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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  January 27, 2022 1:00pm-1:30pm GMT

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covid restrictions are to be eased in care homes in england from monday. any number of family and friends will be able to visit, and the isolation time for those who contract covid will be cut from m to ten days. a real positive move, you know, breathing life back into the homes, allowing people to see their loved ones where they've felt certainly cut off. and from today, face coverings are no longer legally required in england, but some businesses will ask you to wear one. ministers say restrictions can be relaxed because of the success of the booster programme. also this lunchtime... russia's demand that ukraine should never be allowed to join nato is rejected by the us. prince andrew denies ever being a close friend of convicted sex trafficker ghislaine maxwell in a legal response to her suing him for
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alleged sexual assault. the holocaust survivors captured on canvas for a display the holocaust survivors captured on canvas for a display at buckingham palace to mark holocaust memorial day. and tributes to one of the most influential and enduring writers in british comedy — barry cryer — who's died at the age of 86. and coming up on the bbc news channel... england rue dropped catches and missed chances as they fail to take advantage of a good start in the one—off women's ashes test. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. residents in care homes in england will be allowed to see an unlimited
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number of their loved ones from monday. the current limit of three named visitors is being scrapped. the government says a successful roll—out of booster vaccines means the restriction isn't necessary any more. it comes as part of a wider easing of the rules for england's care homes. self—isolation periods will be cut, and in the event of a positive case, care homes will only have to close their doors to visitors for m days rather than 28. our correspondent andrew plant reports. going over the latest guidance at this care home in bristol, working out what the changes will mean for residents and staff here ready for restrictions easing on monday. it should make a lot of people happy, fantastic. for should make a lot of people happy, fantastic. ., ., , , fantastic. for dorothy, visiting should become _ fantastic. for dorothy, visiting should become much - fantastic. for dorothy, visiting should become much easier. l should become much easier. protective clothing is likely to stay but she will no longer need an appointment to come and see her
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sister, and will be able to bring otherfamily members sister, and will be able to bring other family members with her too. the chance to see my grandchildren, nephews and nieces, and being able to come in when they want, more than one of us coming in, so it will be really good. one of us coming in, so it will be really good-— one of us coming in, so it will be really good. each nation in the uk sets its own _ really good. each nation in the uk sets its own care _ really good. each nation in the uk sets its own care home _ really good. each nation in the uk sets its own care home rules. - sets its own care home rules. scotland eased its restrictions last week. in england, as well as lifting limits on visitors, self isolation period will be cut from ia days to ten, outbreak management cut from 28 days to period will be cut from ia days to ten, outbreak management cut from 28 days to ia, period will be cut from ia days to ten, outbreak management cut from 28 days to ia, and period will be cut from ia days to ten, outbreak management cut from 28 days to ia, and care period will be cut from ia days to ten, outbreak management cut from 28 days to ia, and care home period will be cut from ia days to ten, outbreak management cut from 28 days to ia, and care home workers will be asked to use lateral flow test before shifts rather than a weekly pcr. a, test before shifts rather than a weekly pcr-— test before shifts rather than a weekl pcr. �* . , ., weekly pcr. a really positive move, breathin: weekly pcr. a really positive move, breathing life _ weekly pcr. a really positive move, breathing life back _ weekly pcr. a really positive move, breathing life back into _ weekly pcr. a really positive move, breathing life back into the - weekly pcr. a really positive move, breathing life back into the homes, | breathing life back into the homes, allowing people to see loved ones where they have felt cut off. are ou where they have felt cut off. are you confident — where they have felt cut off. are you confident you can still keep your residents safe with more
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relaxed safety rules?- your residents safe with more relaxed safety rules? there is so much more _ relaxed safety rules? there is so much more management- relaxed safety rules? there is soi much more management coming relaxed safety rules? there is so - much more management coming into the sector with fully vaccinated staff and fully vaccinated residents, it feels right to bring the restrictions down. , , , , ., restrictions down. despite limits on visitors being _ restrictions down. despite limits on visitors being lifted, _ restrictions down. despite limits on visitors being lifted, other - restrictions down. despite limits on visitors being lifted, other issues i visitors being lifted, other issues for care homes could mean they still have to manage numbers. we for care homes could mean they still have to manage numbers.— have to manage numbers. we still have to manage numbers. we still have not have to manage numbers. we still have got shortages _ have to manage numbers. we still have got shortages in _ have to manage numbers. we still have got shortages in staff, - have to manage numbers. we still have got shortages in staff, we . have to manage numbers. we still. have got shortages in staff, we have over 50% of services in outbreak, so facilitating visits, we need to be absolutely clear, you know, these are time—consuming and when you have are time—consuming and when you have a lot of people wanting to come through at the same time, we are going to have to limit the number of people coming into the services. changes to restrictions won't mean the end of the challenges for the care home industry, but the new arrangement should see less isolation and much more socialising for those in care homes here. andrew plant, bbc news, bristol. in another change coming into force from today,
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face coverings in england are no longer mandatory. but many shops, such asjohn lewis and sainsbury�*s, and transport networks will still ask customers to wear masks as a courtesy to others — and it remains mandatory to wear a face covering on transport for london services. face coverings continue to be compulsory in indoor public places in northern ireland, scotland and wales. our correspondent emma simpson has this report. it is —— is this the beginning of the end forfacemasks it is —— is this the beginning of the end for facemasks in it is —— is this the beginning of the end forfacemasks in england it is —— is this the beginning of the end for facemasks in england at least? commuters at st albans train station seem to be taking a cautious approach. will you still be wearing approach. will you still be wearing a mask on the train?— approach. will you still be wearing a mask on the train? yes, of course, on the train — a mask on the train? yes, of course, on the train and _ a mask on the train? yes, of course, on the train and on _ a mask on the train? yes, of course, on the train and on the _ a mask on the train? yes, of course, on the train and on the underground | on the train and on the underground for the next few months, for sure, just to be safe, and in supermarkets as well. i just to be safe, and in supermarkets as well. , ., ., just to be safe, and in supermarkets as well. , . ., ., ,~ just to be safe, and in supermarkets as well. , ., ., ., ., as well. i will be wearing a mask on the train, as well. i will be wearing a mask on the train. yes- _ as well. i will be wearing a mask on the train, yes. i _ as well. i will be wearing a mask on the train, yes. i have _ as well. i will be wearing a mask on the train, yes. i have decided - as well. i will be wearing a mask on the train, yes. i have decided that, | the train, yes. i have decided that, for the _ the train, yes. i have decided that, for the moment, with the number of cases, _ for the moment, with the number of cases. i_ for the moment, with the number of cases, i would still rather protect
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myself _ cases, i would still rather protect myself and everyone else. train companies _ myself and everyone else. train companies want _ myself and everyone else. train companies want customers - myself and everyone else. train companies want customers to i myself and everyone else. t': “i companies want customers to keep wearing masks too. the companies want customers to keep wearing masks too.— wearing masks too. the advice is really clear. _ wearing masks too. the advice is really clear, it _ wearing masks too. the advice is really clear, it is _ wearing masks too. the advice is really clear, it is where _ wearing masks too. the advice is really clear, it is where a - wearing masks too. the advice is really clear, it is where a face - really clear, it is where a face covering if it is crowded or indoors, so we would like people to continue wearing them on trains for the time being, just as you will be in supermarkets and other busy indoor settings.— in supermarkets and other busy indoor settings. from today, face coverin . s indoor settings. from today, face coverings are _ indoor settings. from today, face coverings are no _ indoor settings. from today, face coverings are no longer _ indoor settings. from today, face coverings are no longer legally i coverings are no longer legally required in public indoor settings. the mandatory wearing of masks has been contentious throughout this pandemic. today's move is too early for some, and for others it can't come soon enough. this gift shop isn't wasting any time. emma and her three staff are ready to ditch the mask. it three staff are ready to ditch the mask. , . , three staff are ready to ditch the mask. , ., , ., , ., three staff are ready to ditch the mask. , ., , ., ,.,, mask. it is really lovely to be able to net a mask. it is really lovely to be able to get a bit _ mask. it is really lovely to be able to get a bit of— mask. it is really lovely to be able to get a bit of lipstick— mask. it is really lovely to be able to get a bit of lipstick on - mask. it is really lovely to be able to get a bit of lipstick on again - to get a bit of lipstick on again and not have to worry about wearing masks and them sticking to me so it has felt liberating.— has felt liberating. down the road it is business _
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has felt liberating. down the road it is business as _ has felt liberating. down the road it is business as usual— has felt liberating. down the road it is business as usual at - has felt liberating. down the road it is business as usual at this - it is business as usual at this hairdressers. fist it is business as usual at this hairdressers.— it is business as usual at this hairdressers. �* ., hairdressers. at the moment, we feel that it is better— hairdressers. at the moment, we feel that it is better to _ hairdressers. at the moment, we feel that it is better to stick _ hairdressers. at the moment, we feel that it is better to stick with _ that it is better to stick with wearing the masks and we want people to come in and have their hair done feeling comfortable that we are still taking precautions because it is a mixture of how people feel at the moment. some people feel very comfortable sitting there without a mask but some people still don't. there is no change to mask wearing for scotland, wales and northern ireland just yet, as england takes another step towards normality. emma simpson, bbc news, st albans. the latest weekly figures for covid in the uk and the impact on the nhs have just been published. to go through the detail, with me now is our health correspondent katharine da costa. what have we learned? for the first time, the majority _ what have we learned? for the first time, the majority of _ what have we learned? for the first time, the majority of covid - what have we learned? for the first time, the majority of covid patients| time, the majority of covid patients in hospital in england are therefore something else rather than the virus. of the something else rather than the virus. of the 13,000 covid patients on tuesday, 32% were being treated for other conditions so it's another
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sign of how the 0micron variant is leading to a milder illness. but people being treated primarily for other conditions could include stroke and cancer patients might is held can still be compromised by the virus and they still need to be isolated away from other patients which creates difficulties for hospitals. which creates difficulties for hospitals-— which creates difficulties for hositals. ., ., , , ., which creates difficulties for hositals. . ., ., , , ., ., hospitals. what does this mean for the nhs, hospitals. what does this mean for the ms, is — hospitals. what does this mean for the ms, is the _ hospitals. what does this mean for the nhs, is the pressure _ hospitals. what does this mean for the nhs, is the pressure easing? l the nhs, is the pressure easing? health leaders say the pressure is still intense. they saw the busiest week for ambulances taking patients to a&e since the start of december. but covid related staff absence is falling across the country. it accounted for about 3% of staff in acute trusts being off each day in the week to the 23rd of january. it is down 15% on the previous week so it is an improving picture, but hospitals in the north west and midlands are still under pressure from staff absence, more so than
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others in the south.— downing street says that it has "no sight whatsoever" of a copy of the civil servant sue gray's report into lockdown parties in government. while the wait in westminster continues, the prime minister has vowed to fight on. speaking in wales this morning, borisjohnson also dismissed claims that he approved the controversial airlift of animals from afghanistan. did you authorise evacuating animals out of kabul? no, this whole thing is total rhubarb. i was very proud of what our armed services did, and it was an amazing thing to move 15,000 people out of kabul in the way we did. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in westminsterfor us. the prime minister has just spoken, and he denies any involvement in this decision? he and he denies any involvement in this decision?— this decision? he gave another fruity response _ this decision? he gave another fruity response saying - fruity response saying the allegations were rhubarb. as far as
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i'm aware rhubarb is not a synonym for andre but he has said elsewhere this was nonsense when challenged on this was nonsense when challenged on this allegation before. he is helped by the defence secretary ben wallace who said he was in charge of movements in and out of kabul airport and wasn't influenced by the prime minister, but this allegation is continuing because the animal rights campaigner dominic daya has repeated his claim the prime minister was involved and there are e—mails given to the commons foreign affairs committee yesterday from a foreign office official that said the prime minister had authorised this. he's proud of the operation of getting people in and out of kabul, the question is whether anyone was left behind because of penn farthing's animals. find left behind because of penn farthing's animals.- left behind because of penn farthing's animals. and in the meantime _ farthing's animals. and in the meantime everyone _ farthing's animals. and in the meantime everyone is - farthing's animals. and in the meantime everyone is still- farthing's animals. and in the - meantime everyone is still waiting for sue gray's reporting to government lockdown parties. that's ri . ht, it government lockdown parties. that's right. it was — government lockdown parties. that's right, it was expected _ government lockdown parties. that's right, it was expected yesterday, - right, it was expected yesterday, but downing street still haven't received it today so questions are being asked about what is causing
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the potential delay. i'm told by sources close to the inquiry that it isn't because of political interference from downing street. it is not because trade unions are worried about some of their members being named. it's been a green very senior civil servants including those whose names have not been in the public domain will be named in this report when we see it. but there have been complications because of the involvement of the metropolitan police. i'm told sue gray wants to make it absolutely clear that the report she produces can be handed over to downing street and published in that form. so if there's been any last—minute reassurances the metropolitan police have been seeking, it is perfectly possible there might be some kind of minor redrafting to avoid the prospect of having to release a report full of redactions and therefore would raise questions at least by the opposition of a potential whitewash.- least by the opposition of a potential whitewash. many thanks. iain potential whitewash. many thanks. iain watson — potential whitewash. many thanks. iain watson reporting _ potential whitewash. many thanks. iain watson reporting from - iain watson reporting from westminster. the us has rejected russia's demand
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that ukraine should never be allowed to join the western military alliance nato. moscow made the demand after amassing around 100,000 troops near the ukrainian border in both belarus and russia, although it denies that it's planning to invade. russia responded this morning by saying its concerns were not being taken into account. james waterhouse in ukraine sent this report. there's no such thing as rain at this time of year in kyiv. for cab driver andre, a peaceful relationship with neighbouring russia feels equally unlikely. if ukraine again will be occupied, russian troops, like it was 100 years ago in soviet times, in russian empire times, it will be a new aggression, a new situation, a new genocide for ukrainians. ukraine's relationship with russia is a complicated one. there are cultural ties which go back a long way. in that time, ukraine has also been no stranger to a struggle for sovereignty. we have liberty and we have six presidents in the last 30 years.
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talks will continue over russian's demands that ukraine never joins nato and for the alliance to scale back its operations. but with the us not meeting those demands and these deep—rooted differences between kyiv and moscow, for how much longer will there be dialogue? nothing about ukraine without ukraine, a principal repeated not just here, but by the west on frequent occasions. now, whilst the country isn't involved in these main talks, the foreign minister says he is satisfied the country's priorities are being considered. his government though is under pressure to deliver on its promise to sort things diplomatically, so for a while the authorities have been urging one thing. "don't panic." however, that's only going to get harder with tensions not exactly thawing in ukraine's frozen conflict with russian—backed separatists, and
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the kremlin now saying there aren't many reasons to be optimistic. james waterhouse, bbc news, in kyiv. court documents submitted in new york show that prince andrew has asked for a jury trial in the civil case being brought by virginia giuffre. she is suing him over claims she was sexually assaulted by him 21 years ago when she was a teenager — allegations he strenuously denies. the court papers also show the prince has denied he was a close friend of the convicted sex trafficker ghislaine maxwell. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. it is basically a blanket denial of everything, most importantly and specifically of virginia giuffre's accusation of sexual abuse. but the document from andrew's lawyers questions virtually everything. this widely seen photograph, for example. andrew says he doesn't have enough information to say whether or not it's genuine. that's an echo of what he said in his newsnight interview. she provided a photo of the two of you together. yes, yes. your arm was around her waist.
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yes. you've seen the photo. i've seen the photograph. how do you explain that? i can't. because i don't...| have no...again, i have absolutely no memory of that photograph ever being taken. and then there's the question of andrew's friendship with ghislaine maxwell. he's known herfor 20 years. he took her to royal ascot with her boyfriend, jeffrey epstein, and invited both of them to balmoral and sandringham. however, he now says it wasn't a close friendship. this is what andrew said about the sandringham visit on newsnight. am i right in thinking you threw a birthday party for epstein's girlfriend, ghislaine maxwell, at sandringham? no, it was a shooting weekend. a shooting weekend. just a straightforward... ..straightforward shooting weekend. in addition to the denials, it's clear that andrew's lawyers will attempt to undermine virginia giuffre's credibility and call into question her behaviour. his legal submission said...
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the gloves are off. what you've really got here is prince andrewl saying "bring it on". you want a jury trial? i want a jury trial. - you want to bring these claims? well, in that case, you have i to prove everything that you're saying because i'm not- going to admit to anything. and all this just ten days from accession day, when the queen will mark the 70th anniversary of the day she came to the throne. nicholas witchell, bbc news. the time is 1.15. our top story this lunchtime. covid restrictions are to be eased in care homes in england from monday with any number of family and friends able to visit. still to come — front—line nhs staff in england who aren't yetjabbed have just a week to get vaccinated, or face losing theirjobs. coming up on the bbc news channel, ash barty is the first australian woman to reach the singles final
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of her home open in more than a0 years, as she beats madison keys in no time at all, in melbourne. today is the 77th anniversary of the liberation in 19a5 of the nazi death camp at auschwitz. it is marked, as it is every year, by holocaust memorial day, and the victims of all genocides are being remembered. in a special project commissioned by prince charles, seven holocaust survivors have had their portraits painted by different artists. 0ur royal correspondent daniela relph has more. arek hersh was one ofjust two members of his family to survive the holocaust. this painting captures him now at the age of 93. the style is realistic, almost photographic. his right hand rests on his left arm, the arm that bears the number he was marked with at auschwitz.
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creating a gallery of holocaust survivors, the bbc has been following the project. covid made things unconventional for artist massimiliano pironti. i started to paint this portrait in completely opposite process as normal. you should have painted me when i had hair! yeah, that was a while ago. we had like three virtual sittings. it was a very challenging experience. your book? oh, yes. months later came a real—life meet—up, as arek shared his story. that was my first camp. 11 years old, i was. 11 years old. yeah. that's auschwitz, yeah. it's where we got our number on the arm. newsreel: these are children who survived at auschwitz. - arek was one of those survivors.
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but the rest of his family, bar his older sister, never reached liberation. they were some of the six million jews killed in the holocaust. this week, arek met the prince of wales, who commissioned the project. actually, i think it's fantastic. yes, i felt we owed it to these remarkable people just to...remember them in this way. there is something very special about the portrait and about the artist's eye in bringing out the real, underlying character. the connection between artists and survivors has been strong. the pictures reflect both loss and survival. these portraits go to the heart of their individuality and their humanity. what better way of rejecting that kind of philosophy that led to the holocaust? the reality is this extraordinary group of people are now growing smaller every year,
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but the power of their testimony forms a lasting memory. daniela ralph, bbc news, the queen's gallery at buckingham palace. and you can watch the full documentary survivors: portraits of the holocaust on bbc two tonight at nine o'clock, and it will also be available on bbc iplayer. £100 million is being provided by the government to help develop the planned nuclear plant sizewell c in suffolk. it's the latest stage in efforts to build the £20 billion reactor on the east coast of england. our business correspondent theo leggett is with me. how significant is this? well, it's si . nificant how significant is this? well, it's significant because _ how significant is this? well, it's significant because it _ how significant is this? well, it's significant because it shows - how significant is this? well, it's significant because it shows that | significant because it shows that the government is reasonably committed to getting sizewell c up and running. it's already said it wants to have at least one new nuclear project approved by the end of this parliament, so we are talking by 202a, and the reason for
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thatis talking by 202a, and the reason for that is pretty clear. 0ur existing nuclear reactors are ageing and by the end of the decade all but one of them will have been shut down, so them will have been shut down, so the government says there is a need for a new, reliable, zero carbon form of energy generation but this is not the end of the story. this is a £20 billion project and there are still questions over the funding. 0ne still questions over the funding. one of the main shareholders is china general nuclear, cgm, a chinese company, state owned. the government doesn't really want them on board so is looking for investors to replace them and this money will go to the other major shareholder, which is edf of france, to allow the project to take over while new investors are found and assuming that can happen, even then the controversy won't end because the way in which the building costs of this project are going to be funded is largely through a levy on consumer bills. at the moment of course we are all talking about the cost of living, how high our energy bills are because of high international energy prices, so
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anything that will increase bills is always going to cause problems, it's going to be controversial, but the government would say that the reason we need to do this is because at the moment we are too vulnerable to high international energy prices so we need some secure power generation domestically but i theo, many thanks. job—seekers on universal credit will have to look forjobs outside their chosen field more quickly under new government plans. currently, claimants have three months to find work in their chosen area, but from thursday that's being reduced to four weeks. the government wants 500,000 job—seekers in employment by the end ofjune. but opposition parties say there should be more support for people to find the job they want. car production in britain fell to its lowest level since 1956 last year, according to the latest figures. the society of motor manufacturers and traders blamed covid disruption — particularly a lack of silicon chips and staff shortages — but said new investment in electric vehicles gives some ground for optimism.
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front—line nhs staff in england who are not yet vaccinated against covid now have just one week left to get a jab — or face losing theirjobs. the health secretary sajid javid says it's their professional duty to be fully vaccinated. but some in the health service have called for the policy to be re—thought. 0ur health reporter jim reed has more. amy is an occupational therapist, often working with the elderly and physically disabled. she has, though, decided not to be vaccinated against covid. i would say that each person has to weigh up the pros and cons for themselves. what would you say to people who'd think — if you work with vulnerable people in a health care setting, you have a responsibility to be vaccinated yourself, to protect other people? but you can still get — even with three vaccines, you can still get covid, you can still spread it. and the other thing is wearing ppe, personal protective equipment, protects the vulnerable people.
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and you're prepared to lose yourjob rather than get vaccinated at the moment? yes, i don't want to lose myjob. i love myjob, i respect the nhs, but i'm very much a supporter of choice. amy is one of two million in england covered by new rules on compulsory vaccination. that already includes half a million care home workers who had to have their second jab by last november. next week, another 1.7 million in front line health care will need to have their first dose. that includes nhs staff and other jobs like gps and dentists. the latest figures suggest 95% of nhs workers are already vaccinated, leaving around 77,000 who haven't yet had a firstjab. i think the scientific evidence is so overwhelming. many others working in health care support the principle of mandatory vaccination. if a patient comes to me and says,
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"should i have the vaccine? have you been vaccinated, doctor?" that answer should always be, "yes, of course i've been vaccinated, and you should too." there is no wriggle room ethically for a doctor or a nurse or anybody talking to patients about whether they should be vaccinated themselves or not. so your message would be "get the vaccine if you want to stay in the job"? i think the evidence is overwhelming. i've been working on covid itus since the beginning. i have not had a vaccination. i do not want to have a vaccination. the debate, though, is becoming more heated as the deadline looms. this clip of a doctor challenging the health secretary on the policy has been viewed more than one million times on social media. the government says doctors, nurses and other front line health staff look after the most vulnerable, who could face serious consequences if they catch the virus. and nhs health chiefs say staff have a duty to make sure they're protected. last weekend, health care workers
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joined this wider protest against compulsory vaccination. 0ther nhs staff firmly support the policy. with just a week to go, ministers now say they will reflect on the latest evidence, but the need to protect patients remains unchanged. jim reed, bbc news. in cricket — england were hurt by dropped catches and missed chances, as australia took control on day one of the crucial ashes test. australia's captain meg lanning and rachael haynes put on a fourth—wicket partnership of 169, steering the hosts to 327—7 at the close in canberra. britain's alfie hewett couldn't repeat yesterday's australian open success when he took the wheelchair doubles title with gordon reid. he lost the singles final to japan's shingo kunieda. meanwhile, the world number one ash barty comfortably reached the singles decider. she beat madison keys in straight sets, making her the first home player to reach the australian open
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women's final since 1980. barty will face danielle collins on saturday. one of the most influential writers in british comedy, barry cryer, has died at the age of 86. during a long career he worked with a number of star names and was known to millions for his role on radio a's i'm sorry i haven't a clue. his close friend gyles brandreth paid tribute, saying, "wherever barry went he brought laughter with him," and the bbc�*s director general tim davie described him as an "incredible comedian and writer...if you heard or saw a great sketch there was always a good chance barry was behind it." sarah campbell looks back at his life. # i know a fat old policeman # he's always on our street # a fat and jolly red—faced man...# radio a's i'm sorry i haven't a clue, and barry cryer sings the words of the laughing policeman to the tune of as time goes by. # he never known to frown # and everybody says
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# he's the happiest man in town...# barry cryer seemed a happy fellow too, and a lucky one. i spent my time mainly with people i liked and admired, laughing about something. he'd started young, playing shakespeare's falstaff at school in leeds. down in london, he wrote gags for the drag artist danny la rue, as well as performing himself. an early success was a novelty song which went to number one... ..in finland. # it looks like a purple people eater to me...# there was a comedy panel show on itv. good evening, ladies and gentlemen, welcome tojokers wild, a game in which some of the country's top comedians match wits to see who, if anybody, knows all the jokes. and hello cheeky on tv and radio. he wrote for almost every leading comic, from frankie howerd to spike milligan, dick emery to kenny everett,
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the two ronnies to mike yarwood. when morecambe and wise switched from the bbc to itv, he and john junkin wrote their scripts. we've been so looking forward to working with you! come this way. it's just the same here - as what they are at the bbc. denis norden always says there's a sitter and a pacer, there's someone typing and someone walking about. and i would sit there scribbling or typing, and john would walk around, waggling his glasses. what a lovely audience! where are they? oh, there they are. yes _ never mind, they'll do. i saw them arriving on the coaches. did you really? _ yeah, with their blankets over their heads. - # my short—term memory�*s shot to pieces # and i'll tell you something else # my short—term memory�*s shot to pieces...# he was still performing well into his 80s. a man whose trade was quite simply making people laugh. # ha—ha—ha.# applause
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barry cryer, who's died aged 86. time for a look at the weather. here's a sarah keith—lucas. yesterday you promised some blue sky. there was a blue sky. will there be more? yes, it's a windy night, a breezy day, and the breeze is helping to blow the cloud away so for some others we got blue skies and some sunshine. this was the picture on the isle of man taken by one of our weather watchers. not everywhere, it's a bit cloudier in the far south but in general through the far south but in general through the rest of the day, we are looking at a lot of dry weather, some long spells of sunshine are just a few blustery showers in the forecast as well particularly towards the north and the west. this is the satellite and the west. this is the satellite and radarfrom the past and the west. this is the satellite and radar from the past couple of hours. the showers have been driving in across parts of scotland, northern ireland too. we had this area of cloud around southern counties of england and that slowly
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clearing away but it's going

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