Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 27, 2022 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

2:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines: covid rules on care homes in england have been eased by the government — allowing unlimited visits from monday. resident campaign groups say they welcome the move. i could actually cry with willie. we have actually been asking our members to write to their mps asking for all the restrictions to be lifted. —— cry with relief. we know it is definitely safer now. face coverings are no longer mandatory in england from today, but some big retailers ask customers to continue wearing them. borisjohnson says human beings were prioritised over animals in afghanistan. it's after suggestions he was personally involved in rescuing animals from pen farthing's charity in kabul. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i
2:01 pm
was very proud of what our armed services debt. prince andrew has denied being a close friend of convicted sex trafficker ghislaine maxwell, in a legal response to the woman suing him for sexual assault — he denies all allegations against him. it is holocaust memorial day, marking 77 years since the liberation of auschwitz. seven holocaust survivors have had portraits painted in a commission by prince charles. one of the most prolific scriptwriters in british comedy has died at the age of 86. good afternoon, welcome to bbc news.
2:02 pm
residents in care homes in england will be allowed to see an unlimited number of their loved ones from monday. the current limit of three named visitors is being scrapped. the government says a successful rollout of booster vaccines means the restriction isn't necessary anymore. it comes as part of a wider easing of the rules for england's care homes. self—isolation periods will be cut, and in the event of a positive case care homes will only have to close their doors to visitors for 14 days rather than 28. our correspondent andrew plant reports. from monday we have the unlimited visiting. going over the latest guidance at their secure home in bristol, working out what the changes will mean for residents and staff here, ready for restrictions easing on monday. should make a lot of people happy. fantastic. for dorothy, visiting should become much easier. protective clothing is likely to stay, but she will no longer need an appointment to come and see her sister and will be able to bring otherfamily members with her, too. she hasn't seen my grandchildren... well, her nieces and nephews
2:03 pm
for a while, you know, they would be able to come in when we want and more than one of us coming in, so it would be really, really good. really good. each nation in the uk sets its own care home rules. scotland eased its restrictions last week. in england, as well as lifting limits on visitors, self isolation periods will be cut from 14 days to 10, outbreak management cut from 28 days to 14, and care home workers will be asked to use lateral flow tests before shifts rather than a weekly pcr. real positive move, you know, breathing life back into the homes, allowing people to see their loved ones where they have felt certainly cut off. are you confident you can still keep your residents safe with more relaxed safety rules? there is so much risk management that has come into our sector, with fully vaccinated staff, fully vaccinated residents.
2:04 pm
it feels right to bring those restrictions down. despite limits on visitors being lifted, other issues for care homes could mean they still have to manage numbers. we have still got shortages in staff. we have got over 50% of services who are in outbreak, so facilitating visits, we need to be absolutely clear, you know, these are time—consuming, and when you have a lot of people wanting to come through at the same time, we are going to have to limit the number of people coming into the services. you can pick out your favourites if you like. i changes to restrictions will not mean the end of the challenges for the care home industry. the new arrangements should see less isolation... another daisy. ..and much more socialising for those in care homes. andrew plant, bbc news, in bristol. pam banwait, runs strong life care — they have four care homes in yorkshire and nottinghamshire.
2:05 pm
welcome. thank you very much for being with us on bbc news. how are you and your staff and residents approaching this? is it with anxiety or relief? fix, approaching this? is it with anxiety or relief? �* , ., . or relief? a little bit of both. we are currently _ or relief? a little bit of both. we are currently consultation - or relief? a little bit of both. we are currently consultation with l or relief? a little bit of both. we i are currently consultation with our residents, those who have the capacity, and with their advocates and representatives with those who don't to see if they want to go to face—to—face visiting or if they want to continue with the pod visits, which means there is a screen in between. for a lot of people, i think it is a relief because they get to be reunited with their loved ones any more natural setting, without having to make appointments, without having a glass screen. forthose appointments, without having a glass screen. for those residents where they are a bit more cautious and a bit more anxious about things changing, they are wanting to stick to the current visiting arrangements we have at the moment. mixed feelings at the moment. to what extent can _ feelings at the moment. to what extent can you — feelings at the moment. to what extent can you accommodate - feelings at the moment. to what extent can you accommodate all| feelings at the moment. to what - extent can you accommodate all those different views? at extent can you accommodate all those different views?— different views? at the moment, we are already having _ different views? at the moment, we are already having appointments - are already having appointments system anyway, and people are doing
2:06 pm
pod visits. so that is running as usual. there is nothing different to do there. for those that then want to go back to face—to—face visiting, we are going to have to do risk assessments, which we are in the process of doing. we will have to find a way of accommodating that. you are not afraid in the past of going ahead of government advice, being more cautious. tell us what you do to put robust measures in place when you were not told what to do. , ~ ., place when you were not told what to do. , ~' . , place when you were not told what to do. , ~ . , , ., do. yes, i think at the very start ofthe do. yes, i think at the very start of the pandemic, _ do. yes, i think at the very start of the pandemic, before - do. yes, i think at the very start of the pandemic, before the - do. yes, i think at the very start i of the pandemic, before the nation went into lockdown, strong life care care homes had a contingency plan where we decided to put our homes and almost restricted visiting lockdown to the end of february. and this was really done because at that time we were wanting to protect the most vulnerable and it was very welcomed by the family members and relatives of the residents, and the residents themselves because we were
2:07 pm
ultimately one month ahead of going into lockdown. also we ensure that we had all the right supplies and, all the right ppe for staff. i think that forward planning really has helped. to that forward planning really has heled. ., . ., ,, that forward planning really has heled. ., . ., , helped. to what extent would you be reared to helped. to what extent would you be prepared to do _ helped. to what extent would you be prepared to do that _ helped. to what extent would you be prepared to do that again _ helped. to what extent would you be prepared to do that again if - helped. to what extent would you be prepared to do that again if you - helped. to what extent would you be prepared to do that again if you sawl prepared to do that again if you saw that cases were rising, for example? we always tried to work in line with the government. if we saw that the government wasn't issuing any more restrictions and we felt that infections were rising, then we would look at taking... perhaps if we went to visiting without ppe for example are without the screen in the pods, doing face—to—face visits, we would perhaps look at taking a step back and going back to pod visits or perhaps even looking at bringing further restrictions and where we were stopping visiting if the data wishing that were spreading. also we need to consider that there is still a population of residents in care home that are not vaccinated. we still need to protect them. in vaccinated. we still need to protect them. , ., , vaccinated. we still need to protect
2:08 pm
them. , , , vaccinated. we still need to protect them. , , ., them. in terms of staff numbers, how willin: them. in terms of staff numbers, how willing have — them. in terms of staff numbers, how willing have staff— them. in terms of staff numbers, how willing have staff been _ them. in terms of staff numbers, how willing have staff been generally - them. in terms of staff numbers, how willing have staff been generally to i willing have staff been generally to have their vaccines, which is being asked of them? we have their vaccines, which is being asked of them?— have their vaccines, which is being asked of them? we have been very fortunate. most _ asked of them? we have been very fortunate. most of— asked of them? we have been very fortunate. most of our— asked of them? we have been very fortunate. most of our staff - asked of them? we have been very fortunate. most of our staff are - fortunate. most of our staff are vaccinated. they have been really don't like they have welcomed the opportunity to be vaccinated, but there is a small minority of residents that are not. they have really got to be at the heart of anything that we do.— really got to be at the heart of anything that we do. pam from a stron: anything that we do. pam from a strong life _ anything that we do. pam from a strong life care, _ anything that we do. pam from a strong life care, really _ anything that we do. pam from a strong life care, really good - anything that we do. pam from a strong life care, really good to i strong life care, really good to talk to you. thank you for your time. in another change coming into force from today, face coverings in england are no longer mandatory. but many shops, such asjohn lewis and sainsbury�*s, and transport networks will still ask customers to wear masks as a courtesy to others — and it remains mandatory to wear a face covering on transport for london services. face coverings continue to be compulsory in indoor public places in northern ireland, scotland and wales. our correspondent emma simpson has this report. is this the beginning of the end forface masks in england at least?
2:09 pm
commuters at st albans train station seem to be taking a cautious approach. will you still be wearing a mask on the train, may i ask you? yeah, yeah, no, of course, on the train, on the underground, you know, for the next few months, yeah, for sure, just to be safe, in the supermarkets as well, so i will do. i will be wearing a mask on the train, yes. i have decided that, you know, for the moment, with the numbers of cases, i would still rather protect myself and everyone else. train companies want customers to keep wearing masks, too. the advice is really clear, it's where a face covering —— the advice is really clear, it's wear a face covering if it is crowded or if your indoors, and that means we would like to see people continuing to wear them on trains for the time being. just as you will be in supermarkets and other busy indoor settings. the big change is that from today face coverings are no longer legally required in public indoor settings. the mandatory wearing of masks has been contentious throughout this pandemic.
2:10 pm
today's move, it's too early for some, and for others it can't come soon enough. this gift shop isn't wasting any time. emma and her three staff are ready to ditch the mask. it is really lovely to be able to get a little bit of lipstick on again and not have to worry about having masks sticking to me, so today has felt quite liberating. down the road, it is business as usual at this hairdressers. at the moment, we feel that it is better to stick with wearing the masks, and we want people to come in and have their hair done feeling comfortable that we are still taking precautions because it is a mixture of how people feel at the moment. some people feel very comfortable sitting there without a mask, but some people still do not. there is no change to mask wearing for scotland, wales and northern ireland just yet as england takes another step toward normality. emma simpson, bbc news, st albans.
2:11 pm
court documents submitted in new york show that prince andrew has asked for a jury trial in the civil case being brought by virginia giuffre. she is suing him over claims she was sexually assaulted by him 21 years ago when she was a teenager — allegations he strenuously denies. the court papers also show the prince has denied he was a close friend of the convicted sex trafficker ghislaine maxwell. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. it is basically a blanket denial of everything, most importantly and specifically of virginia giuffre's accusation of sexual abuse. but the document from andrew's lawyers questions virtually everything. this widely seen photograph, for example. andrew says he doesn't have enough information to say whether or not it's genuine. that's an echo of what he said in his newsnight interview. she provided a photo of the two of you together. yes, yes. your arm was around her waist. yes. you've seen the photo. i've seen the photograph.
2:12 pm
how do you explain that? i can't. because i don't...| have no...again, i have absolutely no memory of that photograph ever being taken. and then there's the question of andrew's friendship with ghislaine maxwell. he's known herfor 20 years. he took her to royal ascot with her boyfriend, jeffrey epstein, and invited both of them to balmoral and sandringham. however, he now says it wasn't a close friendship. this is what andrew said about the sandringham visit on newsnight. am i right in thinking you threw a birthday party for epstein's girlfriend, ghislaine maxwell, at sandringham? no, it was a shooting weekend. a shooting weekend. just a straightforward... ..straightforward shooting weekend. in addition to the denials, it's clear that andrew's lawyers will attempt to undermine virginia giuffre's credibility and call into question her behaviour. his legal submission said...
2:13 pm
the gloves are off. what you've really got here is prince andrewl saying "bring it on". you want a jury trial? i want a jury trial. you want to bring these claims? well, in that case, you have i to prove everything that you're saying because i'm not- going to admit to anything. and all this just ten days from accession day, when the queen will mark the 70th anniversary of the day she came to the throne. nicholas witchell, bbc news. let's speak now with moira penza, former assistant us attorney for the eastern district of new york. hello, thank you very much for joining us. to what extent is this a pr move rather than something sensible that any lawyer would do? thank you for having me on. this is not... this is a document that prince andrew was required to file
2:14 pm
yesterday, and so i think that is a really important thing for everyone to remember in terms of analysing what is the actual importance of this. and so in this document, for example, he is required to actually admit or deny all of the allegations that are in virginia giuffre's complaint. that is because his attempt to have this case thrown out was denied by the judge two weeks ago. and so this is exactly what you would expect at this stage, to see these sorts of denials, especially where we are before their has actually been discovery in the case. so in terms of a pr move, this is something that he had to file. requesting a jury is something that most litigants do. but here in particular there really is very little import to the fact that prince andrew included a so—called jury prince andrew included a so—called jury demand, which is actually the terminology that is used under the
2:15 pm
law. because virginia giuffre included a jury demand in her very first complaint. so in the initial court document that she failed, she requested a trial byjury, which is a constitutional right in a civil case in america. and so once she had said that, prince andrew had no choice but they are to be a jury trial. so whether he was just including it as a matter of course, whether there was a hope that this would get some positive press, it really is an irrelevant statement in his answer. really is an irrelevant statement in his answer-— really is an irrelevant statement in hisanswer. . ~ �*, ., , , his answer. prince andrew's lawyers have also listed _ his answer. prince andrew's lawyers have also listed something - his answer. prince andrew's lawyers have also listed something called i have also listed something called the doctrine of unclean hands. what does that mean? the the doctrine of unclean hands. what does that mean?— does that mean? the unclean hands doctrine is an _ does that mean? the unclean hands doctrine is an affirmative _ does that mean? the unclean hands doctrine is an affirmative defence i doctrine is an affirmative defence under the law in the united states where you are seeing because this person had engaged in unethical conduct in some other wrongful thing, they are not entitled to recover here. what we are seeing is
2:16 pm
this is likely to reflect the sorts of defences that we were expecting all along from prince andrew, really attacking virginia giuffre. again, this is something he has to raise at this is something he has to raise at this stage, raising affirmative defences is now required or else they are considered waived. it is hard to say that this is a doctrine, for example, that he will absolutely rely upon. it is very difficult to see how you would actually incorporate that doctrine into a defence where somebody is alleging battery and intentional infliction of emotional distress. whether you say that she had some role with jeffrey epstein or not, it seems very difficult to imagine that that will be a successful defence. it is one that he would have to prove at trial. but there cannot be a lot right into the fact that he is asserting it at this stage because he has to or else it is considered
2:17 pm
waived down the road.— he has to or else it is considered waived down the road. finally and briefl , if waived down the road. finally and briefly. if you _ waived down the road. finally and briefly, if you would, _ waived down the road. finally and briefly, if you would, prince i briefly, if you would, prince andrew's legal team have listed reasons why this case should be dismissed. what would it take to have the case dismissed? fist dismissed. what would it take to have the case dismissed?- have the case dismissed? at this stare, have the case dismissed? at this stage. the _ have the case dismissed? at this stage. the case _ have the case dismissed? at this stage, the case is _ have the case dismissed? at this stage, the case is not _ have the case dismissed? at this stage, the case is not going i have the case dismissed? at this stage, the case is not going to i have the case dismissed? at this| stage, the case is not going to be dismissed. he has already failed at the motion to dismiss stage. there are other proceedings down the road, for example, you could seek summary judgment, which would be the next real procedural stage. but that would still be after discovery, after virginia giuffre and prince andrew have had to sit for depositions and produce documents. that is one point in time where this could end up being resolved by the court prior to trial, but it is not something you would actually call a dismissal. again, very unlikely that that would happen. we are most likely looking at a trial or a settlement prior to trial, if that is something that virginia giuffre would even entertain. goad
2:18 pm
is something that virginia giuffre would even entertain.— is something that virginia giuffre would even entertain. good to have our would even entertain. good to have your insight- _ would even entertain. good to have your insight. thank _ would even entertain. good to have your insight. thank you _ would even entertain. good to have your insight. thank you very - would even entertain. good to have your insight. thank you very much. | your insight. thank you very much. thank you. downing st says that it has �*no sight whatsoever�* of a copy of the civil servant sue gray's report into lockdown parties in government. while the wait in westminster continues, the prime minister has vowed to fight on. the labour leader says he is dismayed. speaking in wales this morning, borisjohnson also dismissed claims he approved the controversial airlift of animals from afghanistan. let's talk to our political correspondent damian grammaticas about all of this. we are having to be rather a patient. we are having to be rather a atient. , ., . we are having to be rather a atient. , . . ., patient. yes, we are. we might have to be patient — patient. yes, we are. we might have to be patient for— patient. yes, we are. we might have to be patient for some _ patient. yes, we are. we might have to be patient for some more - patient. yes, we are. we might have to be patient for some more time i to be patient for some more time because, as you say, downing street say they have had no sight of it. everyone was thinking it might come yesterday. it doesn't. the question why, then. it seems that what may be
2:19 pm
happening in the background is that we had a statement from downing street yesterday, or from the prime minister's spokesman, saying downing street was seeking assurances that nothing in the report would, in their words, cut across the police inquiry that is now happening. because of course this week we now know that the metropolitan police are investigating those parties. so what it appears, i think is likely, is that in the background that inquiry team, led by sue gray, have been having discussions with the police to ensure that when they hand over the report to downing street, they are able to say everything in this are things that the police are perfectly happy with us putting into the public domain. because it is believed that the inquiry team are seeking to hand over a report that cannot then be redacted or have a black pen taken to it before it is published. we know, too, that they were ready in a few days ago, we
2:20 pm
think. individuals who were likely to be named in it, we understand there are already some in the public domain, were told so earlier in the week. this is the final sort of ensuring that report is in a way that it could be published, but it may take now until monday. we are not quite sure. depending on when the premise could come to parliament and answer questions about it in the house. —— the prime minister could come to parliament. went back out the prime minister that art did not have a hand in getting pen farthing and his animals out of afghanistan last year? this cropped up before. the importance of this, i should say, is two things. the first is questions about the prime minister's own truthfulness. has he liked about this is one question the opposition are focusing on. the other question is what actions did he take if he
2:21 pm
did take any to intervene in this case? go back to last summer, that evacuation from afghanistan, chaotic circumstances. in the middle of it, this animal rescue charity, run by a former british serviceman trying to get out staff and animals, they eventually did on a plane at the very end, how did that come about? borisjohnson said that it was nonsense he had intervened in that. what we had yesterday was an e—mail from within the foreign office that were released to a house of commons committee in which civil servants were talking about the prime minister having authorised... the premise has just authorised the staff and animals to be evacuated, one of the e—mails sent. today that has been backed up, again, it has to be said, in comments from dominic dyer. a wildlife campaigner who was working at the centre to try to get all this to happen. this is what he
2:22 pm
said. ~ ., , all this to happen. this is what he said. ~ . , ., all this to happen. this is what he said. . . , ., , , ., said. we had vets and vet nurses and animal care — said. we had vets and vet nurses and animal care assistants _ said. we had vets and vet nurses and animal care assistants within - said. we had vets and vet nurses and animal care assistants within the i animal care assistants within the charity— animal care assistants within the charity on— animal care assistants within the charity on the ground in kabul who were _ charity on the ground in kabul who were under— charity on the ground in kabul who were under real threat, particularly women, _ were under real threat, particularly women, and we had manyjobs for them in the _ women, and we had manyjobs for them in the uk _ women, and we had manyjobs for them in the uk where we had manyjobs across_ in the uk where we had manyjobs across the — in the uk where we had manyjobs across the veterinary care sector. the prime — across the veterinary care sector. the prime minister understood and accepted _ the prime minister understood and accepted those arguments and put those _ accepted those arguments and put those people on the evacuation list, working _ those people on the evacuation list, working with the home, come secretary— working with the home, come secretary to get the wheels of whitehall moving.— secretary to get the wheels of whitehall moving. secretary to get the wheels of whitehall movin-. . , , ., , whitehall moving. that seems to be directin: whitehall moving. that seems to be directing -- — whitehall moving. that seems to be directing -- directly _ whitehall moving. that seems to be directing -- directly in _ directing —— directly in contradiction to what borisjohnson has said and what he again said today on a visit to wales. this whole thing — today on a visit to wales. this whole thing is _ today on a visit to wales. this whole thing is total _ today on a visit to wales. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was very proud — whole thing is total rhubarb. i was very proud of what our armed services — very proud of what our armed services debt.— very proud of what our armed services debt. . _ services debt. dominic dyer said he was only speaking _ services debt. dominic dyer said he was only speaking up _ services debt. dominic dyer said he was only speaking up because i services debt. dominic dyer said he was only speaking up because he i was only speaking up because he thought the prime minister should be proud of what he did. the labour party have been very critical, saying the it is increasingly clear
2:23 pm
the prime minister's story is not credible. and he has lied about what actions he took. she says that also matters notjust because of that question of probity but also the issue she says that thousands of people were left behind, or many people were left behind, or many people were left behind, or many people were left behind in that evacuation, afghans who had helped the uk over the course of time in afghanistan left to an uncertain fate in afghanistan. she said, in her words, she said it is increasingly clear you cannot believe a word were prime minister says and he has been very damaging. for the moment, thank you very much. a bit of breaking news regarding an incident that happened injune last yearin incident that happened injune last year in stjames's park in central london involving england's chief medical officer professor sir chris whitty. a 24—year—old from essex has pleaded guilty at westminster magistrates' court to a charge of
2:24 pm
intent to cause harassment, alarm or distress to sir chris. this was on the june last year went there was an accusation of assault. he was one of two men who filmed themselves with the chief medical officer for england. now pleading guilty. we will have to wait and see what sort of sentence there will be and whether it will be a custodial one. a24—year—old man pleading guilty to that charge. research has shown that changes to women's periods after a covid vaccine are temporary. now two new studies from the us and norway published in the british medicaljournal have been described as �*reassuring' by fertility experts here, suggesting that any changes are short—lived and small compared with natural variation in normal menstruation cycles. joining me now to discuss this further is dr victoria male from imperial college london. good to see you again. just explain if you would the sorts of changes
2:25 pm
that women have noticed.- if you would the sorts of changes that women have noticed. well, over the summer— that women have noticed. well, over the summer as _ that women have noticed. well, over the summer as the _ that women have noticed. well, over the summer as the vaccines - that women have noticed. well, over the summer as the vaccines were i the summer as the vaccines were rolled out, people did report noticing changes to their periods. what they most often reported was later than usual period or a heavier than usual period. the thing is that periods vary a lot anyway, so it is really difficult to know without a control group if these were changes that were really caused by the vaccine or if these were just changes that were happening anyway that people happened to be noticing at the time they were vaccinated. these two studies from the us and norway aim together about 10,000 people to tackle that question. it was only after the vaccine, was there any effect of having covid itself? , ., , ., there any effect of having covid itself? , . , ., ., , itself? yes, that is a really good oint. itself? yes, that is a really good point- there _ itself? yes, that is a really good point. there are _ itself? yes, that is a really good point. there are two _ itself? yes, that is a really good point. there are two studies i itself? yes, that is a really good| point. there are two studies that suggest if you get covid, about between 15—25% of people will notice a change to their periods. it is quite important to say that one of
2:26 pm
these studies actually has found that it takes a little while after covid for your periods to settle back to normal, which is kind of in contrast to what the us study found. it found a delay to the second period after vaccination, a very small one of half a day, or if you got both doses in the same cycle or a longer one of a little bit more than two days. but this was back to normal within a couple of cycles. 50 normal within a couple of cycles. so thatis normal within a couple of cycles. so that is reassuring news to a lot of women. what is your advice to them if women do notice these changes? well, i think if women do notice these changes? well, ithink it if women do notice these changes? well, i think it shows quite clearly that these changes do happen, they are real, people were not imagining them, but they are really very small compared to normal variation and they do reverse quickly. so if you notice the change that carries on for many, many cycles, that suggest it is not very likely to be to do with the covid vaccine and we would recommend you go to see your doctor to get checked out to find out why thatis to get checked out to find out why that is happening and make sure you
2:27 pm
get the appropriate treatment. do not ignore it. always should have good advice. in terms of those changes that are related to having covid or having the vaccine, what is the explanation for the changes coming about because of that? neither of these studies got to that. what i thought was really interesting was that both of them were better able to detect the changes, small ones but still they are, after the second dose of the vaccine. to me, is an immunologist, things happen for the second time suggests an immune mechanism. that to me might put these changes in the same kind of basket as things like a sore arm or feeling feverish, that we know are mediated by the immune system, that we know are short—lived. they are annoying but fundamentally nothing to worry about. ,., ., ., fundamentally nothing to worry about. ., , , .«r fundamentally nothing to worry about. ., ,, .«r ., ., ,, about. good to speak to you. thank ou ve about. good to speak to you. thank you very much _ about. good to speak to you. thank you very much for _ about. good to speak to you. thank you very much for your— about. good to speak to you. thank you very much for your time. i car production in britain fell to its lowest level since 1956 last year, according to the latest figures. the society of motor manufacturers and traders
2:28 pm
blamed covid disruption — particularly a lack of silicon chips and staff shortages — but said new investment in electric vehicles gives some ground for optimism. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah. some of us started off the day with a fair amount of cloud, particularly in the south, it has also been quite breezy. forthe in the south, it has also been quite breezy. for the remainder of today, it should be stained out for many places with long spells of sunshine. there are a few blustery showers here and there, particularly towards the north—west. northern and western scotland, north—west england seen one or two, as well. further south and east spaces staying dry with great sunshine. once the sun sets, will such to see these temperatures dipping fairly quickly, particularly across eastern areas. a little bit more cloud always towards the west and north—west. through tonight, with a light went and clear skies, thatis with a light went and clear skies, that is the recipe for quite a chilly night. some pockets of frost certainly, even towns and cities down to freezing any few spots. colder than that in the countryside.
2:29 pm
not quite as cold across the north west with more cloud around, but some pockets of mist and fog that are going to lingerfor a while some pockets of mist and fog that are going to linger for a while for central and eastern areas. they should clear away. through the day, work cloud and outbreaks of rain for northern and western parts, dry and the south—east and highs of around 8-11. the south—east and highs of around 8—11. goodbye. this is bbc news. the headlines: covid rules on care homes in england have been eased by the government —
2:30 pm
allowing unlimited visits from monday. resident campaign groups say they welcome the move. i could actually cry with relief. they welcome the move. we have actually been asking our members to write to their mps asking for all the restrictions to be lifted. we know it is definitely safer now. face coverings are no longer mandatory in england from today, but some big retailers ask customers to continue wearing them. borisjohnson says human beings were prioritised during the fall of kabul — it's after suggestions he was personally involved in rescuing animals from pen farthing's charity in afghanistan. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was very proud of what our armed services did. prince andrew has denied being a close friend of convicted sex trafficker, ghislaine maxwell, in a legal response to the woman suing him for sexual assault — he denies all allegations
2:31 pm
against him. it's holocaust memorial day — marking 77 years since the liberation of auschwitz—birkenau. seven holocaust survivors have had portraits painted in a project commissioned by prince charles. barry cryer — one of the most prolific scriptwriters in british comedy — has died at the age of 86. sport now — and for a full round up from the bbc sport centre. dropped catches undermined england's good start in the one—off women's ashes test. it's a crucial match that, were england to lose, they'd have no chance of winning the series. australia were 4—2 at one stage but they dug in and are on top after day one. jo currie reports.
2:32 pm
tests in women's cricket are rare, and ashes test therefore a special moment. england won the toss and opted to bowl, that bravery paid off, an early breakthrough, alyssa healy gone for naught. ten days ago, beth mooney fractured herjaw earlier, surgery later, she's back, but not for long. australia needed to rebuild, what could the best test cricketer in the world offer? her flare was short—lived. jones with a hat—trick of catches, england on top. just after lunch, a missed opportunity, heather knight dropping her australian counterpart, a moment they would come to rue as australia steadily added runs to the board. australia had turned the tide, centuries were on the horizon, until finally, lanning was dismissed for 93, and followed almost immediately by haynes on 96. the runs kept coming and by close of play, the hosts were 327—7,
2:33 pm
england is into day two up against it. as party took a little more than an hour to do something that no is still young women had done in four decades. we were a number one is for to the final of the austrian open. she won the first to sit in atjust 26 minutes. it did not take that much longer to wrap up the whole match. she is the first after ewing through to the student open final and her home grand slam since 1980. and barty will face another american in the final. danielle collins could prove to be a formidable opponent, she beat the seventh seed iga swiatek in straight sets to make it through to her first grand slam final. it feels amazing, it's been such a journey and it doesn't happen overnight. so many years of hard work
2:34 pm
from an early age on court. yesterday, i was talking about all the early mornings my dad would get up with me and practice with me before school. it's just incredible to be on this stage, especially with the health challenges, i'm just so grateful. i couldn't be happier. exeter chiefs will reference to native americans in their branding after it promoted criticism. they have changed their logo, which from the summer will only use images from the summer will only use images from the iron age celtic age. derby county administrators have been given an extra month to show they have enough money to survive the rest of the championship season first up they have agreed with the efl to staying at the deadline into much even though they are expected to run out of cash next month.
2:35 pm
players in the women's super league and championship will have guaranteed maternity and long—term sickness cover written into their contracts after the fa and pfa agreed to the change. west ham's dagny brynjarsdottir is one of the few mothers have played in wsl and because maternity cover has previously been at the discretion of clubs, many have decided to wait until they've retired before starting a family. fifa have introduced similar rules and one member of parliament told a recent debate to have the change implemented would be a massive step forward. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories frontline nhs staff in england who are not yet vaccinated against covid now have just one week left to get a jab — or face losing theirjobs. the health secretary, sajid javid, says it's their professional duty to be fully vaccinated. but some in the health service have called for the policy to be re—thought. our health reporter jim reed has more.
2:36 pm
amy is an occupational therapist, often working with the elderly or physically disabled. she has it they decided not to be vaccinated against covid. i decided not to be vaccinated against covid. ., , covid. i would say each person has to wei . h covid. i would say each person has to weigh up _ covid. i would say each person has to weigh up the — covid. i would say each person has to weigh up the pros _ covid. i would say each person has to weigh up the pros and _ covid. i would say each person has to weigh up the pros and cons i covid. i would say each person has to weigh up the pros and cons forl to weigh up the pros and cons for themselves. to weigh up the pros and cons for themselves-— to weigh up the pros and cons for themselves. ~ ., ., , ., ., themselves. what would you say to eo - le themselves. what would you say to people who — themselves. what would you say to people who think— themselves. what would you say to people who think if— themselves. what would you say to people who think if you _ themselves. what would you say to people who think if you work - themselves. what would you say to people who think if you work with i people who think if you work with vulnerable people and a health care setting, you have irresponsibility to be vaccinated yourself, to protect other people. —— a responsibility. wearing ppe, personal protective equipment, protects the vulnerable people. find equipment, protects the vulnerable --eole. �* ., ., equipment, protects the vulnerable --eole. ., ., , equipment, protects the vulnerable n-eole. . . , ., people. and that you are prepared to lose our people. and that you are prepared to lose yourjob — people. and that you are prepared to lose yourjob rather— people. and that you are prepared to lose yourjob rather than _ people. and that you are prepared to lose yourjob rather than get - lose yourjob rather than get vaccinated at the moment? yes. i don't want — vaccinated at the moment? yes. i don't want to _ vaccinated at the moment? yes. i don't want to lose _ vaccinated at the moment? yes. i don't want to lose my _ vaccinated at the moment? yes. i don't want to lose my job, - vaccinated at the moment? yes. i don't want to lose my job, i i vaccinated at the moment? yes. i don't want to lose my job, i love i vaccinated at the moment? yes. i. don't want to lose my job, i love my don't want to lose myjob, i love my job, i respect the nhs. but i am very much a supporter of choice. ethnic amy is one of 2 million in england covered by new rules on compulsory vaccination. that already
2:37 pm
includes half an onion care home workers, who had to have their second child by last november. if a patient comes to me and says, "should i have the vaccine? have you been vaccinated, doctor?" that answer should always be, "yes, of course i've been vaccinated, and you should too." there is no wriggle room ethically for a doctor or a nurse or anybody talking to patients about whether they should be vaccinated themselves or not. so your message would be "get the vaccine if you want to stay in the job"? i think the evidence is overwhelming. i've been working on covid itus
2:38 pm
since the beginning. i have not had a vaccination. i do not want to have a vaccination. the debate, though, is becoming more heated as the deadline looms. this clip of a doctor challenging the health secretary on the policy has been viewed more than one million times on social media. the government says doctors, nurses and other front line health staff look after the most vulnerable, who could face serious consequences if they catch the virus. and nhs health chiefs say staff have a duty to make sure they're protected. last weekend, health care workers joined this wider protest against compulsory vaccination. other nhs staff firmly support the policy. with just a week to go, ministers now say they will reflect on the latest evidence, but the need to protect patients remains unchanged. jim reed, bbc news. the latest nhs figures were published this morning, including the impact of covid on the health service.
2:39 pm
our health correspondent, katharine da costa, gave us this assessment on how health services are being affected. it's been another busy week. while covid—related staff absence is now falling, pressure on the nhs, they say, is still intense. it's been the busiest week for underlings who is taking patients into a&e since the start of december. but it is an improving picture. if we take covid staff absence, that has been falling across england. about 3% of hospital staff in trusts in england were off ending the week of january. that is more than 30,000 staff each day on average, down on the previous week. still highest in the midlands and at the north—west but it is falling. if we look at other pressures on the health service. one of the biggest areas is freeing up beds, where
2:40 pm
patients might be medically fit enough to be discharged but they are waiting for social care packages to be put in place. that figure has stayed fairly stable, about 13,000 patients who remain in hospital despite being eligible to leave. up a bit on the previous week. it still means about one in seven beds in england are taken up by someone fit enough to leave. that has knock—on effects, how many patients hospitals can take from a&e1 of the impact is on ambulances waiting to hand over their patients to a&e. it has stayed stable at about 18%, similar to the previous week when they were reaching 30 minutes or more to hand over their patients to ard. one area worth pointing out is that the number of covid patients that they are primarily treated for the riders as opposed to being there with the
2:41 pm
virus but being gritty for something completely separate. that has changed. less than half covid patients in england were being treated primarily for covid and the week to the end of january. what they call incidental covid, that has been gradually increasing. in the autumn it was about 25% of patients. it is now more than half. 30 of those in covid patients in england on january those in covid patients in england onjanuary 25, those in covid patients in england on january 25, just those in covid patients in england onjanuary 25, just over 6000 at them primarily being there treated for the virus, but about 7000 there for the virus, but about 7000 there for something completely different. it is worth saying they could be being treated for a stroke or cancer and covid could make their condition worse. it does not mean the nhs is under less pressure because of that, this only to be isolated and fitted in separate wards. overall, an
2:42 pm
improving picture. covid admissions have been falling in england, the number in hospital is about 14,000. the nhs are urging people to continue coming forward for their vaccinations and really stressed the importance of only using 999 when it is a life—threatening emergency, otherwise they're asking people to use one and using the appropriate services. with the pressures on local hospitals, the bbc now has a special nhs tracker with the latest data on waits for emergency treatment which will let you find out how your local services are coping this winter — and how that compares to pre—pandemic demand. let's return to the news that a report into a series of alleged parties at downing street during lockdown is expected to land on the desk of the prime minister today. but there are also reports it may not be published until next week. the report by the senior civil servant, sue gray, has already prompted a separate
2:43 pm
inquiry by the metropolitan police. some conservative mps are waiting to read sue gray's findings before deciding whether to try to oust borisjohnson. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, has in the last hour expressed his feelings about the delay. i want to see the publication of the report in full as soon as possible. and when i see in full, i mean the whole report as it is delivered to the prime minister, no reductions, no editing, no summaries, no bits left out. the full report. after what this country has been through in the last year or two with the pandemic and the sacrifices people have made, the least they are entitled to the full truth. let's speak to jill rutter, who's a senior fellow at the institute for government and a former civil servant. why might this be delayed? it has
2:44 pm
been slightly _ why might this be delayed? it has been slightly complicated - why might this be delayed? it has been slightly complicated by i why might this be delayed? it is; been slightly complicated by the decision of the metropolitan police to open up their investigation. there are some reports they are looking to see whether anything in the cabinet office report might cut across that police investigation. other reports that they are going through final legal, hr and legal checks. ~ ., ., through final legal, hr and legal checks. ., ., . ., checks. what sort of hr checks would be necessary- — checks. what sort of hr checks would be necessary. for— checks. what sort of hr checks would be necessary. for civil— checks. what sort of hr checks would be necessary. for civil servants i be necessary. for civil servants involved. _ be necessary. for civil servants involved, potential— be necessary. for civil servants involved, potential quite i be necessary. for civil servants involved, potential quite a i be necessary. for civil servants involved, potential quite a lot, | involved, potential quite a lot, this might result in disciplinary action. we have also heard the unions are getting involved, some of them may be union members and the unions may be making representations that they don't think their members should be named. so we don't know what is really going on. what is slightly odd is that you would have thought that steps would have been na in a project planned for completion of a report, that these issues should not come as too much of a surprise and they should have
2:45 pm
built that until the timetable for release before they started saying anything was good to go. hour release before they started saying anything was good to go. how elastic does that timetable _ anything was good to go. how elastic does that timetable necessarily i anything was good to go. how elastic does that timetable necessarily need j does that timetable necessarily need to become as yet more and more gatherings were added to the last four investigation? that gatherings were added to the last four investigation?— gatherings were added to the last four investigation? that has clearly been one of— four investigation? that has clearly been one of the _ four investigation? that has clearly been one of the difficulties - four investigation? that has clearly been one of the difficulties of i been one of the difficulties of this, the increasing doubt feed of revelations. on the most recent stories, we were told so great was already aware of those so those that do not require her to do anything new. but dominic cummings' revelations last week, and the fact he then gave his evidence to sue gray, clearly would have meant a bit of extra thinking going in there. we will see. one of the questions depends on how forthcoming people have been in at number ten and the wider civil service from the get go, whether sue gray has had to drag information out of them or whether they actually offered at all straightaway.—
2:46 pm
they actually offered at all straiahtawa . ., . ., ':: straightaway. how much control 10 downin: straightaway. how much control 10 downing street _ straightaway. how much control 10 downing street have _ straightaway. how much control 10 downing street have over - straightaway. how much control 10 downing street have over what i straightaway. how much control 10 downing street have over what is l downing street have over what is actually published and what is redacted? ih actually published and what is redacted? ., , . ., ., redacted? in theory, it could have comlete redacted? in theory, it could have complete control. _ redacted? in theory, it could have complete control. it _ redacted? in theory, it could have complete control. it is _ redacted? in theory, it could have complete control. it is for - redacted? in theory, it could have complete control. it is for the i complete control. it is for the prime minister to decide what to put out there. if you want to do a freedom of information request, you might very well find it might take quite a long time to be dealt with. people say that there is a lot of sensitive personnel issues and you might not have muchjoy in sensitive personnel issues and you might not have much joy in getting it. but the prime minister has given commitments in parliament that the report will be published timely and i think in the field. the political pressure will be enormous if the ring aged on that. keir starmer in your club was repeating his calls of we don't use one the summary, we don't want lots of names are blacked out, we want the full thing that comes to you. unamended, on redacted
2:47 pm
to the house. hour comes to you. unamended, on redacted to the house-— to the house. how problematic for ou is to the house. how problematic for you is this — to the house. how problematic for you is this very — to the house. how problematic for you is this very system, _ to the house. how problematic for you is this very system, whereby l to the house. how problematic for i you is this very system, whereby sue gray is producing a report for the prime minister in which the prime minister may feature quite significantly? i minister may feature quite significantly?— minister may feature quite significantly? i think that is a very good — significantly? i think that is a very good question. - significantly? i think that is a very good question. i - significantly? i think that is a very good question. i think i significantly? i think that is a i very good question. i think this is, in a sense, why the whole process has been quite flawed from the start. the prime minister's initial commission was to his cabinet secretary, simon case. it is not unprecedented that cabinet office have investigated other cabinet misters for misdemeanours. but this was always going to end up in a judgment about activities in downing street and ultimately at the behaviour of the prime minister. it is an incredibly difficult position to put the civil service in, partly because they are judging the man who is ultimately their boss, who has
2:48 pm
quite a big say in the future course of their careers, that is quite difficult. but also because it lies at the civil service open to so many charges. —— lays the civil service. if it lets the prime minister off, people will accuse it of whitewashing the stop if it damns the civil service, people will say the civil service, people will say the civil service is all tied in for a brexit supporting government. jobseekers on universal credit will have to look forjobs outside their chosen field more quickly under new government plans. currently, claimants have three months to find work in their chosen area — but from thursday, that's being reduced to four weeks. the government wants half a millionjobseekers in employment by the end ofjune. but opposition parties say there should be more support for people to find the job they want. the us has rejected russia's demand that ukraine should never be allowed to join the western military alliance, nato. moscow made the demand after amassing around 100,000 troops near the ukrainian border in both
2:49 pm
belarus and russia — although it denies that it's planning to invade. russia responded this morning by saying its concerns were not being taken into account. james waterhouse in ukraine sent this report. there's no such thing as rain at this time of year in kyiv. for cab driver andre, a peaceful relationship with neighbouring russia feels equally unlikely. if ukraine again will be occupied, russian troops, like it was 100 years ago in soviet times, in russian empire times, it will be a new aggression, a new situation, a new genocide for ukrainians. ukraine's relationship with russia is a complicated one. there are cultural ties which go back a long way. in that time, ukraine has also been no stranger to a struggle for sovereignty. we have liberty and we have six presidents in the last 30 years. talks will continue over russian's demands that ukraine never joins nato and for the alliance to scale
2:50 pm
there's no such thing as rain at this time of year in kyiv. but with the us not meeting those demands and these deep—rooted differences between kyiv and moscow, for how much longer will there be dialogue? nothing about ukraine without ukraine, a principal repeated not just here, but by the west on frequent occasions. now, whilst the country isn't involved in these main talks, the foreign minister says he is satisfied the country's priorities are being considered. his government though is under pressure to deliver on its promise to sort things diplomatically, so for a while the authorities have been urging one thing. "don't panic." however, that's only going to get harder with tensions not exactly thawing in ukraine's frozen conflict with russian—backed separatists, and the kremlin now saying there aren't many reasons to be optimistic. james waterhouse, bbc news, in kyiv.
2:51 pm
today is the 77th anniversary of the liberation in 1945 of the nazi death camp at auschwitz. it is marked — as it is every year — by holocaust memorial day, and the victims of all genocides are being remembered. in a special project commissioned by prince charles, seven holocaust survivors have had their portraits painted by different artists. our royal correspondent daniela relph has more. arek hersh was one ofjust two members of his family to survive the holocaust. this painting captures him now, at the age of 93. the style is realistic, almost photographic. his right hand rests on his left arm, the arm that bears the number he was marked with at auschwitz. creating a gallery of holocaust survivors, the bbc has been following the project. covid made things unconventional for artist massimiliano pironti. i started to paint this portrait in completely opposite process as normal.
2:52 pm
you should have painted me when i had hair! yeah, that was a while ago. we had, like, three virtual sittings. how do you feel? 0k. months later, came a real life meet—up, as arek shared his story. that was our first camp. 11 years old, i was, 11 years old. that's auschwitz, yeah. and it's where we got our number on the arm. these are children who survived at auschwitz. | arek was one of those survivors. but the rest of his family, bar his older sister, never reached liberation. they were some of the six million jews killed in the holocaust. this week, arek met the prince of wales, who commissioned the project. this is my picture.
2:53 pm
i think it's fantastic. i felt we owed it to these remarkable people just to remember them in this way. there is something very special about the portrait, and about the artist's eye in bringing out the real underlying character, personality and meaning the connection between artists and survivors has been strong. the pictures reflect both loss and survival. these portraits go to the heart of their individuality and their humanity. what better way of rejecting that kind of philosophy that led to the holocaust? the reality is this extraordinary group of people are now growing smaller every year, but the power of their testimony forms a lasting memory. daniela relph, bbc news, the queen's gallery at buckingham palace. one of the most influential writers in british comedy — barry cryer — has died
2:54 pm
at the age of 86. during a long career he worked with a number of star names and was known to millions for his role on radio 4's i'm sorry i haven't a clue. his close friend, gyles brandreth, paid tribute saying �*wherever barry went he brought laughter with him' and the bbc�*s director general tim davie described him as an �*incredible comedian and writer. if you heard or saw a great sketch, there was always a good chance barry was behind it.�* sarah campbell looks back at his life. # i know a fat old policeman # he�*s always on our street # a fat and jolly red—faced man...# radio 4�*s i�*m sorry i haven�*t a clue, and barry cryer sings the words of the laughing policeman to the tune of as time goes by. # he never known to frown # and everybody says # he�*s the happiest man in town...# barry cryer seemed a happy fellow too, and a lucky one. i spent my time mainly with people i liked and admired, laughing about something. he�*d started young, playing shakespeare�*s falstaff at school in leeds.
2:55 pm
down in london, he wrote gags for the drag artist, danny la rue, as well as performing himself. an early success was a novelty song which went to number one... ..in finland. # it looks like a purple people eater to me...# there was a comedy panel show on itv. good evening, ladies and gentlemen, welcome tojokers wild, a game in which some of the country�*s top comedians match wits to see who, if anybody, knows all the jokes. and hello cheeky on tv and radio. he wrote for almost every leading comic, from frankie howerd to spike milligan, dick emery to kenny everett, the two ronnies to mike yarwood. when morecambe and wise switched from the bbc to itv, he and john junkin wrote their scripts. we've been so looking forward to working with you! come this way.
2:56 pm
it's just the same here i as what they are at the bbc. denis norden always says there�*s a sitter and a pacer, there�*s someone typing and someone walking about. and i would sit there scribbling or typing, and john would walk around, waggling his glasses. what a lovely audience! where are they? oh, there they are. yes _ never mind, they'll do. i saw them arriving on the coaches. did you really? _ yeah, with their blankets over their heads. - # my short—term memory�*s shot to pieces # and i�*ll tell you something else # my short—term memory�*s shot to pieces...# he was still performing well into his 80s. a man whose trade was quite simply making people laugh. # ha—ha—ha.# applause now it�*s time for a look at the weather with sarah.
2:57 pm
last night brought a particularly windy night for northern parts of the uk, but those are brisk winds we have seen are now easing. through the rest of the day, we are looking at quite a lot of dry weather, some sunny spells around, but some blustery showers across the north—west. a few filtering for northern ireland, into north—west england and north wales. elsewhere looking at clear skies into the last part of the some like brightness as the sun sets. a little bit more cloud across the north and the west. through the course of the night, under clear skies with relatively light wind we will see some pockets of frost and fog forming, particularly across parts of england, wales and eastern scotland. even in towns and cities it could be quite a cold night, a few degrees below freezing in the countryside. the next frontal system approaches,
2:58 pm
but it will be high pressure that holes on further south, drawing in pretty mild air from the south—west as we move through friday with winds rotating around high pressure. still quite chilly with pockets of mist and fog lingering for southern and eastern areas. turning milderfrom the norfolk north—west. temperatures mild in the west, but still holding on to single figures across parts of southern and eastern england. into the weekend, not much change in the setup, high—pressure are still sitting toward the south and weather systems trying to move on from the north. saturday, frontal systems bring rain to scotland, the rain tends to be set out as it headed south. still quite mild in the south, turning colderfor the north. saturday wherever you are it will be
2:59 pm
quite a windy day, with some quite gusty winds, 60 mph or more across the north of scotland,. into sunday, low pressure brings more rain to northern ireland and scotland, pro cd for the time by some fairly heavy hill snow. try a further south and east but turning colder, temperatures 5—10.
3:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines: covid rules for care homes in england have been eased by the government, allowing an limited visits from monday. campaign groups say they welcome the move. i visits from monday. campaign groups say they welcome the move.- say they welcome the move. i could actually cried _ say they welcome the move. i could actually cried with _ say they welcome the move. i could actually cried with relief. _ say they welcome the move. i could actually cried with relief. we - say they welcome the move. i could actually cried with relief. we have i actually cried with relief. we have been _ actually cried with relief. we have been asking our members to write to their mps. _ been asking our members to write to their mps, asking for all visiting restrictions to be lifted because we know _ restrictions to be lifted because we know it _ restrictions to be lifted because we know it is _ restrictions to be lifted because we know it is definitely safer now. face _ know it is definitely safer now. face coverings are no longer mandatory in england from today, but some big retailers ask customers to continue wearing them. borisjohnson says human beings were prioritised during the fall of kabul after suggestions he was personally involved in rescuing animals from the farthing�*s charity in afghanistan. the farthing's charity in afghanistan.— the farthing's charity in afghanistan. the farthing's charity in afuhanistan. , ., , afghanistan. this whole thing is total rhubarb. _
3:01 pm
afghanistan. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i _ afghanistan. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was _ afghanistan. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was very - afghanistan. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was very proud l afghanistan. this whole thing is | total rhubarb. i was very proud of what our armed services did. aha, what our armed services did. a 24—year—old man has admitted his part in an assault on england�*s chief medical officer professor sir chris witty any central london park last year. it is holocaust memorial day, marking 77 years since the liberation of auschwitz—birkenau. we will be live in poland for an auschwitz memorial. one of the most prolific scriptwriters in british comedy has died at the age of 86. good afternoon. welcome to bbc news. residents in care homes in england will be allowed to see an unlimited number of their loved ones from monday.
3:02 pm
the current limit of three named visitors is being scrapped. the government says a successful rollout of booster vaccines means the restriction isn�*t necessary anymore. it comes as part of a wider easing of the rules for england�*s care homes. self—isolation periods will also be cut and in the event of a positive case, care homes will only have to close their doors to visitors for 14 days rather than 28. our correspondent andrew plant reports. from monday we have the unlimited visiting. going over the latest guidance at their secure home in bristol, —— going over the latest guidance at this care home in bristol, working out what the changes will mean for residents and staff here, ready for restrictions easing on monday. should make a lot of people happy. fantastic. for dorothy, visiting should become much easier. protective clothing is likely to stay, but she will no longer need an appointment to come and see her sister and will be able to bring otherfamily members with her, too. she hasn�*t seen my grandchildren... well, her nieces and nephews for a while, you know, they would be able to come in when we want and more
3:03 pm
than one of us coming in, so it would be really, really good. really good. each nation in the uk sets its own care home rules. scotland eased its restrictions last week. in england, as well as lifting limits on visitors, self isolation periods will be cut from 14 days to 10, outbreak management cut from 28 days to 14, and care home workers will be asked to use lateral flow tests before shifts rather than a weekly pcr. real positive move, you know, breathing life back into the homes, allowing people to see their loved ones where they have felt certainly cut off. are you confident you can still keep your residents safe with more relaxed safety rules? there is so much risk management that has come into our sector, with fully vaccinated staff, fully vaccinated residents. it feels right to bring those restrictions down. despite limits on visitors being lifted, other issues for care
3:04 pm
homes could mean they still have to manage numbers. we have still got shortages in staff. we have got over 50% of services who are in outbreak, so facilitating visits, we need to be absolutely clear, you know, these are time—consuming, and when you have a lot of people wanting to come through at the same time, we are going to have to limit the number of people coming into the services. you can pick out your favourites if you like. j changes to restrictions will not mean the end of the challenges for the care home industry. the new arrangements should see less isolation... another daisy. ..and much more socialising for those in care homes. andrew plant, bbc news, in bristol. in another change coming into force from today, face coverings in england are no longer mandatory. but many shops, such asjohn lewis and sainsbury�*s, and transport networks will still ask customers to wear masks as a courtesy to others — and it remains mandatory to wear a face covering on transport
3:05 pm
for london services. face coverings continue to be compulsory in indoor public places in northern ireland, scotland and wales. our correspondent emma simpson has this report. is this the beginning of the end for face masks — in england at least? commuters at st albans train station seem to be taking a cautious approach. will you still be wearing a mask on the train, may i ask you? yeah, yeah, no, of course, on the train, on the underground, you know, for the next few months, yeah, for sure, just to be safe, in the supermarkets as well, so i will do. i will be wearing a mask on the train, yes. i have decided that, you know, for the moment, with the numbers of cases, i would still rather protect myself and everyone else. train companies want customers to keep wearing masks, too. the advice is really clear, it�*s wear a face covering if it is crowded or if your indoors, and that means we would like to see people continuing to wear them on trains for the time being.
3:06 pm
just as you will be in supermarkets and other busy indoor settings. the big change is that from today face coverings are no longer legally required in public indoor settings. the mandatory wearing of masks has been contentious throughout this pandemic. today�*s move, it�*s too early for some, and for others it can�*t come soon enough. this gift shop isn�*t wasting any time. emma and her three staff are ready to ditch the mask. it is really lovely to be able to get a little bit of lipstick on again and not have to worry about having masks sticking to me, so today has felt quite liberating. down the road, it is business as usual at this hairdressers. at the moment, we feel that it is better to stick with wearing the masks, and we want people to come in and have their hair done feeling comfortable that we are still taking precautions because it is a mixture of how people feel at the moment.
3:07 pm
some people feel very comfortable sitting there without a mask, but some people still do not. there is no change to mask wearing for scotland, wales and northern ireland just yet as england takes another step toward normality. emma simpson, bbc news, st albans. the latest nhs england figures were published this morning, including the impact of covid on the health service. our health correspondent katharine da costa gave us this assessment on how health services are being affected. it has been another busy week. so, while covid—related staff absence is now falling, pressure on the nhs, they say, is still intense. it has been one of the busiest weeks for ambulances taking patients into a&e since the start of december. but it is an improving picture. so if we take covid staff absence, that has been falling right across england. about 3% of staff at hospital trusts in england were off due to covid in the week ending the 23rd of january, so that is more than
3:08 pm
30,000 staff off each day on average. it is down on the previous week. still highest in the midlands and the north—west, but it is falling. if we look at other pressures on the health service, one of the biggest areas is freeing up beds. so this is where patients might be fit enough, medically fit enough to be discharge, but they are waiting for social care packages to be put in place. now, that figure has stayed fairly stable. so there were about 13,000 patients who remained in hospital despite being eligible to be released. that was up a bit on the previous week, but it still means about one in seven beds in england is being taken up by someone who is fit enough to leave. and that has knock—on effects — so how many patients that hospital can take in from a&e. and one of the impacts is on ambulances waiting to hand over their patients to a&e. it stayed stable again, about 18%, similar to the previous week,
3:09 pm
where they were waiting 30 minutes or more to hand over their patients to a&e. so pressure remains. one area worth pointing out is that the number of covid patients that are there primarily being treated for the virus as opposed to being with the virus being treated for something completely separate, and that has changed. so less than half of covid patients in england were being treated primarily for covid in the week up to the 25th of january. that is the lowest level so far. what they call incidental covid, where you are going in for something else, like a broken leg, and have covid, that has been gradually increasing. so, in the autumn, it was about 25% of patients, it is now more than half. so if you take the figure of 13,000 covid patients in england on the 25th of january, just over 6,000 where they are primarily on the 25th of january, just over 6,000 where there primarily being treated for the virus, but about 7,000 were there for something completely different.
3:10 pm
it is worth saying though that they could be being treated for a stroke or cancer and covid might complicate or make their condition worse. so it doesn�*t mean that the nhs is under less pressure because of it, they still need to be isolated and treated in separate wards, so there are still infection—control issues there that make it difficult. so, overall, then, an improving picture. covid admissions have been falling in england. the number in hospitals — about 14,000 — again, has been falling. but the nhs have said they are urging people to continue coming forward for their vaccinations and really stress the importance of only using 999 when it has a life threatening emergency, otherwise they are asking people to use 111 and use the appropriate services. it�*s holocaust memorial day today, marking 77—years since the liberation of the nazi death camp at auschwitz—birkenau — although the day is for the victims of all genocides. seven holocaust survivors have
3:11 pm
had their portraits painted by different artists, in a special project commissioned by prince charles. our royal correspondent daniela relph has more. arek hersh was one ofjust two members of his family to survive the holocaust. this painting captures him now, at the age of 93. the style is realistic, almost photographic. his right hand rests on his left arm, the arm that bears the number he was marked with at auschwitz. creating a gallery of holocaust survivors, the bbc has been following the project. covid made things unconventional for artist massimiliano pironti. i started to paint this portrait in completely opposite process as normal. you should have painted me when i had hair! yeah, that was a while ago. we had like, three virtual sittings. how do you do you feel like, arek?
3:12 pm
how do you feel? 0k. it was a very challenging experience. your book... oh, yes. months later, came a real life meet—up, as arek shared his story. that was our first camp. 11 years old, i was, 11 years old. that's auschwitz, yeah. and it's where we got our number on the arm. these are children who survived at auschwitz. | arek was one of those survivors. but the rest of his family, bar his older sister, never reached liberation. they were some of the six million jews killed in the holocaust. this week, arek met the prince of wales, who commissioned the project. this is my picture. i think it�*s fantastic. i felt we owed it to these remarkable people just to remember them in this way.
3:13 pm
there is something very special about the portrait, and about the artist�*s eye in bringing out the real underlying character, personality and meaning of the person who�*s sitting for the portrait. the connection between artists and survivors has been strong. the pictures reflect both loss and survival. these portraits go to the heart of their individuality and their humanity. what better way of rejecting that kind of philosophy that led to the holocaust, and honouring survivors, than this project? the reality is this extraordinary group of people are now growing smaller every year, but the power of their testimony forms a lasting memory. daniela relph, bbc news, the queen�*s gallery at buckingham palace. joining me now is eve kugler,
3:14 pm
who survived the holocaust. welcome. thank you very much for joining us on bbc news. tell us how important is the memorial day for you? it important is the memorial day for ou? . important is the memorial day for ou? , ., ., important is the memorial day for ou? ., ., . you? it is of ultimate importance because i feel _ you? it is of ultimate importance because i feel very _ you? it is of ultimate importance because i feel very strongly i you? it is of ultimate importance because i feel very strongly that| because i feel very strongly that the people who were not alive at that time because it was so long ago must know what happened, the effort to exterminate thejewish people, the story of the holocaust must be remembered so that people will not have to go through what i went through, what my family went through, what my family went through, what my family went through, what many others, including a good friend of mine, all these people suffered too much. my family and i, and it should not happen again. and i, and it should not happen aaain. ,, and i, and it should not happen aaain. c, , a, a, and i, and it should not happen aaain. c, , a, c, again. you were separated from your arents for again. you were separated from your parents for a — again. you were separated from your parents for a long _ again. you were separated from your parents for a long time, _ again. you were separated from your
3:15 pm
parents for a long time, and - again. you were separated from your parents for a long time, and then - parents for a long time, and then from your sister. how did that loss and separation shape your later life? , ., ., , life? during the time that i was se arated life? during the time that i was separated from _ life? during the time that i was separated from my _ life? during the time that i was separated from my family, - life? during the time that i was| separated from my family, from life? during the time that i was - separated from my family, from my older sister, separated from my family, from my oldersister, i separated from my family, from my older sister, separated from my family, from my oldersister, i became separated from my family, from my older sister, i became a separated from my family, from my older sister, i became a person separated from my family, from my older sister, i became a person who was very inward looking. i kept to myself, i never shared any of my history, ijust wanted to stay myself, i never shared any of my history, i just wanted to stay out of trouble, and get on with it quietly. do you understand what i'm saying? i isolated myself in order to keep people out because as a child of eight, nine, ten, 11, i2, i did not want other people to know. how do you spend today? what is your
3:16 pm
overriding feeling on a day like this? h overriding feeling on a day like this? , , . overriding feeling on a day like this? , , ~ , overriding feeling on a day like this? , , . , ., , this? i remember very much my family who i lost, particularly _ this? i remember very much my family who i lost, particularly my _ this? i remember very much my family who i lost, particularly my beloved - who i lost, particularly my beloved grandfathers, both of whom were murdered. and i think of my mother and my father, who were at concentration camps in france during the war and suffered desperately, terribly, and the fact that they survived as a miracle. my mother said everyone has to know what happened to us. it is important. if they do not know... everyone has to know or it will happen again. i think this is a tribute to her, my ability to be with you today is her wish. ., ., ., , wish. the theme of holocaust memorial _ wish. the theme of holocaust memorial day _ wish. the theme of holocaust memorial day this _ wish. the theme of holocaust memorial day this year - wish. the theme of holocaust memorial day this year as - wish. the theme of holocaust| memorial day this year as one wish. the theme of holocaust - memorial day this year as one day.
3:17 pm
how do you interpret that? i memorial day this year as one day. how do you interpret that? heel how do you interpret that? i feel that there was _ how do you interpret that? i feel that there was more _ how do you interpret that? i feel that there was more than - how do you interpret that? i feel that there was more than one . how do you interpret that? life" that there was more than one day that there was more than one day that was really awful in those years of the holocaust. but thinking back, i think about when six nazis broke into our home in the middle of the night, trashed our home, took my father away, and that is just one aspect of that day. in the morning, the nazis torched the synagogue which my grandfather had established. the synagogue where we worshipped, where i studied hebrew school, and would you believe the fire brigadejust school, and would you believe the fire brigade just watched. school, and would you believe the fire brigadejust watched. they watched it burn until there were only ashes left. such an attack against us personally and all the jewish people, all the congregation. we are very grateful to you for sharing those memories, as painful
3:18 pm
as they are. thank you very much for joining us. as they are. thank you very much for 'oinin: us. . ~ i. you can watch that special documentary on bbc two at nine o'clock tonight. it's called "survivors: portraits of the holocaust". downing st says that it has 'no sight whatsoever�* of a copy of the civil servant sue gray's report into lockdown parties in government. while the wait in westminster continues, the prime minister has vowed to fight on. the labour leader says he's frustrated at the delay. borisjohnson, speaking in wales this morning, has also dismissed claims he approved the controversial airlift of animals from afghanistan. our political correspondent damian grammaticas has the details. but first on the delay to that report by sue gray on the downing street party downing street say they have no sight of it. everyone was thinking it might come yesterday, it did not. the question why then. it seems that what may be happening in the background is that we had a
3:19 pm
statement from downing street yesterday, from the prime minister's spokesman, saying that downing street were seeking assurances that nothing in the report would, in their words, cut across the police inquiry that is now happening. of course, this week we now know that the metropolitan police are investigating those parties. so what it appears, i think, is likely that in the background that inquiry team, led by sue gray, have been having discussions with the police to ensure that when they hand over the report to downing street, they are able to see everything in this are things that the police are perfectly happy with us putting into the public domain. because it is believed that what the inquiry team are seeking to do is to hand over a report that cannot then be redacted anyway, have a black pen taken to it before it is published. we know that they were ready in a few days ago,
3:20 pm
we think. individuals who are likely to be named or are going to be named in it, we understand there are more than have already been in the public domain, they were told so earlier in the week. what this is is the final ensuring that report is on the way that it could be published, but it may take now until monday. we are not quite sure, depending on parliamentary time when the prime minister could come to parliament and answer questions about it in the house. ,, , ., , and answer questions about it in the house. ,, , ., , ., ., house. question is also about whether the _ house. question is also about whether the prime _ house. question is also about whether the prime minister i house. question is also about. whether the prime minister did house. question is also about - whether the prime minister did or did not have a hand in getting pen farthing and his animals out of afghanistan last year. at farthing and his animals out of afghanistan last year. of course, this crapped _ afghanistan last year. of course, this crapped up _ afghanistan last year. of course, this cropped up before. - afghanistan last year. of course, this cropped up before. the - this cropped up before. the importance of this, i should say, is two things. the first is questions about the prime minister's own truthfulness. has he lied about this is one question the opposition are focusing on. the other question is what sort of actions that you take,
3:21 pm
if you didn't take any, to intervene in this case? now, go back to last summer, the evacuation from afghanistan, chaotic circumstances. this animal rescue charity, in the middle of it, run by a former british serviceman trying to get out animals and staff, they eventually did on a plane at the end, how did that come about? borisjohnson has said it was nonsense that he had intervened in that. what we had yesterday was an e—mail from within the foreign office released to a house of commons committee in which civil servants were talking about the prime minister having authorised. the prime minister has just authorised the saturn animals to be evacuated, one of the e—mails sent. today, that has been backed up again, it has to be said, in comments from dominic dyer. he is a wildlife campaigner who was working at the centre to try to get all of this to happen. this is what he said. ~ ., ,
3:22 pm
this to happen. this is what he said. ~ . , ., , , said. we had vets and vet nurses, animal care _ said. we had vets and vet nurses, animal care assistants _ said. we had vets and vet nurses, animal care assistants within - said. we had vets and vet nurses, animal care assistants within the l animal care assistants within the charity— animal care assistants within the charity on— animal care assistants within the charity on the ground in kabul who were _ charity on the ground in kabul who were under— charity on the ground in kabul who were under real threat, particularly women _ were under real threat, particularly women we — were under real threat, particularly women. we had manyjobs for them were under real threat, particularly women. we had manyjobs forthem in the uk _ women. we had manyjobs forthem in the uk where we have got lots of vacancies — the uk where we have got lots of vacancies across the veterinary care sector, _ vacancies across the veterinary care sector, and — vacancies across the veterinary care sector, and the prime minister understood those arguments and accepted — understood those arguments and accepted them. he did put those people _ accepted them. he did put those people on the evacuation left, working — people on the evacuation left, working with the home secretary and foreign— working with the home secretary and foreign secretary to get the wheels whitehall moving. gf foreign secretary to get the wheels whitehall moving.— whitehall moving. of course, the im ortant whitehall moving. of course, the important thing _ whitehall moving. of course, the important thing is _ whitehall moving. of course, the important thing is that _ whitehall moving. of course, the important thing is that seems - whitehall moving. of course, the important thing is that seems to | whitehall moving. of course, the i important thing is that seems to be directly in contradiction to what borisjohnson has said and what he again said today on a visit to wales. , ., , ., ., wales. this whole thing is total rhubarb. wales. this whole thing is total rhubarb- l _ wales. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was _ wales. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was very _ wales. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was very proud - wales. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was very proud of. wales. this whole thing is total l rhubarb. i was very proud of what our armed — rhubarb. i was very proud of what our armed services did.— rhubarb. i was very proud of what our armed services did. dominic dyer said he was — our armed services did. dominic dyer said he was speaking _ our armed services did. dominic dyer said he was speaking out _ our armed services did. dominic dyer said he was speaking out because - our armed services did. dominic dyer said he was speaking out because he | said he was speaking out because he thought the prime ministers should be proud of what he did. the labour party, though, have been very critical, saying... lisa nandi saying it is increasingly clear that the prime minister's story is not
3:23 pm
credible and he has lied about what actions he took. she says that also matters notjust because of that question of probity but also the issue she says that thousands of people were left behind, or many people were left behind, or many people were left behind, or many people were left behind in that evacuation, afghans who had helped the uk over the course of time in afghanistan, they were left in an uncertain fate in afghanistan. she said, in herwords, she uncertain fate in afghanistan. she said, in her words, she said uncertain fate in afghanistan. she said, in herwords, she said it uncertain fate in afghanistan. she said, in her words, she said it is increasingly clear you cannot believe a word our prime minister says and he has been very damaging to britain. is says and he has been very damaging to britain. , ., ., ,, to britain. is the labour leader sir keir starmer— to britain. is the labour leader sir keir starmer has _ to britain. is the labour leader sir keir starmer has been _ to britain. is the labour leader sir keir starmer has been expressing | to britain. is the labour leader sir i keir starmer has been expressing his feelings about the delay to sue gray 's report. you will i want to see the publication of the report in full as soon as possible.- the publication of the report in full as soon as possible. when i say in full as soon _ full as soon as possible. when i say in full as soon as _ full as soon as possible. when i say in full as soon as possible. - full as soon as possible. when i say in full as soon as possible. when i i in full as soon as possible. when i see in full i as it is given to, deliver to the prime minister. no summaries, no bits left out. a full report. after what this country has been through in the last year or two
3:24 pm
with the pandemic and the sacrifices people have made, the least they are entitled to is the full truth. a second man has admitted involvement in an assault on england's chief medical officer, professor sir chris witty, and a london park last year. professor chris witty was approached as he walked through st james's park in westminster injune last year. he originally denied a costing sir chris, who were seen in mobile phone footage trying to escape, appearing today at court, he admitted a charge of intent to cause harassment, alarm or distress. one of the most influential writers in british comedy — barry cryer — has died at the age of 86. during a long career he worked with a number of star names and was known to millions for his role on radio 4's "i'm sorry i haven't a clue". his close friend gyles brandreth paid tribute saying 'wherever barry went he brought laughter with him' and the bbc�*s director general
3:25 pm
tim davie described him as an 'incredible comedian and writer. if you heard or saw a great sketch there was always a good chance barry was behind it.�* sarah campbell looks back at his life. # i know a fat old policeman # he's always on our street # a fat and jolly red—faced man...# radio 4's i'm sorry i haven't a clue, and barry cryer sings the words of the laughing policeman to the tune of as time goes by. # he never known to frown # and everybody says # he's the happiest man in town...# barry cryer seemed a happy fellow too, and a lucky one. i spent my time mainly with people i liked and admired, laughing about something. he'd started young, playing shakespeare's falstaff at school in leeds. down in london, he wrote gags for the drag artist danny la rue, as well as performing himself. an early success was a novelty song which went to number one... ..in finland.
3:26 pm
# it looks like a purple people eater to me...# there was a comedy panel show on itv. good evening, ladies and gentlemen, welcome tojokers wild, a game in which some of the country's top comedians match wits to see who, if anybody, knows all the jokes. and hello cheeky on tv and radio. he wrote for almost every leading comic, from frankie howerd to spike milligan, dick emery to kenny everett, the two ronnies to mike yarwood. when morecambe and wise switched from the bbc to itv, he and john junkin wrote their scripts. we've been so looking forward to working with you! come this way. it's just the same here - as what they are at the bbc. denis norden always says there's a sitter and a pacer, there's someone typing and someone walking about. and i would sit there scribbling or typing, and john would walk around, waggling his glasses. what a lovely audience! where are they?
3:27 pm
oh, there they are. yes _ never mind, they'll do. i saw them arriving on the coaches. did you really? _ yeah, with their blankets over their heads. - # my short—term memory�*s shot to pieces # and i'll tell you something else # my short—term memory�*s shot to pieces...# he was still performing well into his 805. a man whose trade was quite simply making people laugh. # ha—ha—ha.# applause barry cryer — who's died aged 86. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah. some of us started off the day with a fair amount of cloud, particularly in the south, it has also been quite breezy. for the remainder of today, it should be staying dry for many places with long spells of sunshine. there are a few blustery showers here and there, particularly towards the north—west. northern and western scotland, north—west england seeing one or two, as well. further south and east staying dry with great sunshine.
3:28 pm
once the sun sets, we'll start to see these temperatures dipping fairly quickly, particularly across eastern areas. a little bit more cloud always towards the west and north—west. through tonight, with a light wind and clear skies, that is the recipe for quite a chilly night. some pockets of frost certainly, even towns and cities down to freezing in a few spots. colder than that in the countryside. not quite as cold across the north west with more cloud around, but some pockets of mist and fog that are going to linger for a while for central and eastern areas. they should clear away. through the day, more cloud and outbreaks of rain for northern and western parts, dry in the south—east, and highs of around 8—ii. goodbye. unchecked, it can lead to more serious crime. a macro going to be a matter of time
3:29 pm
and this is bbc news, i'm martine croxall. the headlines. covid rose for care homes in england have been eased by the government, allowing unlimited visits from monday. resident groups for england say they
3:30 pm
welcome the move. i resident groups for england say they welcome the move.— welcome the move. i could actually c with welcome the move. i could actually cry with relief- _ welcome the move. i could actually cry with relief. we _ welcome the move. i could actually cry with relief. we have _ welcome the move. i could actually cry with relief. we have been - welcome the move. i could actually cry with relief. we have been at - cry with relief. we have been at which members to dry to mps asking for all restrictions to be listed because we know it is definitely safer now. because we know it is definitely safer now— safer now. face coverings i no loner safer now. face coverings i no longer mandatory _ safer now. face coverings i no longer mandatory in _ safer now. face coverings i no longer mandatory in england i safer now. face coverings i no - longer mandatory in england today by some big retailers continue to ask customers to continue wearing them. borisjohnson customers to continue wearing them. boris johnson says customers to continue wearing them. borisjohnson says humid beings were prioritised during the fall of cal ball. it is after suggestions he was personally involved in privatising animals. , ., .,., animals. this whole thing as total rhubarb. i was _ animals. this whole thing as total rhubarb. i was very _ animals. this whole thing as total rhubarb. i was very proud - animals. this whole thing as total rhubarb. i was very proud of - animals. this whole thing as total rhubarb. i was very proud of whatj rhubarb. i was very proud of what our armed celsius dead. aha, rhubarb. i was very proud of what our armed celsius dead. a second mild has admitted _ our armed celsius dead. a second mild has admitted involvement i our armed celsius dead. a second mild has admitted involvement in | our armed celsius dead. a second i mild has admitted involvement in an assault on england was my chief medical officer professor sir chris whitty in a london park last year. it is holocaust memorial day, marking 17 —— 77 years since the liberation of auschwitz birkenau now. barry carver, one of the most
3:31 pm
prolific brighter in british comedy has died at the age of 86. sport — and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's hugh. ash barty took little more than an hour to do something no australian woman has done for four decades — the world number one is through to the final of the australian open, beating madison keys in straight sets. barty hasn't even looked close to losing a set in melbourne and wrapped up the first in just 26 minutes. and barty will face another american in the final. danielle collins could prove to be a formidable opponent, she beat the seventh seed iga swiatek in straight sets to make it through to her first grand slam final. it feels amazing, it's been such a journey and it doesn't happen overnight. so many years of hard work from an early age on court. yesterday, i was talking about all the early mornings my dad would get up with me and practice with me before school. it's just incredible to be on this stage, especially with the health challenges, i'm just so grateful.
3:32 pm
i couldn't be happier. meanwhile, two finals in as many days proved too much for alfie hewett as he just mist out on a second title at the austrian open. he had already won the wheelchair at the balls but he lost the singles final in 3 sets to the top seed and paralympics champion. exeter chiefs will drop all references to native americans in their branding after it promoted criticism. they have changed their logo, which from the summer will only use imagery from the iron age celtic tribe.
3:33 pm
traore has 18 months left on his current deal, with barca offering to take their pled back with the option to buy for £29 million at the end of the season. spurs had a £50 million bid for the spanish international turned down earlier this month. derby county administrators have been given an extra month to show they have enough money to survive the rest of the championship season. they have agreed with the efl to extend the deadline into march even though they are expected to run out of cash next month. the extra time has been granted to allow further talks with potential buyers. players in the women's super league and championship will have guaranteed maternity and long—term sickness cover written into their contracts after the fa and pfa agreed to the change. west ham's dagny brynjarsdottir is one of the few mothers have played in wsl and because maternity cover has previously been at the discretion of clubs, many have decided to wait until they've retired before starting a family.
3:34 pm
fifa have introduced similar rules and one member of parliament told a recent debate to have the change implemented would be a massive step forward. england were rueing dropped catches and missed chances on the first day of the one off women's ashes test match, which if they lose australia will take an unassailable lead in the series. australia were li—2 at one stage but they dug in, heather knight dropped fellow captain meg lanning when she was on ia and she went onto make 93, helping her team build a big score — they were 327—7 at the close. england's men are 2—1 down in their t—20 series in the west indies after defeat in barbados. rovman powell hit 107 offjust 53 balls as the home side set a victory target of 225. tom banton top—scored with 73 in england's reply, as they fell 20 runs short. they meet again on saturday. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for
3:35 pm
you in the next hour. still no sign of a copy of sue gray's report into lockdown parties in government. borisjohnson in government. boris johnson speaking in government. borisjohnson speaking in willis and someone has dismissed claims he approved a controversial a—list of animals from afghanistan. the conservative mp for great gay is on the line. how important is it for you to see sue gray's report before you decide on whether boris johnson gray's report before you decide on whether borisjohnson should continue as prime minister or not. —— for great grimsby. i continue as prime minister or not. -- for great grimsby.— continue as prime minister or not. -- for great grimsby. i have already decided whether _ -- for great grimsby. i have already decided whether boris _ -- for great grimsby. i have already decided whether boris johnson - -- for great grimsby. i have already i decided whether boris johnson should decided whether borisjohnson should continue or not, i think it is the best prime minister places like great grimsby has had in generations and he has my wholehearted approach. so no matter what she finds, he should carry on?—
3:36 pm
so no matter what she finds, he should carry on? from the thing the prime minister _ should carry on? from the thing the prime minister has _ should carry on? from the thing the prime minister has said, _ should carry on? from the thing the prime minister has said, i _ should carry on? from the thing the prime minister has said, i would - should carry on? from the thing the prime minister has said, i would be| prime minister has said, i would be very surprised if there is anything that we don't already know, frankly, from the media stuff we have had over the last few weeks. i have talked to the prime minister directly and i support him. what directly and i support him. what about the police _ directly and i support him. what about the police investigation? might that have a different bearing on how you think?— on how you think? obviously the police have _ on how you think? obviously the police have got to _ on how you think? obviously the police have got to do the - police have got to do the investigation, i can't really comment about that. we have got to let the police do whatever they need to do it feel that they are happy with the situation. but to do it feel that they are happy with the situation.— to do it feel that they are happy with the situation.- if i with the situation. but if... if some rules — with the situation. but if... if some rules were _ with the situation. but if... if some rules were broken - with the situation. but if... if some rules were broken by. with the situation. but if... if - some rules were broken by members with the situation. but if... if _ some rules were broken by members of staff and the police think that is the case, then the police will take action. i assume those people would be fine if it was appropriate. including the prime minister? lets wait and see _ including the prime minister? lets wait and see what the met say. i would be very surprised if we see anything like that but i can't prejudge that. let's see what the
3:37 pm
met police find in their investigation.- met police find in their investigation. but it is a hypothetical _ investigation. but it is a hypothetical question. | investigation. but it is a i hypothetical question. they investigation. but it is a - hypothetical question. they want investigation. but it is a _ hypothetical question. they want a hypothetical— hypothetical question. they want a hypothetical answer? _ hypothetical question. they want a hypothetical answer? i— hypothetical question. they want a hypothetical answer? i want - hypothetical question. they want a hypothetical answer? i want to i hypothetical question. they want a hypothetical answer? i want to tellj hypothetical answer? i want to tell me, if the prime _ hypothetical answer? i want to tell me, if the prime minister- hypothetical answer? i want to tell me, if the prime minister is - hypothetical answer? i want to tell me, if the prime minister is found | me, if the prime minister is found to be a fault by the police, should he be out the consequences too? eyoma if the prime minister is at fault and the police find out, i assume the police would fine him as any other citizen. what do you say to the thousands and thousands of people who follow the rules to the letter and it meant they were not meant able to see relatives for a very long time, they were not able to say goodbye to people who are dying, but at the same time all these parties were taking place which seem to have either some involvement by the prime minister or certainly he knew of them? obviously, ifeel very certainly he knew of them? obviously, i feel very much for those people who have lost loved
3:38 pm
ones and family members and friends, of course we do. the success of being able to make sure that the lockdown was successful was that people did follow the rules. but i don't want to be judge and jury at this point when we still haven't seen the sue gray report. i think we have got to make sure we owe it to the proper process. if you are an employee and somebody has accuse you of something, then you need to make sure there is enough time and space for employees to have a proper investigation in the workplace before anybody actually comes up with a conclusion. that's why it's important to wait for it sue gray's report now. but important to wait for it sue gray's report now— important to wait for it sue gray's report now. but we are not talking about an employee, _ report now. but we are not talking about an employee, we _ report now. but we are not talking about an employee, we are - report now. but we are not talking| about an employee, we are talking about an employee, we are talking about the prime minister of the country. forget it is the leader of your party and the prime minister, sure that you would want truth, integrity and the following of the rules you have just announced to the
3:39 pm
nation. that is what a prime minister should do, set the tone from the top. we minister should do, set the tone from the top-— from the top. we have got to remember — from the top. we have got to remember that _ from the top. we have got to remember that people - from the top. we have got to i remember that people working at number 10 including the prime minister that when essential workers working 24/7 to make sure we were getting the vaccinations we are two needed. i'm not going to prejudge that, i'm going to wait to see what happens. but i know how hard the premise and his team have been working for the last two years and i think we need to look at this in the round. as i said before, i support this prime minister. lise round. as i said before, i support this prime minister.— this prime minister. use it at the bearinnin this prime minister. use it at the beginning he _ this prime minister. use it at the beginning he was _ this prime minister. use it at the beginning he was the _ this prime minister. use it at the beginning he was the best - this prime minister. use it at the beginning he was the best prime j beginning he was the best prime ministerfor the talent beginning he was the best prime minister for the talent like lindsay —— grimsby. what has the prime minister a person than to make lives better for people and at that time? the prime minister has person come up the prime minister has person come up with policy around levelling up, we have towns investment, living up investment, the infrastructure are starting to change, the lifetime
3:40 pm
skills guarantee for people who haven't got qualifications to be able to get that at no cost. we have got huge amount of investment, not only from the government, but that is bringing in private investment as well. there are lots of things that are starting to change and i have been out in the constituency over the last few weekends and people do support the prime minister an want him to continue with the policies he has come up with. pare him to continue with the policies he has come up with.— him to continue with the policies he has come up with. are you convinced that is enough _ has come up with. are you convinced that is enough to _ has come up with. are you convinced that is enough to wipe _ has come up with. are you convinced that is enough to wipe out _ has come up with. are you convinced that is enough to wipe out all - has come up with. are you convinced that is enough to wipe out all of - that is enough to wipe out all of the allegation of lying and lack of integrity to get you re—elected at the next election? integrity to get you re-elected at the next election?— integrity to get you re-elected at the next election? let's be honest, the next election? let's be honest, the --eole the next election? let's be honest, the people that _ the next election? let's be honest, the people that are _ the next election? let's be honest, the people that are accusing - the next election? let's be honest, the people that are accusing the i the people that are accusing the prime minister of a lack of integrity and lying are people who don't want him there because they know that a huge majority of people in this country voted for him, which is why we have over an 80 seat majority. people have said to me on
3:41 pm
the doorstep they want him to carry on with thejob. the doorstep they want him to carry on with the job. we had a the doorstep they want him to carry on with thejob. we had a labour mp in the grimsby for 74 years and we saw no change, nothing at all, and people are saying that to me over and over again. they support me and the work i am doing and i make sure that the prime minister has got places like great grimsby right at the centre of his policies.- the centre of his policies. thank ou ve the centre of his policies. thank you very much- _ the mother of six—year—old rikki neave said she was telling the "truth and nothing but the truth" when denying his murder more than 25 years ago. rikki was strangled and posed naked in woods near his peterborough home in november 1994. ruth neave was cleared of his murder the next year but convicted of child cruelty, the old bailey was told. joining me now is our correspondent jo black with more on this. what has the court heard so far? people who have been following this case might remember it dates back to
3:42 pm
1994, so it is 27 years old. the trial that opened here at the old bailey a couple of weeks ago, the defending james watson is in the dock. he is 48 years old, he would have been 30 at the time of rikki neave's death. we have 30 orfrom prosecutors about the alleged breakthrough in the case when it was reopened a few years ago. the prosecution here have said that james watson's dna was found on rikki neave's clothing. that clothing was a school uniform found in a wheelie bin the day after rikki neave's body was found in woodland. turning to today's evidence, we have heard from ruth neave. she is rikki neave's mother, she was talking about how trial back in at the mid 90s because she was accused of rikki neave's now do it when this all happened, which she denied, and she was cleared by a jury at trial.
3:43 pm
asked about that trial today, the prosecutors said to her, when you are asked if you murdered your son, what answer did you give? no, i did not, she said. and it was that the truth? positively the truth and nothing but the truth, she said. she was also asked about when she last saw her son alive. she said in the morning when she told him to get up, she said he had been arguing with his sister. she said she hadn't got much sleep the night before because she had a new baby, he was poorly. when she was asked where were you when you lasso your son alive. ruth neave said i was at home in my living room, iwas neave said i was at home in my living room, i was sitting up, dozing, trying to keep my eyes open. and what was rikki doing the last time you saw him lies? he was playing with the baby, i was sitting there looking at them both, dazing.
3:44 pm
we expect ruth neave to continue giving evidence next week. as for the trial here at the old bailey, james watson denies murder and we expect this trial to last several more weeks. court documents submitted in new york show that prince andrew has asked for a jury trial in the civil case being brought by virginia giuffre. she is suing him over claims she was sexually assaulted by him 21 years ago when she was a teenager — allegations he strenuously denies. the court papers also show the prince has denied he was a close friend of the convicted sex trafficker, ghislaine maxwell. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, reports. it is basically a blanket denial of everything, most importantly and specifically of virginia giuffre's accusation of sexual abuse. but the document from andrew's lawyers questions virtually everything. this widely seen photograph, for example. andrew says he doesn't have enough information to say whether or not it's genuine. that's an echo of what he said
3:45 pm
in his newsnight interview. she provided a photo of the two of you together. yes, yes. your arm was around her waist. yes. you've seen the photo. i've seen the photograph. how do you explain that? i can't. because i don't...| have no...again, i have absolutely no memory of that photograph ever being taken. and then there's the question of andrew's friendship with ghislaine maxwell. he's known herfor 20 years. he took her to royal ascot with her boyfriend, jeffrey epstein, and invited both of them to balmoral and sandringham. however, he now says it wasn't a close friendship. this is what andrew said about the sandringham visit on newsnight. am i right in thinking you threw a birthday party for epstein's girlfriend, ghislaine maxwell, at sandringham? no, it was a shooting weekend. a shooting weekend. just a straightforward... ..straightforward shooting weekend. in addition to the denials, it's clear that andrew's lawyers will attempt to undermine
3:46 pm
virginia giuffre's credibility and call into question her behaviour. his legal submission said... "guiffre's alleged causes of action are barred in whole or in part by her own wrongful conduct." the gloves are off. what you've really got here is prince andrewl saying "bring it on". you want a jury trial? i want a jury trial. you want to bring these claims? well, in that case, you have i to prove everything that you're saying because i'm not- going to admit to anything." and all this just ten days from accession day, when the queen will mark the 70th anniversary of the day she came to the throne. nicholas witchell, bbc news. frontline nhs staff in england who are not yet vaccinated against covid now have just one week left to get a jab — or face losing theirjobs. the health secretary, sajid javid, says it's their professional duty to be fully vaccinated. but some in the health service have called for the policy to be re—thought. our health reporter
3:47 pm
jim reed has more. amy is an occupational therapist, often working with the elderly and physically disabled. she has, though, decided not to be vaccinated against covid. i would say that each person has to weigh up the pros and cons for themselves. what would you say to people who'd think — if you work with vulnerable people in a health care setting, you have a responsibility to be vaccinated yourself, to protect other people? but you can still get — even with three vaccines, you can still get covid, you can still spread it. and the other thing is wearing ppe, personal protective equipment, protects the vulnerable people. and you're prepared to lose yourjob rather than get vaccinated at the moment? yes, i don't want to lose myjob. i love myjob, i respect the nhs, but i'm very much a supporter of choice. amy is one of two million in england covered by new rules on compulsory vaccination. that already includes half a million care home workers who had
3:48 pm
to have their second jab by last november. next week, another 1.7 million in front line health care will need to have their first dose. that includes nhs staff and other jobs like gps and dentists. the latest figures suggest 95% of nhs workers are already vaccinated, leaving around 77,000 who haven't yet had a firstjab. i think the scientific evidence is so overwhelming. many others working in health care support the principle of mandatory vaccination. if a patient comes to me and says, "should i have the vaccine? have you been vaccinated, doctor?" that answer should always be, "yes, of course i've been vaccinated, and you should too." there is no wriggle room ethically for a doctor or a nurse or anybody talking to patients about whether they should be vaccinated themselves or not. so your message would he "get
3:49 pm
the vaccine if you want to stay in the job"? i think the evidence is overwhelming. i've been working on covid itus since the beginning. i have not had a vaccination. i do not want to have a vaccination. the debate, though, is becoming more heated as the deadline looms. this clip of a doctor challenging the health secretary on the policy has been viewed more than one million times on social media. the government says doctors, nurses and other front line health staff look after the most vulnerable, who could face serious consequences if they catch the virus. and nhs health chiefs say staff have a duty to make sure they're protected. last weekend, health care workers joined this wider protest against compulsory vaccination. other nhs staff firmly support the policy. with just a week to go, ministers now say they will reflect on the latest evidence, but the need to protect patients remains unchanged. jim reed, bbc news.
3:50 pm
two new studies from the us and norway published in the british medicaljournal have been described as "reassuring" by fertility experts here, suggesting that any changes are short—lived and small compared with natural variation in normal menstruation cycles. job seekers on universal credit will have to look forjobs outside their chosen field more quickly under new government plans. currently, claimants have three months to find work in their chosen area — but from thursday, that's being reduced to four weeks. the government wants half a millionjob—seekers in employment by the end ofjune. but opposition parties say there should be more support for people to find the job they want. the us has rejected russia's demand that ukraine should never be allowed to join the western military alliance, nato.
3:51 pm
moscow made the demand after amassing around 100,000 troops near the ukrainian border in both belarus and russia — although it denies that it's planning to invade. russia responded this morning by saying its concerns were not being ta ken into account. james waterhouse in ukraine sent this report. there's no such thing as rain at this time of year in kyiv. for cab driver andre, a peaceful relationship with neighbouring russia feels equally unlikely. if ukraine again will be occupied, russian troops, like it was 100 years ago in soviet times, in russian empire times, it will be a new repression, a new situation, a new genocide for ukrainians. ukraine's relationship with russia is a complicated one. there are cultural ties which go back a long way. in that time, ukraine has also been no stranger to a struggle for sovereignty. we have liberty and we have six presidents in the last 30 years. talks will continue over russian's demands that ukraine never joins nato and for the alliance to scale back its operations. but with the us not meeting those demands and these deep—rooted differences between kyiv and moscow, for how
3:52 pm
much longer will there be dialogue? nothing about ukraine without ukraine, a principal repeated not just here, but by the west on frequent occasions. now, whilst the country isn't involved in these main talks, the foreign minister says he is satisfied the country's priorities are being considered. his government though is under pressure to deliver on its promise to sort things diplomatically, so for a while the authorities have been urging one thing. "don't panic." however, that's only going to get harder with tensions not exactly thawing in ukraine's frozen conflict with russian—backed separatists, and the kremlin now saying there aren't many reasons to be optimistic. james waterhouse, bbc news, in kyiv. the number of rapes recorded by
3:53 pm
police in england and wales has reached an all—time high. there were 63,000 offences in the year to last september, a rise of 13% on the previous 12 months. reports of sex offences were also the highest on record. the national office of statistics is willingness to come forward may be a factor. car production in britain has fallen to its lowest level since 1956 last yea r. its lowest level since 1956 last year. covid this option has been blind, critically a lack of silicon chips and a staff shortages. it says a new investment in electric vehicles gives some grounds for optimism. british aid has arrived in tonga 11 days after an undersea volcanic eruption and tsunami devastated entire islands and villages. bottled water, first aid kits, ppe and baby products were taken off a royal navy patrol ship, to protect the pacific island nation from the pandemic. she's the oldest volunteer
3:54 pm
in the nhs and possibly the country. beryl carr who turned 100—years—old this month has been volunteering at ealing hospital in west london for the past 18 years. born in acton, she moved away but came back to the area to be near her daughter after her husband died. bhvanni vadde has been to meet her. cani can i have a cup of coffee? she is a friendly familiarface can i have a cup of coffee? she is a friendly familiar face at a volunteer run cafe in ealing hospital. volunteer run cafe in ealing hospital-— volunteer run cafe in ealing hosital. ~ ., ~ hospital. would you like some milk? be lcarr hospital. would you like some milk? lten/l carr is — hospital. would you like some milk? lten/l carr is now _ hospital. would you like some milk? beryl carr is now the _ hospital. would you like some milk? beryl carr is now the oldest - beryl carr is now the oldest volunteer in the nhs and possibly in the country after celebrating her 100th birthday recently. she started volunteering when she moved back to london to be close to her daughter when her husband died. it is london to be close to her daughter when her husband died.— when her husband died. it is my lifeline and _ when her husband died. it is my lifeline and i _ when her husband died. it is my lifeline and i enjoyed _ when her husband died. it is my lifeline and i enjoyed coming i when her husband died. it is my| lifeline and i enjoyed coming and it's a worthwhile job, i'm lifeline and i enjoyed coming and it's a worthwhilejob, i'm helping people who are not as fortunate or as well as i am.—
3:55 pm
as well as i am. and you'll look really well- _ as well as i am. and you'll look really well. yeah, _ as well as i am. and you'll look really well. yeah, people - as well as i am. and you'll look really well. yeah, people say i | really well. yeah, people say i don't look _ really well. yeah, people say i don't look my _ really well. yeah, people say i don't look my age! _ really well. yeah, people say i don't look my age! you - really well. yeah, people say i don't look my age! you don't. | really well. yeah, people say i i don't look my age! you don't. no, i'm so lucky- _ don't look my age! you don't. no, i'm so lucky. bearable _ don't look my age! you don't. no, i'm so lucky. bearable celebrated| i'm so lucky. bearable celebrated her milestone _ i'm so lucky. bearable celebrated her milestone birthday _ i'm so lucky. bearable celebrated her milestone birthday in - i'm so lucky. bearable celebrated her milestone birthday in style, l her milestone birthday in style, showing us age is no barrier to throwing some shapes on the dance floor. it’s throwing some shapes on the dance floor. �* , ., . . throwing some shapes on the dance floor. 3 ~ . ., �* floor. it's like a dream, i couldn't believe it was _ floor. it's like a dream, i couldn't believe it was all _ floor. it's like a dream, i couldn't believe it was all happening. it i believe it was all happening. it seemed to go on for days and days. it's been nonstop! bert;r seemed to go on for days and days. it's been nonstop!— it's been nonstop! bery has been helinu it's been nonstop! bery has been helping out _ it's been nonstop! bery has been helping out at — it's been nonstop! bery has been helping out at this _ it's been nonstop! bery has been helping out at this hospital - it's been nonstop! bery has been helping out at this hospital cafe i helping out at this hospital cafe for the last 18 years. during that time she has gained lots of fans was that i think she is a complete inspiration, she always has a smile on herface, a swagger as she inspiration, she always has a smile on her face, a swagger as she works with you come back from a clinic or ward round, you see her and you just inspired when you see her. it
3:56 pm
ward round, you see her and you 'ust inspired when you see heni inspired when you see her. it gives me a lot of — inspired when you see her. it gives me a lot of motivation, _ inspired when you see her. it gives me a lot of motivation, when - inspired when you see her. it gives me a lot of motivation, when you i me a lot of motivation, when you think— me a lot of motivation, when you think about — me a lot of motivation, when you think about how— me a lot of motivation, when you think about how times _ me a lot of motivation, when you think about how times with - me a lot of motivation, when you think about how times with covid| me a lot of motivation, when you - think about how times with covid and all that, _ think about how times with covid and all that, if— think about how times with covid and all that, if beryl— think about how times with covid and all that, if beryl can— think about how times with covid and all that, if beryl can do— think about how times with covid and all that, if beryl can do that, - think about how times with covid and all that, if beryl can do that, it- all that, if beryl can do that, it motivates— all that, if beryl can do that, it motivates all— all that, if beryl can do that, it motivates all of— all that, if beryl can do that, it motivates all of us. _ all that, if beryl can do that, it motivates all of us.— all that, if beryl can do that, it motivates all of us. when asked the secret for a — motivates all of us. when asked the secret for a long _ motivates all of us. when asked the secret for a long and _ motivates all of us. when asked the secret for a long and healthy - secret for a long and healthy life... �* , ., secret for a long and healthy life... �* y., ., �* life... i've titled you it wouldn't be a secret. — life... i've titled you it wouldn't be a secret, my _ life... i've titled you it wouldn't be a secret, my answer. -- i life... i've titled you it wouldn't be a secret, my answer. -- if. life... i've titled you it wouldn't be a secret, my answer. -- if i | life... i've titled you it wouldn't i be a secret, my answer. -- if i told be a secret, my answer. —— if i told you. be a secret, my answer. -- if i told ou. . ~' be a secret, my answer. -- if i told ou. . ~ , ., be a secret, my answer. -- if i told ou. ., ~' ., be a secret, my answer. -- if i told ou. ., ~ ., ., you. thank you to look at the weather forecast _ you. thank you to look at the weather forecast now - you. thank you to look at the weather forecast now with i you. thank you to look at the - weather forecast now with sarah. last night brought a particularly windy night for the northern part of the uk, but those brisk winds are at now easing. through the rest of the day, quite a lot of dry weather, some sunny spells around, but some blustery showers. a few filtering in the former northern ireland into north—west england and north wales. clear skies elsewhere as we head into the last part of the afternoon. some like brightness before the sun sets. once it does set temperature
3:57 pm
is going to be dropping fairly quickly under clear skies. more cloud was at the north and west. under those clear sky tonight with relatively light winds, we will see some pockets of frost and fog forming, particular across parts of england, wales and eastern scotland. it could be quite a cold night, a few degrees below freezing in the countryside. it will be how to up the holes on further south, drawing in pretty mild airfrom the south—west as we may through friday with winds rotating around an area of high pressure. still quite chilly with pockets of mist and fog lingering for many southern and eastern areas. some rain, mainly for parts of scotland but a few splashes for south what northern england, perhaps into north wales. temperature is mild in the west, but we will just about temperature is mild in the west, but we willjust about hold on to single figures for parts of southern and
3:58 pm
eastern england. into the weekend, not much change in the set up, high pressure toward the south, with the system is trying to move in to the north. saturday, rain in scotland, perhaps followed by some wintry showers. the rain tends to put it out as it heads further south. still quite mild in the south but turning colderfor quite mild in the south but turning colder for the north. quite mild in the south but turning colderfor the north. wherever quite mild in the south but turning colder for the north. wherever you are on saturday it will be quite a windy day, with some quite gusty winds, 60 mph or more across the north of scotland. into sunday, low pressure brings more rain to northern ireland and scotland, chrissy day for a time by some fairly heavy hill snow here. drier further south and east, but colder.
3:59 pm
4:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines. borisjohnson says human beings were prioritised during the fall of kabul — it's after suggestions he was personally involved in rescuing animals from pen farthing's charity in afghanistan. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was very proud of what our armed services did with op pitting. covid rules for care homes in england have been eased by the government, allowing unlimited visits from monday. resident campaign groups say they welcome the move. iurge i urge all care homes to do everything they can to allow as many visitors as they can. face coverings are no longer mandatory in england from today,
4:01 pm
but some big retailers ask customers to continue wearing them. a second man has admitted involvement in an assault on england's chief medical officer professor sir chris whitty, in a london park last year. it's holocaust memorial day — marking 77—years since the liberation of auschwitz—birkenau. seven holocaust survivors have had portraits painted in a project commissioned by prince charles. and barry cryer — one of the most prolific scriptwriters in british comedy — has died at the age of 86. good afternoon. borisjohnson has described as "total rhubarb" claims that he personally intervened so a british man could airlift animals from afghanistan last summer, when the taliban took control of the country.
4:02 pm
yesterday, an email released by a parliamentary committee stated that he'd authorised the evacuation of pen farthing, his staff and more than 150 cats and dogs under the care of his nowzad charity, at a time when people fleeing the taliban were left behind. our political correspondent iain watson is in westminster, what we saw was not allegations by opposition politicians all boris johnson opponents in his own ranks, the committee chaired by conservative mp was handed internal correspondence from the foreign office that suggested boris johnson had authorised the evacuation of pen farthing and his animals from kabul. that is controversial because as we know there are still people left behind the government was trying to get up. where the government has been solid on this is saying no animal was prioritised over any human being. there were elements of
4:03 pm
the evacuation that were chaotic, but they are maintaining the animal evacuation was not at the expense of refugees. what has been less clear is whether the prime minister himself was getting involved in order to get the animals out. pen farthing was running a campaign at the time to have the animal is evacuated. in the end, on a plane he paid for to be charted. this is how the prime minister reacted today on a visit to wales to the accusation that he was personally involved. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was very proud of what our armed services did with 0p pitting, the reference to rhubarb is not a synonym for untrue but when boris johnson was challenged on this he
4:04 pm
said it was nonsense he was involved in the animal evacuation but others take a different view. it has been supported by the defence secretary ben wallace who said he was in charge but dominic dyer has repeated claims he made last year that the prime minister was involved and said he believes the prime minister should be saying how proud he is to get animals evacuated from kabul. we have we had vets and vet nurses and animal care assistants have animal care assistants within the nowzad charity and mayhew, another british charity on the ground in kabul, who were under real threat, particularly the women. and we had manyjobs forthem in the uk ,where we have lots of vacancies across the veterinary care sector. and the prime minister understood those arguments, accepted them, and did put those people on the evacuation list, working with the home secretary and the foreign secretary to get the wheels of whitehall moving. thatis that is something dominic dyer would approve _ that is something dominic dyer would approve of— that is something dominic dyer would approve of but he is simply a campaigner at this stage. opposition mps say this —
4:05 pm
campaigner at this stage. opposition mps say this matters _ campaigner at this stage. opposition mps say this matters not _ campaigner at this stage. opposition mps say this matters not simply - mps say this matters not simply because of the chaotic evacuation and the aftermath and whether government priorities were correct but given everything else going on, whether the prime minister can be trusted to tell the truth. we whether the prime minister can be trusted to tell the truth.— trusted to tell the truth. we are still waiting _ trusted to tell the truth. we are still waiting for _ trusted to tell the truth. we are still waiting for the _ trusted to tell the truth. we are still waiting for the report - trusted to tell the truth. we are still waiting for the report by . trusted to tell the truth. we are | still waiting for the report by sue gray. it still waiting for the report by sue gra . . ., still waiting for the report by sue gra . .., , still waiting for the report by sue gra . . ., , ., still waiting for the report by sue gra. ,., ., still waiting for the report by sue gra . .., , ., ., 4' still waiting for the report by sue gra . , ., ., ~ ., gray. it could be a long weekend, a nervous weekend _ gray. it could be a long weekend, a nervous weekend at _ gray. it could be a long weekend, a nervous weekend at westminster. l nervous weekend at westminster. people have been asking why it has been delayed. there are theories doing the rounds that do not seem to be correct. first that the trade unions are worried some of their members could be named. that is not the case because i understand it has been agreed to senior civil servants will be named in the report. they have been held as recently as tuesday they would be named and there have been no objections to that. morejuniorstaff, there have been no objections to that. morejunior staff, there may be concerns there. even though not
4:06 pm
identified perhaps some information in the report could identify them. another theory, there is direct political interference from downing street but i am told by sources close to the inquiry rather than downing street that is not the case. there has not been an overt political attempt to change the content of the report. what is more likely, the met police announcing they are carrying out inquiries, there is a process whereby downing street were concerned the police might need reassurance that nothing in the report were cut across their own inquiry so it is possible the senior civil servant in charge is making sure the way in which the report is drafted would reassure the police. i am told she will be keen to make sure none of this word in any way watered down, change her findings and what she is keen to avoid is a tale of two reports where some of the least serious events at
4:07 pm
downing street and government buildings are reported and other allegations are pushed away until after the police inquiry. i am told she is working to publish a report in a form downing street can publish it and avoid last—minute redactions which might make the report look a bit of a whitewash. i'm told when she brings the report out. it may be harsh in its depiction of what senior civil servants were doing and there may be strong criticism of the civil service but opponents of boris johnson inside and outside his party will be hoping to see e—mails and whatsapp messages, embarrassing photographs, that will not be produced with the report. there might be produced with the report. there might he quotes from the evidence but you will not get the full pile of evidence being made public. thank ou. residents in care homes in england
4:08 pm
will be allowed to see an unlimited number of their loved ones from monday. the current limit of three named visitors is being scrapped. the government says a successful roll—out of booster vaccines means the restriction isn't necessary any more. it comes as part of a wider easing of the rules for england's care homes. self—isolation periods will also be cut and in the event of a positive case, care homes will only have to close their doors to visitors for iii days rather than 28. our correspondent andrew plant reports. from monday, we have the unlimited visiting. going over the latest guidance at this care home in bristol, working out what the changes will mean for residents and staff here, ready for restrictions easing on monday. should make a lot of people happy. fantastic. for dorothy, visiting should become much easier. protective clothing is likely to stay, but she will no longer need an appointment to come and see her sister and will be able to bring otherfamily members with her, too. she hasn't seen my grandchildren...
4:09 pm
well, her nieces and nephews for a while, you know, and we would be able to come in when we want and more than one of us coming in, so it would be really, really good. really good. each nation in the uk sets its own care home rules. scotland eased its restrictions last week. in england, as well as lifting limits on visitors, self—isolation periods will be cut from iii days to 10, outbreak management cut from 28 days to ia, and care home workers will be asked to use lateral flow tests before shifts rather than a weekly pcr. real positive move, you know, breathing life back into the homes, allowing people to see their loved ones where they have felt certainly cut off. are you confident you can still keep your residents safe with more relaxed safety rules? there is so much risk management that has come into our sector, with fully vaccinated staff, fully vaccinated residents.
4:10 pm
it feels right to bring those restrictions down. despite limits on visitors being lifted, other issues for care homes could mean they still have to manage numbers. we have still got shortages in staff. we have got over 50% of services who are in outbreak, so facilitating visits, we need to be absolutely clear, you know, these are time—consuming, and when you have a lot of people wanting to come through at the same time, we are going to have to limit the number of people coming into the services. you can pick out your favourites if you like. j changes to restrictions will not mean the end of the challenges for the care home industry. the new arrangements should see less isolation... another daisy. ..and much more socialising for those in care homes. andrew plant, bbc news, in bristol. i'm joined now by retired nurse, julia knight, whose mother — evelyn — is in a care home in lincolnshire.
4:11 pm
what is your view on the timing of the removal of restrictions in care homes? i the removal of restrictions in care homes? ., , . ., , homes? i am delighted restrictions have been removed. _ homes? i am delighted restrictions have been removed. because - homes? i am delighted restrictions have been removed. because so i homes? i am delighted restrictions i have been removed. because so many people have suffered through the restrictions. i am a little wary that some care providers might still be saying that this is only guidance and they make their own rules, which is what we have been finding all the time since we have had guidance. i am one of the very lucky few is in a care home who have always gone with the guidelines wisely and humanely. i have had a good experience. i know thousands of others have not. i hope the new guidance is interpreted wisely by all care homes and that
4:12 pm
they do not start putting up barriers. in my case, i do not see staff shortages as the problem. when i go to see my mum i ring the door bell, somebody opens the door, i show my lateral flow test, we say how are you, and i walked to my mum's room. it does not take up any staff time. ,, , , ., ., mum's room. it does not take up any stafftime. ,, , ., ,y , staff time. surely you have sympathy when care homes _ staff time. surely you have sympathy when care homes were _ staff time. surely you have sympathy when care homes were trying - staff time. surely you have sympathy when care homes were trying to - staff time. surely you have sympathy when care homes were trying to put. when care homes were trying to put measures in place ahead of the government, when they knew there were problems coming, but they have not received that central advice? i not received that central advice? i have every sympathy with care homes and especially in the beginning when we knew nothing about the pandemic. it was confusing for everybody. it was heartbreaking for some people who lost people without seeing them. i was lucky. at the beginning, my parents were together in a care home
4:13 pm
but had a very good manager who interpreted... we did not have much guidance then and who allowed me to be with my dad when he died when lots of others were kept away. i have every sympathy, but we have so much knowledge now, most care home residents and their families are triple vaccinated, we have lateral flow tests we do every day. i think it is time for elderly people, who are often in their last weeks, months, years of their life, to be able to see at least one person. we have had the central caregiver implemented, but some care homes have not recognised that. what have not recognised that. what difference will _ have not recognised that. what difference will it _ have not recognised that. what difference will it make... - have not recognised that. what difference will it make... i'm i difference will it make... i'm sorry, we lost you for a second.
4:14 pm
what difference will it make to your mum and others who live in her home, the fact they are not restricted with the number of people who can visit? ~ , ,., , with the number of people who can visit? ~ , with the number of people who can visit? , f. visit? absolutely massive effect. the want visit? absolutely massive effect. they want to _ visit? absolutely massive effect. they want to live _ visit? absolutely massive effect. they want to live their _ visit? absolutely massive effect. they want to live their lives. - visit? absolutely massive effect. | they want to live their lives. they want to be kept safe, but i do not think many relatives of elderly people would go in and put their family at risk. most people with relatives in a care home, they will not go in if they have a cold, sore throat. people will not put loved ones at risk. we have the tools, let us let these people live out their lives. , ., ., , , lives. julian knight, give our best wishes to your — lives. julian knight, give our best wishes to your mum. _ lives. julian knight, give our best wishes to your mum. thank - lives. julian knight, give our best wishes to your mum. thank you. | lives. julian knight, give our best i wishes to your mum. thank you. -- wishes to your mum. thank you. —— julia night. sajid javid has encouraged people
4:15 pm
and care homes. i sajid javid has encouraged people and care homes.— sajid javid has encouraged people and care homes. i want a care homes to do everything _ and care homes. i want a care homes to do everything they _ and care homes. i want a care homes to do everything they can _ and care homes. i want a care homes to do everything they can to - and care homes. i want a care homes to do everything they can to allow - to do everything they can to allow as many visitors as they can. from monday, in terms of national rules, there will be no restriction on the number of visitors. if a care home needs to act differently because of an outbreak, that is understandable, they do everything they can to allow they do everything they can to allow the maximum number of visitors. the latest figures have just been released. the report says there have been 96,871 new cases reported on thursday, down from 102,000 yesterday. in terms of the number of covid related deaths, today the number is 338 people who have died within 28 days of a positive test, slightly down from 346 yesterday.
4:16 pm
in another change coming into force from today, face coverings in england are no longer mandatory. but many shops, such asjohn lewis and sainsbury�*s, and transport networks will still ask customers to wear masks as a courtesy to others, and it remains mandatory to wear a face covering on transport for london services. face coverings continue to be compulsory in indoor public places in northern ireland, scotland and wales. our correspondent emma simpson has this report. is this the beginning of the end for face masks — in england at least? commuters at st albans train station seem to be taking a cautious approach. will you still be wearing a mask on the train, may i ask you? yeah, yeah, no, of course, on the train, on the underground, you know, for the next few months, yeah, for sure, just to be safe, in the supermarkets as well, so i will do. i will be wearing a mask on the train, yes. i have decided that, you know, for the moment, with the numbers of cases, i would still rather protect myself and everyone else.
4:17 pm
train companies want customers to keep wearing masks, too. the advice is really clear, it's wear a face covering if it is crowded or if your indoors, and that means we would like to see people continuing to wear them on trains for the time being. just as you will be in supermarkets and other busy indoor settings. the big change is that from today face coverings are no longer legally required in public indoor settings. the mandatory wearing of masks has been contentious throughout this pandemic. today's move is too early for some, and for others it can't come soon enough. this gift shop isn't wasting any time. emma and her three staff are ready to ditch the mask. it is really lovely to be able to get a little bit of lipstick on again and not have to worry about having masks sticking to me, so today has felt quite liberating. down the road, it is business as usual at this hairdressers. at the moment, we feel
4:18 pm
that it is better to stick with wearing the masks, and we want people to come in and have their hair done feeling comfortable that we are still taking precautions, because it is a mixture of how people feel at the moment. some people feel very comfortable sitting there without a mask, but some people still do not. there is no change to mask wearing for scotland, wales and northern ireland just yet as england takes another step toward normality. emma simpson, bbc news, st albans. a man has beenjailed for eight weeks after admitting intending to cause distress to england's chief medical officer professor sir chris whitty, in a london park last year. jonathan chew, approached prof sir whitty as he walked through stjames' park in westminster injune last year. mr chew originally denied accosting sir chris — who was seen in mobile phone footage trying to escape. our correspondent helena wilkinson
4:19 pm
has been following the case. reminders of the background. this happened last year during the pandemic. the court heard that professor sir chris was walking through saintjames park in central london and was approached by this man, jonathan chew, and another man, lewis hughes, who already previously admitted assault by beating. he was previously sentenced. today, jonathan chew appeared in court. the facts of the case were laid out by the prosecutor and the two men approached so chris whitty and they asked for a selfie. lewis hughes put his arm around the professor and jonathan chew then began to film the incident and it was clear, the court heard, the professor felt uncomfortable by what was happening at that time. and then that footage
4:20 pm
was sent on byjonathan chew to lewis hughes. the court heard that after that incident, the professor managed to get through these two men and go on his way. police approached both of these men and whenjonathan chew was asked for his details, he gave his brother's name and also a previous address where his brother lived. thejudge previous address where his brother lived. the judge sentenced jonathan chew to eight weeks in prison. in his sentence he said those who responded to an unprecedented crisis in the pandemic has been over the last two years. professor sir chris whitty did it with great big mitty said the chief magistrate, under a great deal of pressure, and he was entitled to go about his business, his public life, without the fear of someone like you, when he was
4:21 pm
addressing jonathan chew in court. the court heard during mitigation forjonathan chew that he had autism and the chief magistrate received a report from his doctors and his defence barrister told the court if he looked at the footage, he was excited to meet professor sir chris whitty but at the end, after the sentencing, in the dock, he was standing in the dark and the chief magistrate had to stop proceedings at one point and asked him if he was smoking. he was actually vaping in the dark and the chief magistrate said that was not allowed. he told jonathan chew that his contempt for these proceedings and this court had been breathtaking. the court heard thatjonathan chew had a number of previous convictions, including a number of public order offences. thank you.
4:22 pm
jobseekers on universal credit will have to look forjobs outside their chosen field more quickly or face sanctions under new government plans. from thursday, people will have to look outside their sectors after just four weeks, rather than three months. if they fail to make "reasonable efforts" to get a job, or turn down employment, they could see their benefit payment reduced. ministers want 500,000 jobseekers in work by the end ofjune. dr david webster is an honorary research fellow at the university of glasgow. why is this not a sensible idea in your view given taxpayers are footing the bill for benefits if people are out of work? the trouble is there is not _ people are out of work? the trouble is there is not evidence _ people are out of work? the trouble is there is not evidence that - is there is not evidence that pushing people to take jobs quicker —— there is evidence you end up with worse matches, in other words you get square pegs in round holes. the
4:23 pm
national audit office published a study about this and they've found this type of policy does indeed get people into work faster, but it also reduces people's earnings in the long—term. that is also the finding of other studies. other studies find that people who take longer to find a job get a betterjob, which i think is the common sense most people would expect. irate think is the common sense most people would expect.— think is the common sense most people would expect. we do have --eole people would expect. we do have peeple out _ people would expect. we do have peeple out of— people would expect. we do have people out of work, _ people would expect. we do have people out of work, in _ people would expect. we do have people out of work, in low-paid i people out of work, in low—paid work, and thejob people out of work, in low—paid work, and the job vacancy number is at 1.22 million, work, and the job vacancy number is at1.22 million, a work, and the job vacancy number is at 1.22 million, a record work, and the job vacancy number is at1.22 million, a record high between september and november. what is the best way of getting people into the rightjobs? ht is the best way of getting people into the right jobs?— into the right 'obs? it does take time to into the right jobs? it does take time to match _ into the right jobs? it does take time to match people _ into the right jobs? it does take time to match people up. - into the right jobs? it does take time to match people up. this. into the right jobs? it does take| time to match people up. this is into the right jobs? it does take - time to match people up. this is not the first time we have been through this sequence of events. if you look
4:24 pm
at the historical record of benefit conditions, going back to the 19205, you find that the time when governments put pressure on unemployed people is during the recovery phase of a recession. not when a recession is starting, but when a recession is starting, but when it is ending. what seems to be going on is that governments tend to become impatient with the speed with which people are being reabsorbed into the economy. but really, there is no worthwhile evidence for this. itjust is no worthwhile evidence for this. it just seems to is no worthwhile evidence for this. itjust seems to be the case that it does take time for people to sort themselves out after a recession. we have been through a big spike in unemployment. i have to say the number of claimants due to the covid
4:25 pm
epidemic has actually come down by more than half already. people have been getting reabsorbed into the economy. to been getting reabsorbed into the econom . ., ., ., , economy. to what extent are they reabsorbed _ economy. to what extent are they reabsorbed into _ economy. to what extent are they reabsorbed into well-paid - economy. to what extent are they reabsorbed into well-paid jobs, i reabsorbed into well—paid jobs, rather than low—paid part—time? rather than low—paid pa rt—time? there rather than low—paid part—time? there has publicity about the rise in what proportion of employed people are giving up theirjobs. there seems to be evidence from here and the usa that people have been taking advantage of the higher number of vacancies to move into betterjobs. which i think is in everybody�*s interest. betterjobs. which i think is in everybody's interest.- betterjobs. which i think is in everybody's interest. one of the most influential writers in british comedy — barry cryer — has died at the age of 86. during a long career he worked with a number of star names and was known to millions for his role on radio 4's i'm sorry i haven't a clue. his close friend gyles brandreth
4:26 pm
paid tribute saying "wherever barry went, he brought laughter with him". and the bbc�*s director general tim davie described him as an "incredible comedian and writer — if you heard or saw a great sketch there was always a good chance barry was behind it". sarah campbell looks back at his life. # i know a fat old policeman # he's always on our street # a fat and jolly red—faced man...# radio 4's i'm sorry i haven't a clue, and barry cryer sings the words of the laughing policeman to the tune of as time goes by. # he's never known to frown # and everybody says # he's the happiest man in town...# barry cryer seemed a happy fellow too, and a lucky one. i spent my time mainly with people i liked and admired, laughing about something. he'd started young, playing shakespeare's falstaff at school in leeds. down in london, he wrote gags for the drag artist danny la rue, as well as performing himself.
4:27 pm
an early success was a novelty song which went to number one... ..in finland. # it looks like a purple people eater to me...# there was a comedy panel show on itv. good evening, ladies and gentlemen, welcome tojokers wild, a game in which some of the country's top comedians match wits to see who, if anybody, knows all the jokes. and hello cheeky on tv and radio. he wrote for almost every leading comic, from frankie howerd to spike milligan, dick emery to kenny everett, the two ronnies to mike yarwood. when morecambe and wise switched from the bbc to itv, he and john junkin wrote their scripts. we've been so looking forward to working with you! come this way. it's just the same here - as what they are at the bbc. denis norden always says there's a sitter and a pacer, there's someone typing and someone walking about. and i would sit there
4:28 pm
scribbling or typing, and john would walk around, waggling his glasses. what a lovely audience! where are they? oh, there they are. yes _ never mind, they'll do. i saw them arriving on the coaches. did you really? _ yeah, with their blankets over their heads. - # my short—term memory�*s shot to pieces # and i'll tell you something else # my short—term memory�*s shot to pieces...# he was still performing well into his 805. a man whose trade was quite simply making people laugh. # ha—ha—ha.# applause barry cryer, who's died aged 86. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas most of us have seen blue sky and sunshine today. we have had a breeze that helped to break up the cloud. this evening, the breeze is dying down. a glorious end to the day in
4:29 pm
fife. as we head through this evening and overnight, mostly dry and cold. that means fog will form and cold. that means fog will form and frost. temperatures heading down to mid—single figures in the next hour and through tonight, you can see some pockets of fog forming and also frost around particularly in eastern parts. norwich down to freezing but colder than that in the countryside. milderair freezing but colder than that in the countryside. milder air in the north west. through the day, cloudy weather heading in from the north—west with the breeze picking up north—west with the breeze picking up and some rain in north—west scotland but some spots further south. driest in the south—east tomorrow and temperatures between 8-11.
4:30 pm
hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. borisjohnson says human beings were prioritised during the fall of kabul — it's after suggestions he was personally involved in rescuing animals from pen farthing's charity in afghanistan. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was very proud of what our armed services did with 0p pitting. covid rules for care homes in england have been eased by the government — allowing unlimited
4:31 pm
visits from monday — resident campaign groups say they welcome the move. i would just urge all care homes to do everything they can to allow as many visitors as they can. face coverings are no longer mandatory in england from today, but some big retailers ask customers to continue wearing them. a second man has admitted involvement in an assault on the england's chief medical officer professor sir chris whitty, in a london park last year. it's holocaust memorial day — marking 77—years since the liberation of auschwitz—birkenau. seven holocaust survivors have had portraits painted in a project commissioned by prince charles. and barry cryer — one of the most prolific scriptwriters in british comedy — has died at the age of 86.
4:32 pm
sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, the home crowd invested in one of the finals of the australian open. it will mark the first time in 42 years and australian women in the final. her opponent has never reached the stage before. both had straight set wins in their final today. it isjust straight set wins in their final today. it is just incredible. straight set wins in their final today. it isjust incredible. i love this tournament i love coming out here and playing this tournament. we are so spoiled we get to play in our backyard. i am just happy i get to play my best tennis here. we have done well before and never get chance to play for the title it's unreal. ht chance to play for the title it's unreal. . , , , . chance to play for the title it's unreal. ., , , , . ., chance to play for the title it's unreal. , , . ., ., , unreal. it has been such a 'ourney. it does not — unreal. it has been such a 'ourney. it does not happen h unreal. it has been such a journey. it does not happen overnight. -
4:33 pm
unreal. it has been such a journey. it does not happen overnight. so i it does not happen overnight. so many— it does not happen overnight. so many hours on court. yesterday i was talking _ many hours on court. yesterday i was talking about — many hours on court. yesterday i was talking about early mornings, my dad was practising with me before school~ — was practising with me before school~ it _ was practising with me before school. it isjust incredible to be on the _ school. it isjust incredible to be on the stage and especially with the health— on the stage and especially with the health challenges, i am just so grateful~ — health challenges, i am just so grateful~ i_ health challenges, i am just so grateful. i could not be happier. well, the mens world number one is not in australia after being deported, but novak djokovic is expected to be competing next month in dubai. the serb confirmed on his website that he had entered the dubai tennis championships, scheduled to start on the 21st of february. djokovic — who is unvaccinated — was told to leave australia without defending his title after an 11—day legal battle. judges rejected his challenge to the country's government cancelling his visa on "health and good order" grounds. premiership rugby club exeter chiefs will drop all references to native americans in their branding after it provoked significant criticism. they'll still be called the chiefs but have changed their logo... which from this summer will only use imagery from a celtic iron age
4:34 pm
tribe... the dumnonii, which encompassed a large area in teh south west including devon. barcelona are in talks with wolves over signing their forward adama traore which would appear to end spurs chances of getting the player. traore has 18 months left on his current deal with barca offering to take their former player back on loan with the option to buy for around 29 million pounds at the end of the season. spurs had a 15 million pound bid for the spanish international turned down earlier this month. derby county's administrators have been given an extra month to show they have enough money to survive the rest of the season. they've agreed with the efl to extend the deadline into march even though they were expected to run out of cash next month. the extra time has been granted to allow further talks with potential buyers. players in the women's super league and championship will have guaranteed maternity and long—term sickness cover written into their contracts after the fa and pfa agreed to the change.
4:35 pm
west ham's dagny brynjarsdottir is one of the few mothers have played in wsl... because maternity cover has previously been at the discretion of clubs many have decided to wait until they've retired before starting a family. fifa have introduced similar rules and one member of parliament told a recent debate to have the change implemented would be a 'massive step forward'. two time superbowl champion quarterback ben roethlisberger has announced his retirement from the nfl. he spent his entire 18 year career at the pittsburgh steelers and will likely be voted into the sport's hall of fame for his two superbowl rings... as well as six pro bowl appearances and more than 64 thousand yards passing. that's all the sport for now. thank you very much. police forces in england and wales have recorded the highest number of rapes and sexual offences in a 12—month period.
4:36 pm
there were 63,136 rapes recorded in the year to september, according to the office for national statistics which is up 13% from the previous period and is the highest recorded annualfigure to date. the crime survey also showed a 47% increase in fraud and computer misuse in the year to september. let's speak to the shadow home secretary yvette cooper. thank you very much forjoining us. it looks like a 13% increase in rape and sexual offences but there are warnings this could be down to a number of factors and we should not be too hasty to make sweeping conclusions. what is your view on why we are seeing the increase? ht why we are seeing the increase? if is an overall increase in crime, even at a time when more people have been staying at home during the pandemic and at the same time, a drop in prosecutions which means more criminals are getting away with it and victims getting late down. we want people to come forward and
4:37 pm
record sexual offences. this is also still a significant increase, a very serious increase in reports of rapes and sexual offences and a very shocking figure out today that only 1.3% of rapes are even being charged so that means they are not even going to court which means victims are being badly let down. why is that? i think there's a whole series of problems. a lot of courts don't have specialist rape investigation units, something the labour party has been calling for and i do not understand why the government is still resisting making it a requirement that all forces should have specialist rape investigators. just not enough has been done to make this a priority, the home office is still refusing to make crime against women and girls part of the strategic requirement, the key priorities they set for police
4:38 pm
officers across the country is so time and again investigations end up focusing on the victims rather than the perpetrators and end up with justice not being done for such a serious crime and dangerous perpetrators are getting light off so i think the conservative government is letting down women and girls, dealing with that kind of violence but also more widely letting down communities when you have crime going up and prosecutions going down. have crime going up and prosecutions auoin down. ., ., ., , going down. conventionally conservatives _ going down. conventionally conservatives are _ going down. conventionally conservatives are seen - going down. conventionally conservatives are seen as l going down. conventionally conservatives are seen as a going down. conventionally - conservatives are seen as a tougher clap —— tough on crime than the labour party and they would say more police on the streets, they would say they have criminalised upskirting and victims of domestic abuse can report crime, surely these measures are putting women and girls front and centre. but measures are putting women and girls front and centre.—
4:39 pm
front and centre. but this is the -a front and centre. but this is the party which _ front and centre. but this is the party which cut _ front and centre. but this is the party which cut 23,000 - front and centre. but this is the party which cut 23,000 police l party which cut 23,000 police officers from communities around the country and are nowhere near restoring those police officers back into our communities. we are not seeing us police officers on the street 50 this is the party responsible for major cuts, you are correct about the issue of extending the time limit 50 there is not as six month time limit but that is something i put forward and had to push through parliament to get the government to accept it because they were accepting a six—month time limit in the magistrates' court. 50 we want to work with the government if we can get progress on tackling violence against women and girls but at the moment we are seeing the the number of rape prosecutions has actually fallen in the most recent figures and we are seeing time and again women across the country but also people in many communities across the country just also people in many communities across the countryjust not feeling safe in their own communities and thatis
4:40 pm
safe in their own communities and that is not right, people should have the right to feel safe and secure in their own towns, communities and homes. what impact did ou communities and homes. what impact did you think— communities and homes. what impact did you think covax _ communities and homes. what impact did you think covax -- _ communities and homes. what impact did you think covax -- covid _ communities and homes. what impact did you think covax -- covid had? - communities and homes. what impact did you think covax -- covid had? we| did you think covax —— covid had? we heard from social groups that domestic abuse was on the rise. that is correct, thereby _ domestic abuse was on the rise. trust is correct, thereby increasing reports to helplines and services around domestic abuse and also concerns that existing domestic abuse might be getting more serious as well. we still do not have the full picture of the harm done as result of domestic abuse but we know we have seen these figures around increased reports of violence. overall when you have more people staying at home, it makes it less likely that our burglaries or violent crime but actually in the most recent figures, since the last summer, those violent crimes have been going back up again as well and so i think particularly this is a
4:41 pm
serious problem around violence against women and girls when i think the government has not been doing enough but it is a problem more widely. i think the conservatives are actually weak on law and order and tackling crime and also tackling the causes of crime. you have to do both prevention and policing and prosecution against those dangerous perpetrators. flan prosecution against those dangerous perpetratom-— perpetrators. can you blame the government _ perpetrators. can you blame the government for _ perpetrators. can you blame the government for underlying - perpetrators. can you blame the - government for underlying misogyny in a society? you government for underlying misogyny in a society?— in a society? you have to have a s stem in a society? you have to have a system that _ in a society? you have to have a system that is — in a society? you have to have a system that is ready _ in a society? you have to have a system that is ready to - in a society? you have to have a system that is ready to tackle i system that is ready to tackle it, things have got worse. we have seen a big drop in the proportion of rape prosecutions at the moment and we have seen a drop widely in prosecutions, of course there are wider issues which have to be tackled across society which is why we campaigned for a long time for education in schools to do with relationships and teaching positive attitudes to respect relationships
4:42 pm
in schools. it took government a long time to take up that recommendation and that needs to be spread more widely so of course there are wider issues across communities that all of his half to tackle but when it comes to the police and the criminal system, we need leadership from the home office on tackling this and we are not getting it. t on tackling this and we are not caettin it. . ., ., on tackling this and we are not getting it— on tackling this and we are not caettin it. . ., ., ,, ., getting it. i am going to you about the evacuation _ getting it. i am going to you about the evacuation of _ getting it. i am going to you about the evacuation of pain _ getting it. i am going to you about the evacuation of pain farthing's l the evacuation of pain farthing's rescue animals in afghanistan and the suggestion that animals were put before humans, which the prime minister has said is nonsense, rhubarb is what he said. he has waved away the idea that he had sanctioned that to happen, how clear are you about what visually gone on here because there seem to be conflicting reports? j here because there seem to be conflicting reports?— here because there seem to be conflicting reports? i think we have this contradiction _ conflicting reports? i think we have this contradiction between - conflicting reports? i think we have this contradiction between e-mails| this contradiction between e—mails which seem to be sent from what the prime minister has said. that is
4:43 pm
part of the problem here, nobody has any trust in the things the prime minister says and that is damaging to us at home and abroad. obviously there is serious concern about british citizens and also people who worked for the uk armed forces who are still in afghanistan, whose lives are still at risk which is what makes a serious but i think this also comes back to trust in the prime minister or bluntly a lack of trust in this prime minister to be honest about things and you need to be able to have confidence in the things that are prime minister says. thank you very much. court documents submitted in new york show that prince andrew has asked for a jury trial in the civil case being brought by virginia giuffre. she is suing him over claims she was sexually assaulted by him 21 years ago when she was a teenager — allegations he strenuously denies. the court papers also show the prince has denied he was a close
4:44 pm
friend of the convicted sex trafficker ghislaine maxwell. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. it is basically a blanket denial of everything, most importantly and specifically of virginia giuffre's accusation of sexual abuse. but the document from andrew's lawyers questions virtually everything. this widely seen photograph, for example. andrew says he doesn't have enough information to say whether or not it's genuine. that's an echo of what he said in his newsnight interview. she provided a photo of the two of you together. yes, yes. your arm was around her waist. yes. you've seen the photo. i've seen the photograph. how do you explain that? i can't. because i don't...| have no...again, i have absolutely no memory of that photograph ever being taken. and then there's the question of andrew's friendship with ghislaine maxwell. he's known herfor 20 years. he took her to royal ascot with her boyfriend, jeffrey epstein, and invited both of them
4:45 pm
to balmoral and sandringham. however, he now says it wasn't a close friendship. this is what andrew said about the sandringham visit on newsnight. am i right in thinking you threw a birthday party for epstein's girlfriend, ghislaine maxwell, at sandringham? no, it was a shooting weekend. a shooting weekend. just a straightforward... ..straightforward shooting weekend. in addition to the denials, it's clear that andrew's lawyers will attempt to undermine virginia giuffre's credibility and call into question her behaviour. his legal submission said... "guiffre's alleged causes of action are barred in whole or in part by her own wrongful conduct." the gloves are off. what you've really got here is prince andrewl saying "bring it on". you want a jury trial? i want a jury trial. you want to bring these claims? well, in that case, you have i to prove everything that you're saying because i'm not- going to admit to anything. and all this just ten
4:46 pm
days from accession day, when the queen will mark the 70th anniversary of the day she came to the throne. nicholas witchell, bbc news. some breaking news regarding the effectiveness of boosterjabs effectiveness of booster jabs against effectiveness of boosterjabs against the overgrown variants. according to the uk health security agency, covid—19 boosters increase protection from death against the omicron variant 295%. six months after a second dose of any of the vaccines, protection against death from omicron was down to about in people from age 50 and over but this increased up to 95% after receiving a booster vaccine dose. that will underline further pushes from the
4:47 pm
government to get people to take up those vaccines. a jury has been told that the mother of a six—year—old boy found dead in woodland over 25 years ago had been telling "the truth and nothing but the truth" when she denied his murder. rikki neave's naked body was found near his peterborough home in 1994. his mother, ruth neave, was accused of his murder, but was found not guilty in 1996. today, james watson, who was 13 at the time of rikki's death, is on trial for murder. well, people who have been following this case might remember it dates back to 1994 so it is 27 years old. the trial opened here at the old bailey a couple of weeks ago, the defendantjames watson is in the dock. he is 40 years old, he would have been 13 years old at the time of rikki neave's death. we have heard here from prosecutors of this alleged breakthrough in the case that was reopened just a few years ago. the prosecution here has said james watson's dna was found on rikki neave's clothing.
4:48 pm
that clothing was found in wheelie bin the day after rikki neave's body was found in woodland in peterborough. turning to today's evidence, we heard from ruth neave. she is rikki's mother. she was talking about her trial back in the mid—905 because she was accused of the murder of rikki neave when this all happened. she denied it and she was cleared by thejury. as to her trial today here in this case, the prosecutor set ahar
4:49 pm
set ahar ——asked her, when asked if you had murdered your son, what answer did you give? no, i did not, she said. and was that the truth? positively the truth and nothing but the truth, she said. she was also asked here today when she last saw rikki neave alive. she said on the morning she woken around 845 and told him to get up. she said he had been arguing with his sister. she explained she had not had much sleep the night before because she had a new baby. that new baby was poorly and not sleeping well. so she was asked by the prosecutor where were you when you last saw your son alive? she said she was at home in her living room, i was sitting dozing, try to keep my eyes open. and what was nikki doing the last time you soil alive? he was playing with the baby. i was sitting there looking at them both, dozing. we expect her to continue giving evidence next week, she will be cross—examined. as for this trial at the old bailey, james watson denies murder and we expect the trial to last several more weeks. a line of news regarding the planned rise in national insurance coming in in april. the business secretary has
4:50 pm
defended the planned rise saying it is needed to fund the nhs and social care to which we are totally committed, he said. he said the way to do this is through this tax rise, this is how we will get the revenue to pay for the backlog of care in the nhs and pay for a sustainable social care system. there have been a number of calls from mp5 for the try is to be delayed because of families facing 50 many increases to the cost of living. —— for the rise. the treasury select committee chairman told the bbc today this was an opportunity not to go ahead with the rise but to put it off for at least a year but asked if this meant there would be no u—turn, that is exactly what the business secretary said, there would be no u—turn and the plan would go ahead.
4:51 pm
the us has rejected russia's demand that ukraine should never be allowed to join the western military alliance nato. moscow made the demand after amassing around 100,000 troops near the ukrainian border in both belarus and russia — although it denies that it's planning to invade. russia responded this morning by saying its concerns were not being taken into account. james waterhouse in ukraine sent this report. there's no such thing as rain at this time of year in kyiv. for cab driver andriy, a peaceful relationship with neighbouring russia feels equally unlikely. if ukraine again will be occupied, russian troops, like it was 100 years ago in soviet times, in russian empire times, it will be a new repression, a new situation, a new genocide for ukrainians. ukraine's relationship with russia is a complicated one. there are cultural ties which go back a long way. in that time, ukraine has also been no stranger to a struggle for sovereignty. we have liberty and we have six presidents in the last 30 years.
4:52 pm
talks will continue over russia's demands that ukraine never joins nato and for the alliance to scale back its operations. but with the us not meeting those demands and these deep—rooted differences between kyiv and moscow, for how much longer will there be dialogue? nothing about ukraine without ukraine — a principal repeated not just here, but by the west on frequent occasions. now, whilst the country isn't involved in these main talks, the foreign minister dmytro kuleba says he is satisfied the country's priorities are being considered. his government though is under pressure to deliver on its promise to sort things diplomatically, so for a while the authorities have been urging one thing. "don't panic." however, that's only going to get harder with tensions not exactly thawing in ukraine's frozen conflict with russian—backed separatists, and
4:53 pm
the kremlin now saying there aren't many reasons to be optimistic. james waterhouse, bbc news, in kyiv. ceremonies have been taking place to mark holocaust memorial day or the international day in memory of the victims of the holocaust. the date marks the 77th anniversary of the liberation of the auschwitz concentration camp, where more than a million people were murdered by the nazis. as well as ceremonies around the world, a small group of survivors attended a memorial at the camp in poland. earlier i spoke with eve kugler, who survived the holocaust — i asked her why today is 50 significant. it is also important because i feel very strongly that the people who were not alive at that time because it was so long ago must know what happened, the effort to exterminate the jewish people. the story of the holocaust must be remembered so that people will not
4:54 pm
have to go through what i went through, what my family went through, what many others, including arek who is a good friend of mine. all these people suffered too much, my family and i and it should not happen again. you were separated from your parents for a long time and then from your sister. how did that loss and separation affect your later life? during the time i was separated from my family, even from my older sister, i became a person who was very inward looking. i kept to myself, i never shared anybody with my history, i just wanted to stay out of trouble and quietly got on with it. do you understand what i'm saying? i isolated myself in order to keep
4:55 pm
people out because somehow or other, as a child of eight, nine, ten, 11, i didn't want other people to know, ifelt threatened if they knew. how do you spend today then, what is your overriding feeling on a day like this? i remember very much my family who i lost, particularly my beloved grandfathers both of whom were murdered and i think of my mother and my father who were in concentration camps in france during the war. and suffered desperately, terribly. the fact that they survived a miracle. my mother said everyone has to know what happened to us, it is important. if they do not know, everyone has to know so it
4:56 pm
will not happen again. so i think of her and i think that this in a way is a tribute to her and my ability to be with you today is her wish to inform people. the theme of the holocaust memoria day this year is one day. how do you interpret that, eve? i feel that there was more than one day in those awful years of the holocaust. i think about kristallnacht when six nazis broke into our home in the middle of the night, trashed our home and took my father away. that is just one aspect of that day because in the morning, the nazis torched the synagogue which my grandfather had established. would you believe the fire brigade just watched and watched it burn until there were only ashes left.
4:57 pm
it was such an attack against us personally and all thejewish congregation. we are very grateful to you, eve kugler, for sharing those memories, as painful as they are. thank you very much forjoining us. thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. another beautiful sunset. it is. we have had clear skies through the day and the sun just dipping below the horizon, this is the position in cambridgeshire. many of us a glorious clear into the day and very light winds. tonight we are in for a bit of frost and mist and fog here and there. through this evening and
4:58 pm
overnight, you can see the mist and fog forming over england and wales and southern scotland. more cloud in the west of scotland and northern ireland. milder here, 4 degrees in stornoway but down to freezing in norwich and a few degrees below freezing in the countryside. high pressure and charged toward the south on friday morning, this weather front tracking across the uk, quite mild conditions because the winds are rotating around a high—pressure, coming infrom the winds are rotating around a high—pressure, coming in from the south—west so a warm front moving across the uk for friday. much milder in the west after a chilly start, perhaps mist and fog lingering but it will clear away, sunna spells in east anglia, cloudy skies elsewhere. a few spots of rain further south, 11 degrees top temperature on friday. towards the weekend, we keep the high pressure
4:59 pm
in the south. this cold front tracking in on saturday, bringing rain initially to northern ireland and scotland and then as this train tracks southwards, it will fragment a just a few spots of rain by saturday afternoon. followed by sunshine from the north and a few blustery showers with temperatures between 5—14. it will be a windy day on saturday, gus reaching 30 miles an hour in the south—east and up to 60 miles an hour in the north—west. less windy on sunday, rain across northern ireland, that tracks through scotland. heavy hill snow for scotland. further south and east dry for much of the day but cooler on sunday compared to saturday. a quick look ahead to next week, things remaining dry and settled for southern parts, more unsettled with showers for the north west and something colder and more wintry
5:00 pm
towards the end of next week. this is bbc news. the headlines: borisjohnson says human beings were prioritised during the fall of kabul — after suggestions he was personally involved in rescuing animals from a charity in afghanistan. this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was very proud of what our armed services did with op pitting. and in the next half hour, we'll be speaking to the former international development secretary rory stewart. do stay with us for that. also this afternoon: campaign groups welcome the easing of care home restrictions in england, allowing for unlimited visits from today.
5:01 pm
i would urge

133 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on