my - become friends? he came on my programme 15 — become friends? he came on my programme 15 years _ become friends? he came on my programme 15 years ago - become friends? he came on my programme 15 years ago then - become friends? he came on my i programme 15 years ago then rang become friends? he came on my - programme 15 years ago then rang me every week, reading the bad and the good. he only spoke about what was good, but he told me a joke. he was the only one around my landline besides my mother. his favourite gag of all was the man who ran over a cockrell outside a farm. he says to a woman, "i'm so sorry, i feel i must replace it." "that's fine, the head and's around the back." one of lovely man, to give the gift of laughter. lovely man, to give the gift of lau:hter. ~ . ., , ., laughter. we have images of comedians —
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laughter. we have images of comedians because - laughter. we have images of comedians because there's l laughter. we have images of l comedians because there's the performance than someone very different in private. was there a difference? i different in private. was there a difference?— difference? i think that's really the key thing _ difference? i think that's really the key thing - _ difference? i think that's really the key thing - the _ difference? i think that's really the key thing - the famous - the key thing — the famous stereotype of the tortured soul, the comic with a broken heart. barry had a full heart they kept getting bigger. he wasn't a tortured soul, he was kind and funny, and very empathetic. and unlike a lot of people in show business and television, they'll push you off the set in order to read the news. barry would say, "the way you delivered the weather made me want to get my umbrella." he wasjust the weather made me want to get my umbrella." he was just empathetic and kind, and that's what he really looked for in his gags. it’s and kind, and that's what he really looked for in his gags.— looked for in his gags. it's an unknown _ looked for in his gags. it's an unknown small— looked for in his gags. it's an unknown small secret - looked for in his gags. it's an unknown small secret that i looked for in his gags. it's an | unknown small secret that we looked for in his gags. it's an - unknown small secret that we met in a very bizarre way several years ago that he would no doubt find incredibly amusing and get a gag out of. but he was just one of those people who could find humour quickly in anything. the people who could find humour quickly in an hina. ., , people who could find humour quickly in an hina. . , ., in anything. the family have given an interview _
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in anything. the family have given an interview to _ in anything. the family have given an interview to the _ in anything. the family have given an interview to the mirror - in anything. the family have given an interview to the mirror in - in anything. the family have given an interview to the mirror in the i an interview to the mirror in the last hour, he had four children, they said he was gagging with the nurses, joking with them right up until a few hours ago. last time he was on my programme, just before christmas, he tried out a newjoke on me. and is typical of what he liked — he loved a story that began as a joke, itjoke that began as a story. things like, i will go i said to my parent, how are you enjoying lockdown? and he said, what, in this cage?" he spent a lot of time in pubs, and i'm pleased to say i was with him sinking points. he shines a light on what male friendship is. he was sometimes saying to me, people said he was an honorary gay friend, he is not afraid to have honest, open friendships with all the blokes in life. ~ ., ., ., in life. wonderfulto hear those stories thanks _ in life. wonderfulto hear those stories thanks so _ in life. wonderfulto hear those stories thanks so much - in life. wonderfulto hear those stories thanks so much for - in life. wonderful to hear those - stories thanks so much for coming. now it's time for a
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look at the weather. hello. we've had some reasonably clear skies on thursday, that brought some sunshine and blue skies by day, a beautiful picture as the sun sets. but tonight under those clear skies, a touch of frost and pockets of mist and fog around too. particularly across england and wales, perhaps southern scotland early in the night that we see those mist and fog patch is developing. it turns milder in the northwest, we see the cloud moving in here, temperature is around four celsius for stornoway, but down to freezing in orbit and a touch cold in the countryside. a chilly start here friday morning with that frost and a bit of fog around as well, fog slowly clearing away from parts of england and wales, lingering longest in east anglia with the cooler temperatures here, 8—10 c, but could see highs of up to 11—12 in the northwest. looking ahead towards the weekend, it's mild and breezy on saturday, golder on saturday and some rain in the northwest.
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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching context on bbc news. the last ditch diplomacy continues over ukraine. the white house has tonight called on china to use its influence with moscow, russia's foreign ministry says despite the disagreements there is still some space for a negotiation. president biden says he'll announce his supreme court nominee in a month's time, and confirms it will be the first african american woman. and lifting covid restrictions , most of them in england ended today , many other countries are making similar moves. tonight with the context, nathalie tocci, political scientist and former adviser to the eu's foreign policy chief and the american entrepreneur and former white house communications director, anthony scaramucci —

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