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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 27, 2022 9:00am-10:00am GMT

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this is bbc news, with the latest headlines. covid rules on care homes in england have been eased by the government, allowing unlimited visits from monday. resident campaign groups say they welcome the move. i could actually cry with relief. we've actually been asking our members to write to their mps asking for all visiting restrictions to be lifted because we know that it is definitely safer now. face coverings are no longer mandatory in england from today, but some big retailers ask customers to continue wearing them. prince andrew's lawyers say he's happy to face a trial byjury in new york in the sexual abuse case brought by victoria giuffre.
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he's once again denied all the allegations against him. the wait goes on for sue gray's report on lockdown parties in downing street. borisjohnson says he won't resign over the issue. it's holocaust memorial day — marking 77 years since the liberation of auschwitz—birkenau. seven holocaust survivors have had portraits painted, in a project commissioned by prince charles. hello, good morning, welcome. the government says it's going to ease many of the covid—related restrictions on care homes in england, including scrapping limits on the number of visitors allowed. from monday, there will be no limit on the numbers allowed
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to see their loved ones in care homes, self—isolation periods will be cut, and care homes will only have to follow outbreak management rules for m days, not 28. ministers say restrictions brought in to counter the omicron wave of coronavirus can be relaxed because of the success of the vaccine booster programme. each of the uk nations sets its own rules on care homes, with scotland easing its restrictions last week. the change is the latest rolling back of plan b curbs in england. our social affairs editor alison holtjoins me now. so, before we talk through the exact details of this, my goodness, what a relief for so many people with relatives in care homes. fix, relief for so many people with relatives in care homes. a huge relief. relatives in care homes. a huge relief- this _ relatives in care homes. a huge relief. this has _ relatives in care homes. a huge relief. this has been _ relatives in care homes. a huge relief. this has been an - relatives in care homes. a huge i relief. this has been an increasing bone of contention throughout the pandemic. if you remember at the very start, there were extremely strong restrictions and people were only able to see their relatives at the end of their lives. so the
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families and campaigners have been saying that that did huge damage. whilst the increasing restrictions during the omicron wave were not as drastic as that, you are still allowed four name to people including an essential caregiver. nevertheless, it was an interruption to family life and families felt very strongly that this was having a really deleterious effect on the health and well—being of the people they loved. health and well-being of the people the loved. ., , ., health and well-being of the people the loved. ., ., . they loved. now, you touched upon omicron, they loved. now, you touched upon omicron. i — they loved. now, you touched upon omicron, i wonder— they loved. now, you touched upon omicron, i wonder if— they loved. now, you touched upon omicron, i wonder if there - they loved. now, you touched upon omicron, i wonder if there are - omicron, i wonder if there are people who feel that this is actually too soon? it people who feel that this is actually too soon?- people who feel that this is actually too soon? it is a really difficult balancing _ actually too soon? it is a really difficult balancing act. - actually too soon? it is a really difficult balancing act. when i l actually too soon? it is a really - difficult balancing act. when i have spoken to care providers, i think there is generally a nervousness about when is the right time? but there is also that understanding and desire to try and get life back to some sort of normality for the people living in care homes and staff and families. and easing restrictions as a part of that. they
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also say they tend to reflect what is going on in the community. so if cases are high in the community, then they are more likely to get them in the care home. and it may be that there are decisions made locally which reflect those situations.— locally which reflect those situations. �* ., �* . , locally which reflect those situations. �* ., �* ., , ~ ., situations. but we don't really know et. so i situations. but we don't really know yet. so i wonder, _ situations. but we don't really know yet. so i wonder, i— situations. but we don't really know yet. so i wonder, itouched- situations. but we don't really know yet. so i wonder, i touched upon i yet. so i wonder, i touched upon some of the restrictions that are being lifted. talk us through what are the restrictions lifted, what are the restrictions lifted, what are the restrictions that do actually still remain?- are the restrictions that do actually still remain? ok, so the ke one actually still remain? ok, so the key one is _ actually still remain? ok, so the key one is that _ actually still remain? ok, so the key one is that care _ actually still remain? ok, so the key one is that care home - actually still remain? ok, so the i key one is that care home residents will from one day be able to have an unlimited number of visitors. at the moment, as i said a moment ago, they are restricted to four people including an essential caregiver, thatis including an essential caregiver, that is completely lifted. if they go on a day trip out, they won't now have to take a test when they get back or self—isolate. patients returning to a home from hospital, at the moment, they have to
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self—isolate for 14 days. that will be cut to ten days and testing can also be introduced to see basically how they are doing during that period of time. and one of the key things is that at the moment when a care home has an outbreak of covid and an outbreak is counted as two people testing positive whether they are residents or staff, that means that the home closes its doors for 28 days. that is being reduced to 14 days. that will please a lot of people because certainly, i have had a lot of families and some care providers and staff complaining about the length of that isolation period. about the length of that isolation eriod. �* ., ~ , about the length of that isolation eriod. �* . ~ , ., period. and talk us through the situation when _ period. and talk us through the situation when it _ period. and talk us through the situation when it comes - period. and talk us through the situation when it comes to - situation when it comes to vaccinations. because the government is saying a high proportion of residents have been vaccinated, but what about when it comes to the actual workers? 50 what about when it comes to the actual workers?— what about when it comes to the actual workers? so there has been this ongoing _ actual workers? so there has been this ongoing drive _ actual workers? so there has been this ongoing drive to _ actual workers? so there has been this ongoing drive to make - actual workers? so there has been this ongoing drive to make sure i actual workers? so there has been i this ongoing drive to make sure that care home workers are fully
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vaccinated. back in november, it became mandatory for anyone working in care homes to be double—vaccinated. and one of the interesting things about that, it is an ongoing debate. we see it now with the nhs and with home care about how effective mandatory vaccination is. one of the big issues has been in care homes that they feel that they have lost staff because of that, staff who didn't want to have the vaccine. and that is at a time when there are already staff shortages in the care sector and it is difficult to recruit people because pay tends to be low, supermarkets are often offering much more for one hour than a care home offers. so there are lots of issues still around vaccinations. but overall, staff vaccinations are high and resident vaccinations are high in care homes. {lila and resident vaccinations are high in care homes-— and resident vaccinations are high in care homes. ok, alison, thanks very much — in care homes. ok, alison, thanks very much for— in care homes. ok, alison, thanks very much for talking _ in care homes. ok, alison, thanks
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very much for talking us _ in care homes. ok, alison, thanks very much for talking us through l very much for talking us through that, alison holt, our social affairs editor, thank you, and we are hoping to speak to the chair of the national care association to get their reaction to this. this care home rule relaxation comes as face coverings are no longer legally required in england after covid rules were eased. but some shops — including john lewis and sainsbury�*s — and many transport providers have said they'll still ask customers to wear masks, as a courtesy to others. here's our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith. you no longer have to wear a mask in shops, restaurants or on public transport in england. but today's relaxation of the rules once again leaves customers facing the conundrum of different requests, depending on where they are. john lewis said it would be suggesting shoppers wear masks, and sainsbury�*s said they would keep signs up and still make announcements, urging staff and customers to use them. but morrisons don't go as far, simply saying it will be complying with government regulations.
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and currys says it will ask staff, but not customers, to wear a mask. face coverings will still be needed on trains and buses in london, while other rail operators are hoping passengers still wear them. we'll be relying on people doing the right thing, and we're confident thatjust before masks became mandatory again, and like it was last summer, people will want to do the right thing. they'll follow the government's advice and they'll wear a face covering where it's busy, or they're indoors. face coverings are still mandatory when shopping in northern ireland, scotland and wales. colletta smith, bbc news. that is face coverings, let's go back to the, saying italy's covid related restrictions in care homes in england. like a promise, we will speak to nadra ahmed. executive chair of the national care association — which represents small and medium sized care providers. your initial reaction, are you
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relieved and welcoming of this decision? i relieved and welcoming of this decision? ~ , relieved and welcoming of this decision? ~' , ., decision? i think there will be a lot of nervousness _ decision? i think there will be a lot of nervousness around - decision? i think there will be a - lot of nervousness around certainly within the care sector, but it is something that we knew would be coming and in the interest of the people we care for and their well—being, we do welcome it. i think it is all the logistics around its that will be causing a little bit of a headache as providers are waking up to it this morning. let’s waking up to it this morning. let's talk about the _ waking up to it this morning. let's talk about the logistics _ waking up to it this morning. let's talk about the logistics because this, in theory, should be taking place from monday, is that enough time to get something like this in place? time to get something like this in lace? ~ , ., time to get something like this in lace? . , ., , time to get something like this in lace? ~ , . , ., place? well, it is a little bit more time than we _ place? well, it is a little bit more time than we had _ place? well, it is a little bit more time than we had less _ place? well, it is a little bit more time than we had less time - place? well, it is a little bit more time than we had less time to - place? well, it is a little bit more time than we had less time to tryi place? well, it is a little bit more i time than we had less time to try to do this. we will have to make it work, it is never going to be enough time because we haven't got the right number of staff available at the moment, we have still got shortages in a macro to over 50% of services in outbreak, which is why we can't support the nhs by taking discharges in —— shortages in staff.
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facilitating visits, we need to be absolutely clear these are time—consuming and when you have a lot of people wanting to come through at the same time, we are going to have to limit the number of people coming into the services and we are going to have to manage all of that, it is a full—time job now in a care home to try and make sure we can make the booking is and get the testing. and then of course, the cleaning of the services afterwards. so this is going to be something that people will have to vamp up to and we have got to remember that the variant is still out there. we understand why this needs to happen, but we also need to be very clear that the safety of our residents and our staff is paramount, but the that the safety of our residents and our staff is of ramount, but the that the safety of our residents and our staff is of the ount, but the that the safety of our residents and
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our staff is of the residents the that the safety of our residents and our staff is of the residentst have are going to be exposed. we have insurance issues, we need to think about all of that. so there is a lot of nervousness. some providers are saying we are going to have to think about this very carefully because we are already in an outbreak and how we make this work. but the vast
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majority are saying they do understand that this needs to happen and they can see all the benefits of people, once they have had a visit from a loved one, and there will be people that they haven't seen for a long, long time now. months and months and months. who will be able to come. families are going to have to come. families are going to have to work with us because they are going to also have to agree between themselves about the prioritisation of how we make this happen. so again, it seems like a bit of an onus on families themselves as well to take some leadership in this. but when you talk to the patients, the most vulnerable within our community, there must be nervousness, but a sense of relief? absolutely. nothing can take away from the fact, and it is a fact, that seeing your loved one when you are in a setting like this, and this is two years in. in out, in out. we have a real challenge here for the way we have operated prior to this,
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people came and went at will. it was a lovely environment to come and visit loved ones. so for the individual who is in our settings, this is, this has got to be a moment of relief, absolutely, there is no doubt about it.— of relief, absolutely, there is no doubt about it. ok, thanks so much for coming — doubt about it. ok, thanks so much for coming on _ doubt about it. ok, thanks so much for coming on so _ doubt about it. ok, thanks so much for coming on so quickly _ doubt about it. ok, thanks so much for coming on so quickly and - doubt about it. ok, thanks so much for coming on so quickly and giving | for coming on so quickly and giving your reaction, nadra ahmed, executive chair of the national care association. what's more details on our website as well. the duke of york has denied being a close friend of the convicted sex trafficker ghislaine maxwell, in a legal response to the woman who's suing him in the us for sexual assault. the ii—page document says the prince wants the claims brought by virginia giuffre to be heard by a jury in new york. she alleges that he assaulted her when she was 17, at homes owned by maxwell and the paedophilejeffrey epstein, something prince andrew has consistently denied. our royal correspondent
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nicholas witchell has more details. across 11 pages, andrew's lawyers have set out his defence, a denial of the central allegation of sexual abuse made by virginia giuffre, and an assertion in respect of others that andrew lacks sufficient information to either admit or deny what's been claimed. he says, for example, in relation to the widely publicised picture of the two of them, that he doesn't have enough information to admit or deny that there exists photographic evidence of his alleged meeting with miss giuffre. elsewhere, his lawyers assert that virginia giuffre's civil complaint should be dismissed, because she's a permanent resident of australia, and not domiciled in the united states. and they say this. "giuffre's alleged causes of action are barred, in whole or in part, by her own wrongful conduct." finally, they demand this. "prince andrew hereby demands a trial byjury on all causes of action asserted in the complaint."
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all of which suggests that andrew is determined to fight it out in court. though lawyers say this doesn't preclude an out—of—court settlement. you can certainly have a settlement further down the road, and it wouldn't shock me at all, between now and a trial, to see something like that happen, you know. and sometimes, though, there are cases where no amount of money will make them go away. there are times when, again, you know, a victim wants their day in court. and that certainly seems to be virginia giuffre's intention. her lawyer has said they look forward to confronting prince andrew with his denials and his attempts to blame ms giuffre for her own abuse at the trial. nicholas witchell, bbc news. speaking to the bbc earlier, legal commentator and lawyer joshua rozenberg explained more about the ii—page court document where prince andrew's legal team set out the response to ms giuffre's allegations. so, what you've really got here is prince andrew
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saying, "bring it on. you want a jury trial? i want a jury trial. you want to bring these claims? well, in that case, you have to prove everything that you're saying, because i'm not going to admit to anything." we're not familiar with jury trials in civil cases and, don't forget, this is a civil claim. we're not familiar with that in the united kingdom any more, but in the united states, it's fairly common. of course, it doesn't mean that there will be a trial. this case may settle at any time, even at the door of the court. but nevertheless, the prince is saying that he denies everything and he is putting virginia giuffre to proof in saying that she has to prove all the allegations against him. he denies sexual abuse. he denies refusing to cooperate with us investigators. he denies that he first metjeffrey epstein through ghislaine maxwell. he admits he was on epstein's private plane, stayed at epstein's private island, and his homes in palm beach
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and new york, but denies sexually abusing giuffre at epstein's home in new york. and he denies threats to giuffre. he denies he even knew giuffre's age. he denies causing her significant emotional distress and harm. and then we come onto these 11 defences he puts forward. the first one, i think the most important one, is lack ofjurisdiction. he says that she is a permanent resident of australia. she is not domiciled in the us state of colorado and, therefore, she doesn't have the right to bring this claim in the united states. he then repeats this allegation that she signed a deal withjeffrey epstein for half $1 million in 2009 and, therefore, she has waived her right to sue. and he lists a number of other defences. delay, consent, what is called unclean hands. claim is barred by her own wrongful conduct. and so he is fighting this
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at every point and in every way. a report into a series of alleged parties at downing street during lockdown is expected to land on the desk of the prime minister today, but it may not be published until next week. the report, by the senior civil servant sue gray, has already prompted a separate inquiry by the metropolitan police. some conservative mps are waiting to read sue gray's findings before deciding whether to try to oust borisjohnson. let's go straight to westminster and our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. adam, the wait continues. yes, we thought we would get this report yesterday, it didn't arrive. the cabinet office is not repeating the phrase from yesterday that it is expected to arrive today. so who knows, frankly, when we will get it? we understand it is pretty much done, just under doing —— undergoing final checks from a legal and hr
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perspective and to make sure it doesn't cut across the police investigation launched into this issue earlier this week. also, then you have got the process around it. because the government is committed to publish the findings. we don't know if that means the whole thing, we have to wait and see for that. also, borisjohnson, the prime minister, said he will go to parliament and adds mps questions. we are running out of time in the parliamentary diary this week for those things to happen which is why some people are speculating it may happen next week. because also, why would the government want to publish the report and leave a few days of space for everyone to make up their own mind without hearing the prime minister's interpretation of it? he says he is getting on with the job, he is on a visit today in the uk and the comet is also announcing changes to the universal credit programme, with the goal of getting half a million people intojobs by the summer, which meant it was the work and pensions secretary therese coffee who had to give the government line on the sue gray report this morning.— report this morning. well, i am conscious _ report this morning. well, i am conscious that _ report this morning. well, i am conscious that people -
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report this morning. well, i am conscious that people do - report this morning. well, i am conscious that people do want. report this morning. well, i am | conscious that people do want to make _ conscious that people do want to make sure — conscious that people do want to make sure that the report is published and the government has said that _ published and the government has said that we intend to publish the full findings of that report. at the same _ full findings of that report. at the same time as the pm said it is entirely— same time as the pm said it is entirely right for the police who have _ entirely right for the police who have chosen to investigate these matters, — have chosen to investigate these matters, i— have chosen to investigate these matters, i hope when they conclude their investigations, that will provide — their investigations, that will provide welcome clarity. but given the ongoing investigation started by the ongoing investigation started by the police, it is not appropriate to, any— the police, it is not appropriate to, any furtherand it is the police, it is not appropriate to, any further and it is not in my hands— to, any further and it is not in my hands when— to, any further and it is not in my hands when the sue gray report will be published, but i confident it will he — be published, but i confident it will be done at the earliest opportunity. so will be done at the earliest opportunity-— will be done at the earliest o- ortuni . . ., opportunity. so at the moment, we are in a very _ opportunity. so at the moment, we are in a very process _ opportunity. so at the moment, we are in a very process led _ opportunity. so at the moment, we are in a very process led phase, - are in a very process led phase, when, what and how customer but as soon as that report lines and the prime minister responds to it, it will be a deeply political phase because that is when the majority of conservative mps will make up their mind about the prime minister's judgment and his position. adam, in the process — judgment and his position. adam, in the process phase, _ judgment and his position. adam, in the process phase, as _ judgment and his position. adam, in the process phase, as always, - judgment and his position. adam, in the process phase, as always, thankj the process phase, as always, thank you so much, our chief political correspondent adam fleming in westminster. and the moment we get
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any more, of course we will bring that to you. now to another big story. the united states has rejected russia's demand to bar ukraine from joining the nato alliance of western powers. moscow made the demand after amassing a huge number of troops on its border with ukraine, although it denies that it is planning to invade. the us said ukraine has a sovereign right to join nato if it chooses to. our correspondent caroline davies is in moscow. so bring us up—to—date on where we are today as tensions remain high. so at the moment, of course, we know the us presented these responses to russia, they were not made public, so we don't know the exact details of what america was suggesting to russia. however, we do know some of the things they have said are completely off the table. it is no massive surprise, they have said there is no way nato's open door policy, the idea that nato would be allowed to have other people join
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including in particular of course ukraine, that is still very much possible. ukraine could join nato in the future, in theory. we know that russia had always said that was a very key part of its demands. back in december, russia presented some draft treaties to america and to nato and it has taken up until now for the us to respond to those draft treaties. now, what we are waiting for next, of course, russia's response to the response will be. we don't have that yet and we don't know when we will definitely get it. earlier, yesterday, we heard from foreign minister lavrov who said if america wanted to have these demands remained private, they would keep them private, but their responses, whatever their reaction would be, would honestly be more public. he also said once he got those responses, they would take them where they would consider them and they would present what they thought was the option to president putin about what to do next. that is of course what everyone is waiting to hear about and whether or not russia
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feels like it has got enough from the us proposals to feel like it can stop and decide not to escalate the situation any further. as you say, russia always adamant that they were never going to intervene, they were never going to intervene, they were never going to invade ukraine. whether or not the situation will further disc —— de escalate, we are waiting to hear. further disc -- de escalate, we are waiting to hear.— further disc -- de escalate, we are waiting to hear. caroline, thank you for bringing — waiting to hear. caroline, thank you for bringing us _ waiting to hear. caroline, thank you for bringing us up-to-date, - waiting to hear. caroline, thank you for bringing us up-to-date, we - waiting to hear. caroline, thank you for bringing us up-to-date, we will| for bringing us up—to—date, we will be back with you as and when we get more. from moscow, thank you. car production fell to its lowest level since 1956 last year, according to the latest figures. the society of motor manufacturers and traders blamed covid disruption — particularly a lack of silicon chips and staff shortages — but said new investment in electric vehicles gives some ground for optimism. our business correspondent theo leggett is here. i touched upon a few of those reasons, why is that situation so bad? , ., a, .,
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bad? even the society of motor manufacturers _ bad? even the society of motor manufacturers and _ bad? even the society of motor manufacturers and traders - bad? even the society of motor manufacturers and traders has| bad? even the society of motor - manufacturers and traders has said these figures were dismal and it was a miserable year last year and it is easy to see why. in 2020, we had the first waves of covert and there were lockdowns, factories had to shut. so when the figures were bad, that year, it was understandable. people hoped there would be a good recovery, it didn't happen because we started to suffer from the knock—on effects of covid. car is now a day rely on a steady supply of computer chips, there are 1,500 to 3,000 computer chips in a modern car to power all sorts of complex systems like the abs braking, navigation systems, engine management systems, all that sort of thing, you need computer chips. but the supply of chips was interrupted, there were not enough coming from factories in east asia and the car industry was also fighting competition from the consumer electronics industry, which did very well during lockdown when everybody was at home and wanted new devices or new computers to work with. so that was a major factor. on top of
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that, you probably remember the pingdemic when people were forced to stay at home because they had been pinged by that covid app, that had an effect is welcome and we had the closure of honda's plant in swindon which took out a fair amount of production. all of that put together amounted to a very bad year indeed for the uk car industry. the pingdemic. _ for the uk car industry. the pingdemic, thank— for the uk car industry. the pingdemic, thank you for reminding us of that, you forget that. that pingdemic, thank you for reminding us of that, you forget that.- us of that, you forget that. that is the gloom. _ us of that, you forget that. that is the gloom. give — us of that, you forget that. that is the gloom, give us— us of that, you forget that. that is the gloom, give us some - us of that, you forget that. that is i the gloom, give us some optimism. us of that, you forget that. that is - the gloom, give us some optimism. £5 billion worth of new investment was committed last year. we had for example the owner of vauxhall saying it would build electric vans at its plant in ellesmere port, we had the announcement of new investment in a giga factory to produce batteries by the nissan plant in sunderland, so new money is coming in and the reason is the uncertainty hanging over the uk car industry since 2015, 2016 because of covid —— brexit has been taken away because of the brexit deal so car makers are looking at the uk and the potential
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for electric car production and battery production. last week, the gum put £100 million into the development of a new giger factory to produce batteries in blyth in northumberland. all of this put together says there is a reason for optimism, but the uk has a lot of catching up to do.— optimism, but the uk has a lot of catching up to do. let's leave it on an optimistic— catching up to do. let's leave it on an optimistic note. _ catching up to do. let's leave it on an optimistic note. as _ catching up to do. let's leave it on an optimistic note. as always, - catching up to do. let's leave it on l an optimistic note. as always, thank you for —— thank you. it's holocaust memorial day today, marking 77 years since the liberation of the nazi death camp at auschwitz—birkenau — although the day is for the victims of all genocides. seven holocaust survivors have had their portraits painted by different artists, in a special project commissioned by prince charles. our royal correspondent daniela relph has more.
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his right hand let —— rests on his left arm, the hand that bears the number he was marked on at auschwitz. creating a gallery of holocaust survivors, the bbc has been following the project. covid made things unconventional for the artist. i made things unconventional for the artist. , ., ., , artist. i started to paint his ortrait artist. i started to paint his portrait incompletely - artist. i started to paint his i portrait incompletely opposite process. as normal.— portrait incompletely opposite process. as normal. should have ainted process. as normal. should have painted me _ process. as normal. should have painted me when _ process. as normal. should have painted me when i _ process. as normal. should have painted me when i had _ process. as normal. should have painted me when i had hair! - process. as normal. should have| painted me when i had hair! yes, that was a _ painted me when i had hair! yes, that was a while _ painted me when i had hair! yes, that was a while ago! _ painted me when i had hair! yes, that was a while ago! we - painted me when i had hair! yes, that was a while ago! we had - painted me when i had hair! yes, l that was a while ago! we had three virtual sittings. _ that was a while ago! we had three virtual sittings. how _ that was a while ago! we had three virtual sittings. how do _ that was a while ago! we had three virtual sittings. how do you - that was a while ago! we had three virtual sittings. how do you feel? l virtual sittings. how do you feel? 0k. it virtual sittings. how do you feel? ok. it was a very challenging experience. ok. it was a very challenging exoerience-_ ok. it was a very challenging exerience. ., , ., experience. your book. months later came a real-life _ experience. your book. months later came a real-life meet _ experience. your book. months later came a real-life meet up _ experience. your book. months later came a real-life meet up as - experience. your book. months later came a real-life meet up as he - came a real—life meet up as he shared his story. came a real-life meet up as he shared his story.— came a real-life meet up as he shared his story. that is the first cam -. 11 shared his story. that is the first camp- 11 years — shared his story. that is the first camp. 11 years old, _ shared his story. that is the first camp. 11 years old, i— shared his story. that is the first camp. 11 years old, i was - shared his story. that is the first. camp. 11 years old, i was committed 11 camp. 11 years old, i was committed ii years— camp. 11 years old, i was committed ii years old~ — camp. 11 years old, i was committed 11 years old. that is auschwitz.
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that _ 11 years old. that is auschwitz. that is — 11 years old. that is auschwitz. that is where we got our number. on the arm _ that is where we got our number. on the arm. these are children who survived — the arm. these are children who survived at— the arm. these are children who survived at auschwitz. he the arm. these are children who survived at auschwitz.— the arm. these are children who survived at auschwitz. he was one of those survivors. _ survived at auschwitz. he was one of those survivors, but _ survived at auschwitz. he was one of those survivors, but the _ survived at auschwitz. he was one of those survivors, but the rest - survived at auschwitz. he was one of those survivors, but the rest of- survived at auschwitz. he was one of those survivors, but the rest of his i those survivors, but the rest of his family, but his older sister, never reached liberation. they were some of the 6 millionjews killed in the auschwitz. this week, he met the prince of wales, who commissioned the project. prince of wales, who commissioned the ro'ect. ., prince of wales, who commissioned the ro'ect. . , prince of wales, who commissioned the project-— the pro'ect. that is fantastic. i felt the project. that is fantastic. i felt we owed _ the project. that is fantastic. i felt we owed it _ the project. that is fantastic. i felt we owed it to _ the project. that is fantastic. i felt we owed it to these - the project. that is fantastic. i- felt we owed it to these remarkable people _ felt we owed it to these remarkable people just to remember them in this way. people just to remember them in this wav there _ people just to remember them in this way. there is something very special about— way. there is something very special about the _ way. there is something very special about the portrait and about the artist's — about the portrait and about the artist's i — about the portrait and about the artist's i in — about the portrait and about the artist's i in bringing out the real underlining character, personality and meaning of the person who is sitting _ and meaning of the person who is sitting for— and meaning of the person who is sitting for the portrait. the connection _ sitting for the portrait. the connection between - sitting for the portrait. tue: connection between artists sitting for the portrait. tts: connection between artists and survivors has been strong. the
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pictures reflect both loss and survival. , ., , ., ., survival. these portraits go to the heart of their— survival. these portraits go to the heart of their individuality - survival. these portraits go to the heart of their individuality and - heart of their individuality and their— heart of their individuality and their humanity. _ heart of their individuality and their humanity. what - heart of their individuality and their humanity. what better. heart of their individuality and . their humanity. what better way heart of their individuality and - their humanity. what better way of rejecting _ their humanity. what better way of rejecting that — their humanity. what better way of rejecting that kind _ their humanity. what better way of rejecting that kind of— their humanity. what better way of rejecting that kind of philosophy. rejecting that kind of philosophy that led — rejecting that kind of philosophy that led to — rejecting that kind of philosophy that led to the _ rejecting that kind of philosophy that led to the holocaust - rejecting that kind of philosophy that led to the holocaust and i that led to the holocaust and honouring _ that led to the holocaust and honouring survivors - that led to the holocaust and honouring survivors than - that led to the holocaust and honouring survivors than thisj honouring survivors than this project? _ honouring survivors than this ro'ect? ., , , , project? the reality is, this extraordinary _ project? the reality is, this extraordinary group - project? the reality is, this extraordinary group of - project? the reality is, this i extraordinary group of people project? the reality is, this - extraordinary group of people are now growing smaller every year, but the power of their testimony forms a lasting memory. bbc news, the queen's gallery at buckingham palace. you can watch that special documentary on bbc two at nine o'clock tonight. it's called "survivors: portraits of the holocaust". now it's time for a look at the weather, let's cross the newsroom to matt taylor. what kind of a day is it, chilly in the morning when i woke up at a ridiculous hour. a bit it was, not a bad day today, a
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bit gloomy for one or two spots especially in the south, a few showers across scotland right now, but for most, dry and bright day with plenty of sunshine around. there is the cloud that brought the gloomy start with patchy rain and drizzle. southern counties, confined to the channel islands, west cornwall, isles of scilly, showers and north—west england, but the bulk of the showers in north—west scotland, wintry over the hills, cold day across shetland and orkney but nowhere near as windy as our site. milderfurther south, a big difference to of late. tonight with light winds and clear skies and mist and fog patches, southern counties of england and wales, clouding over towards the west later, that stops the temperature dropping too much. scotland england and wales away from the city centres, a frosty but sunny start friday morning. mist and fog patches slowly clearing. after that bright start, cloud increases from the north and west which could produce light rain and drizzle across western areas, the bulk of the rain and strongest winds in the northern half of scotland,
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particularly in the morning, and temperatures rising through the day to take us into a pretty mild night well. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... covid rules on care homes in england have been eased by the government, allowing unlimited visits from monday. resident campaign groups say they welcome the move. i could actually cry with relief. we've actually been asking our members to write to their mps asking for all visiting restrictions to be lifted because we know that it is definitely safer now. face coverings are no longer mandatory in england from today, but some big retailers ask customers to continue wearing them. prince andrew's lawyers say he's happy to face a trial byjury in new york in the sexual abuse case brought by virginia giuffre. he's once again denied all the allegations against him.
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the wait goes on for sue gray's report on lockdown parties in downing street — borisjohnson says he won't resign over the issue. it's holocaust memorial day, marking 77 years since the liberation of auschwitz—birkenau. seven holocaust survivors have had portraits painted in a project commissioned by prince charles. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's mike bushell. good morning. england were rueing dropped catches and missed chances on the first day of the one—off test match, which they must win to stay in the women's ashes series. they did make a bright start in canberra. after winning the toss and putting australia into bat, katherine brunt struck early on, removing alyssa healey here for nought — she and nat sciver took three wickets apiece
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on the opening day. the tourists were in trouble at a3—3, but they dug in and recovered well, let off the hook at times by england's fielders. heather knight dropping australia's captain, meg lanning, when she was on 1a, and she went onto make 93, helping her team build a big score. they were 327—7 at the close. england's men are behind again in their t20 series in the west indies after defeat in barbados. rovman powell did most of the damage, hitting a magnificent 107 offjust 53 balls, punishing england's bowlers as he recorded his first t20 century. a 73 from tom banton was one of the few highlights of the reply, the tourists' much—changed line—up failing to impress, and they fell 20 runs short of their target. the west indies lead the series 2—1 and they meet again on saturday. ash barty is back on court at the australian open, as she bids to win her home grand slam for the first time. she's playing madison keys for a place in the final. and she made the best
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possible start, breaking the american in the first game. she took the opening set 6—1 and it is going with surface so far in the second. —— with serve. two finals in as many days proved just too much for britain's alfie hewett, as hejust missed out on a second title at the australian open. remember, he'd already won the wheelchair doubles with gordon reid — a record ninth consecutive grand slam crown for the pair. but he lost the singles final in three sets to the top seed and paralympic champion, shingo kunieda, who won his 47th grand slam title. it's the 11th time he's been crowned australian open singles champion. hewett saying he was exhausted and had nothing left in the tank. right now i'm not going to lie to you, i'm pretty exhausted. it was about 30 degrees with a lot of humility today so i found it very challenging to get out there after yesterday's hi but i'm ready to rock and roll and get home now. it has
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been a great trip and i can look back and feel very positive about it. scottish premiership leaders rangers were in danger of dropping points for the second game in a row, but scott arfield came to the rescue. he scored the only goal of the game at home to lowly livingston in the 75th minute. that kept them four points clear of celtic, who survived a scare at hearts. they were 2—0 up, reo hatate with a brilliant opening goal. liam boyce got one back for hearts and he could have equalised from the penalty spot, but he hit the post and it finished 2—1 to celtic. chelsea women's manager emma hayes has demanded more goals from erin cuthbert, after she helped them to victory over west ham. she scored the second in a 2—0 win that takes them to within a point of arsenal at the top of the table, and hayes described cuthbert as a "warrior", but said she doesn't score enough goals for the number of chances she has. he's the top scorer in the premier league and mohamed salah has taken egypt into the quarter—finals of the africa cup of nations.
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the liverpool striker scored the winning penalty as they beat ivory coast 5—4 on spot kicks, after the match had finished goalless. egypt will face morocco on sunday. the day's other game also went to penalties after no goals in normal time. equitorial guniea beating mali, falaye sacko missing the all important kick. that's all the sport for now. great to see you, thank you. unemployed workers on universal credit will have just four weeks to find a job in their preferred sector under the government's new �*way to work�* campaign. after that period, if they fail to make what's described as �*reasonable efforts' to secure a role outside of their chosen sector, or if they turn down any offer, they will have part of their universal credit payment withdrawn. alison mcgovern is labour's shadow
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minister for employment. i know you are not happy with this but we do have the government saying they are hoping that this will get half a million people looking for work into work.— half a million people looking for work into work. they seem to be ho - in: work into work. they seem to be hoinr a work into work. they seem to be hoping a lot _ work into work. they seem to be hoping a lot of— work into work. they seem to be hoping a lot of things _ work into work. they seem to be hoping a lot of things and - hoping a lot of things and delivering very little. we know the government's flagship kick—start scheme which was supposed to help a quarter of a million young people had failed to do that and helped barely half of that so my main problem with this is worrying that it is not going to work. meanwhile, businesses are crying out for staff. we don't have an unemployment crisis but a vacancy is a crisis and ijust think all of the government schemes seem to be failing to put that they need to think differently about how we help people move on and up in work and that means getting to the fundamental challenges that are stopping people getting the jobs they want at the moment to put it
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looking at a vacancy gap 1.22 million between september and november last year. hagar million between september and november last year.— million between september and november last year. how do you su: est november last year. how do you suggest that _ november last year. how do you suggest that it — november last year. how do you suggest that it would _ november last year. how do you suggest that it would help - november last year. how do you suggest that it would help to - november last year. how do you j suggest that it would help to get people into work?— people into work? actually, the government _ people into work? actually, the government commissioned - people into work? actually, the government commissioned a i people into work? actually, the - government commissioned a report themselves on this question which said that things like lack of public transport in a lot of parts of the country, the child care crisis and theissues country, the child care crisis and the issues with social care, people have caring responsibilities that mean they have a limited choice of jobs and that is what is holding people back. it i was a minister in the department for work and pensions tomorrow, i would the department for work and pensions tomorrow, iwould be the department for work and pensions tomorrow, i would be working across government to deal with those things, to work with a business so we can actually make the apprenticeships levy, another failing scheme, work properly so we can get people skills as well put that you have to get to the heart of the problem, notjust announced initiatives that fail to deliver anything in some sort of an attempt to distract people from what is going on with the prime minister.
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this way to work scheme, and we will come onto the prime minister in a moment, but the scheme is widening claimants�* job option but i wonder what your issue with that is? tia what your issue with that is? no issue what your issue with that is? th? issue with people having different options and in fact i would like to see work coaches in job centres having a lot more support options that they could share with people and that would help people. as i have said, some of the fundamental challenges that are stopping people doing thejob challenges that are stopping people doing the job they can have been there for a long time point at the office for budget responsibility told us that one in five people in the uk labour market are working below their skill level so this is not just a below their skill level so this is notjust a challenge what dwp does, it is about dealing with issues like skills and that kind of thing to help people be able to work in the best possible job they can and i just don�*t think that yet another initiative announced by the dwp is
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going to work. there are other schemes haven�*t worked and i would like to see more evidence that they have learnt the lessons of what has gone on in the past couple of years. you touched on the prime minister and talked about the announcement being to do with trying to save his position and we are obviously waiting for the sue gray report but i wonder if i could get your perspective on that, what you are hoping to see and if you have any insight as to when we will get it? unfortunately, i have no insight at all and we keep expecting in the house of commons for any minister to come and answer questions properly on this point it has been an absolute pantomime over the past couple of weeks. we have had junior ministers sent in without being able to answer a single question and then the prime minister at pmqs claiming that he can�*t answer questions about parties he was or maybe he wasn�*t at. it is quite ridiculous and it is holding up the business of government on important things we need to crack on with and ijust
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wish that the prime minister would come clean, tell us the truth about what happened and take responsibility for it. how hard is that really? irate responsibility for it. how hard is that really?— that really? we will continue to wait for the _ that really? we will continue to wait for the report. _ that really? we will continue to wait for the report. alison - wait for the report. alison mcgovern, thank you forjoining us. more on coronavirus, and there�*s a deadline looming forfrontline nhs staff in england who are not yet vaccinated against covid. they�*ve gotjust one week left to get their firstjab or face losing theirjobs. the health secretary has said it�*s their professional duty to be fully vaccinated but some people in the health service have called for the policy to be reconsidered. our health reporter jim reed has more. amy is an occupational therapist, often working with the elderly and physically disabled. she has, though, decided not to be vaccinated against covid. i would say that each person has to weigh up the pros and cons for themselves. what would you say to people who think, if you work
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with vulnerable people in a health care setting, you have a responsibility to be vaccinated yourself, to protect other people? but you can still get, even with three vaccines, you can still get covid, you can still spread it. and the other thing is, wearing ppe, personal protective equipment, protects the vulnerable people. and you�*re prepared to to lose yourjob rather than get vaccinated at the moment? yes, i don�*t want to lose myjob. i love myjob. i respect the nhs, but i�*m very much a supporter of choice. amy is one of two million in england covered by new rules on compulsory vaccination. that already includes half a million care home workers, who had to have their second jab by last november. next week, another 1.7 million in front line health care will need to have their first dose. that includes nhs staff and other jobs, like gps and dentists.
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the latest figures suggest 95% of nhs workers are already vaccinated, leaving around 77,000 who haven�*t yet had a firstjab. i think the scientific evidence is so overwhelming. many others working in health care support the principle of mandatory vaccination. if a patient comes to me and says, "should i have the vaccine? "have you been vaccinated, doctor?" that answer should always be, "yes, of course i've been vaccinated, "and you should, too." there is no wriggle room, ethically, for a doctor or a nurse, or anybody, talking to patients about whether they should be vaccinated themselves or not. so your message would be, get the vaccine if you want to stay in a job? i think the evidence, the evidence is overwhelming. i�*ve been working on covid icu since the beginning. i have not had a vaccination. i do not want to have a vaccination. the debate, though, is becoming more heated as the deadline looms. this clip of a doctor challenging the health secretary on the policy
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has been viewed more than a million times on social media. the government says doctors, nurses and other front line health staff look after the most vulnerable, who could face serious consequences if they catch the virus. and nhs health chiefs say staff have a duty to make sure they�*re protected. anne—marie is unvaccinated but works in admin, not with patients. she was sent this letter saying there was no record of her having a jab, and telling her to contact her manager. i was left for two weeks, actually, sort of worrying about the letter, and worrying about the conversation that i was going to have to have. she has now been told the new rule won�*t apply in her role, but she�*s still worried about the impact on the health service. if those staff are forced to leave the nhs, not only will you lose those staff, you�*ll be leaving behind a lot of people who are demoralised and a lot of teams will be divided. last weekend, health care workers
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joined this wider protest against compulsory vaccination. other nhs staff firmly support the policy. with just a week to go, ministers now say they will reflect on the latest evidence, but the need to protect patients remains unchanged. jim reed, bbc news. the deputy chief executive of the nhs confederation this morning encouraged staff to come forward to getjabbed the position we are in the government consulted on making the vaccine mandatory beyond care homes, where it was already mandatory from november, the majority of nhs leaders believe there were real benefits in terms of requiring health staff to be vaccinated. they believe that in terms of public confidence, they believe that in terms of protecting the service, protecting individuals and above
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all, protecting patients. they see real benefits to the health service in terms of the mentation of vaccine and that is the decision the government have made. and alongside that, the nhs already insists, the government already insists on vaccination or immunity against a whole host of other conditions in order to protect patients and those things are not left to individual judgment, they are made as decisions about standards and safety standards in particular. clearly, implementing this particular safety standard, there will be people who choose not to comply with it, that is their choice, but unfortunately, we will lose them and that may well have impact in some areas on some services but they view the government have taken is that there are very clear benefits, very clear benefits to health staff and social care staff from being vaccinated at the moment. care staff from being vaccinated at the moment-— care staff from being vaccinated at the moment. . _, ., .,
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the moment. that encouragement from the moment. that encouragement from the deu the moment. that encouragement from the deputy chief— the moment. that encouragement from the deputy chief of— the moment. that encouragement from the deputy chief of the _ the moment. that encouragement from the deputy chief of the nhs _ the deputy chief of the nhs confederation. it�*s been six months since the taliban swept to power across afghanistan, after decades of war. the economy is close to collapse, millions face starvation and the former allies of osama bin laden now face a new terror threat of their own — large scale attacks by islamic state in the khorasan, or isk. this report is from yalda hakim, who has travelled to sangin in helmand province, a small village 600 kilometres south of the capital, kabul. it was one of the deadliest places for british and american forces, and their afghan allies. the road to sangin in helmand province was once littered with roadside bombs. now there is relative calm. our taliban escort says this highway was hell for american marines and british troops. abdulkarim laid mines. he is responsible for the killing of hundreds of coalition
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forces and civilians. translation: when the people saw that they were dropping bombs - on us and killing us, they stood against them. all the people helped. even when i was planting mines, children around ten years old helped me. when i asked him to clarify if the children were forced, he insists they were not. no, they were in tears and said, "dad, we are members of the resistance." many families fled during the years of fighting. translation: a bullet went | through the wall and hit here. the bullets were fired incessantly. mohammed sherali has now returned with his children to rebuild their lives. everything is expensive now. i cannot even afford cooking oil and bread.
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people learn to get by but everyone is happy that foreign forces have left here. people genuinely felt occupied by the foreign forces and the former government, and this is what they have left behind. homes destroyed. and this is the price of freedom that these people say they have had to pay. in the conservative heartland of sangin, the taliban in power may be welcome. but in many parts of the country, afghans continue to pay a heavy price. the economy is close to collapse, poverty and hunger are affecting millions. across the country, the taliban are intimidating and crushing dissent. and this one—time terror organisation is dealing with a terror threat of its own. islamic state in the khorasan,
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or isk, has launched a string of large—scale attacks across afghanistan in recent months. we have been called here by the taliban police who wanted to show us an isis sleeper cell that they recently attacked. translation: in all parts of the world, these kinds l of incidents are seen, _ even the place where you can see the safest place in the world. i mean united states, new york, britain, even in those places, - incidents such as these happen. the taliban is trying to make afghanistan the safest - country in the world. despite abdulkarim�*s assurances, members of the shia community say they don�*t feel protected by the taliban. they continue to be targeted by is—k. in october, a suicide bombing of a shi�*ite mosque in kandahar claimed the lives of 50 worshippers.
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aisha�*s husband was killed. translation: what should i do now? i no longer have him. my partner has gone. i feel completely devastated. the family now face an uncertain future. translation: it was rumoured - that the schools were being bombed. my children were very scared. i tell them to go to school and they say no. they were meant to protect us and then a bomb went off. is that what you call protection, bombing ordinary people? afghanistan is a nation shattered by decades of war. sanctions on the new regime are biting hard. as the humanitarian crisis deepens and violence continues, the taliban are struggling to even begin rebuilding this fragile country. yalda hakim, bbc news, afghanistan.
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british aid has arrived in tonga 11 days after an under—sea volcanic eruption and tsunami devastated entire islands and villages. bottled water, first aid kits, ppe and baby products were taken off a royal navy patrol ship, to protect the pacific island nation from the pandemic. a year ago today, a small fishing boat called �*nicola faith�* left its home port of conwy in search of whelks off the north wales coast. the three crew on board would never be seen alive again. now the families of those men — alan minard, ross ballantine and carl mcgrath — are working with the lifeboat service to improve safety at sea. chris dearden went to meet them. man overboard. this is only a training course, but next time it might be for real. these men and women work as fishing
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crews around the coast of wales, and they�*ve come to fleetwood in lancashire to be shown how to survive if they find themselves in rough waters. a lot easier with a life jacket on? a lot easier. how was it the first - time round without one? hard work. did you expect it to be as hard? yeah, because there�*s a lot of weighty gear on. but i didn�*t expect it to be that hard, to be honest. you can relax a lot more, i you can breathe and you can just float around. just shows how well these life jackets actually work. i wouldn't like to be in the water without one anyway. and watching are six people who know what it�*s like when things go wrong at sea. these are the family members who were left behind when the fishing boat nicola faith sank off colwyn bay on january 27th last year. on board were skipper carl mcgrath, ross ballantine and alan minard. their families have spent the last year supporting each other, and now they�*re working with the lifeboat service to tell their story as part of the training course.
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it was ross, it was our brother. he�*s got two sons. we want them to grow up and see that we are doing something positive, and in his name and in all of the men�*s names. we really have to show that it�*s real lives and devastating families who were left behind. once they go, they�*re gone. but it�*s the people who are stood here today, who have got to live with it for the rest of their lives. and they say it�*s made it an emotional and difficult year. none of the families knew each other until they found themselves outside llandudno lifeboat station waiting for news of the search. the men�*s bodies weren�*t found for over six weeks. their relatives raised money for extra searches, so the wreck of the boat could also be found. and now money left over from that appeal will go to support the work of the lifeboat service. in this instance, we formed a really deep and meaningful relationship with the families of the nicola faith crew, and they're pledging their ongoing support for us, and we're delighted with that. it shows real courage for them
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in their circumstances to have come in our direction and taken that step, and we're really hopeful that working together will save the lives of other fishermen and women moving forward. but working with the lifeboat service is only one of the things on the families�* minds. they continue to support each other a year after their loss. and they�*re still waiting for answers as to how the nicola faith sank in the first place. the boat was raised from the sea bed last may, and an official investigation is due to report back later this year. chris dearden, bbc news. the streaming platform spotify has begun removing the music of neil young. it follows the call from young for spotify to choose between him and the us podcasterjoe rogan, whom young accuses of being against covid vaccinations. mr rogan denies the allegation. spotify said it "regrets" the move and hopes the issue can be resolved soon.
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now it�*s time for a look at the weather, let�*s cross the newsroom to matt taylor at long last sunshine becoming a bit more widespread, good morning, it is great for some at the moment, this was in devon, quite drizzly as well but this is the scene on the way to most parts, it has developed in parts of cheshire further north. through the day the cloud and patchy drizzle in southern counties of england and wales starts to thin out and break and it pushes towards the channel islands where it will be gloomy this afternoon and it could stay that way in the scilly isles point if you shout in north—west england and northern ireland come mainly in north and west of scotland and a breezy day in the far north—east of the wins come down to better last night pulled much milder in the south, 12 or 13 degrees. tonight, the chill is back but with clear skies and light winds, some frost and fog in the southern
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counties of england and wales, these southern and eastern parts of the uk, they will see a widespread frost away from the city centres in the morning. a chilly start to friday underneath high—pressure but looking to the extent of the system, at the top of it we are dragging airfrom the azores and the milder air is pushing back towards us as we head through friday into the weekend bullet with it, these fronts in scotland turn windy again and they will bring outbreaks of rain quite widely pandit we could see some rain and drizzle on western areas at the club thickens, further south and east will be dry and bright with some spells of hazy sunshine —— the cloud thickens. not as an is in the morning. ten or 11 degrees, mild night follow, westerly winds coming in on the high pressure on sunday, and of a deepening area of low pressure in the north will bring another spell of windy weather going into the weekend. saturday as
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outbreaks of rain in scotland and northern ireland, turning brighter and shallower read through the day. blustery further south, cloud with some rain and drizzle but most places are staying dry with sunny spells. template is up to 15 degrees in southern counties for a while, cooler later in the day in the north which could lead to a bit of a frost for some on sunday morning. are dry and bright in southern and eastern areas on sunday but the next low pressure spills in bringing rain and longer lasting showers in northern ireland, scotland, and proceeded by some snow on the mountain spend pandit we could see some rain in other western areas and that will mount up through the next four or five days in the highlands of scotland, over 100 millimetres but elsewhere on the four custom very little to no rain in some parts of central and southern england. that is the weather but before i go, look across the atlantic because while we avoid the frost this weekend, look at this in miami, temperatures
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should be 16 or 17 by night but they could be a widespread frost at the weekend, a rare event, crop damage and those temperatures cause iguanas to fall from the trees but they do warm up!
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. prince andrew�*s lawyers say he�*s happy to face a trial byjury in new york — in the sexual abuse case brought by virginia giuffre. he�*s once again denied all the allegations against him. covid rules on care homes in england have been eased by the government — allowing unlimited visits from monday. resident campaign groups say they welcome the move. i could actually cry with relief. we�*ve actually been asking our members to write to their mps asking for all visiting restrictions to be lifted because we know that it is definitely safer now.
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the us has rejected russia�*s demand to bar

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