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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 27, 2022 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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prince andrew demands atrial byjury in new york, as he denies he was a close friend of convicted sex trafficker, ghislaine maxwell. face coverings are no longer mandatory in england from today, but some big retailers ask customers to continue wearing them. on holocaust memorial day, we'll meet one of the survivors of nazi concentration camps, and the artist who was commissioned by prince charles to paint him. today the advertising watchdog will tell mps about their concerns about a post on social media not clearly marked as adverts. it is more regulation needed? i'll explain. a great start for england's women in the ashes test. they take early australia wickets in canberra, but they need more, with the hosts now digging in. and we'll be joined by the repair shop presenterjay blades, who's made a documentary about living with dyslexia and
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learning to read at the age of 51. it may be a little bit grey and damp for some this morning, but there is a good deal of sunshine on the way as we go into the second half of the afternoon. good morning. it's thursday, the 27th of january. prince andrew is demanding a trial byjury in a civil case brought by virginia giuffre, who has accused him of sexual assaulting her when she was 17. the prince denies her claims, and his lawyers have lodged papers with the us court, which set out several reasons why they say the allegations are false. these include a denial that andrew was a close friend of ghislaine maxwell, at whose house some of the alleged abuse took place. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell has more details. across 11 pages, andrew's lawyers have set out his defence, a denial of the central allegation of sexual abuse made
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by virginia giuffre, and an assertion in respect of others that andrew lacks sufficient information to either admit or deny what's been claimed. he says, for example, in relation to the widely publicised picture of the two of them, that he doesn't have enough information to admit or deny that there exists photographic evidence of his alleged meeting with miss giuffre. elsewhere, his lawyers assert that virginia giuffre�*s civil complaint should be dismissed, because she's a permanent resident of australia, and not domiciled in the united states. and they say this. "giuffre�*s alleged causes of action are barred, in whole or in part, by her own wrongful conduct." finally, they demand this. "prince andrew hereby demands a trial byjury on all causes of action asserted in the complaint." all of which suggests that andrew is determined to fight it out in court. though lawyers say this doesn't preclude an out—of—court settlement. you can certainly have a settlement further down the road, and it wouldn't shock me at all,
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between now and a trial, to see something like that happen, you know. and sometimes, though, there are cases where no amount of money will make them go away. there were times when, again, you know, a victim wants their day in court. and that certainly seems to be virginia giuffre�*s intention. her lawyer has said they look forward to confronting prince andrew with his denials and his attempts to blame mr giuffre for her own abuse at the trial. nicholas witchell, bbc news. face coverings are no longer legally in england required, after covid rules were relaxed from this morning. however, some shops — including john lewis and sainsbury�*s — and many transport providers, have said they'll still ask customers to wear masks, as a courtesy to others. here's our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith. you no longer have to wear a mask in shops, restaurants or on public transport in england.
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but today's relaxation of the rules once again leaves customers facing the conundrum of different requests, depending on where they are. john lewis said it would be suggesting shoppers wear masks, and sainsbury�*s said they would keep signs up and still make announcements, urging staff and customers to use them. but morrisons don't go as far, simply saying it will be complying with government regulations. and currys says it will ask staff, but not customers, to wear a mask. face coverings will still be needed on trains and buses in london, while other rail operators are hoping passengers still wear them. we'll be relying on people doing the right thing, and we're confident thatjust before masks became mandatory again, and like it was last summer, people will want to do the right thing. they'll follow the government's advice and they'll wear a face covering where it's busy, or they're indoors. face coverings are still mandatory when shopping in northern ireland, scotland and wales. colletta smith, bbc news. a report into alleged parties
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at downing street during lockdown is expected to land on the desk of the prime minister today, although it may not be published until next week. let's speak to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. morning. all day yesterday we thought maybe it might come, didn't we? and then it didn't and now we are being told it is, but we are not going to see it yet?— are being told it is, but we are not going to see it yet? yes, the nerves of journalists _ going to see it yet? yes, the nerves of journalists are _ going to see it yet? yes, the nerves of journalists are getting _ going to see it yet? yes, the nerves of journalists are getting a - going to see it yet? yes, the nerves of journalists are getting a little - ofjournalists are getting a little bit shredded, but that is the least important — bit shredded, but that is the least important aspect of this. we understand the words have been committed to the page about sue gray but what _ committed to the page about sue gray but what is _ committed to the page about sue gray but what is happening now are last—minute checks in terms of the law, hr. _ last—minute checks in terms of the law, hr, making sure people are informed — law, hr, making sure people are informed and are ok and making sure that this _ informed and are ok and making sure that this doesn't cut across the new police _ that this doesn't cut across the new police investigation launched in the middle _ police investigation launched in the middle of— police investigation launched in the middle of this week. then you have -ot middle of this week. then you have got the _ middle of this week. then you have got the issue, it is notjust publishing the report, the prime mihister— publishing the report, the prime minister is also committed to go to
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partiameht— minister is also committed to go to parliament to answer questions about it. parliament to answer questions about it we _ parliament to answer questions about it we are _ parliament to answer questions about it. we are running out of time for both— it. we are running out of time for both of— it. we are running out of time for both of those things to happen in parliament this week, because mps tend not— parliament this week, because mps tend not to — parliament this week, because mps tend not to be there on a friday. i don't _ tend not to be there on a friday. i don't think— tend not to be there on a friday. i don't think downing street would want the — don't think downing street would want the reports to be out there and then a _ want the reports to be out there and then a few— want the reports to be out there and then a few days to pass before the prime _ then a few days to pass before the prime minister is to interpret it in his own _ prime minister is to interpret it in his own words and answer questions. that is— his own words and answer questions. that is why— his own words and answer questions. that is why people are saying it may be good _ that is why people are saying it may be good slip into next week. in terms — be good slip into next week. in terms of— be good slip into next week. in terms of the mood on the conservative backbenchers, because it is conservative mps that will decide — it is conservative mps that will decide what happens to boris johnson, _ decide what happens to boris johnson, it is quite difficult to gauge — johnson, it is quite difficult to gauge i— johnson, it is quite difficult to gauge. i spoke to one ally of the prime _ gauge. i spoke to one ally of the prime minister yesterday, a staunch ally, prime minister yesterday, a staunch ally. who _ prime minister yesterday, a staunch ally, who said of the mood in the party— ally, who said of the mood in the party had — ally, who said of the mood in the party had galvanised behind the prime _ party had galvanised behind the prime minister in the last few days and marry— prime minister in the last few days and many mps felt this whole process had gone _ and many mps felt this whole process had gone beyond a joke, in his words — had gone beyond a joke, in his words. another mp, he said they are still waiting — words. another mp, he said they are still waiting to see how the prime mihister— still waiting to see how the prime minister response to this and one of the things— minister response to this and one of the things they are demanding is a huge _ the things they are demanding is a huge claire wright of staff in
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number 10. huge claire wright of staff in number10. even when huge claire wright of staff in number 10. even when the report lands— number 10. even when the report lands and — number 10. even when the report lands and the prime minister speaks, some _ lands and the prime minister speaks, some mps— lands and the prime minister speaks, some mps will be waiting a while to make _ some mps will be waiting a while to make up— some mps will be waiting a while to make up their minds what to do. thank— make up their minds what to do. thank you — make up their minds what to do. thank you. —— huge claire wright. the united states has rejected russia's demand to bar ukraine from joining the nato alliance of western powers. moscow made the demand after amassing a huge number of troops on its border with ukraine, although it denies that it is planning to invade. the us said ukraine has a sovereign right to join nato if it chooses to. car production fell to its lowest level since 1956 last year, according to the latest figures. the society of motor manufacturers and traders blamed covid disruption, particularly a lack of silicon chips, but said new investment in electric vehicles gives some ground for optimism. here's our business correspondent, theo leggett. a dismal 12 months for the car industry, the worst in 65 years, and the pandemic is still taking a heavy toll. the most severe problem — a lack of computer chips.
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modern cars need thousands of them to control their complex electronics. but the pandemic has hit the supply of those chips and boosted demand, so they've been harder and harder to get hold of. this mini plant in oxford was one of a number of car factories which had to suspend production lines last year as a result. staff shortages also hurt output at several car makers, while honda closed its swindon plant for good. coming on the back of a pretty dreadful 2020, 2021 turned out to be worse. most of it is covid—related factors, most obviously the shortage of semiconductors, which was related to covid, and implications especially in the far east. but we also had a closure of a major plant, and all in all, the output was, as you know, the worst since 1956, so truly awful. the pandemic came at a time when car production was already declining. five years ago, 1.7 million cars were built in this country. by 2019, the total had gone down
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tojust 1.3 million. and for the past two years, with the impact of covid, it's been less than a million. but the society of motor manufacturers and traders says there are reasons for optimism. a total of £5 billion worth of potential new investments was announced last year, the highest total since 2013. the smmt claims those announcements were triggered by the trade deal agreed with the eu, which removed much of the uncertainty the industry was facing. now, car makers are going flat out to build a new generation of electric vehicles. just last week, the government announced funding for a major new battery plant in northumberland. and today's figures show that production of electric and hybrid vehicles increased sharply last year, despite the covid pandemic. so after a miserable 2021, the british car industry is hoping to accelerate its recovery with a hefty dose of battery power. theo leggett, bbc news. people on universal credit will be
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given one month before they must look forjobs outside their chosen field, under government plans to push more people into work. currently, claimants have three months to find work in their chosen area, but ministers want half a millionjobseekers in employment by the end ofjune. 0pposition parties have said there should be more support for people to find the job they want. fans of neil young won't able to listen to his music on spotify for much longer. the streaming platform has begun removing young's tracks, after he called for it to choose between him and the us podcasterjoe rogan, whom he accuses of being against covid vaccinations. joe rogan denies that claim. spotify said it regrets the move, and hopes the issue can be resolved soon. 11 minutes past six. we are going to get the weather with matt. i have got a question. good morning. this fits perfectly. it looks likely
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picture behind you is the top of a mountain. can you clear this up? there is a story in the daily mirror today. mark sandford scaled one upbritain's highest mountains in freezing weather. when he got to the top of snowdonia, he said the temperature up there was 21 degrees. he had one of these watches that showed the temperature. it said a 21 degrees, even though when he set off it was 2 degrees. is that possible? it was 2 degrees. is that ossible? , ., , is that possible? the temperature is a bit far-fetched, _ is that possible? the temperature is a bit far-fetched, to _ is that possible? the temperature is a bit far-fetched, to be _ is that possible? the temperature is a bit far-fetched, to be honest. - is that possible? the temperature is a bit far-fetched, to be honest. a i a bit far—fetched, to be honest. a watch _ a bit far—fetched, to be honest. a watch is _ a bit far—fetched, to be honest. a watch is hot — a bit far—fetched, to be honest. a watch is not the best measure of temperature. because you have got the body— temperature. because you have got the body heat, you have got the effect _ the body heat, you have got the effect of— the body heat, you have got the effect of the sun. he did experience a temperature version. this picture from _ a temperature version. this picture from cumbria a few weeks ago. you can see _ from cumbria a few weeks ago. you can see the — from cumbria a few weeks ago. you can see the valleys. you get cold air, cioud — can see the valleys. you get cold air, cloud and fog. very cold. get
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above _ air, cloud and fog. very cold. get above that, — air, cloud and fog. very cold. get above that, you are into the sunshine _ above that, you are into the sunshine. the effect of the sun makes — sunshine. the effect of the sun makes it— sunshine. the effect of the sun makes it feel warmer and the temperature will be higher the further— temperature will be higher the further up the mountain you go. perfectly— further up the mountain you go. perfectly normal phenomenon which occurs _ perfectly normal phenomenon which occurs every year and occurs quite often _ occurs every year and occurs quite often during the winter. certainly pleasant — often during the winter. certainly pleasant when you get up there. thank— pleasant when you get up there. thank you — pleasant when you get up there. thank you for explaining that. high pressure has moved away a little _ high pressure has moved away a little bit — high pressure has moved away a little bit today. you will see a bit more _ little bit today. you will see a bit more of — little bit today. you will see a bit more of this. it has been a gloomy month— more of this. it has been a gloomy month so— more of this. it has been a gloomy month so far. much more sunshine today~ _ month so far. much more sunshine today~ it _ month so far. much more sunshine today~ it wiii— month so far. much more sunshine today. it will be a little bit on the breezy side. very windy north of scotland _ the breezy side. very windy north of scotland. winds 77 mph in orkney. the breeze — scotland. winds 77 mph in orkney. the breeze will ease down. certainly a noticeable feature this morning. plenty— a noticeable feature this morning. plenty of— a noticeable feature this morning. plenty of cloud for england and wates— plenty of cloud for england and wales to — plenty of cloud for england and wales to begin with, with outbreaks of rain _ wales to begin with, with outbreaks of rain and — wales to begin with, with outbreaks of rain and drizzle through the rush-hour _ of rain and drizzle through the rush—hour. particular parts of the midlands. — rush—hour. particular parts of the midlands, south wales and the south west _ midlands, south wales and the south west. about eight o'clock, get to north— west. about eight o'clock, get to north wales, the north midlands northwards, plenty of sunshine. a
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few showers in the north and west of scotland _ few showers in the north and west of scotland. still very blustery through orkney and shetland. the winds— through orkney and shetland. the winds wiii— through orkney and shetland. the winds will gradually ease down as we io winds will gradually ease down as we go through— winds will gradually ease down as we go through the day. that area of cloud _ go through the day. that area of cloud in— go through the day. that area of cloud in the south will gradually become — cloud in the south will gradually become confined to the channel isiands — become confined to the channel islands into the afternoon. southernmost counties will see the sunshine _ southernmost counties will see the sunshine. most will have a fine afternoon _ sunshine. most will have a fine afternoon. showers in the north and west _ afternoon. showers in the north and west. wintry on the tops of the mountains. temperatures up to ten, 11 mountains. temperatures up to ten, ii degrees — mountains. temperatures up to ten, 11 degrees this afternoon. feeling warmer— 11 degrees this afternoon. feeling warmer than recent days, even with the breeze — warmer than recent days, even with the breeze. tonight are the breeze falls lighter. sky is clear for a time — falls lighter. sky is clear for a time the _ falls lighter. sky is clear for a time. the chance of a widespread frost— time. the chance of a widespread frost as _ time. the chance of a widespread frost as we — time. the chance of a widespread frost as we head into friday. a cold start _ frost as we head into friday. a cold start to _ frost as we head into friday. a cold start to tomorrow, a bright start, more _ start to tomorrow, a bright start, more cioud — start to tomorrow, a bright start, more cloud and rain in the west of scotland — more cloud and rain in the west of scotland. windy weather in the north — north. for many, north. - for many, quite north. — for many, quite mild. the time now is 1a minutes past six. it's holocaust memorial day today,
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marking 77—years since the liberation of the nazi death camp at auschwitz—birkenau, although the day is for the victims of all genocides. seven holocaust survivors have had their portraits painted by different artists, in a special project commissioned by prince charles. our royal correspondent daniela relph has more. arek hersh was one ofjust two members of his family to survive the holocaust. this painting captures him now, at the age of 93. the style is realistic, almost photographic. his right hand rests on his left arm, the arm that bears the number he was marked with at auschwitz. creating a gallery of holocaust survivors, the bbc has been following the project. covid made things unconventional for artist massimiliano pironti. i started to paint this portrait in completely opposite process as normal. you should have painted me when i had hair!
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yeah, that was a while ago. we had like, three virtual sittings. how do you do you feel like, arek? how do you feel? 0k. it was a very challenging experience. your book... oh, yes. months later, came a real life meet—up, as arek shared his story. that was our first camp. 11 years old, i was, 11 years old. that's auschwitz, yeah. and it's where we got our number on the arm. these are children who survived at auschwitz. | arek was one of those survivors. but the rest of his family, bar his older sister, never reached liberation. they were some of the six million jews killed in the holocaust. this week, arek met the prince of wales, who commissioned the project.
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this is my picture. i think it's fantastic. i felt we owed it to these remarkable people just to remember them in this way. there is something very special about the portrait, and about the artist's eye in bringing out the real underlying character, personality and meaning of the person who's sitting for the portrait. the connection between artists and survivors has been strong. the pictures reflect both loss and survival. these portraits go to the heart of their individuality and their humanity. what better way of rejecting that kind of philosophy that led to the holocaust, and honouring survivors, than this project? the reality is this extraordinary group of people are now growing smaller every year, but the power of their testimony forms a lasting memory.
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daniela relph, bbc news, the queen's gallery at buckingham palace. we are going to speak to arek and the artist at ten past eight. you can watch that special documentary on bbc two at nine o'clock tonight. it's called survivors: portraits of the holocaust. there is something very special about the relationship that grows between artist and a survivor in those circumstances. we will get to see that played out later on the sofa. 1? see that played out later on the sofa. ' , , , let's take a look at today's papers. the times reports supermarkets and train operators will carry on asking people to wear face masks, after the legal requirement to wear them comes to an end in england today. according to the daily mail, tory mps are urging borisjohnson to rethink the national insurance hike. it comes amid what the paper calls wavering support for the prime minister. this, as the release of the report into downing street parties, by civil servant
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sue gray, is awaited. the daily mirror is among a number of papers reporting on the latest court documents submitted by prince andrew's legal team. it says he tried to get claims by virginia giuffre thrown out, but insisted he would see her in court if the bid fails. and one of the most—watched videos on the bbc news website tells the story of 100—year—old beryl, who volunteers at a cafe in ealing hospital in west london. she started there 18 years ago, when she moved to london after her husband died. she said at the time she knew no—one, so it became a lifeline for her. and she now has no plans to quit. good on beryl. what a great story that is. a couple of stories from the insides. robots. we periodically hear about what robots are capable of doing. this one feels significant. this is indeed times. a robot has performed keyhole surgery on a did for the first time. ——
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without help. they're trying to bring forward the idea of automated surgery. for micropigs underwent... they are trialling these on pace first. for micropigs underwent a treatment to treat bowel cancer in people. they are experimenting on the pics to see if it works. it is apparently a very fiddly piece of surgery requiring about 20 stitches. thejob surgery requiring about 20 stitches. the job is surgery requiring about 20 stitches. thejob is made more difficult because the patient is breathing throughout anyway. the end result is that a neat row of stitches, more evenly spaced, say the experts, and leak—proof than those made by even specialist professional surgeons. they were better than humans? yeah. i am sure they were better than humans? yeah. i am sure we — they were better than humans? yeah. i am sure we will— they were better than humans? yeah. i am sure we will hear— they were better than humans? yeah. i am sure we will hear more _ they were better than humans? yeah. i am sure we will hear more about - i am sure we will hear more about that. ., �* , ., i am sure we will hear more about that. .,�* ,., i am sure we will hear more about that. ., that. you've brought pics to the table, i that. you've brought pics to the table. i want — that. you've brought pics to the table, i want to _ that. you've brought pics to the table, i want to bring _ that. you've brought pics to the | table, i want to bring hedgehogs that. you've brought pics to the - table, i want to bring hedgehogs to the table. where are they? or a
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hedgehog. a little prick me up. this is allen, the hedgehog. you know one of those before and after pictures? alan was taken to an animal sanctuary. he had boldness. he was underweight and he had like a type of ringworm as well, a fungal infection. so what they did is they found this medicine. they applied it over 30 days. over christmas. they fed him a little bit more because he was underweight. they robbed him with aloe vera gel. they were so caring. and he is growing his spines back. a lovely recovery story. fin back. a lovely recovery story. on the animal theme, which seems to be going on, i bring you this picture. i saw those. going on, i bring you this picture. i saw those-— going on, i bring you this picture. i saw those. has this been around for a while? _ i saw those. has this been around for a while? no, _ i saw those. has this been around for a while? no, i _ i saw those. has this been around for a while? no, i saw _ i saw those. has this been around for a while? no, i saw it - i saw those. has this been around for a while? no, i saw it this - for a while? no, i saw it this morning- — for a while? no, i saw it this morning. john _ for a while? no, i saw it this morning. john randall- for a while? no, i saw it this l morning. john randall became for a while? no, i saw it this - morning. john randall became famous
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for takin: morning. john randall became famous for taking his — morning. john randall became famous for taking his pet _ morning. john randall became famous for taking his pet lion _ morning. john randall became famous for taking his pet lion and _ for taking his pet lion and adventures around london after buying it in harrods in the 1960s when you could buy lyons. john randall has died at the age of 86. they have dug out of him driving around chelsea with the lion. he used to walk it in hyde park and various places. it is like a moment in time. . ,, various places. it is like a moment in time. ., i. ., various places. it is like a moment in time. ., , ., ., ., various places. it is like a moment in time. . , ., ., ., ., ., in time. can you imagine going to a sho now in time. can you imagine going to a shon now and _ in time. can you imagine going to a shop now and being _ in time. can you imagine going to a shop now and being able _ in time. can you imagine going to a shop now and being able to - in time. can you imagine going to a shop now and being able to buy - in time. can you imagine going to a shop now and being able to buy a i shop now and being able to buy a lion cub? ., ., ., , shop now and being able to buy a lion cub?_ 21 - shop now and being able to buy a l lion cub?_ 21 minutes lion cub? extraordinary. 21 minutes ast six. a year ago today, a small fishing boat called nicola faith left its home port of conwy in search of whelks off the north wales coast. the three crew on board would never be seen alive again. now the families of those men — alan minard, ross ballantine and carl mcgrath — are working with the lifeboat service to improve safety at sea. chris dearden went to meet them. man, overboard. this is only a training course,
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but next time it might be for real. these men and women work as fishing crews around the coast of wales, and they've come to fleetwood in lancashire to be shown how to survive if they find themselves in rough waters. a lot easier with a life jacket on? a lot easier. how was it the first - time round without one? hard work. did you expect it to be as hard? yeah, because there's a lot of weighty gear on. but i didn't expect it to be that hard, to be honest. you can relax a lot more, i you can breathe and you can just float around. just shows how well these life jackets actually work. i wouldn't like to be in the water without one anyway. and watching are six people who know what it's like when things go wrong at sea. these are the family members who were left behind when the fishing boat nicola faith sank off colwyn bay on january 27th last year. on board were skipper carl mcgrath, ross ballantine and alan minard. their families have spent the last year supporting each other, and now they're working
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with the lifeboat service to tell their story as part of the training course. it was ross, it was our brother. he's got two sons. we want them to grow up and see that we are doing something positive, and in his name and in all of the men's names. we really have to show that it's real lives and devastating families who were left behind. once they go, they're gone. but it's the people who are stood here today, who have got to live with it for the rest of their lives. and they say it's made it an emotional and difficult year. none of the families knew each other until they found themselves outside llandudno lifeboat station waiting for news of the search. the men's bodies weren't found for over six weeks. their relatives raised money for extra searches, so the wreck of the boat could also be found. and now money left over from that appeal will go to support the work of the lifeboat service. in this instance, we formed a really deep and meaningful relationship with the families of the nicola faith crew,
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and they're pledging their ongoing support for us, and we're delighted with that. it shows real courage for them in their circumstances to have come in our direction and taken that step, and we're really hopeful that working together will save the lives of other fishermen and women moving forward. but working with the lifeboat service is only one of the things on the family's minds. they continue to support each other a year after their loss. and they're still waiting for answers as to how the nicola faith sank in the first place. the boat was raised from the sea bed last may, and an official investigation is due to report back later this year. chris dearden, bbc news. so important to getting that work done. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins the funeral of 14—year—old jermaine cools will be held later this morning in south london. the teenager was attacked close to west croydon station in november and later died in hospital — the youngest victim of knife crime last year. his family say they want the media to show the "anguish and pain" they are going through in the hope teenagers will stop carrying knives. police in westminster have used footage of drivers doing laps around each other to help in a crackdown against anti—social and dangerous driving. special acoustic cameras similar to these installed in neighbouring kensington and chelsea last summer, help detect loud noises such as drivers revving car engines. westminster city council said 10 vehicles were siezed and five people arrested between the weekend of 14th and 16th of january. now, she's the oldest volunteer in the nhs and possibly the country. beryl carr, who turned 100—years—old this month, has been volunteering at ealing hospital for the past 18 years. born in acton, she moved away but came back to the area to be near her daughter after her husband died, and says working at the hospital cafe
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has been her lifeline. i enjoy coming, and it's a worthwhilejob, and i'm helping people that are not as fortunate as i am or as well as i am. people say i don't look my age, but no, i'm so lucky. and you can catch more of the wonderful beryl on our lunchtime and evening news at 6.30 — and on our website — bbc.co.uk/london well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning this is how tfl services are looking right now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning apart from minor delays on the dlr and planned closures on the bank branch of the northern line. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. we start the day with temperatures in mid—to single figures celsius but we wake up to a largely grey and cloudy start and what has been
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happening overnight is a cold front has been slowly making its way southwards, so the cloud increasing and through this morning we might get a little bit of light, patchy rain, nothing more significant ahead of this cold front clearing, and once it clears, plenty of sunshine. so, this afternoon we have blue sky, a bit breezier at this afternoon and the temperature is quite mild, 12 celsius by the end of the day. overnight, the windfall is light and we've got clear skies, so a perfect recipe for the temperature to drop and it will be chilly again with the minimum dropping down to zero and we could see a sparkle or to a frost on friday morning first thing and we could also see one or two mist and fog patches. for friday, a bright start and high pressure there but gradually through the day we could see the cloud increasing from the west. that indicates perhaps it is actually getting a bit milder. temperatures tomorrow perhaps a little chillier than today at nine celsius, and come saturday more unsettled and more cloud and certainly breezy but the temperature could reach 1a celsius. i'm back with the latest
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from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. coming up on today's programme. we'll be speaking to jay blades in around 20 minutes. the "repair shop" star — who has dyslexia — has made a documentary about learning to read at the age of 51. the actor romola garai has got behind the camera to direct her first feature—length film — which is not for the faint—hearted. she'll be on the sofa before 8. and take a look at this. pushing a cart up and down the street — i suppose that's one way to train. that man making the queen laugh
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is raf gunner shanwayne stephens, who is also part of the jamaican men's bobsleigh team. we'll be catching up with him before he heads off to the winter olympics. we thought it might happen yesterday. many people did. then we thought, surely, today. you know what we are talking about. now we understand there's a good chance that a report into alleged parties at downing street during lockdown — by the senior civil servant sue gray — may not be published until next week. let's try to get a handle on what's going on with two westminster—watchers. sonia sodha writes for the observer, and mo hussein is a former chief press officer at number ten. may be starting with you first, we are all slightly baffled at the moment as to when and how and what
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the sequence will be. have you got any words of wisdom for us? this is now the big — any words of wisdom for us? this is now the big question, _ any words of wisdom for us? this is now the big question, bit _ any words of wisdom for us? this is now the big question, bit of- any words of wisdom for us? this is now the big question, bit of a - now the big question, bit of a waiting game in the report and there is a debate going on about how much of it can be published and it's going through lawyers and hr people in terms of the names that might come out or might be mentioned and there is some expectation, even though we were here yesterday, that it could come out as early as today and again, the prime minister has committed to coming to the house of commons and giving a statement on this. i think commons and giving a statement on this. ithink if it is commons and giving a statement on this. i think if it is less than the full report, this will clearly cause a political problem for the government and the debate because if you tell people to wait for the report, it is quite reasonable for them to want to see the report and it's quite important for mps before they make their mind up on the prime minister's future to have access to all of the information.— all of the information. sonia, the waitinu all of the information. sonia, the waiting game _ all of the information. sonia, the waiting game continues - all of the information. sonia, the waiting game continues and - all of the information. sonia, the waiting game continues and we l waiting game continues and we understand, talking to adam fleming,
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our political correspondent, ok it's likely to be on the prime minister's desk so let's talk about this short timeline and say it is on the prime minister's desk today, what will happen between now and monday and what is the political advantage for it not being released into the public until next week. i it not being released into the public until next week. i think the prime minister _ public until next week. i think the prime minister is _ public until next week. i think the prime minister is going _ public until next week. i think the prime minister is going to - public until next week. i think the prime minister is going to do - prime minister is going to do whatever— prime minister is going to do whatever he can to buy himself time and one _ whatever he can to buy himself time and one of— whatever he can to buy himself time and one of the things about the way that westminster works, i think, is that westminster works, i think, is that timelines can be really important, so there is a substance of what _ important, so there is a substance of what is — important, so there is a substance of what is in — important, so there is a substance of what is in the report, but what comes— of what is in the report, but what comes out— of what is in the report, but what comes out when, the conversations that mps— comes out when, the conversations that mps have, whether they had a chance _ that mps have, whether they had a chance to _ that mps have, whether they had a chance to go back to their constituencies, test the temperature there. _ constituencies, test the temperature there. that _ constituencies, test the temperature there, that can all affect their reaction — there, that can all affect their reaction to a report whether it comes— reaction to a report whether it comes out— reaction to a report whether it comes out at the end of this week for the _ comes out at the end of this week for the start of next week.- comes out at the end of this week for the start of next week. sorry to interru t, for the start of next week. sorry to interrunt. but _ for the start of next week. sorry to interrupt, but what _ for the start of next week. sorry to interrupt, but what would - for the start of next week. sorry to interrupt, but what would change? j for the start of next week. sorry to - interrupt, but what would change? we heard from so many mps saying their constituents are furious and angry
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and they are dealing with lots of letters. i and they are dealing with lots of letters. ~ and they are dealing with lots of letters. ,, ., �* , ., letters. i think that's right and i don't know _ letters. i think that's right and i don't know that _ letters. i think that's right and i don't know that very _ letters. i think that's right and i don't know that very much - letters. i think that's right and i l don't know that very much would change _ don't know that very much would change but the thing is the prime minister— change but the thing is the prime minister will hope that it will, so when _ minister will hope that it will, so when you — minister will hope that it will, so when you are in as dire a political situation — when you are in as dire a political situation as — when you are in as dire a political situation as boris johnson when you are in as dire a political situation as borisjohnson is when you are in as dire a political situation as boris johnson is where you have _ situation as boris johnson is where you have all— situation as boris johnson is where you have all of these revelations coming — you have all of these revelations coming out in recent days and you stand _ coming out in recent days and you stand accused of misleading parliament and there is a police investigation that has been launched into allegations that you yourself have broken the law during a national— have broken the law during a national emergency, when you are in that position, and it's very clear that position, and it's very clear that what— that position, and it's very clear that what boris johnson's strategy is to hang — that what boris johnson's strategy is to hang on another day and hang on another— is to hang on another day and hang on another day on the way that westminster works, on another day on the way that westminsterworks, sometimes, if you han- westminsterworks, sometimes, if you hang on. _ westminsterworks, sometimes, if you hang on, things defuse a little bit. personally— hang on, things defuse a little bit. personally i don't think it will make — personally i don't think it will make much difference and i think you're _ make much difference and i think you're right but i think the prime minister— you're right but i think the prime minister thinks if he can buy himself— minister thinks if he can buy himself a _ minister thinks if he can buy himself a bit of extra time, maybe that witt— himself a bit of extra time, maybe that will sort of defuse things amongst his backbench mps somewhat but i amongst his backbench mps somewhat but i think— amongst his backbench mps somewhat but i think that probably won't happen —
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but i think that probably won't ha en. ., but i think that probably won't ha . en, ., ., but i think that probably won't ha en. ., ., i. but i think that probably won't ha en, ., ., y., ., happen. how do you read the weariness — happen. how do you read the weariness of _ happen. how do you read the weariness of the _ happen. how do you read the weariness of the public - happen. how do you read the l weariness of the public around happen. how do you read the - weariness of the public around the story generally? as compared possibly with the anger that many people have been fearing and then time is passing. what do you think about that? i time is passing. what do you think about that?— about that? i think it is something eve bod about that? i think it is something everybody can _ about that? i think it is something everybody can connect _ about that? i think it is something everybody can connect to - about that? i think it is something everybody can connect to because| about that? i think it is something i everybody can connect to because all you need to do is look through your phone and a picture of what you were perhaps doing on any of these given days and it's not some high—level government policy that people feel far away from, so i think that remains, but i do think that number ten might be counting on party fatigue setting in and people wanting to move on and talk about other issues and you will certainly see that and have seen that from allies of the prime minister, the so—called operation save boris where they are focusing on getting the bigger calls right, talking about ukraine on the vaccine roll—out in an attempt to refocus minds and get people to think this is something quite small or trivial and you hear
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a lot of cake being mentioned that it's not about cake, it's about whether people who made the rules actually followed them or not, so there's a lot of strategy going on to try and shift the narrative and use the time in the next few days before the report lands to get to that position but whether it cuts through or not, i'm not too sure. would you have given that advice, to diminish the party and say it was a bit of cake and focus on the bigger issues? we saw borisjohnson very gung ho at prime minister's questions yesterday kind of doing what conservative mps enjoy, him as a strong leader with great rhetoric. it was a real projection strength and he had no other choice. he needs to keep these people on side but the way that number ten have handled this or mishandle this, has made things worse. you had weeks of changing narrative from nothing to
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see here, no parties, all rules were followed, to ever expanding investigations are now a police investigation, so the way that the narrative in number ten has shifted, where as in any other crisis the best thing is to get things out as quickly as you can to say we have got this wrong, this should happen and this is what we will do about it and this is what we will do about it and it might not make it prettier, but it does not erode trust as much and they haven't done that, so that has added to this continually being talked about and made worse and now they are in a position where there's not many options left and a show of strength and trying to focus on the bigger picture is probably the only thing they can now really do. sonia, can i rive thing they can now really do. sonia, can i give you _ thing they can now really do. sonia, can i give you a _ thing they can now really do. sonia, can i give you a last _ thing they can now really do. sonia, can i give you a last thought? - thing they can now really do. sonia, can i give you a last thought? do i thing they can now really do. sonia, | can i give you a last thought? do we need to be careful about what to expect out of this report? it is a fact that most of the people involved in these parties were civil servants. only a small portion of it, in a way, will directly relate to the prime minister.-
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it, in a way, will directly relate to the prime minister. while that ma be to the prime minister. while that may be true. _ to the prime minister. while that may be true, the _ to the prime minister. while that may be true, the fact _ to the prime minister. while that may be true, the fact is - to the prime minister. while that may be true, the fact is the - to the prime minister. while that| may be true, the fact is the prime minister— may be true, the fact is the prime minister is — may be true, the fact is the prime minister is personally caught up in this as _ minister is personally caught up in this as shown by the fact that he attended — this as shown by the fact that he attended some of these gatherings and lots _ attended some of these gatherings and lots of people say it was a party — and lots of people say it was a party and _ and lots of people say it was a party and borisjohnson and lots of people say it was a party and boris johnson says and lots of people say it was a party and borisjohnson says it wasn't — party and borisjohnson says it wasn't a — party and borisjohnson says it wasn't a party on the other important thing is that the prime minister— important thing is that the prime minister is ultimately responsible for culture across government. even if there _ for culture across government. even if there were — for culture across government. even if there were things that civil servants— if there were things that civil servants did, it was going on in the officiat— servants did, it was going on in the official residence of the prime minister— official residence of the prime minister or in the same building as the official— minister or in the same building as the official residence of the prime minister. — the official residence of the prime minister, so there's no way that boris _ minister, so there's no way that borisjohnson willjust minister, so there's no way that boris johnson willjust be able to say, boris johnson willjust be able to say. sorry, — boris johnson willjust be able to say, sorry, not me, governor, that was the — say, sorry, not me, governor, that was the civil— say, sorry, not me, governor, that was the civil servants because he was the civil servants because he was at _ was the civil servants because he was at some of these gatherings and also secondly because he is responsible at —— as the head of government and the culture, there was clearly— government and the culture, there was clearly a culture of having gatherings, social gatherings, parties. — gatherings, social gatherings, parties, and many legal experts think— parties, and many legal experts think they broke the rules and possibly— think they broke the rules and possibly break the law in downing street _ possibly break the law in downing street throughout the lockdown. that cuiture _ street throughout the lockdown. that culture comes from the top. there is no way— culture comes from the top. there is no way the _ culture comes from the top. there is no way the boss can watch —— wash
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their— no way the boss can watch —— wash their hands— no way the boss can watch —— wash their hands on that. no way the boss can watch -- wash their hands on that.— no way the boss can watch -- wash their hands on that. thank you both very much- — some breaking rule —— news regarding care home visits and we understand the rules when it comes to visiting care homes in england are going to be relaxed from monday. the department for health and social care says there will be no limit on the number of visitors to care homes. currently only three designated people can visit. another change is that residents who test positve for covid outbreaks will only have to self—isolate for ten days, not 1a. we'll be talking about the rules later on in the moment.- we'll be talking about the rules later on in the moment. let's get an u date later on in the moment. let's get an update from — later on in the moment. let's get an update from mike _ later on in the moment. let's get an update from mike on _ later on in the moment. let's get an update from mike on what _ later on in the moment. let's get an update from mike on what is - update from mike on what is happening. update from mike on what is happening-— update from mike on what is| happening-_ we update from mike on what is - happening._ we had the happening. how are you? we had the roller-coasters _ happening. how are you? we had the roller-coasters of _ happening. how are you? we had the roller-coasters of the _ happening. how are you? we had the roller-coasters of the ashes - happening. how are you? we had the roller-coasters of the ashes morning j roller—coasters of the ashes morning on the _ roller—coasters of the ashes morning on the emotions of the ashes series it brings _ on the emotions of the ashes series it brings. england women have to win
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this only— it brings. england women have to win this only test match because if they don't, _ this only test match because if they don't, australia will retain the ashes— don't, australia will retain the ashes and it's the opening—day. and they've _ ashes and it's the opening—day. and they've started well enough. in canberra, after winning the toss and putting australia into bat first to strike was katherine brunt — she took three wickets in all, this one removing, alyssa healey, without scoring, caught by amyjones, one of 5 catches for her behind the stumps. but from being 43—3, the hosts dug in and recovered well they built a big score — reaching 327 for 7 at the close. (england's men are 2—1 down in their t—20 series, in the west indies after defeat in barbados. roman powell hit a magnificent, 107 offjust 53 balls, punishing england's bowlers, as he recorded his first t—20 century. the tourists' much—changed line—up, failed to impress.
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73 from opener tom banton, one of the few highlights, but they fell 20 runs short of their target. the next match is on saturday. britain's alfie hewett, has fallen short, in his bid for a second title at the australian open — remember, he'd already won the wheelchair doubles with gordon reid — a record ninth consecutive grand slam crown for the pair but he lost the singles final in three sets to the top seed and paralympic champion, shingo kunieda who won his 47th grand slam title — it's the 11th time he's been crowned australian open singles champion. hewett saying he was exhausted and had nothing left in the tank. hopefully we'll speak to alfie in an hour's— hopefully we'll speak to alfie in an hour's time. rangers have a penalty miss to thank for their four—point lead over celtic at the top of the scottish premiership — they beat livingston 1—0. and celtic survived a scare at hearts — they were 2—nil up — reo hatate with a brilliant opening goal. liam boyce got one back for hearts and he could have
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equalised from the spot — but he hit the post and it finished 2—1 to celtic. chelsea women's manager emma hayes has demanded more goals from erin cuthbert, after she helped them to victory over west ham. she scored the second in a 2—0 win that takes them to within a point of arsenal at the top of the table — and hayes described cuthbert as a "warrior" but said she doesn't score enough goals for the number of chances she has. he's the top scorer in the premier league — and mohamed salah has taken egypt into the quarter—finals of the africa cup of nations. the liverpool striker scored the winning penalty as they beat ivory coast 5—4 on spot kicks after the match had finished goalless. egypt will face morocco on sunday. and equatorial guinea are through to the quarterfinals after they beat mali on penalties. we will see you later on thank you very much.
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so many people have been deprived of visiting their loved ones in care homes and there been a lot of restrictions and they are changing. this is for england. the department of health and social care says there will be unlimited visiting for care home residents to return, so no limit on the number that can visit. at the moment that is three. just lookin: at at the moment that is three. just looking at the _ at the moment that is three. just looking at the timing on this because anyone who has a loved one in a care home i want to know this. this is coming into place from monday the 31st of january and there will be no limits on the number of visitors allowed in care homes and also management say that there will be the time that you have to remain in isolation is coming down from 1a down to ten days for those who test positive in the care home so significant changes and we will get more detail. also care homes, the way they manage any outbreaks in the
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care homes. that way they manage any outbreaks in the care homes. . way they manage any outbreaks in the care homes— care homes. that will be reduced to 14 da s care homes. that will be reduced to 14 days rather _ care homes. that will be reduced to 14 days rather than _ care homes. that will be reduced to 14 days rather than 28 _ care homes. that will be reduced to 14 days rather than 28 days - care homes. that will be reduced to 14 days rather than 28 days and - care homes. that will be reduced to | 14 days rather than 28 days and from the middle of february, care workers will be asked to use lateral flow test before their shift and that replaces the current system which included the use of pcr test, so some changes there and we will bring you the details and as they come through now we will get more details in the programme. here's matt with a look at the weather. bit of a wild night in the north of scotland last night, windy in orkney and the winds are easing down now and the winds are easing down now and they will continue to do so so a blustery day across the uk but after the gloom some of you have experienced it will turn sunnier and there is some cloud around at the moment bringing outbreaks of rain and you can see it here clearing away from northern england and parts of wales into the midlands. the odd heavy burst and showers in the north of scotland but it's the northern half of the country away from the showers who will start with sunshine this morning and lots of cloud
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across mid wales, south wales, the midlands, southern england and some dampness this morning and brightening up in the afternoon for most and staying cloudy with further rain and drizzle in the likes of the channel islands later on but for most this afternoon it will be a sunny one and some scattered showers in the north and west and a chilly day in orkney and shetland and we could see wintry showers to go with it but up to around ten or 11 degrees in southern parts but with the wind falling later tonight we could see mist and fog patches in southern england and south wales and then more cloud in the south and west and it will stop the temperature drop in for much of scotland, england and wales, the chance of a frost as we head into your friday morning rush—hour, particularly in the suburbs and countryside because we have this ridge of high pressure to begin with but if you step out and look at the big picture we will see milder and milder air pushing its way in through friday and into the start of the weekend. breezy again across the northern half of the country and for the highlands and islands, fairly rain and more persistent rain across
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orkney and caithness and sutherland and there will be some rain across scotland and the odd chow in northern england later and some light rain and drizzle here but further south will see most of us staying dry and some hazy sunshine after a bright start and notice the temperatures are back in double figures for a fairfew temperatures are back in double figures for a fair few and a warm night on friday into saturday and that zone of mild air is with us but wet and windy weather spreading quickly into the morning scotland and northern ireland and touching gale force at time, brightening up as we go into the afternoon and cloud, outbreaks of rain pushing south but not much rain if any at all towards the south of the country on saturday and we will see temperatures between 13 and 15 degrees but through the afternoon in the north it will turn cooler after a milestone. into sunday back to a bright star, may be a touch of frost in southern areas but as we go through the day we will see more wet and windy weather spreading into scotland preceded by snow over the hills and rain heading further south but many in the south of england and wales continue with what is turning
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out to be quite a dry january. wales continue with what is turning out to be quite a dryjanuary. i out to be quite a dryjanuary. i think i know the answer to the next two questions i am going to ask you. you don't have to ask me any questions. you don't have to ask me any questions— you don't have to ask me any cuestions. . , ., ., ., , ., questions. are you a regular user of social media — questions. are you a regular user of social media because _ questions. are you a regular user of social media because what - questions. are you a regular user of social media because what i - questions. are you a regular user of social media because what i am - questions. are you a regular user of| social media because what i am very familiar with social media. would you consider yourself an influencer? on social media, no.— on social media, no. would you like to know how — on social media, no. would you like to know how to _ on social media, no. would you like to know how to become _ on social media, no. would you like to know how to become one? - on social media, no. would you like to know how to become one? nina, | to know how to become one? nina, what have you _ to know how to become one? nina, what have you got? _ you always struck me as being big on instagram, _ you always struck me as being big on instagram, facebook, youtube,, this is where _ instagram, facebook, youtube,, this is where you — instagram, facebook, youtube,, this is where you could, with your status, — is where you could, with your status, people following your life, you could — status, people following your life, you could influence what people are thinking _ you could influence what people are thinking and what they want to buy and with— thinking and what they want to buy and with that comes power and comes regulation _ and with that comes power and comes regulation but where this regulation come _ regulation but where this regulation come from? it's a grey area.
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good morning everyone. if you're anything lke me you love a scroll through social media to see how the other half lives. the clothes, the holidays, in particular i enjoy looking at what people are eating! and it can make you think — i want a bit of that! which gives people with lots of followers, a lot of power. which is why they are called influencers; they can influence how we spend our money. and plenty of people have built a career on it. someone like the american influencer kylie jenner can earn three quarters of a million pounds per post! no implication she has played by the rules, _ no implication she has played by the rules, by— no implication she has played by the rules, by the way. for lots of people it's a launchpad to a great career. this is beckii — her youtube videos went viral when she was 14. and she's used that experience to begin a career in marketing. ididn't end i didn't end up going to university, but i've _ ididn't end up going to university, but we still— i didn't end up going to university, but i've still managed _ i didn't end up going to university, but i've still managed to _ i didn't end up going to university, but i've still managed to build - i didn't end up going to university, but i've still managed to build a i but i've still managed to build a career— but i've still managed to build a career that— but i've still managed to build a career that i_ but i've still managed to build a career that i don't— but i've still managed to build a career that i don't think - but i've still managed to build a career that i don't think would i but i've still managed to build a i career that i don't think would have even _ career that i don't think would have even been — career that i don't think would have even been possible. _ career that i don't think would have even been possible. ten _ career that i don't think would have even been possible. ten years- career that i don't think would havej even been possible. ten years ago, career that i don't think would have. even been possible. ten years ago, i don't _ even been possible. ten years ago, i don't think— even been possible. ten years ago, i don't think this — even been possible. ten years ago, i don't think this even _ even been possible. ten years ago, i don't think this even existed, - even been possible. ten years ago, i don't think this even existed, so i even been possible. ten years ago, i don't think this even existed, so it i don't think this even existed, so it can teach— don't think this even existed, so it can teach you _ don't think this even existed, so it can teach you so _ don't think this even existed, so it can teach you so many _ don't think this even existed, so it can teach you so many incredible i can teach you so many incredible skills _ can teach you so many incredible skills from — can teach you so many incredible skills from photo _ can teach you so many incredible skills from photo editing, - can teach you so many incredible skills from photo editing, video i skills from photo editing, video editing, —
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skills from photo editing, video editing, creative _ skills from photo editing, video editing, creative and _ skills from photo editing, video editing, creative and marketing skills— editing, creative and marketing skills and — editing, creative and marketing skills and it's _ editing, creative and marketing skills and it's really _ editing, creative and marketing skills and it's really endless i editing, creative and marketingj skills and it's really endless the kinds _ skills and it's really endless the kinds of— skills and it's really endless the kinds of industries _ skills and it's really endless the kinds of industries that - skills and it's really endless the kinds of industries that are i kinds of industries that are emerging _ kinds of industries that are emerging off— kinds of industries that are emerging off the _ kinds of industries that are emerging off the back i kinds of industries that are emerging off the back of l kinds of industries that are i emerging off the back of social media — emerging off the back of social media an _ emerging off the back of social media. an audience _ emerging off the back of social media. an audience feels i emerging off the back of social media. an audience feels like i emerging off the back of social- media. an audience feels like they are being — media. an audience feels like they are being misled _ media. an audience feels like they are being misled or— media. an audience feels like they are being misled or lied _ media. an audience feels like they are being misled or lied to, - media. an audience feels like they are being misled or lied to, they. are being misled or lied to, they are being misled or lied to, they are not— are being misled or lied to, they are not going _ are being misled or lied to, they are not going to— are being misled or lied to, they are not going to be _ are being misled or lied to, they are not going to be fans - are being misled or lied to, they are not going to be fans of- are being misled or lied to, they are not going to be fans of that. are not going to be fans of that influence — are not going to be fans of that influence of— are not going to be fans of that influence of a _ are not going to be fans of that influence of a much _ are not going to be fans of that influence of a much longer, i. are not going to be fans of that. influence of a much longer, i don't think. _ influence of a much longer, idon't think. so— influence of a much longer, i don't think. so it's — influence of a much longer, i don't think. so it's in _ influence of a much longer, i don't think, so it's in all— influence of a much longer, i don't think, so it's in all of— influence of a much longer, i don't think, so it's in all of our- think, so it's in all of our interests _ think, so it's in all of our interests to— think, so it's in all of our interests to be _ think, so it's in all of our interests to be open i think, so it's in all of our interests to be open and| think, so it's in all of our— interests to be open and transparent about— interests to be open and transparent about when— interests to be open and transparent about when we — interests to be open and transparent about when we are _ interests to be open and transparent about when we are advertising - interests to be open and transparent about when we are advertising to i about when we are advertising to people _ about when we are advertising to people and — about when we are advertising to people and what _ about when we are advertising to people and what we _ about when we are advertising to people and what we are - about when we are advertising to l people and what we are consuming about when we are advertising to i people and what we are consuming as advertising _ people and what we are consuming as advertising and — people and what we are consuming as advertising and i— people and what we are consuming as advertising and i think— people and what we are consuming as advertising and i think it's _ people and what we are consuming as advertising and i think it's best- advertising and i think it's best for the — advertising and i think it's best for the industry— advertising and i think it's best for the industry and _ advertising and i think it's best for the industry and everybodyj advertising and i think it's best. for the industry and everybody all round _ but there are concerns about whether people looking at the content are being made fully aware that what they're looking at is, in fact, an advert. mps are currently looking into influence culture. today they'll speak with the advertising standards authority. because if a company has control over what you're putting online because they've paid you — that's an advert. and adverts come with rules. the body recently looked at about 24,000 instagram posts from uk influencers and found just
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a third were following advertising rules. take a look at this. this tiktok video by love island's luke mabbott breached the advertising code last year. he wore two outfits, with the captions "which look do you prefer?" and made clear where the outfits were from — with the caption "outfit from boohooman, #boohooman". what he didn't do was ensure that anyone who looked at this was instantly aware that this is an advert — rather than something he's simply bought and really likes. and some experts say the lines are too blurred and more regulation could be needed. when people think of ilnfuencers they think— when people think of ilnfuencers they think of— when people think of ilnfuencers they think of those _ when people think of ilnfuencers they think of those with - when people think of ilnfuencers they think of those with millions | when people think of ilnfuencers l they think of those with millions of followers _ they think of those with millions of followers but — they think of those with millions of followers but there _ they think of those with millions of followers but there can _ they think of those with millions of followers but there can be - they think of those with millions of followers but there can be micro i followers but there can be micro influencers. _ followers but there can be micro influencers, and _ followers but there can be micro influencers, and the _ followers but there can be micro influencers, and the need - followers but there can be micro influencers, and the need to- followers but there can be micro i influencers, and the need to monitor this the _ influencers, and the need to monitor this the amounts _ influencers, and the need to monitor this the amounts opposed _ influencers, and the need to monitor this the amounts opposed by - influencers, and the need to monitor this the amounts opposed by these i this the amounts opposed by these micro _ this the amounts opposed by these micro influencers, _ this the amounts opposed by these micro influencers, there _ this the amounts opposed by these micro influencers, there is- this the amounts opposed by these micro influencers, there is a - this the amounts opposed by these | micro influencers, there is a chance that the _ micro influencers, there is a chance that the power— micro influencers, there is a chance that the power of— micro influencers, there is a chance that the power of regulatory - micro influencers, there is a chance that the power of regulatory bodiesj that the power of regulatory bodies could _ that the power of regulatory bodies
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could be _ that the power of regulatory bodies could be broadened, _ that the power of regulatory bodies could be broadened, just— that the power of regulatory bodies could be broadened, just to - that the power of regulatory bodies could be broadened, just to assist. could be broadened, just to assist with this _ could be broadened, just to assist with this proliferation _ could be broadened, just to assist with this proliferation of _ could be broadened, just to assist with this proliferation of content l with this proliferation of content that does— with this proliferation of content that does need _ with this proliferation of content that does need regulation. i it's another example of technology racing ahead of regulation. last week the advertising watchdog took out its own ads against influencers breaking the rules. and ultimately they could face fines. pa rt of part of this is about whose responsibility it is, particular people — responsibility it is, particular people have 2000 3000 followers in subleases where this, give it a tag and i_ subleases where this, give it a tag and i will— subleases where this, give it a tag and i will give you £500. are they aware _ and i will give you £500. are they aware enough that they are breaching the regulations and the responsibility of the business that pays them on them as an individual? this is— pays them on them as an individual? this is why— pays them on them as an individual? this is why there has to be a big investigation to see a greater regulation is needed. i�*m investigation to see a greater regulation is needed. i'm with you about being _ regulation is needed. i'm with you about being slightly _ regulation is needed. i'm with you about being slightly assessed i regulation is needed. i'm with you | about being slightly assessed about food. . ilike about being slightly assessed about food. . i like your sweaty ones after you have gone for a run. let's move on. not meet sweats or
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anything. jay blades is best known as the foreman and furniture restorer on bbc one's award—winning show, the repair shop — but he's also founded charities, worked with disadvantaged young people and branched out into different types of tv it's a fascinating career — and even more impressive when you learn that jay has dyslexia and, until recently, had the reading age of an 11—year—old. now he's made a documentary called "jay blades — learning to read at 51", which was on bbc one last night. wa nt want me to read it to you? dearjay it's an _ want me to read it to you? dearjay it's an enormous pleasure to be writing — it's an enormous pleasure to be writing and _ it's an enormous pleasure to be writing and congratulating you on mba and — writing and congratulating you on mba and you have been awarded for services _ mba and you have been awarded for services to— mba and you have been awarded for services to craft as a furniture doc designer— services to craft as a furniture doc designer and presenter. services to craft as a furniture doc designerand presenter. can you services to craft as a furniture doc designer and presenter. can you read that? _ designer and presenter. can you read that? �* , designer and presenter. can you read that? ~ , designer and presenter. can you read that?�* , , designer and presenter. can you read that? , , ., designer and presenter. can you read that? , ., (an that? because you 'ust read it. can ou read that? because you 'ust read it. can you read it. _ that? because you 'ust read it. can you read it. not — that? because youjust read it. can you read it, not memorise - that? because youjust read it. can you read it, not memorise a i that? because you just read it. can i you read it, not memorise a question mark i can memorise it. that you read it, not memorise a question marki can memorise it.— marki can memorise it. that is not readina .
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marki can memorise it. that is not reading- the _ marki can memorise it. that is not reading. the words _ marki can memorise it. that is not reading. the words move _ marki can memorise it. that is not reading. the words move like i marki can memorise it. that is not reading. the words move like that l reading. the words move like that and my brain _ reading. the words move like that and my brain tends _ reading. the words move like that and my brain tends to _ reading. the words move like that and my brain tends to kind i reading. the words move like that and my brain tends to kind of i reading. the words move like that l and my brain tends to kind of make words up because i'm trying to catch them. jar; words up because i'm trying to catch them. , ., ., , ., words up because i'm trying to catch them. , ., , ., , words up because i'm trying to catch them. ., , ., , , words up because i'm trying to catch them. .,, .,, , them. jay does not see himself as havin: a them. jay does not see himself as having a disability. _ them. jay does not see himself as having a disability. the _ them. jay does not see himself as having a disability. the thing i them. jay does not see himself as having a disability. the thing is i them. jay does not see himself as having a disability. the thing is he is very— having a disability. the thing is he is very confident that i know most of it is— is very confident that i know most of it is bravado and just to cover. that— of it is bravado and just to cover. that is— of it is bravado and just to cover. that is me. — of it is bravado and just to cover. that is me, jay blades, and my love of restoring furniture landed me a job as a presenter on telly. that is the link between _ job as a presenter on telly. that is the link between you _ job as a presenter on telly. that is the link between you and - job as a presenter on telly. that is the link between you and your i the link between you and your grandad _ the link between you and your arandad. ., ., the link between you and your i randad. ., ., ., . ~' , the link between you and your arandad. ., ., , grandad. imagine, a hackney boy on the bbc. madness. _ grandad. imagine, a hackney boy on the bbc. madness. but _ grandad. imagine, a hackney boy on the bbc. madness. but there i grandad. imagine, a hackney boy on the bbc. madness. but there is- grandad. imagine, a hackney boy on the bbc. madness. but there is one| the bbc. madness. but there is one thing you may not know about me. i am one of over 8 million adults in the uk who struggle to read. the only way i can explain reading, imagine giving yourself a headache and it is just all, imagine giving yourself a headache and it isjust all, pure pain. i've never read a book in my life. after half a century of not reading, it's
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time to give it a go. jayjoins us now from chichester. good morning to you. how are you feeling after that went out last night because you've put yourself out there. i night because you've put yourself out there. . , night because you've put yourself out there. ., , , , night because you've put yourself out there. . , , , ., out there. i have put myself out there and _ out there. i have put myself out there and it's _ out there. i have put myself out there and it's almost _ out there. i have put myself out there and it's almost as - out there. i have put myself out there and it's almost as if- out there. i have put myself out there and it's almost as if i've i there and it's almost as if i've done full monty and shown everyone my vulnerability, and did i say good morning question mark i know my mum is watching. good morning to both of you. it's been a bit overwhelming. i'm normally hidden in the repair shop and now it's me on my own showing that i have a problem with reading and i've been inundated with social media, the whole, the output has been unbelievable and there's been so much me coming out. you mentioned — been so much me coming out. you mentioned your — been so much me coming out. you mentioned your mum and you talk about your mum in the programme and how she was a single parent who raised you and she was busy, and rather than having time and having the opportunity to read to you at
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night, there was a look that she gave. can you just show me the look that your mum would have given when it was time for you to be quiet and go to bed. i it was time for you to be quiet and no to bed. , ., ., it was time for you to be quiet and aoto bed. ., ., ,, go to bed. i tell you what happened, there was something _ go to bed. i tell you what happened, there was something that _ go to bed. i tell you what happened, there was something that happened | there was something that happened yesterday where someone came in and gave the mum look and it was the most scary thing. my glasses steamed up. i can't even do it but it is this look and others don't even have to say anything, they give you that look like wait till i get you home, or you've done something wrong. i can't do it. only mums can do it. but it is a stern look.— but it is a stern look. your mum sounds fabulous. _ but it is a stern look. your mum sounds fabulous. she _ but it is a stern look. your mum sounds fabulous. she must i but it is a stern look. your mum sounds fabulous. she must be i sounds fabulous. she must be incredibly proud. i sounds fabulous. she must be incredibly proud.— sounds fabulous. she must be incredibly proud. i think she is. i haven't spoken _ incredibly proud. i think she is. i haven't spoken to _ incredibly proud. i think she is. i haven't spoken to her— incredibly proud. i think she is. i haven't spoken to her this i incredibly proud. i think she is. i. haven't spoken to her this morning and she lives in barbados and they are a few hours behind if i'm not mistaken and i will speak to her today but i have two mothers and i'm very fortunate and in the show you get to see my second mum that is in wolverhampton and i will speak to her today as well and see what they thought of it. her today as well and see what they thought of it—
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thought of it. good morning to you, charlie here- _ thought of it. good morning to you, charlie here. it's— thought of it. good morning to you, charlie here. it's a _ thought of it. good morning to you, charlie here. it's a very _ thought of it. good morning to you, charlie here. it's a very emotional. charlie here. it's a very emotional story and some of it is practical about you learning to read and it's about you learning to read and its extraordinary to see a fully grown man and i will put it out there, going through those things that for most people they did when they were children. it's extraordinary watching that and very brave of you to do it on camera. but i know that you are mindful of in that you are a lucky one that through your confidence or skills or whatever you came out of it and it was ok but for so many other young people who don't get the help when it is needed, it's completely life changing thing which stops them from having the life they should. i should. i totally agree and i'm one of the lucky ones. _ should. i totally agree and i'm one of the lucky ones. my _ should. i totally agree and i'm one of the lucky ones. my naivety i should. i totally agree and i'm one of the lucky ones. my naivety and | of the lucky ones. my naivety and confidence took me to places where i did not know, for instance, i went to university not knowing i would have to read a book so when they gave me a reading list in the first seminar i was like, what you want me to do with that and it hit me that i
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would have to read the books but luckily for me i've been able to do so many different things and jump into different opportunities but there are about 8 million people affected by this and it's a case of not everybody is going to be, and it's going to sound bad, but not everybody will be as successful as me or be able to take those opportunities, and i'm hoping with this documentary that everybody gets a chance to say, i have dyslexia and i would like to receive support because there is support out there. i think we can maybe see another clip of the moment when you are going to read a little bit. flan clip of the moment when you are going to read a little bit.- going to read a little bit. can we do that? there's _ going to read a little bit. can we do that? there's a _ going to read a little bit. can we do that? there's a lot _ going to read a little bit. can we do that? there's a lot of- going to read a little bit. can we do that? there's a lot of words i do that? there's a lot of words in here, do that? there's a lot of words in here. isn't _ do that? there's a lot of words in here, isn't there? _ do that? there's a lot of words in here, isn't there? 0k. _ do that? there's a lot of words in here, isn't there? 0k. take - do that? there's a lot of words in here, isn't there? 0k. take your| here, isn't there? 0k. take your time. do dad, i hope you are doing well. now, i'd prop you don't need that. i
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can't see it all. i have been busy here. my theatre work is getting more real. real now. i've been doing pretty well in my lessons.— pretty well in my lessons. now, that is a letter from _ pretty well in my lessons. now, that is a letter from your _ pretty well in my lessons. now, that is a letter from your daughter - pretty well in my lessons. now, that is a letter from your daughter to - is a letter from your daughter to you, so how is the reading now and is this a work in progress and you are still working on it? i’m is this a work in progress and you are still working on it?— are still working on it? i'm still workin: are still working on it? i'm still working on _ are still working on it? i'm still working on it. _ are still working on it? i'm still working on it. there's - are still working on it? i'm still working on it. there's five - are still working on it? i'm still i working on it. there's five books are still working on it? i'm still - working on it. there's five books to go through and i've started number three and because of the schedule of filming and ifeel quite three and because of the schedule of filming and i feel quite a three and because of the schedule of filming and ifeel quite a lot comments like six days a week iphone, so i probably fit their meaning between lunch break and stuff —— six days a week i filmed. i have a way to go but that letter that my daughter wrote to me, that is quite special because it's the first time she's ever wrote one and it's the first time i've attempted to read something out loud as well, so it was quite emotional. it’s
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so it was quite emotional. it's interesting — so it was quite emotional. it's interesting that you started telling people he worked with that you could not or had difficulty reading and it's amazing the support you get. no judgment when people were talking to you and i think that is one of the things that will help a lot of people who have difficulty with reading vcu, tv star, putting yourself out there. —— who see you. that has been the biggest learning for me, growing up in the areal grew up, to show your vulnerability made you a victim, so it wasn't something you would admit to everybody but doing it in the workplace, there are people that who are super kind and they gave me so much support, and even today, even now, what they do with me is they just inform me. nobody sends me e—mails, i don't get them and they just talk to me because that's the easiest way. once you talk to me, i can remember what you are saying and it's just a different way of learning, that is all is. completely
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different. it’s learning, that is all is. completely different. �* , . learning, that is all is. completely different. �*, ., ., , ., , ., different. it's a great story and lovely talking _ different. it's a great story and lovely talking to _ different. it's a great story and lovely talking to you _ different. it's a great story and lovely talking to you this - different. it's a great story and - lovely talking to you this morning, jay- lovely talking to you this morning, jay. lovely to see you. you can watch "jay blades: learning to read at 51" on the bbc iplayer time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. the funeral of 14—year—old jermaine cools will be held later this morning in south london. the teenager was attacked close to west croydon station in november, and later died in hospital — the youngest victim of knife crime last year. his family say they want the media to show the anguish and pain they are going through, in the hope teenagers will stop carrying knives. police in westminster have used footage of drivers doing laps around each other to help in a crackdown against anti—social and dangerous driving. special acoustic cameras, similar to these installed
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in neighbouring kensington and chelsea last summer, help detect loud noises such as drivers revving car engines. westminster city council said ten vehicles were seized and five people arrested between the weekend of 14th and 16th of january. now, she's the oldest volunteer in the nhs and possibly the country. beryl carr, who turned 100 years old this month, has been volunteering at ealing hospital for the past 18 years. born in acton, she moved away but came back to the area to be near her daughter after her husband died, and says working at the hospital cafe has been her lifeline. i enjoy coming, and it's a worthwhilejob, and i'm helping people that are not as fortunate as i am or as well as i am. people say i don't look my age, but no, i'm so lucky. and you can catch more of the wonderful beryl on our lunchtime and evening news at 6.30, and on our website — bbc.co.uk/london.
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if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning, apart from minor delays on the dlr and planned closures on the bank branch of the northern line. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. we start the day with temperatures in mid—single figures celsius but we wake up to a largely grey and cloudy start and what has been happening overnight is a cold front has been slowly making its way southwards, so the cloud increasing and through this morning we might get a little bit of light, patchy rain, nothing more significant ahead of this cold front clearing, and once it clears, plenty of sunshine. so, this afternoon we have blue sky bit a bit breezy at this afternoon on the temperature is quite mild, i2 celsius by the end of the day. overnight, the wind is light and we've got clear skies, so a perfect recipe for the temperature to drop and it will be chilly again
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with the minimum dropping down to zero and we could see a sparkle or to a frost on friday morning first thing, and we could also see one or two mist and fog patches. friday, a bright start and high pressure there but gradually through the day we could see the cloud increasing from the west. that indicates perhaps it is actually getting a bit milder. temperatures tomorrow perhaps a little chillier than today at nine celsius, and come saturday more unsettled and more cloud and certainly breezy but the temperature could reach ia celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. care home visitation rules in england are suddenly eased by the government, allowing unlimited visits from monday.
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prince andrew demands a trial byjury in new york, as he denies he was a close friend of convicted sex trafficker, ghislaine maxwell. face coverings are no longer mandatory in england from today, but some big retailers ask customers to continue wearing them. after his recordbreaking doubles win, britain's alfie hewitt said he had nothing left in the tank, as he lost the australian open wheelchair singles final this morning to the top seed. and it may be a bit cloudy and damp for a song this morning, but there is plenty of sunshine in the afternoon. good morning. in the last hour it has been announced at the rules for visiting care homes in england will be relaxed from monday. the department _ be relaxed from monday. the department of _ be relaxed from monday. tue: department of health be relaxed from monday. t't;e: department of health and be relaxed from monday. tt;e: department of health and social case says there will be no limit on the number of to care homes currently
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only three designated people can visit. ,, :, , :, , :, visit. self isolating periods for residents will _ visit. self isolating periods for residents will also _ visit. self isolating periods for residents will also be - visit. self isolating periods for residents will also be reduced| visit. self isolating periods for i residents will also be reduced or scrapped, and here is alison holt. at the end of last year the government tightened restrictions on care home visits because of the vulnerability of many residents. now with case is beginning to fall and the rest of society opening up, those restrictions are being removed. from monday, january 31, residents will be able to have unlimited visitors. if they go out on a day trip they won't have to take a test or self—isolate when they get back. patients returning home from hospital will have the length of time they have to self—isolate cut from 1a to ten days. if a care home as an outbreak of the virus it has to close its doors for four weeks. that would be reduced to two weeks. alison holt, bbc news.
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face coverings in england are no longer mandatory, as covid restrictions are eased this morning. many shops, like sainsbury�*s and john lewis, and some transport providers will still be asking customers to wear one. face coverings continue to be mandatory when shopping in northern ireland, scotland and wales. prince andrew is demanding a trial byjury in a civil case brought by virginia giuffre, who has accused him of sexual assault. the prince rejects her claims, and his lawyers have lodged papers with the us court, which include a denial that andrew was a close friend of convicted sex trafficker, ghislaine maxwell. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell has more details. across 11 pages, andrew's lawyers have set out his defence, a denial of the central allegation of sexual abuse made by virginia giuffre, and an assertion in respect of others that andrew lacks sufficient information to either admit or deny what's been claimed. he says, for example, in relation to the widely publicised picture of the two of them,
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that he doesn't have enough information to admit or deny that there exists photographic evidence of his alleged meeting with miss giuffre. elsewhere, his lawyers assert that virginia giuffre's civil complaint should be dismissed, because she's a permanent resident of australia, and not domiciled in the united states. and they say this. finally, they demand this. all of which suggests that andrew is determined to fight it out in court. though lawyers say this doesn't preclude an out—of—court settlement. you can certainly have a settlement further down the road, and it wouldn't shock me at all, between now and a trial, to see something like that happen, you know. and sometimes, though, there are cases where no amount of money will make them go away. there were times when, again, you know, a victim
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wants their day in court. and that certainly seems to be virginia giuffre's intention. her lawyer has said they look forward to confronting prince andrew with his denials and his attempts to blame miss giuffre for her own abuse at the trial. nicholas witchell, bbc news. virginia giuffre's lawyer says she was looking forward to confronting prince andrew about her... another lawyer said prince andrew's request for a jury trial is meaningless as miss dufresne had already asked for one, which is her constitutional right. six minutes past seven. a report into alleged parties at downing street during lockdown, is expected to land on the desk of the prime minister today — although it may not be published until next week. let's speak to our chief political correspondent adam fleming.
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what can you tell us this morning? a really curious situation. what do you know?— really curious situation. what do ou know? . , ., , you know? sources in the cabinet office are not _ you know? sources in the cabinet office are not repeating - you know? sources in the cabinet office are not repeating the - you know? sources in the cabinet. office are not repeating the phrase they used — office are not repeating the phrase they used yesterday, where they said it was_ they used yesterday, where they said it was expected to be handed over to the prime _ it was expected to be handed over to the prime minister. they are not repeating — the prime minister. they are not repeating that. so we are now in guessing — repeating that. so we are now in guessing territory. our understanding is that most of the words _ understanding is that most of the words have been committed to the pa-e words have been committed to the page lry— words have been committed to the page by sue gray, but it is last—minute checks for legal and hr staff, _ last—minute checks for legal and hr staff, and _ last—minute checks for legal and hr staff, and also to make sure that nothing — staff, and also to make sure that nothing cuts across this police investigation. then you've just got the questions of timing and logistics. it is notjust that this report— logistics. it is notjust that this report will— logistics. it is notjust that this report will get published in some fornr _ report will get published in some fornr the — report will get published in some form. the prime minister is committed to go to parliament, make a statement and answer questions from _ a statement and answer questions from we — a statement and answer questions from mps. we are running out of time in this— from mps. we are running out of time in this week's — from mps. we are running out of time in this week's parliamentary calendar— in this week's parliamentary calendar for all of that to happen. plus, _ calendar for all of that to happen. plus, mps — calendar for all of that to happen. plus, mps and the opposition parties want enough time to scrutinise the report— want enough time to scrutinise the report before they then scrutinise the pmi, — report before they then scrutinise the pmi, so there is a question
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about— the pmi, so there is a question about how— the pmi, so there is a question about how much time that will all take _ about how much time that will all take. there is also a question about what _ take. there is also a question about what we _ take. there is also a question about what we will— take. there is also a question about what we will get to see of this report — what we will get to see of this report. the government is insisting it will— report. the government is insisting it will publish it in but they do not know— it will publish it in but they do not know what form it will take and whether— not know what form it will take and whether it — not know what form it will take and whether it will contain any confidential information which you might— confidential information which you might want to blank out or take out altogether. we may end up seeing a version _ altogether. we may end up seeing a version of— altogether. we may end up seeing a version of the report, which would prompt— version of the report, which would prompt accusations of a cover—up from _ prompt accusations of a cover—up from the — prompt accusations of a cover—up from the opposition. lots of stuff around _ from the opposition. lots of stuff around the — from the opposition. lots of stuff around the publication of all of this before you even get to do the actual— this before you even get to do the actual content and how people react to that _ actual content and how people react to that in _ actual content and how people react to that. in terms of how the conservative party are feeling, because — conservative party are feeling, because they will decide whether it should _ because they will decide whether it should lead to a vote of confidence in boris _ should lead to a vote of confidence in borisjohnson's leadership, allies— in borisjohnson's leadership, allies say— in borisjohnson's leadership, allies say people are galvanising behind _ allies say people are galvanising behind him because they have had enough. _ behind him because they have had enough, and other mps say they are still waiting to see the details and crucially, — still waiting to see the details and crucially, what does the prime minister— crucially, what does the prime minister do about it? for example, having _ minister do about it? for example, having a _ minister do about it? for example, having a big — minister do about it? for example, having a big clear out of downing street _ having a big clear out of downing street staff. the waiting is one thing. — street staff. the waiting is one thing, when it gets here is another hole -- _
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thing, when it gets here is another hole -- all— thing, when it gets here is another hole —— all game. the united states has rejected russia's demand to bar ukraine from joining the nato alliance of western powers. moscow made the demand after amassing a huge number of troops on its border with ukraine, although it denies that it is planning to invade. our correspondentjames waterhouse is in kyiv. this situation is tense, we know that. should there be any encouragement or any optimism at least in the fact there are discussions going on? t least in the fact there are discussions going on? i think there is a bit of optimism _ discussions going on? i think there is a bit of optimism this _ discussions going on? i think there is a bit of optimism this morning, | is a bit of optimism this morning, naga _ is a bit of optimism this morning, naga the — is a bit of optimism this morning, naga. the reason being, yes, the us seems _ naga. the reason being, yes, the us seems to— naga. the reason being, yes, the us seems to have rejected russia's main demand _ seems to have rejected russia's main demand. but we understand there could _ demand. but we understand there could he _ demand. but we understand there could be some proposals in the security— could be some proposals in the security sense, so that is the deployment of missiles and military exercises _ deployment of missiles and military exercises. those are things which russia _ exercises. those are things which russia could consider and president putin— russia could consider and president putin could — russia could consider and president putin could turn around to his people — putin could turn around to his people and say, look, we have something out of this, we got the attention— something out of this, we got the attention of the west. it was it
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would — attention of the west. it was it would retaliate if it did not get what _ would retaliate if it did not get what it — would retaliate if it did not get what it wanted. this all mean stocks will continue. the ukrainian foreign minister— will continue. the ukrainian foreign minister says he is confident as well that— minister says he is confident as well that ukraine's interests and priorities— well that ukraine's interests and priorities have been considered by the us— priorities have been considered by the us in— priorities have been considered by the us in these talks happening without— the us in these talks happening without them. separate do this though. — without them. separate do this though, there is further optimism. yesterday, — though, there is further optimism. yesterday, experts from ukraine, russia, _ yesterday, experts from ukraine, russia, germany and france resumed talks after— russia, germany and france resumed talks after months of no dialogue, called _ talks after months of no dialogue, called the — talks after months of no dialogue, called the normandy format, to do with the _ called the normandy format, to do with the peace process in the east of the _ with the peace process in the east of the country, where there has been fighting _ of the country, where there has been fighting for— of the country, where there has been fighting for eight years now. so there _ fighting for eight years now. so there is— fighting for eight years now. so there is optimism there. russia has said there _ there is optimism there. russia has said there has been no breakthroughs but they— said there has been no breakthroughs but they are open to talks. that is the diplomacy side sorted. meanwhile, here in kyiv, for example. _ meanwhile, here in kyiv, for example, there are apps which show you where _ example, there are apps which show you where bomb shelters are. more ukrainians— you where bomb shelters are. more ukrainians are sharing grab bags they would use in the event of an invasion — they would use in the event of an invasion. the us is the latest
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country— invasion. the us is the latest country to— invasion. the us is the latest country to urge citizens to leave. the tension _ country to urge citizens to leave. the tension hasn't really changed what _ the tension hasn't really changed what it— the tension hasn't really changed what it is— the tension hasn't really changed what it is a — the tension hasn't really changed what it is a tension many ukrainians have learned to live with. indeed _ have learned to live with. indeed. james, very interesting. thank you for bringing us up to date. james waterhouse in kyiv. people on universal credit will be given one month before they must look forjobs outside their chosen field, under government plans to get more people into work. currently, claimants have three months to find work in their chosen sector but ministers want half a million jobseekers in employment by the end ofjune. opposition parties have said there should be more support for people to find the job they want. fans of neil young won't able to listen to his music on spotify for much longer. the streaming platform has begun removing young's tracks after he called for it to choose between him and the us podcasterjoe rogan, whom he accuses of being against covid vaccinations. joe rogan denies that claim. spotify said it regrets the move and hopes the issue can be resolved soon.
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12 minutes past seven. let's go back to one of our main stories. there's a deadline looming for frontline nhs staff in england who are not yet vaccinated against covid. they've gotjust one week left to get their firstjab, or face losing theirjobs. the health secretary has said it's their professional duty to be fully vaccinated, but some people in the health service have called for the policy to be r—thought. our health reporter jim reed has more. amy is an occupational therapist, often working with the elderly and physically disabled. she has, though, decided not to be vaccinated against covid. i would say that each person has to weigh up the pros and cons for themselves. what would you say to people who think, if you work with vulnerable people in a health care setting, you have a responsibility to be vaccinated yourself, to protect other people?
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but you can still get, even with three vaccines, you can still get covid, you can still spread it. and the other thing is, wearing ppe, personal protective equipment, protects the the vulnerable people. and you're prepared to to lose yourjob rather than get vaccinated at the moment? yes, i don't want to lose myjob. i love myjob. i respect the nhs, but i'm very much a supporter of choice. amy is one of two million in england covered by new rules on compulsory vaccination. that already includes half a million care home workers, who had to have their second jab by last november. next week, another 1.7 million in front line health care will need to have their first dose. that includes nhs staff and other jobs, like gps and dentists. the latest figures suggest 95% of nhs workers are already vaccinated, leaving around 77,000 who haven't yet had a firstjab.
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i think the scientific evidence is so overwhelming. many others working in health care support the principle of mandatory vaccination. if a patient comes to me and says, "should i have the vaccine? "have you been vaccinated, doctor?" that answer should always be, "yes, of course i've been vaccinated, "and you should, too." there is no wriggle room, ethically, for a doctor or a nurse, or anybody, talking to patients about whether they should be vaccinated themselves or not. so your message would be, get the vaccine if you want to stay in a job? i think the evidence, the evidence is overwhelming. i've been working on covid icu since the beginning. i have not had a vaccination. i do not want to have a vaccination. the debate, though, is becoming more heated as the deadline looms. this clip of a doctor challenging the health secretary on the policy has been viewed more than a million times on social media. the government says doctors, nurses and other front line health
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staff look after the most vulnerable, who could face serious consequences if they catch the virus. and nhs health chiefs say staff have a duty to make sure they're protected. anne—marie is unvaccinated but works in admin, not with patients. she was sent this letter saying there was no record of her having a jab, and telling her to contact her manager. i was left for two weeks, actually, sort of worrying about the letter, and worrying about the conversation that i was going to have to have. she has now been told the new rule won't apply in her role, but she's still worried about the impact on the health service. if those staff are forced to leave the nhs, not only will you lose those staff, you'll be leaving behind a lot of people who are demoralised and a lot of teams will be divided. last weekend, health care workers joined this wider protest against compulsory vaccination.
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other nhs staff firmly support the policy. with just a week to go, ministers now say they will reflect on the latest evidence, but the need to protect patients remains unchanged. jim reed, bbc news. danny mortimer is deputy chief executive of the nhs confederation, which represents all the nhs services. just so people understand, who do you represent?— you represent? good morning. i represent _ you represent? good morning. i represent organisations - you represent? good morning. i represent organisations that - you represent? good morning. i- represent organisations that provide services _ represent organisations that provide services commissioned by the nhs in england _ services commissioned by the nhs in england. 50, trusts, gp surgeries etcacross— england. 50, trusts, gp surgeries etc across england. as england. so, trusts, gp surgeries etc across england.— england. so, trusts, gp surgeries etc across england. as you are well aware, etc across england. as you are well aware. this — etc across england. as you are well aware, this deadline _ etc across england. as you are well aware, this deadline of— etc across england. as you are well aware, this deadline of february i aware, this deadline of february three to have the first vaccine is looming. as you see it now, what are the risks? what are the dangers and concerns? 50 the risks? what are the dangers and concerns? , :, concerns? so the first thing i would want to say — concerns? so the first thing i would want to say on _ concerns? so the first thing i would want to say on behalf— concerns? so the first thing i would want to say on behalf of— concerns? so the first thing i would want to say on behalf of those - concerns? so the first thing i would want to say on behalf of those i - concerns? so the first thing i would want to say on behalf of those i do | want to say on behalf of those i do represent — want to say on behalf of those i do represent is that what they would do, represent is that what they would do. what — represent is that what they would do. what i — represent is that what they would do, what i would do, is encourage
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everybody— do, what i would do, is encourage everybody who has not had their first jab — everybody who has not had their first jab yet, to come forward, to speak— first jab yet, to come forward, to speak to — first jab yet, to come forward, to speak to a — first jab yet, to come forward, to speak to a trusted clinician, to get answers— speak to a trusted clinician, to get answers to — speak to a trusted clinician, to get answers to their questions. they will not — answers to their questions. they will not he — answers to their questions. they will not be judged or criticised for the fact— will not be judged or criticised for the fact they have waited until this point _ the fact they have waited until this point in _ the fact they have waited until this point in time to have their first dose — point in time to have their first dose. clearly, there will be, we think. _ dose. clearly, there will be, we think. still— dose. clearly, there will be, we think, stilla dose. clearly, there will be, we think, still a small group of people. _ think, still a small group of people, people like amy you spoke to 'ust people, people like amy you spoke to just now. _ people, people like amy you spoke to just now, who will refuse to have the vaccine _ just now, who will refuse to have the vaccine. and they will need to be the vaccine. and they will need to he moved — the vaccine. and they will need to be moved either to alternative roles, — be moved either to alternative roles, or— be moved either to alternative roles, or unfortunately, we'll have to leave _ roles, or unfortunately, we'll have to leave. that carries different risks _ to leave. that carries different risks in — to leave. that carries different risks in different parts of the country _ risks in different parts of the country. it is really hard to predict _ country. it is really hard to predict the kind of level of posts we will _ predict the kind of level of posts we will lose, people we will lose, rather~ _ we will lose, people we will lose, rather~ but — we will lose, people we will lose, rather. but it clearly, that can impact — rather. but it clearly, that can impact on _ rather. but it clearly, that can impact on the services that are provided — impact on the services that are provided in different places and different parts of the country. it will he — different parts of the country. it will be felt variably depending on the individual choices people make. the two _ the individual choices people make. the two options you gave there, they will be given other roles or they
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will be given other roles or they will have to leave. now if they are given other roles, there simply will not be enough staff, presumably, to cover the front line roles, if that is what you need to do. you will do those jobs? is what you need to do. you will do thosejobs? it is is what you need to do. you will do those jobs? it is an industry that is lacking people anyway. —— who will lose those jobs? is lacking people anyway. -- who will lose those jobs?— is lacking people anyway. -- who will lose those jobs? will lose those 'obs? there are real challenaes will lose those 'obs? there are real challenges in — will lose those jobs? there are real challenges in health _ will lose those jobs? there are real challenges in health and _ will lose those jobs? there are real challenges in health and social- will lose those jobs? there are real| challenges in health and social care levy challenges in health and social care levy terms — challenges in health and social care levy terms of the vacancies we are carrying _ levy terms of the vacancies we are carrying at — levy terms of the vacancies we are carrying. at the same time the nhs also employs huge numbers of people, as i also employs huge numbers of people, as i think— also employs huge numbers of people, as i think the secretary of state reported — as i think the secretary of state reported earlier this week. over 95% of staff— reported earlier this week. over 95% of staff working on the nhs have had both doses of the vaccine. but clearly. — both doses of the vaccine. but clearly, any person that we lose, we truly regret — clearly, any person that we lose, we truly regret losing anyone as a result— truly regret losing anyone as a result of— truly regret losing anyone as a result of this, can carry on impact. it result of this, can carry on impact. it depends— result of this, can carry on impact. it depends how many people are lost from particular services. we would rather— from particular services. we would rather not — from particular services. we would rather not lose people. which is why i am rather not lose people. which is why lam encouraging rather not lose people. which is why i am encouraging people to talk to their trusted clinician, to get advice. — their trusted clinician, to get advice. to— their trusted clinician, to get advice, to have their questions answered _
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advice, to have their questions answered. i think the vast majority of people _ answered. i think the vast majority of people over the course of this time _ of people over the course of this time will— of people over the course of this time will come forward and have their— time will come forward and have their first — time will come forward and have their first dose. | time will come forward and have their first dose.— their first dose. i am trying to read between _ their first dose. i am trying to read between the _ their first dose. i am trying to read between the lines - their first dose. i am trying to read between the lines of - their first dose. i am trying to | read between the lines of what their first dose. i am trying to - read between the lines of what you are saying, they appreciate the message is get the vaccination. you have made that point clearly. but there comes a point, and the point is on the 3rd of february, wherever people are either sacked or put into other roles, there will be gaps. you know full well you don't have enough staff anyway, even with those people in employment. so i am trying to work out what the impact will be? the position that we are in, the government consulted on making the vaccine _ government consulted on making the vaccine mandates re—beyond care homes, _ vaccine mandates re—beyond care homes, where it was already mandatory. the majority of nhs leaders — mandatory. the majority of nhs leaders believed there were real benefits — leaders believed there were real benefits in terms of inquiring —— requiring — benefits in terms of inquiring —— requiring health staff to be vaccinated. they believed that in terms _ vaccinated. they believed that in terms of — vaccinated. they believed that in terms of protecting the service,
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protecting individuals and above all, protecting patients. so they see reat— all, protecting patients. so they see real benefits, real benefits to the health service in terms of the imagination of vaccines. that is the decision— imagination of vaccines. that is the decision the — imagination of vaccines. that is the decision the dog might have made. alongside — decision the dog might have made. alongside that, the government already— alongside that, the government already insists on vaccination. there — already insists on vaccination. there are _ already insists on vaccination. there are a _ already insists on vaccination. there are a whole host of other conditions _ there are a whole host of other conditions to protect patients. those — conditions to protect patients. those things are not left to individualjudgment. they are made as this _ individualjudgment. they are made as this isn't — individualjudgment. they are made as this isn't about standards, safety— as this isn't about standards, safety standards in particular. clearly. — safety standards in particular. clearly. in _ safety standards in particular. clearly, in implementing this particular safety standard, there will he _ particular safety standard, there will be people who choose not to comply— will be people who choose not to comply with it. that is their choice _ comply with it. that is their choice. but unfortunately, we will lose them — choice. but unfortunately, we will lose them and that may have impacted in some _ lose them and that may have impacted in some areas, and some services. but at _ in some areas, and some services. but at the — in some areas, and some services. but at the view the government have taken _ but at the view the government have taken is _ but at the view the government have taken is that there are very clear benefits — taken is that there are very clear benefits to — taken is that there are very clear benefits to health staff and social care staff — benefits to health staff and social care staff in being vaccinated.
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thank — care staff in being vaccinated. thank you _ care staff in being vaccinated. thank you very much for it speaking to us. danny mortimer, abidi chief executive of the nhs confederation. —— deputy. and we can now speak to jane townson, chief executive of the homecare association. how is this deadline going to affect your staffing numbers? ithui’eiiii. how is this deadline going to affect your staffing numbers?— your staffing numbers? well, first of all, it's your staffing numbers? well, first of all. it's very — your staffing numbers? well, first of all, it's very important - your staffing numbers? well, first of all, it's very important for - your staffing numbers? well, first of all, it's very important for us i of all, it's very important for us to stress— of all, it's very important for us to stress that we have always strongly— to stress that we have always strongly favoured vaccination because _ strongly favoured vaccination because there is clear evidence that it protects— because there is clear evidence that it protects against serious illness and death. but at the moment, as it stands, _ and death. but at the moment, as it stands, we — and death. but at the moment, as it stands, we have got almost 18% of home _ stands, we have got almost 18% of home care — stands, we have got almost 18% of home care staff without having both vaccines, _ home care staff without having both vaccines, which is required for the regulations — vaccines, which is required for the regulations. if that does not change between _ regulations. if that does not change between now and the 1st of april, we stand _ between now and the 1st of april, we stand to _ between now and the 1st of april, we stand to lose may be somewhere between — stand to lose may be somewhere between 75000 and 100,000 care workers _
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between 75000 and 100,000 care workers. roughly one care worker for every _ workers. roughly one care worker for every one _ workers. roughly one care worker for every one person receiving care. that _ every one person receiving care. that is _ every one person receiving care. that is an — every one person receiving care. that is an awful lot of people that could _ that is an awful lot of people that could potentially go without care. when _ could potentially go without care. when you — could potentially go without care. when you say 75,000100,000, out of how many? when you say 75,000 100,000, out of how man ? :: :: :: :: :: when you say 75,000 100,000, out of how many?_ so _ when you say 75,000 100,000, out of how many?_ so one - when you say 75,000 100,000, out of how many?_ so one fifth - when you say 75,000 100,000, out of how many?_ so one fifth of l how many? 500,000. so one fifth of our staff how many? 500,000. so one fifth of your staff could _ how many? 500,000. so one fifth of your staff could be _ how many? 500,000. so one fifth of your staff could be lost? _ how many? 500,000. so one fifth of your staff could be lost? yes, - how many? 500,000. so one fifth of your staff could be lost? yes, if- how many? 500,000. so one fifth of your staff could be lost? yes, if we . your staff could be lost? yes, if we don't aet your staff could be lost? yes, if we don't get significant _ your staff could be lost? yes, if we don't get significant progress. - your staff could be lost? yes, if we don't get significant progress. so l don't get significant progress. sc what don't get significant progress. what will don't get significant progress. sr what will help reduce that number that could be lost between now and the 1st of february, on the first vaccination will have to be taken? yeah, the number who have had the first dose _ yeah, the number who have had the first dose is— yeah, the number who have had the first dose is a bit higher. we are up first dose is a bit higher. we are up to— first dose is a bit higher. we are up to 88% — first dose is a bit higher. we are up to 88% of staff who have had the first dose _ up to 88% of staff who have had the first dose. it is still over 10% of that— first dose. it is still over 10% of that have — first dose. it is still over 10% of that have not and 10% of a large number— that have not and 10% of a large number is — that have not and 10% of a large number is still a big impact. so if ou lose number is still a big impact. so if you lose 50,000, _ number is still a big impact. so if you lose 50,000, and _ number is stilla big impact. sr t you lose 50,000, and care at the moment is one—to—one, one home carer per person needing care, that reduces it to what? how does that practically change the care that
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somebody would receive at home? already we are seeing the impact of workforce _ already we are seeing the impact of workforce shortages. councils say they can't — workforce shortages. councils say they can't provide care to people who need — they can't provide care to people who need it. we are seeing hospitals unable _ who need it. we are seeing hospitals unable to— who need it. we are seeing hospitals unable to discharge people in a timely— unable to discharge people in a timely manner. we are seeing hospitals _ timely manner. we are seeing hospitals having to offer financial inducements to families to come and collect _ inducements to families to come and collect their loved ones from hospital~ _ collect their loved ones from hospital. we are seeing the opening of care _ hospital. we are seeing the opening of care hotels as a solution to address— of care hotels as a solution to address the problem. but what we are really— address the problem. but what we are really concerned about is the impact on old _ really concerned about is the impact on old and _ really concerned about is the impact on old and disabled people of loss of care _ on old and disabled people of loss of care. many people have nobody to look after _ of care. many people have nobody to look after them. they are unable to -et look after them. they are unable to get out _ look after them. they are unable to get out of— look after them. they are unable to get out of bed themselves. they are unable _ get out of bed themselves. they are unable to— get out of bed themselves. they are unable to feed themselves. what is going _ unable to feed themselves. what is going to _ unable to feed themselves. what is going to happen to those people? who is going _ going to happen to those people? who is going to _ going to happen to those people? who is going to care for them? in some parts _ is going to care for them? in some parts of— is going to care for them? in some parts of the — is going to care for them? in some parts of the country, particularly london. — parts of the country, particularly london, where only 50% of staff have received _ london, where only 50% of staff have received vaccination, we could lose half of _ received vaccination, we could lose half of the — received vaccination, we could lose half of the workforce in some places — half of the workforce in some laces. ~ :, ,, half of the workforce in some laces. ~ ., ., half of the workforce in some laces, : ., ., ., ~' half of the workforce in some laces. ~ ., ., ., ~ ., places. what you are talking about is very real —
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places. what you are talking about is very real and — places. what you are talking about is very real and it _ places. what you are talking about is very real and it will— places. what you are talking about is very real and it will affect - is very real and it will affect people and that is frightening, obviously. and nobody wants to see that. at this point in time, and i know you have said you are not anti—vaccination at all, you are pro—vaccination, just not pro—mandatory vaccination, at this moment in time, if 10%, 12% of your staff, care home workers, or home care workers, i should say, have not been vaccinated, what is going to persuade them to now?— been vaccinated, what is going to persuade them to now? well, many of them have got — persuade them to now? well, many of them have got genuine _ persuade them to now? well, many of them have got genuine fears. - persuade them to now? well, many of them have got genuine fears. what. persuade them to now? well, many ofj them have got genuine fears. what we have found _ them have got genuine fears. what we have found is that when they have the opportunity to sit down one—to—one with a trusted clinician, preferably— one—to—one with a trusted clinician, preferably someone from the same unity that— preferably someone from the same unity that they are from, really listen — unity that they are from, really listen and _ unity that they are from, really listen and address those fears, many of them _ listen and address those fears, many of them do _ listen and address those fears, many of them do go on to have vaccination. we have been pushing, both nhs— vaccination. we have been pushing, both nhs england and who department of health _ both nhs england and who department of health and social care, to provide _ of health and social care, to provide some funding for that time for clinicians to spend with care workers — for clinicians to spend with care workers. up to now, nearly all of the effort —
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workers. up to now, nearly all of the effort has gone into care homes for understandable reasons because the risks— for understandable reasons because the risks in— for understandable reasons because the risks in congregate settings are much _ the risks in congregate settings are much higher. that is another point we want _ much higher. that is another point we want to— much higher. that is another point we want to make. even in the first wave _ we want to make. even in the first wave of— we want to make. even in the first wave of the — we want to make. even in the first wave of the pandemic, when we did not have _ wave of the pandemic, when we did not have enough ppe, we did not have routine _ not have enough ppe, we did not have routine asymptomatic testing for home _ routine asymptomatic testing for home care and vaccines had not yet been _ home care and vaccines had not yet been developed, the number of people that died _ been developed, the number of people that died from a covid in—home care was very— that died from a covid in—home care was very low— that died from a covid in—home care was very low compared to care homes, which _ was very low compared to care homes, which generally tracked the wider population. if the government is very concerned about the welfare and safety _ very concerned about the welfare and safety of _ very concerned about the welfare and safety of older and disabled people, they need _ safety of older and disabled people, they need to control community transmission. and at the moment they are removing _ transmission. and at the moment they are removing masks, telling people they will— are removing masks, telling people they will not pay for tests, they might— they will not pay for tests, they might even bring forward regulations that require self isolation if you are covid — that require self isolation if you are covid positive. so while they are covid positive. so while they are encouraging the spread... everybody_ are encouraging the spread... everybody else is expected to keep older and _ everybody else is expected to keep older and vulnerable people say. the two things— older and vulnerable people say. the two things are not consistent. thank ou ve two things are not consistent. thank you very much _ two things are not consistent. thank you very much for — two things are not consistent. thank
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you very much for your— two things are not consistent. thank you very much for your time - two things are not consistent. thank you very much for your time with - two things are not consistent. thank you very much for your time with us | you very much for your time with us this morning. 26 you very much for your time with us this morning-— you very much for your time with us this morning. 26 minutes past seven. back now this morning. 26 minutes past seven. itack now to — this morning. 26 minutes past seven. itack now to one _ this morning. 26 minutes past seven. back now to one of _ this morning. 26 minutes past seven. back now to one of our _ this morning. 26 minutes past seven. back now to one of our main - this morning. 26 minutes past seven. back now to one of our main stories. | prince andrew is demanding a trial byjury in a civil case brought by a woman who has accused him of sexual assault. virginia giuffre says the duke abused her more than two decades ago, when she was 17, allegations he has always denied. let's speak to the lawyer and legal commentatorjoshua rozenberg. good morning. cast your expert out for us over that headline that has been taken out of these documents, prince andrew's legal team demanding a trial byjury?— a trial by “my? those are certainly the a trial byjury? those are certainly the words with _ a trial byjury? those are certainly the words with which _ a trial byjury? those are certainly the words with which those -- - a trial byjury? those are certainly the words with which those -- the a trial byjury? those are certainly l the words with which those -- the 11 the words with which those —— the 11 page _ the words with which those —— the 11 page defence ends. but as naga just mentioned, it was virginia giuffre who asked — mentioned, it was virginia giuffre who asked for a jury trial, indeed demanded — who asked for a jury trial, indeed demanded a jury trial telling her claim _ demanded a jury trial telling her claim. what you have really got here is prince _ claim. what you have really got here is prince andrew saying, bring it on.
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is prince andrew saying, bring it on you — is prince andrew saying, bring it on. you want a jury trial, i want a jury— on. you want a jury trial, i want a jury trial~ — on. you want a jury trial, i want a jury trial~ you _ on. you want a jury trial, i want a jury trial. you want to bring these claims _ jury trial. you want to bring these claims come in that case you have to prove _ claims come in that case you have to prove everything that you are saying because _ prove everything that you are saying because i_ prove everything that you are saying because i am not going to admit to anything _ because i am not going to admit to an hina. ~ :, because i am not going to admit to an hina.~ :, :,, because i am not going to admit to an hina.~ :, :, ., because i am not going to admit to an hina. :, :, ., :, anything. who it as to what form the trial takes? — anything. who it as to what form the trial takes? i — anything. who it as to what form the trial takes? i think _ anything. who it as to what form the trial takes? i think that _ anything. who it as to what form the trial takes? i think that claimants . trial takes? i think that claimants in these circumstances _ trial takes? i think that claimants in these circumstances do - trial takes? i think that claimants in these circumstances do have . trial takes? i think that claimants in these circumstances do have a| in these circumstances do have a right— in these circumstances do have a right to _ in these circumstances do have a right tojury_ in these circumstances do have a right tojury trial. in these circumstances do have a right to jury trial. we are not familiar— right to jury trial. we are not familiar withjury trials in right to jury trial. we are not familiar with jury trials in the civil— familiar with jury trials in the civil cases. don't forget, this is a civil cases. don't forget, this is a civil claim — civil cases. don't forget, this is a civil claim. we are not familiar with— civil claim. we are not familiar with that — civil claim. we are not familiar with that in the united kingdom any more, _ with that in the united kingdom any more. but _ with that in the united kingdom any more, but in the united states it is fairly— more, but in the united states it is fairly common. it doesn't mean there will be _ fairly common. it doesn't mean there will be a _ fairly common. it doesn't mean there will be a trial. this case may settle — will be a trial. this case may settle at _ will be a trial. this case may settle at any time, even at the door of the _ settle at any time, even at the door of the court. — settle at any time, even at the door of the court, would have nevertheless the prince is saying he denies _ nevertheless the prince is saying he denies everything and he is putting virginia _ denies everything and he is putting virginia giuffre to prove in saying that she — virginia giuffre to prove in saying that she has to prove all the allegations against him. this is . uite allegations against him. this is uuite a allegations against him. this is quite a detailed _ allegations against him. this is quite a detailed document, - allegations against him. this is quite a detailed document, 11 l allegations against him. this is - quite a detailed document, 11 pages in all. what do you think are the significant parts of that?-
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significant parts of that? well, certainly all — significant parts of that? well, certainly all these _ significant parts of that? well, certainly all these denials, - significant parts of that? well, certainly all these denials, he| certainly all these denials, he denies — certainly all these denials, he denies sexual abuse, he denies refusing — denies sexual abuse, he denies refusing to co—operate with the us investigators, he denies that he first met — investigators, he denies that he first metjeffrey investigators, he denies that he first met jeffrey epstein through ghislaine maxwell. he admits he was on epstein's private plane, stayed on epstein's private plane, stayed on epstein's private island, at his home _ on epstein's private island, at his home in— on epstein's private island, at his home in new york, but denies sexually— home in new york, but denies sexually abusing virginia giuffre at epstein's, — sexually abusing virginia giuffre at epstein's, in new york. he denies threats— epstein's, in new york. he denies threats to — epstein's, in new york. he denies threats to virginia giuffre, he denies — threats to virginia giuffre, he denies he _ threats to virginia giuffre, he denies he knew her age, he denies causing _ denies he knew her age, he denies causing her— denies he knew her age, he denies causing her significant emotional distress — causing her significant emotional distress and harm. then we come onto these _ distress and harm. then we come onto these it _ distress and harm. then we come onto these 11 defences he puts forward. the first _ these 11 defences he puts forward. the first one, i think the most important _ the first one, i think the most important one, is lack of jurisdiction. he says that she is a permanent— jurisdiction. he says that she is a permanent resident of australia, she is not _ permanent resident of australia, she is not domiciled in the us state of colorado, — is not domiciled in the us state of colorado, and therefore she doesn't have the _ colorado, and therefore she doesn't have the right to bring this claim in the _ have the right to bring this claim in the united states. he then repeats — in the united states. he then repeats this allegation that she signed — repeats this allegation that she signed the deal with jeffrey
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repeats this allegation that she signed the deal withjeffrey epstein for a half— signed the deal withjeffrey epstein for a half $1 million in 2009, and therefore _ for a half $1 million in 2009, and therefore she has waived her right to sue _ therefore she has waived her right to sue he — therefore she has waived her right to sue. he listed a number of other defences, _ to sue. he listed a number of other defences, delay, consent, what is called _ defences, delay, consent, what is called unclean hands, claims of her own wrongful conduct and so on. he is fighting _ own wrongful conduct and so on. he is fighting this at every point and in every— is fighting this at every point and in every way. is fighting this at every point and in every way-— in every way. one of the phrases used throughout _ in every way. one of the phrases used throughout is _ in every way. one of the phrases used throughout is his _ in every way. one of the phrases used throughout is his lawyers . in every way. one of the phrases i used throughout is his lawyers say it lacks sufficient information to confirm or deny certain allegations, for example, in relation to the image people have seen of him with virginia giuffre. they might be confused by that? t virginia giuffre. they might be confused by that?— virginia giuffre. they might be confused by that? i know. this is written by _ confused by that? i know. this is written by lawyers. _ confused by that? i know. this is written by lawyers. the - confused by that? i know. this is written by lawyers. the point - confused by that? i know. this is written by lawyers. the point is i written by lawyers. the point is that if— written by lawyers. the point is that if you _ written by lawyers. the point is that if you don't deny something or say, that if you don't deny something or say as— that if you don't deny something or say as he — that if you don't deny something or say, as he does in this case, he lacks— say, as he does in this case, he lacks sufficient information to admit — lacks sufficient information to admit or— lacks sufficient information to admit or deny, then it might be assumed — admit or deny, then it might be assumed by the other side that you are conceding something. he is not prepared _ are conceding something. he is not prepared to concede anything. but yes, he _ prepared to concede anything. but yes, he says he lacks sufficient
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information to respond to her claim that this _ information to respond to her claim that this photograph depicts prince andrew— that this photograph depicts prince andrew and virginia giuffre with ghislaine — andrew and virginia giuffre with ghislaine maxwell at maxwell's home prior to _ ghislaine maxwell at maxwell's home prior to prince andrew sexually abusing — prior to prince andrew sexually abusing virginia giuffre. he is denying — abusing virginia giuffre. he is denying the sexual abuse but he is denying the sexual abuse but he is deny this— denying the sexual abuse but he is deny this is— denying the sexual abuse but he is deny this is a genuine photograph it's simply— deny this is a genuine photograph it's simply that he is not accepting this as _ it's simply that he is not accepting this as a _ it's simply that he is not accepting this as a piece of evidence which can be _ this as a piece of evidence which can be taken as read and she has got to prove _ can be taken as read and she has got to prove where this picture came from _ to prove where this picture came from if— to prove where this picture came from if she — to prove where this picture came from if she is going to rely on it. thank— from if she is going to rely on it. thank you — from if she is going to rely on it. thank you. time for the local news. good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins the funeral of 14—year—old jermaine cools will be held later this morning in south london. the teenager was attacked close to west croydon station in november and later died in hospital — the youngest victim
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of knife crime last year. his family say they want the media to show the "anguish and pain" they are going through in the hope teenagers will stop carrying knives. plan b covid restrictions come to an end today in england — which means no more face masks are legally required in shops. but you'll still need a mask as a condition of travel on london's transport system and on the capital's trains. the lifting of restrictions also means the so—called covid pass system for nightclubs and other big events will also be scrapped, as the country returns to its lowest level of restrictions of any stage of the pandemic. now, she's the oldest volunteer in the nhs and possibly the country. beryl carr, who turned 100—years—old this month, has been volunteering at ealing hospital for the past 18 years. born in acton, she moved away but came back to the area to be near her daughter after her husband died, and says working at the hospital cafe has been her lifeline. i enjoy coming, and it's a worthwhilejob, and i'm helping
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people that are not as fortunate as i am or as well as i am. people say i don't look my age, but no, i'm so lucky. and you can catch more of the wonderful beryl on our lunchtime and evening news at 6.30 — and on our website — bbc.co.uk/london well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning this is how tfl services are looking right now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning apart from minor delays on the dlr and planned closures on the bank branch of the northern line. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. we start the day with temperatures in mid—single figures celsius but we wake up to a largely grey and cloudy start and what has been happening overnight is a cold front has been slowly making its way southwards, so the cloud increasing and through this morning we might
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get a little bit of light, patchy rain, nothing more significant ahead of this cold front clearing, and once it clears, plenty of sunshine. so, this afternoon we have blue sky, a bit breezier this afternoon and the temperature is quite mild, 12 celsius by the end of the day. overnight, the windfalls light and we've got clear skies, so a perfect recipe for the temperature to drop and it will be chilly again with the minimum dropping down to zero and we could see a sparkle or to a frost on friday morning first thing and we could also see one or two mist and fog patches. for friday, a bright start and high pressure there but gradually through the day we could see the cloud increasing from the west. that indicates perhaps it is actually getting a bit milder. temperatures tomorrow perhaps a little chillier than today at nine celsius, and come saturday more unsettled and more cloud and certainly breezy but the temperature could reach 1a celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. let's return now to one of our leading stories, the changes to rules around face masks. let's take a look at what rules are in place around the uk. in england, from today, face coverings are no longer a legal requirement. but some retailers and transport companies are asking customers to wear them, and the government does recommend the wearing of them in crowded spaces. in scotland, masks must still be worn in nearly all indoor public spaces, including pubs and restaurants when not seated. from tomorrow those running sessions with under—5s will no longer need to wear face coverings. for wales, masks are still required on public transport and in all indoor public places, with secondary school pupils asked to wear masks in classrooms. and in northern ireland face
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coverings must still be worn on public transport, in shops and hospitality venues, and like in wales secondary school pupils must wear face coverings. separately people there no longer have to show proof of exemption when not wearing a mask. so what have the changes to rules in england meant for businesses? let's speak now to wendy cummins who owns quiffys salon in easteigh. good morning to you. good morning. tell me about — good morning to you. good morning. tell me about how _ good morning to you. good morning. tell me about how it _ good morning to you. good morning. tell me about how it will— good morning to you. good morning. tell me about how it will work- good morning to you. good morning. tell me about how it will work in - tell me about how it will work in the salon. what are you going to impose or require of people when they come in? to impose or require of people when they come in?— impose or require of people when the come in? :, , :, , they come in? to be honest with you, we're not going _ they come in? to be honest with you, we're not going to _ they come in? to be honest with you, we're not going to change _ they come in? to be honest with you, we're not going to change at - they come in? to be honest with you, we're not going to change at all. - we're not going to change at all. we've _ we're not going to change at all. we've discussed it as a salon and with our— we've discussed it as a salon and with our clients and made the decision— with our clients and made the decision that we will continue to wear— decision that we will continue to wear our— decision that we will continue to wear our facemasks and continue to have all— wear our facemasks and continue to have all of— wear our facemasks and continue to have all of our ppe in place and everything _
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have all of our ppe in place and everything will be exactly the same as we _ everything will be exactly the same as we have — everything will be exactly the same as we have had over the last two years _ as we have had over the last two years it's — as we have had over the last two years it's a _ as we have had over the last two years. it's a question of making people — years. it's a question of making people feel comfortable and a question of safeguarding the staff and ijust— question of safeguarding the staff and ijust think and we think is a salon— and ijust think and we think is a salon it's — and ijust think and we think is a salon it's the safest way to go forward — salon it's the safest way to go forward at the moment. if someone comes in and _ forward at the moment. if someone comes in and doesn't _ forward at the moment. if someone comes in and doesn't want - forward at the moment. if someone comes in and doesn't want to - forward at the moment. if someone comes in and doesn't want to do - comes in and doesn't want to do that, maybe not one of your regular customers comes in and says they would like their hair cut but i'm not going to wear a mask, what happens next? to not going to wear a mask, what happens next?— not going to wear a mask, what happens next? to be honest, it is their decision _ happens next? to be honest, it is their decision and _ happens next? to be honest, it is their decision and we _ happens next? to be honest, it is their decision and we would - happens next? to be honest, it is their decision and we would ask. happens next? to be honest, it is- their decision and we would ask them very kindly— their decision and we would ask them very kindly if they would like to wear _ very kindly if they would like to wear a — very kindly if they would like to wear a mask and very kindly if they would like to weara mask and if very kindly if they would like to wear a mask and if they decide it's not for— wear a mask and if they decide it's not for them, wear a mask and if they decide it's not forthem, fair enough, they wear a mask and if they decide it's not for them, fair enough, they can come _ not for them, fair enough, they can come into— not for them, fair enough, they can come into the salon and they will -et come into the salon and they will get their— come into the salon and they will get their treatment and whatever they have — get their treatment and whatever they have booked for and we will treat _ they have booked for and we will treat them as we treat every other client— treat them as we treat every other client because we have our screens and all— client because we have our screens and all of— client because we have our screens and all of our ppe, we are protected, as is everybody else in the salon— protected, as is everybody else in the salon so it is up to the client themselves to make the decision. can ou rive themselves to make the decision. can you give me — themselves to make the decision. can you give me some insight into why it is that the government has told you
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in their understanding, based on the science that now is the safe time to no longer wear facemasks, so why is it you are taking a different approach? to it you are taking a different approach?— it you are taking a different auroach? :, , :, , ~ approach? to be honest, if you think about it, hairdressers _ approach? to be honest, if you think about it, hairdressers have _ approach? to be honest, if you think about it, hairdressers have been - about it, hairdressers have been under— about it, hairdressers have been under the — about it, hairdressers have been under the strict rules for the last two years— under the strict rules for the last two years and the rules have gone up and down _ two years and the rules have gone up and down like a yo—yo and we have had to— and down like a yo—yo and we have had to put in place all sorts of things— had to put in place all sorts of things in— had to put in place all sorts of things in our times is hairdressers we've _ things in our times is hairdressers we've never— things in our times is hairdressers we've never had to do this, and it has made — we've never had to do this, and it has made the business very, very difficult, — has made the business very, very difficult, so — has made the business very, very difficult, so we feel that by taking our own— difficult, so we feel that by taking our own stance on it and making sure everybody _ our own stance on it and making sure everybody is — our own stance on it and making sure everybody is safe, our clients will feel more — everybody is safe, our clients will feel more comfortable coming into our business and have their services _ our business and have their services-— our business and have their services. �* :, , :, , services. i'm not trying to put you in a difficult _ services. i'm not trying to put you in a difficult position, _ services. i'm not trying to put you in a difficult position, but - services. i'm not trying to put you in a difficult position, but given i in a difficult position, but given what you are doing in practice, is it implicit, does it feel the obvious thing to suggest that you think that this is the wrong time to relax restrictions? tia.
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think that this is the wrong time to relax restrictions?— relax restrictions? no, i don't think it's _ relax restrictions? no, i don't think it's the _ relax restrictions? no, i don't think it's the wrong _ relax restrictions? no, i don't think it's the wrong time - relax restrictions? no, i don't think it's the wrong time to i relax restrictions? no, i don't i think it's the wrong time to relax restrictions, ijust think think it's the wrong time to relax restrictions, i just think you think it's the wrong time to relax restrictions, ijust think you have to look— restrictions, ijust think you have to look at— restrictions, ijust think you have to look at the bigger picture and you have — to look at the bigger picture and you have to look at the picture that every _ you have to look at the picture that every hairdressing salon has had a really— every hairdressing salon has had a really rough two years and for everybody in the industry of retail, whether— everybody in the industry of retail, whether it — everybody in the industry of retail, whether it be sales, the entertainment industry industry, the pub industry, we've had a really rough _ pub industry, we've had a really rough stretch, so if we can do anything _ rough stretch, so if we can do anything to encourage our clientele to feel— anything to encourage our clientele to feel more comfortable when they come _ to feel more comfortable when they come into— to feel more comfortable when they come into our premises that is the way forward. what is forgotten about the great _ way forward. what is forgotten about the great last two years is we've had to _ the great last two years is we've had to start again. no business in this country— had to start again. no business in this country that has been shut for that amount of time has had an easy ride since _ that amount of time has had an easy ride since we've come out of lockdown, _ ride since we've come out of lockdown, so i think you have to take _ lockdown, so i think you have to take the — lockdown, so i think you have to take the decisions to safeguard your clientele _ take the decisions to safeguard your clientele and just kind of look between the lines of what the government are doing or trying to do. ~ , :, , :, government are doing or trying to do. , :, ,~/ .,~ :,
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government are doing or trying to do. , :, ,~/ ., do. wendy, lovely to talk to you and i auess do. wendy, lovely to talk to you and i guess the — do. wendy, lovely to talk to you and i guess the doors _ do. wendy, lovely to talk to you and i guess the doors are _ do. wendy, lovely to talk to you and i guess the doors are opening - do. wendy, lovely to talk to you and j i guess the doors are opening soon? they open at 830. t i guess the doors are opening soon? they open at 830-— they open at 830. i hope you have a aood da they open at 830. i hope you have a good day and _ they open at 830. i hope you have a good day and thank _ they open at 830. i hope you have a good day and thank you _ they open at 830. i hope you have a good day and thank you very - they open at 830. i hope you have a good day and thank you very much. i we're joined now by professor stephen reicher who is a social psychologist and a member of the sage sub—committee advising on behavioural science. thinking about business is welcoming customers back, the psychology of it, and you look at how various supermarkets and how they are going about it and whether they want people wearing face coverings or abandon it completely, it's very geared the customer base. t abandon it completely, it's very geared the customer base. i think wend is geared the customer base. i think wendy is excellent _ geared the customer base. i think wendy is excellent example - geared the customer base. i think wendy is excellent example of. geared the customer base. i thinkl wendy is excellent example of why geared the customer base. i think- wendy is excellent example of why we are in _ wendy is excellent example of why we are in a _ wendy is excellent example of why we are in a relatively good situation at the _ are in a relatively good situation at the moment. the reason why infections — at the moment. the reason why infections aren't a size many people feared _ infections aren't a size many people feared and — infections aren't a size many people feared and hospitalisations aren't as high— feared and hospitalisations aren't as high as — feared and hospitalisations aren't as high as people feared, including myself— as high as people feared, including myself is _ as high as people feared, including myself is that peoples behaviour was
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actually _ myself is that peoples behaviour was actually far more cautious than we expected — actually far more cautious than we expected so if we look, when people make _ expected so if we look, when people make the _ expected so if we look, when people make the decision not to go out and see an _ make the decision not to go out and see an elderly relative on christmas day, see an elderly relative on christmas day. many— see an elderly relative on christmas day, many people when they did go out decided to take a test to make sure they— out decided to take a test to make sure they weren't in —— infected in the statistics— sure they weren't in —— infected in the statistics on that are quite remarkable and i was looking at the scottish— remarkable and i was looking at the scottish data showing over the christmas week, 85% of people took a test and _ christmas week, 85% of people took a test and nearly half of people in scotland — test and nearly half of people in scotland took three tests, so people are being _ scotland took three tests, so people are being careful and fastidious and it's those _ are being careful and fastidious and it's those multiple small, heroic acts that — it's those multiple small, heroic acts that people were doing to keep others _ acts that people were doing to keep others safe which puts us in a relatively— others safe which puts us in a relatively good situation and it it is our— relatively good situation and it it is our behaviours and careful behaviours and our decisions to test ourselves— behaviours and our decisions to test ourselves and our decisions to perhaps— ourselves and our decisions to perhaps limit what we do to keep others _ perhaps limit what we do to keep others safe and decisions to wear mask, _ others safe and decisions to wear mask, if— others safe and decisions to wear mask, if those things have put us in a relatively— mask, if those things have put us in a relatively good situation, we have to be _ a relatively good situation, we have to be careful about removing then
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roll because there is a real danger of the _ roll because there is a real danger of the infection spiking again. the fact is it is of the infection spiking again. tt9 fact is it is happening and it's interesting looking at how businesses are addressing this. we were giving examples earlier in the day about how certain supermarkets are offering different advice, so one is saying that we would like all of our customers to wear face coverings when possible and others are saying, no, there no need to wear them in this shop. how do you think customers will react to that? communication is clearly absolutely critical— communication is clearly absolutely critical for— communication is clearly absolutely critical for people to behave in the ways _ critical for people to behave in the ways that — critical for people to behave in the ways that keep them safe and there are three _ ways that keep them safe and there are three elements of that communication that are important which _ communication that are important which the — communication that are important which the government should be acting _ which the government should be acting on— which the government should be acting on the first is to make the point _ acting on the first is to make the point that— acting on the first is to make the point that there is still reason to be cautious. we are over the peak of omicron _ be cautious. we are over the peak of omicron and — be cautious. we are over the peak of omicron and that is great news but we are _ omicron and that is great news but we are not— omicron and that is great news but we are not out of it entirely and we are still— we are not out of it entirely and we are still at— we are not out of it entirely and we are still at a — we are not out of it entirely and we are still at a level where yesterday there _ are still at a level where yesterday there were — are still at a level where yesterday there were 100,000 infections and where _ there were 100,000 infections and where the — there were 100,000 infections and where the nhs is still overloaded and in _ where the nhs is still overloaded and in fact the pandemic and the
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rate of— and in fact the pandemic and the rate of infection is getting higher in schools, incredibly high in schools _ in schools, incredibly high in schools and nearly 400,000 children were off _ schools and nearly 400,000 children were off school yesterday so we are not out _ were off school yesterday so we are not out of _ were off school yesterday so we are not out of it — were off school yesterday so we are not out of it entirely and it's really— not out of it entirely and it's really important to get that message to people. _ really important to get that message to people, and yes, things are heading — to people, and yes, things are heading in _ to people, and yes, things are heading in the right direction, but no, we _ heading in the right direction, but no, we are — heading in the right direction, but no, we are not out of it and that is the first— no, we are not out of it and that is the first thing that needs to be made — the first thing that needs to be made really clear to people. the second _ made really clear to people. the second thing, and i think we have forgotten — second thing, and i think we have forgotten this is one of the reasons why we _ forgotten this is one of the reasons why we did — forgotten this is one of the reasons why we did so well in the first lockdown _ why we did so well in the first lockdown is that people were acting for others — lockdown is that people were acting for others. when you look at the evidence — for others. when you look at the evidence and the factors which determine whether people stop to the rules or— determine whether people stop to the rules or not, it wasn't to keep myself— rules or not, it wasn't to keep myself safe, it was to keep others safe and _ myself safe, it was to keep others safe and others in the community and the more _ safe and others in the community and the more that you identified with the more that you identified with the community and saw yourself as part of— the community and saw yourself as part of the — the community and saw yourself as part of the community, whether that is a local— part of the community, whether that is a local community or national community, the more you are likely to adhere — community, the more you are likely to adhere it— community, the more you are likely to adhere. it was about us, not about— to adhere. it was about us, not about me. _ to adhere. it was about us, not about me, and i think we need more of that— about me, and i think we need more of that emphasis on community as well because while we want society to reopen, — well because while we want society to reopen, and that is critical, we
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want _ to reopen, and that is critical, we want to— to reopen, and that is critical, we want to reopen it for everybody and if me _ want to reopen it for everybody and if me not— want to reopen it for everybody and if me not wearing a mask means a vulnerable — if me not wearing a mask means a vulnerable person doesn't feel safe, that to _ vulnerable person doesn't feel safe, that to me _ vulnerable person doesn't feel safe, that to me is not freedom, it is not reopening — that to me is not freedom, it is not reopening society, it is dividing society— reopening society, it is dividing society so— reopening society, it is dividing society so we need to look after everybody and we need to act for each _ everybody and we need to act for each other, and again the messaging needs— each other, and again the messaging needs to _ each other, and again the messaging needs to be — each other, and again the messaging needs to be very clear on that. thirdly. — needs to be very clear on that. thirdly. we _ needs to be very clear on that. thirdly, we need to be very clear on exactly— thirdly, we need to be very clear on exactly how— thirdly, we need to be very clear on exactly how the virus spreads and to focus _ exactly how the virus spreads and to focus on _ exactly how the virus spreads and to focus on the — exactly how the virus spreads and to focus on the fact it is aerosol, airborne — focus on the fact it is aerosol, airborne and ventilation is critical and what — airborne and ventilation is critical and what people can do to keep themselves safe, and i think that while _ themselves safe, and i think that while it— themselves safe, and i think that while it is— themselves safe, and i think that while it is right and the rules are changing — while it is right and the rules are changing and there is nothing we can do about— changing and there is nothing we can do about that now, for a long people have been— do about that now, for a long people have been keeping themselves safe and adhering to good public health advice _ and adhering to good public health advice despite the government, and i think people will continue to do that _ think people will continue to do that. �* , think people will continue to do that. �*, ., think people will continue to do that. �*, :, , :, think people will continue to do that. �*, :, :, ., ~ :, that. it's always good to talk to, professional _ that. it's always good to talk to, professional social _ that. it's always good to talk to, professional social psychology i that. it's always good to talk to, | professional social psychology at the university of st andrews. for your time.
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we had some breaking news about an hour ago. it's been announced that the rules for visiting care homes in england will be relaxed from monday. the department for health and social care says there will be no limit on the number of visitors to care homes — and that self—isolation periods for residents will be reduced or scrapped. diane mayhew is the co—founder of rights for residents. good morning to you. this is a significant announcement and will mean the world to many, many families. t mean the world to many, many families. . :, mean the world to many, many families. ., , . , families. i could actually cry with relief. families. i could actually cry with relief- we _ families. i could actually cry with relief. we have _ families. i could actually cry with relief. we have been _ families. i could actually cry with relief. we have been asking - families. i could actually cry with relief. we have been asking our| relief. we have been asking our members — relief. we have been asking our members to write to their mps asking for all— members to write to their mps asking for all of— members to write to their mps asking for all of these restrictions to be lifted _ for all of these restrictions to be lifted because we know it is definitely safer now and we've even had jeremy richardson, the ceo of one of— had jeremy richardson, the ceo of one of the — had jeremy richardson, the ceo of one of the third care providers asking — one of the third care providers asking for— one of the third care providers asking for care homes to be run as care homes, — asking for care homes to be run as care homes, not prisons any more and as i care homes, not prisons any more and as i said _ care homes, not prisons any more and as i said when — care homes, not prisons any more and as i said when i came on your show last time —
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as i said when i came on your show last time, care and residence, the majority_ last time, care and residence, the majority have been triple vaccinated and we _ majority have been triple vaccinated and we wear ppe and there is no reason _ and we wear ppe and there is no reason whatsoever why this shouldn't have happened sooner but it has happened — have happened sooner but it has happened today, or from the 31st of january— happened today, or from the 31st of january and i could not be happier. just to— january and i could not be happier. just to confirm four people, because it's a story that has onlyjust broken in the last hour, so this is from monday the 31st of january there will be no limit on the number of visitors allowed into care homes and self isolation periods will be cut so it's a significant announcement and like a lot of families, you have been affected by this during the two—year period as well ofjust not being able to go to those, your loved ones. absolutely. i am auoin those, your loved ones. absolutely. i am going to _ those, your loved ones. absolutely. i am going to try — those, your loved ones. absolutely. i am going to try and _ those, your loved ones. absolutely. i am going to try and state - those, your loved ones. absolutely. i am going to try and state this - i am going to try and state this without— i am going to try and state this without getting upset but i couldn't see my— without getting upset but i couldn't see my dad when he died in a hospital~ _ see my dad when he died in a hospital. jenny, my partner, could not see _ hospital. jenny, my partner, could not see her— hospital. jenny, my partner, could not see her mum who was in a nursing home _ not see her mum who was in a nursing home and _ not see her mum who was in a nursing home and declined and we had to witness _ home and declined and we had to witness that predominantly through a
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window. _ witness that predominantly through a window, and when vaccines came out on all— window, and when vaccines came out on all the _ window, and when vaccines came out on all the other safety measures were _ on all the other safety measures were introduced, that did not translate _ were introduced, that did not translate to caring visits and it has been _ translate to caring visits and it has been wrong. ironically it's probably— has been wrong. ironically it's probably been one of the safest places— probably been one of the safest places to — probably been one of the safest places to be because everybody has been triple vaccinated, unlike in the community, where people haven't and some _ the community, where people haven't and some people have chosen not to. we are _ and some people have chosen not to. we are waiting to see more devil in the detail— we are waiting to see more devil in the detail and i know that the isolation _ the detail and i know that the isolation period has been cut as well to— isolation period has been cut as well to be — isolation period has been cut as well to be brought more in line with the staff— well to be brought more in line with the staff isolation period, but it's still not — the staff isolation period, but it's still not that clear, so we will reserve — still not that clear, so we will reserve judgment on that and of course — reserve judgment on that and of course we _ reserve judgment on that and of course, we are still going to be campaigning for gloria's law which will enshrine the right of every resident — will enshrine the right of every resident to nominate an essential caregiver— resident to nominate an essential caregiver in law, because as we know with these _ caregiver in law, because as we know with these guidance rules and restrictions, whatever you want to call them, — restrictions, whatever you want to call them, they can change any minute — call them, they can change any minute and if they should change
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again. _ minute and if they should change again. we — minute and if they should change again, we need to make sure that we are legally— again, we need to make sure that we are legally able to go in and provide _ are legally able to go in and provide that support that residence so need _ provide that support that residence so need for their mental health and well—being. so need for their mental health and well-beina. , :, ., ~ so need for their mental health and well-being— well-being. diane, thank you for shafinu well-being. diane, thank you for sharing your _ well-being. diane, thank you for sharing your personal— well-being. diane, thank you for sharing your personal story - well-being. diane, thank you for sharing your personal story and i know it has been a hugely emotional time for people not being able to see their loved ones. can i ask you, on the situation we are in now, i dare say you in your organisation would still urge caution. just because all of the rules are relaxed and as many people as you like and go into a care home, that comes with responsibilities for those visiting, doesn't it? because you are still going to see people who are vulnerable.— going to see people who are vulnerable. : , , , i. vulnerable. absolutely, but you know, it vulnerable. absolutely, but you know. it also — vulnerable. absolutely, but you know, it also comes _ vulnerable. absolutely, but you know, it also comes with - vulnerable. absolutely, but you know, it also comes with the i know, it also comes with the responsibility for staff and this issue — responsibility for staff and this issue has— responsibility for staff and this issue has caused a huge divide anyway— issue has caused a huge divide anyway and then, because staff are living _ anyway and then, because staff are living in— anyway and then, because staff are living in the — anyway and then, because staff are living in the community and have 100% _ living in the community and have 100% freedom, they don't have to abide _ 100% freedom, they don't have to abide by— 100% freedom, they don't have to abide by any restrictions at all and they are _ abide by any restrictions at all and
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they are going into care homes and providing _ they are going into care homes and providing personal care and the fact that relatives have been kept out has caused a lot of angst and upset because _ has caused a lot of angst and upset because covid has got in any way because — because covid has got in any way because staff have been testing positive — because staff have been testing positive and i had this argument, not an— positive and i had this argument, not an argument, but a debate with a carer— not an argument, but a debate with a carer yesterday because we support carers _ carer yesterday because we support carers and _ carer yesterday because we support carers and we support care homes and we came _ carers and we support care homes and we came to _ carers and we support care homes and we came to the same conclusion that we came to the same conclusion that we are _ we came to the same conclusion that we are all— we came to the same conclusion that we are all in— we came to the same conclusion that we are all in this together and we should _ we are all in this together and we should be — we are all in this together and we should be united and we should all be acting _ should be united and we should all be acting responsibly and relatives are not— be acting responsibly and relatives are not going to want to take covid into a _ are not going to want to take covid into a care — are not going to want to take covid into a care home and even before the pandemic, _ into a care home and even before the pandemic, jenny and i used to visit all the _ pandemic, jenny and i used to visit all the time, but if we had flu or a sore _ all the time, but if we had flu or a sore throat— all the time, but if we had flu or a sore throat or a sniffle, we didn't io sore throat or a sniffle, we didn't go in _ sore throat or a sniffle, we didn't go in we — sore throat or a sniffle, we didn't go in. we are responsible adults and we don't _ go in. we are responsible adults and we don't want to take anything into a care _ we don't want to take anything into a care home that is going to jeopardise the safety of people that live there. so, yes, of course, we will all— live there. so, yes, of course, we will all be — live there. so, yes, of course, we will all be living a responsible lifestyle. will all be living a responsible lifes le. , :, will all be living a responsible lifes le. ., , lifestyle. diane, a point very well made. lifestyle. diane, a point very well made- thank _ lifestyle. diane, a point very well made. thank you _ lifestyle. diane, a point very well
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made. thank you for _ lifestyle. diane, a point very well made. thank you for speaking i lifestyle. diane, a point very well made. thank you for speaking to | lifestyle. diane, a point very well. made. thank you for speaking to us again and just to confirm, the news this morning, from monday the 31st of january, this morning, from monday the 31st ofjanuary, no limits on the number ofjanuary, no limits on the number of visitors into care homes, that news announced just after 6:30am. tote news announced 'ust after 6:30am. we will news announced just after 6:30am. we will be speaking to a tennis champion. yesterday he was celebrating winning a record ninth consecutive doubles title in the wheelchair tennis and then had a second _ wheelchair tennis and then had a second final in as many days overnight— second final in as many days overnight in the singles. alfie hewett couldn't quite repeat his doubles success and lost to the number one seed shingo kuneeda, 7—5, 3—6, 6—2 in the australian open, wheelchair singles. we can speak to alfie himself right now, whojoins us from melbourne. what a couple of days you have had and i_ what a couple of days you have had and i wonder how you are feeling right— and i wonder how you are feeling right now? — and i wonder how you are feeling right now?—
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right now? right now, i'm pretty exhausted. _ right now? right now, i'm pretty exhausted, it _ right now? right now, i'm pretty exhausted, it was _ right now? right now, i'm pretty exhausted, it was about - right now? right now, i'm pretty exhausted, it was about 3132 - right now? right now, i'm pretty - exhausted, it was about 3132 degrees with a _ exhausted, it was about 3132 degrees with a lot _ exhausted, it was about 3132 degrees with a lot of— exhausted, it was about 3132 degrees with a lot of humidity _ exhausted, it was about 3132 degrees with a lot of humidity today— exhausted, it was about 3132 degrees with a lot of humidity today so - exhausted, it was about 3132 degrees with a lot of humidity today so i- with a lot of humidity today so i found _ with a lot of humidity today so i found it — with a lot of humidity today so i found it very— with a lot of humidity today so i found it very challenging - with a lot of humidity today so i found it very challenging to - with a lot of humidity today so i found it very challenging to get| found it very challenging to get back— found it very challenging to get back out — found it very challenging to get back out there _ found it very challenging to get back out there after _ found it very challenging to get back out there after yesterdayl found it very challenging to get i back out there after yesterday but you know. — back out there after yesterday but you know. i'm _ back out there after yesterday but you know, i'm ready— back out there after yesterday but you know, i'm ready to— back out there after yesterday but you know, i'm ready to rock- back out there after yesterday but you know, i'm ready to rock and l back out there after yesterday but i you know, i'm ready to rock and roll and get _ you know, i'm ready to rock and roll and get home _ you know, i'm ready to rock and roll and get home. pare— you know, i'm ready to rock and roll and get home-— and get home. i've been on court with ou and get home. i've been on court with you a _ and get home. i've been on court with you a couple _ and get home. i've been on court with you a couple of _ and get home. i've been on court with you a couple of times - and get home. i've been on court with you a couple of times and i and get home. i've been on court. with you a couple of times and have seen _ with you a couple of times and have seen how— with you a couple of times and have seen how much of the court you, and the so _ seen how much of the court you, and the so its— seen how much of the court you, and the so it's no— seen how much of the court you, and the so it's no wonder that you said you had _ the so it's no wonder that you said you had nothing left in the end to -ive you had nothing left in the end to give in _ you had nothing left in the end to give in this— you had nothing left in the end to give in this second final in as many days _ give in this second final in as many da s. , :, , give in this second final in as many da s. , ., , . ., days. yes, it was challenging. yesterday's — days. yes, it was challenging. yesterday's match _ days. yes, it was challenging. yesterday's match was - days. yes, it was challenging. yesterday's match was a i days. yes, it was challenging. | yesterday's match was a pretty days. yes, it was challenging. i yesterday's match was a pretty long one with _ yesterday's match was a pretty long one with the — yesterday's match was a pretty long one with the rain _ yesterday's match was a pretty long one with the rain delay— yesterday's match was a pretty long one with the rain delay as _ yesterday's match was a pretty long one with the rain delay as well - yesterday's match was a pretty long one with the rain delay as well and i one with the rain delay as well and we play— one with the rain delay as well and we play the — one with the rain delay as well and we play the world _ one with the rain delay as well and we play the world number- one with the rain delay as well and we play the world number three, l one with the rain delay as well and i we play the world number three, so it was— we play the world number three, so it was a _ we play the world number three, so it was a battle — we play the world number three, so it was a battle out _ we play the world number three, so it was a battle out there _ we play the world number three, so it was a battle out there and - we play the world number three, so it was a battle out there and a - we play the world number three, so it was a battle out there and a lot i it was a battle out there and a lot of energy— it was a battle out there and a lot of energy was _ it was a battle out there and a lot of energy was taken _ it was a battle out there and a lot of energy was taken out - it was a battle out there and a lot of energy was taken out of- it was a battle out there and a lot of energy was taken out of me i it was a battle out there and a lotl of energy was taken out of me but today— of energy was taken out of me but today was — of energy was taken out of me but today was a — of energy was taken out of me but today was a tough _ of energy was taken out of me but today was a tough match - of energy was taken out of me but today was a tough match and - of energy was taken out of me but i today was a tough match and probably one of— today was a tough match and probably one of the _ today was a tough match and probably one of the highest _ today was a tough match and probably one of the highest quality— today was a tough match and probably one of the highest quality matches i one of the highest quality matches we have _ one of the highest quality matches we have played _ one of the highest quality matches we have played and _ one of the highest quality matches we have played and the _ one of the highest quality matches we have played and the best - one of the highest quality matches i we have played and the best showcase of wheelchair — we have played and the best showcase of wheelchair tennis _ we have played and the best showcase of wheelchair tennis and _ we have played and the best showcase of wheelchair tennis and it _ we have played and the best showcase of wheelchair tennis and it comes - we have played and the best showcase of wheelchair tennis and it comes at i of wheelchair tennis and it comes at a bit of— of wheelchair tennis and it comes at a bit of a _ of wheelchair tennis and it comes at a bit of a price — of wheelchair tennis and it comes at a bit of a price and _ of wheelchair tennis and it comes at a bit of a price and everybody- of wheelchair tennis and it comes atj a bit of a price and everybody knows it, a bit of a price and everybody knows it. but _ a bit of a price and everybody knows it. but it's _ a bit of a price and everybody knows it. but it's been _ a bit of a price and everybody knows it, but it's been a _ a bit of a price and everybody knows it, but it's been a great _ a bit of a price and everybody knows it, but it's been a great trip - a bit of a price and everybody knows it, but it's been a great trip and i. it, but it's been a great trip and i can look— it, but it's been a great trip and i can look back _ it, but it's been a great trip and i can look back and _ it, but it's been a great trip and i can look back and feel— it, but it's been a great trip and i can look back and feel very - it, but it's been a great trip and ii can look back and feel very positive about— can look back and feel very positive about it _ can look back and feel very positive about it. :, , :, , can look back and feel very positive aboutit. :, , ., ., :,
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can look back and feel very positive aboutit. ., , ., ., ., ., about it. you should be aware of all the ride about it. you should be aware of all the pride and _ about it. you should be aware of all the pride and everyone _ about it. you should be aware of all the pride and everyone so - about it. you should be aware of all| the pride and everyone so delighted for you _ the pride and everyone so delighted for you and — the pride and everyone so delighted for you and gordon reid and the record—breaking ninth doubles title. what impact do you think it will have _ what impact do you think it will have in— what impact do you think it will have in growing the profile of the sport— have in growing the profile of the sport and — have in growing the profile of the sport and it's a fantastic success that you — sport and it's a fantastic success that you should be proud of as you leave _ that you should be proud of as you leave melbourne?— that you should be proud of as you leave melbourne? yes, we are doing our 'ob. leave melbourne? yes, we are doing ourjob- we — leave melbourne? yes, we are doing ourjob- we want _ leave melbourne? yes, we are doing ourjob. we want to _ leave melbourne? yes, we are doing ourjob. we want to go _ leave melbourne? yes, we are doing ourjob. we want to go out _ leave melbourne? yes, we are doing ourjob. we want to go out there i leave melbourne? yes, we are doing j ourjob. we want to go out there and perform _ ourjob. we want to go out there and perform the — ourjob. we want to go out there and perform the best— ourjob. we want to go out there and perform the best as _ ourjob. we want to go out there and perform the best as athletes - ourjob. we want to go out there and perform the best as athletes and i perform the best as athletes and performers — perform the best as athletes and performers but _ perform the best as athletes and performers but there _ perform the best as athletes and performers but there is - perform the best as athletes and performers but there is also i perform the best as athletes and performers but there is also a i performers but there is also a bigger— performers but there is also a bigger picture _ performers but there is also a bigger picture and _ performers but there is also a bigger picture and the - performers but there is also a bigger picture and the impact| performers but there is also a i bigger picture and the impact we performers but there is also a - bigger picture and the impact we can have on— bigger picture and the impact we can have on anyone _ bigger picture and the impact we can have on anyone, and _ bigger picture and the impact we can have on anyone, and it— bigger picture and the impact we can have on anyone, and it can _ bigger picture and the impact we can have on anyone, and it can be - have on anyone, and it can be massive _ have on anyone, and it can be massive so— have on anyone, and it can be massive, so trying _ have on anyone, and it can be massive, so trying to - have on anyone, and it can be massive, so trying to push i have on anyone, and it can be| massive, so trying to push the boundaries _ massive, so trying to push the boundaries and _ massive, so trying to push the boundaries and use _ massive, so trying to push the boundaries and use our- massive, so trying to push the i boundaries and use our platforms massive, so trying to push the - boundaries and use our platforms and use the _ boundaries and use our platforms and use the media — boundaries and use our platforms and use the media and _ boundaries and use our platforms and use the media and broadcasters - boundaries and use our platforms and use the media and broadcasters and i use the media and broadcasters and -et use the media and broadcasters and get the _ use the media and broadcasters and get the sport— use the media and broadcasters and get the sport out— use the media and broadcasters and get the sport out there _ use the media and broadcasters and get the sport out there for - use the media and broadcasters and get the sport out there for people i get the sport out there for people to watch, — get the sport out there for people to watch, because _ get the sport out there for people to watch, because i— get the sport out there for people to watch, because i remember. get the sport out there for people l to watch, because i remember back when _ to watch, because i remember back when t _ to watch, because i remember back when t was — to watch, because i remember back when t was a — to watch, because i remember back when t was a young _ to watch, because i remember back when i was a young kid, _ to watch, because i remember back when i was a young kid, not- to watch, because i remember backl when i was a young kid, not knowing that wheelchair— when i was a young kid, not knowing that wheelchair tennis _ when i was a young kid, not knowing that wheelchair tennis existed, - when i was a young kid, not knowing that wheelchair tennis existed, and i that wheelchair tennis existed, and knowing _ that wheelchair tennis existed, and knowing that — that wheelchair tennis existed, and knowing that it _ that wheelchair tennis existed, and knowing that it could _ that wheelchair tennis existed, and knowing that it could be _ that wheelchair tennis existed, and knowing that it could be someone i knowing that it could be someone else there — knowing that it could be someone else there watching _ knowing that it could be someone else there watching having - knowing that it could be someone else there watching having a - knowing that it could be someone else there watching having a role | else there watching having a role ntoget— else there watching having a role model and — else there watching having a role model and an _ else there watching having a role model and an ambassador- else there watching having a role model and an ambassador to - else there watching having a role i model and an ambassador to look else there watching having a role - model and an ambassador to look up to is realty— model and an ambassador to look up to is really important, _ model and an ambassador to look up to is really important, so— model and an ambassador to look up to is really important, so hopefully. to is really important, so hopefully we can _ to is really important, so hopefully we can improve _ to is really important, so hopefully we can improve-— we can improve. absolutely. and exlain we can improve. absolutely. and exniain why _ we can improve. absolutely. and exniain why you _ we can improve. absolutely. and exniain why you say _ we can improve. absolutely. and explain why you say you - we can improve. absolutely. and explain why you say you are - we can improve. absolutely. and i explain why you say you are playing with such _
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explain why you say you are playing with such freedom and you have so much _ with such freedom and you have so much took— with such freedom and you have so much look forward to but in november, the rules and criteria were _ november, the rules and criteria were made — november, the rules and criteria were made clear finally and you feared — were made clear finally and you feared you might not even be able to play at _ feared you might not even be able to play at the _ feared you might not even be able to play at the australian open. why now do you _ play at the australian open. why now do you have — play at the australian open. why now do you have such freedom to look forward _ do you have such freedom to look forward to? — do you have such freedom to look forward to?— forward to? obviously the last coule of forward to? obviously the last couple of years _ forward to? obviously the last couple of years there - forward to? obviously the last couple of years there was - forward to? obviously the last couple of years there was a i forward to? obviously the last| couple of years there was a lot forward to? obviously the last i couple of years there was a lot of uncertainty — couple of years there was a lot of uncertainty as _ couple of years there was a lot of uncertainty as to _ couple of years there was a lot of uncertainty as to whether- couple of years there was a lot of uncertainty as to whether i - couple of years there was a lot of uncertainty as to whether i would have _ uncertainty as to whether i would have a _ uncertainty as to whether i would have a future _ uncertainty as to whether i would have a future in _ uncertainty as to whether i would have a future in the _ uncertainty as to whether i would have a future in the sport - uncertainty as to whether i would have a future in the sport and - uncertainty as to whether i would have a future in the sport and by| have a future in the sport and by the end — have a future in the sport and by the end of— have a future in the sport and by the end of last _ have a future in the sport and by the end of last year— have a future in the sport and by the end of last year i _ have a future in the sport and by the end of last year i got - have a future in the sport and by the end of last year i got the - have a future in the sport and by i the end of last year i got the news that i_ the end of last year i got the news that i would — the end of last year i got the news that i would be _ the end of last year i got the news that i would be able _ the end of last year i got the news that i would be able to _ the end of last year i got the news that i would be able to continue i the end of last year i got the news| that i would be able to continue so psychologically— that i would be able to continue so psychologically it _ that i would be able to continue so psychologically it just _ that i would be able to continue so psychologically it just takes - that i would be able to continue so psychologically it just takes a i psychologically it just takes a massive _ psychologically it just takes a massive weight _ psychologically it just takes a massive weight of _ psychologically it just takes a massive weight of my- psychologically it just takes a i massive weight of my shoulders knowing — massive weight of my shoulders knowing that _ massive weight of my shoulders knowing that when _ massive weight of my shoulders knowing that when i— massive weight of my shoulders knowing that when i step - massive weight of my shoulders knowing that when i step on i massive weight of my shoulders i knowing that when i step on court it's not _ knowing that when i step on court it's not the — knowing that when i step on court it's not the last _ knowing that when i step on court it's not the last time, _ knowing that when i step on court it's not the last time, and - knowing that when i step on court it's not the last time, and the i knowing that when i step on court it's not the last time, and the last time _ it's not the last time, and the last time can— it's not the last time, and the last time can be — it's not the last time, and the last time can be in— it's not the last time, and the last time can be in my— it's not the last time, and the last time can be in my hands - it's not the last time, and the last time can be in my hands and i time can be in my hands and hopefully— time can be in my hands and hopefully there _ time can be in my hands and hopefully there will- time can be in my hands and hopefully there will be - time can be in my hands and hopefully there will be manyj time can be in my hands and - hopefully there will be many more austratian — hopefully there will be many more australian open— hopefully there will be many more australian open or— hopefully there will be many more australian open or wimbledon i hopefully there will be many more . australian open or wimbledon finals to come _ australian open or wimbledon finals to come and — australian open or wimbledon finals to come and there _ australian open or wimbledon finals to come and there will— australian open or wimbledon finals to come and there will not _ australian open or wimbledon finals to come and there will not be - australian open or wimbledon finals to come and there will not be the i to come and there will not be the added _ to come and there will not be the added pressure _ to come and there will not be the added pressure of— to come and there will not be the added pressure of having - to come and there will not be the added pressure of having to i to come and there will not be the added pressure of having to win i to come and there will not be the i added pressure of having to win in the right— added pressure of having to win in the right here, _ added pressure of having to win in the right here, right— added pressure of having to win in the right here, right now- added pressure of having to win in the right here, right now and i added pressure of having to win in the right here, right now and it. the right here, right now and it treing _ the right here, right now and it treing the — the right here, right now and it being the last _ the right here, right now and it being the last time _ the right here, right now and it being the last time so - the right here, right now and it being the last time so i'm i the right here, right now and it- being the last time so i'm enjoying it and _ being the last time so i'm enjoying it and tapping _ being the last time so i'm enjoying it and tapping up _ being the last time so i'm enjoying it and lapping up and _ being the last time so i'm enjoying it and lapping up and it's— being the last time so i'm enjoying it and lapping up and it's almost i it and lapping up and it's almost like a _ it and lapping up and it's almost like a new— it and lapping up and it's almost like a new chapter _ it and lapping up and it's almost like a new chapter and - it and lapping up and it's almost like a new chapter and press i it and lapping up and it's almost i like a new chapter and press start. fantastic — like a new chapter and press start. fantastic in— like a new chapter and press start. fantastic in a _ like a new chapter and press start. fantastic. in a word, _ like a new chapter and press start. fantastic. in a word, how- like a new chapter and press start. fantastic. in a word, how will- like a new chapter and press start. fantastic. in a word, how will you i fantastic. in a word, how will you celebrate — fantastic. in a word, how will you celebrate tonight customer quiet meat? _ celebrate tonight customer quiet meat? |— celebrate tonight customer quiet meal? , ., , ., celebrate tonight customer quiet
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meal? , ., ., �*, celebrate tonight customer quiet meal? , ., ., meal? i will show you how. it's been sittin: meal? i will show you how. it's been sitting there — meal? i will show you how. it's been sitting there for _ meal? i will show you how. it's been sitting there for a _ meal? i will show you how. it's been sitting there for a couple _ meal? i will show you how. it's been sitting there for a couple of - meal? i will show you how. it's been sitting there for a couple of weeks i sitting there for a couple of weeks now _ sitting there for a couple of weeks now. , ., ., ., sitting there for a couple of weeks now. ,., ., ., ,., sitting there for a couple of weeks now. , ., ,., ,., ., now. good for you. go and find gordon and _ now. good for you. go and find gordon and have _ now. good for you. go and find gordon and have a _ now. good for you. go and find gordon and have a great i now. good for you. go and find gordon and have a great night. j now. good for you. go and find i gordon and have a great night. thank ou. so gordon and have a great night. thank you- so proud- _ gordon and have a great night. thank you. so proud. brilliant— gordon and have a great night. thank you. so proud. brilliant stuff. - gordon and have a great night. thank you. so proud. brilliant stuff. the i you. so proud. brilliant stuff. the imortant you. so proud. brilliant stuff. important point was about the you. so proud. brilliant stuff.- important point was about the rules and criteria — important point was about the rules and criteria might change which could _ and criteria might change which could see — and criteria might change which could see him out of the competition but that— could see him out of the competition but that is— could see him out of the competition but that is sorted now and he can took— but that is sorted now and he can look forward to it at only 24. thanks. _ look forward to it at only 24. thanks, mike.— look forward to it at only 24. thanks, mike. ~., , ., , thanks, mike. matt, it feels a bit milder today _ thanks, mike. matt, it feels a bit milder today and _ thanks, mike. matt, it feels a bit milder today and it _ thanks, mike. matt, it feels a bit milder today and it was _ thanks, mike. matt, it feels a bit milder today and it was really i thanks, mike. matt, it feels a bit| milder today and it was really cold earlier in the week. still a bit of cloud at the moment. good _ still a bit of cloud at the moment. good morning. that will clear and through— good morning. that will clear and through the rest of the day lots more _ through the rest of the day lots more sunshine developing and it will turn a _ more sunshine developing and it will turn a hit _ more sunshine developing and it will turn a bit cooler later on but compared _ turn a bit cooler later on but compared with what had been a big improvement and if you're heading out on _ improvement and if you're heading out on the — improvement and if you're heading out on the next few hours let me tell you — out on the next few hours let me tell you what to expect as we still have _ tell you what to expect as we still have the — tell you what to expect as we still have the cloud across the southernmost counties as we head through— southernmost counties as we head through the rush—hour on the school drop off— through the rush—hour on the school
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drop off and — through the rush—hour on the school drop off and there will be some patchy— drop off and there will be some patchy rain and drizzle across the southern — patchy rain and drizzle across the southern counties, but brightening up southern counties, but brightening up across— southern counties, but brightening up across the rest of wales, the midlands — up across the rest of wales, the midlands and the north of that plenty— midlands and the north of that plenty of sunshine, one or two showers — plenty of sunshine, one or two showers dotted around to the north and west— showers dotted around to the north and west of scotland and will be wintry _ and west of scotland and will be wintry over the hills and still a breeze — wintry over the hills and still a breeze blowing across orkney and shetland — breeze blowing across orkney and shetland and orkney saw winds gusting — shetland and orkney saw winds gusting around 77 miles an hour but the breeze — gusting around 77 miles an hour but the breeze will ease and it is a cold _ the breeze will ease and it is a cold wind _ the breeze will ease and it is a cold wind and showers will continue, one or— cold wind and showers will continue, one or two _ cold wind and showers will continue, one or two in — cold wind and showers will continue, one or two in northern ireland in north-west— one or two in northern ireland in north—west england and the cloud in the south _ north—west england and the cloud in the south will depart the south coast _ the south will depart the south coast around lunchtime but will tinger— coast around lunchtime but will linger with rain across the channel istands _ linger with rain across the channel islands. temperatures between 12 or 13 degrees— islands. temperatures between 12 or 13 degrees but turning fresher further— 13 degrees but turning fresher further north but coldest across orkney — further north but coldest across orkney and shetland. through the night _ orkney and shetland. through the night as— orkney and shetland. through the night as the winds fall lighter we will see — night as the winds fall lighter we will see mist and fog to the south and in _ will see mist and fog to the south and in parts of wales but it will be and in parts of wales but it will be a night _ and in parts of wales but it will be a night where we see a bit of rust around _ a night where we see a bit of rust around as— a night where we see a bit of rust around as well.— a night where we see a bit of rust around as well. . ,, , ., , . around as well. thank you very much. do ou around as well. thank you very much. do you like — around as well. thank you very much. do you like scary _ around as well. thank you very much. do you like scary films? _ around as well. thank you very much. do you like scary films? around as well. thank you very much. do ou like sca films? i around as well. thank you very much. do you like scary films? around as well. thank you very much. do ou like sca films? i love do you like scary films? i love scary films- — do you like scary films? i love scary films. you _ do you like scary films? i love scary films. you will - do you like scary films? i love scary films. you will love i do you like scary films? i love scary films. you will love this | do you like scary films? i love i scary films. you will love this next bit.
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we'll be speaking to romola garai in a moment. you'll know her from films like "atonement" and "the hour" but now she's got behind the camera to direct her first feature—length movie. it's a horror—thriller called "amulet" — which you may want to watch from behind a cushion. we will give you a pause for a moment if you are very sensitive disposition. taste moment if you are very sensitive disposition-— moment if you are very sensitive disosition. . ., ., , ., disposition. we are not showing the sca bits. disposition. we are not showing the scary bits- but _ disposition. we are not showing the scary bits. but it's _ disposition. we are not showing the scary bits. but it's all— disposition. we are not showing the scary bits. but it's all scary? - let's take a look. it is nearing the end now. it is dying. — it is nearing the end now. it is dying, finally. it is nearing the end now. it is dying. finally-— it is nearing the end now. it is dying, finally. it is nearing the end now. it is d in~,finall. . , , dying, finally. some answer will be free. no master— dying, finally. some answer will be free. no master will— dying, finally. some answer will be free. no master will let _ dying, finally. some answer will be free. no master will let its - dying, finally. some answer will be free. no master will let its slave i free. no master will let its slave out live it- _ free. no master will let its slave out live it. this _ free. no master will let its slave out live it. this is _ free. no master will let its slave out live it. this is my _ free. no master will let its slave out live it. this is my duty. it i free. no master will let its slave | out live it. this is my duty. it has been _ out live it. this is my duty. it has been our— out live it. this is my duty. it has been our duty through the ages. duty? _ been our duty through the ages. du ? , , . ., ., duty? evil must be contained, thomas. so? _
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duty? evil must be contained, thomas. so? you _ duty? evil must be contained, thomas. so? you gave - duty? evil must be contained, thomas. so? you gave her- duty? evil must be contained, thomas. so? you gave her to| duty? evil must be contained, i thomas. so? you gave her to that thin ? thomas. so? you gave her to that thing? we — thomas. so? you gave her to that thing? we tried _ thomas. so? you gave her to that thing? we tried to _ thomas. so? you gave her to that thing? we tried to make - thomas. so? you gave her to that thing? we tried to make things i thing? we tried to make things bearable for _ thing? we tried to make things bearable for them. _ why ami why am i here? it is your destiny. there is an _ why am i here? it is your destiny. there is an existential _ why am i here? it is your destiny. there is an existential for - why am i here? it is your destiny. there is an existential for the i there is an existential for the first thing in the morning. romola garai joins us now. i think we will have a likely conversation. why horror when, for you, it seems so different to the stuff you have acted in a now you are behind the scenes? me stuff you have acted in a now you are behind the scenes? i've always loved horror— are behind the scenes? i've always loved horror films _ are behind the scenes? i've always loved horror films and _ are behind the scenes? i've always loved horror films and i _ are behind the scenes? i've always loved horror films and i grew - are behind the scenes? i've always loved horror films and i grew up i loved horror films and i grew up loving _ loved horror films and i grew up loving them and i'm a big fan and they have — loving them and i'm a big fan and they have gone through this incredible golden age recently, and i've been_ incredible golden age recently, and i've been writing and directing for a number— i've been writing and directing for a number of years and was writing and lots _ a number of years and was writing and lots of— a number of years and was writing and lots of different genres but when _ and lots of different genres but when it— and lots of different genres but when it came to making my first feature, — when it came to making my first feature, i — when it came to making my first feature, i did want to explore some quite _ feature, i did want to explore some quite dark— feature, i did want to explore some quite dark themes and obviously horror— quite dark themes and obviously horror lends itself to that. how did ou come horror lends itself to that. how did you come up _ horror lends itself to that. how did you come up with _ horror lends itself to that. how did you come up with that? _
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horror lends itself to that. how did you come up with that? a - horror lends itself to that. how did you come up with that? a good - you come up with that? a good question- _ you come up with that? a good question- i _ you come up with that? a good question. i was _ you come up with that? a good question. i was thinking - you come up with that? a good question. i was thinking about| you come up with that? a good | question. i was thinking about a number— question. i was thinking about a number of— question. i was thinking about a number of things, men and women, forgiveness, — number of things, men and women, forgiveness, also there's a lot in the film — forgiveness, also there's a lot in the film about birth, all of those things— the film about birth, all of those things got mixed together into a big pot and _ things got mixed together into a big pot and this is what came out. and are ou a pot and this is what came out. and are you a horror— pot and this is what came out. jifuc are you a horror fan yourself? do you gravitate towards scary films? where did it come from? i you gravitate towards scary films? where did it come from?— you gravitate towards scary films? where did it come from? i think some --eole where did it come from? i think some people when — where did it come from? i think some people when they _ where did it come from? i think some people when they are _ where did it come from? i think some people when they are watching - people when they are watching a horror— people when they are watching a horror film, they find the fear really — horror film, they find the fear really hard to deal with that i find it oddly— really hard to deal with that i find it oddly comforting because it's something you can control and something you can control and something you can control and something you know will get resolved in the _ something you know will get resolved in the end _ something you know will get resolved in the end. gr something you know will get resolved in the end. ., .,, ..,, ._ in the end. or not, as the case may be. the in the end. or not, as the case may be- the other _ in the end. or not, as the case may be. the other thing _ in the end. or not, as the case may be. the other thing i _ in the end. or not, as the case may be. the other thing i was _ in the end. or not, as the case may be. the other thing i was thinking, | be. the other thing i was thinking, horror comes in different styles, there is the horror of impending menace throughout and then there is horror which is right in yourface. where do you see this one? where does it sit?— does it sit? definitely in this film, does it sit? definitely in this film. the — does it sit? definitely in this film, the film _
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does it sit? definitely in this film, the film sets _ does it sit? definitely in this film, the film sets up - does it sit? definitely in this film, the film sets up a - does it sit? definitely in this i film, the film sets up a number does it sit? definitely in this - film, the film sets up a number of different— film, the film sets up a number of different characters and you get to know _ different characters and you get to know those people and then at a certain— know those people and then at a certain point in the film your relationship with those people changes, so it does have a gentle pace _ changes, so it does have a gentle pace at _ changes, so it does have a gentle pace at the — changes, so it does have a gentle pace at the beginning and then, hopefully, a very explosive climax. you've _ hopefully, a very explosive climax. you've made this already and i've seen two thirds of the film, and i didn't know, and i enjoyed it, but i didn't know, and i enjoyed it, but i didn't know, and i enjoyed it, but i didn't know if i would watch until the end because i disagree with you fundamentally about horror is having resolution. nightmare on elm street, capelle razor, they always carry on. there's always that thing that it is not resolved —— hell—raiser. but she said there is resolution to this. you can have films like the shining where _ you can have films like the shining where the — you can have films like the shining where the horror is resolved but it is contained — where the horror is resolved but it is contained in said distance where you can _ is contained in said distance where you can watch it and walk away from it and _ you can watch it and walk away from it and in _ you can watch it and walk away from it and in does not, for me, feels like it— it and in does not, for me, feels like it seeps _ it and in does not, for me, feels like it seeps into the rest of your life _ like it seeps into the rest of your life. ., ,., , like it seeps into the rest of your life. ., _ ., ,., life. you were saying about the themes about _ life. you were saying about the themes about birth _ life. you were saying about the themes about birth and - life. you were saying about the themes about birth and you - life. you were saying about the| themes about birth and you had children, and you have young
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children, and you have young children and you have related this to being a mother yourself. let's make clear that your children are not the spawn of the devil or anything and you love your children. i suppose the experience of birth itself— i suppose the experience of birth itself being quite extreme and transformative, i should say labour more, _ transformative, i should say labour more. that — transformative, i should say labour more, that is definitely part of the landscape — more, that is definitely part of the landscape of the film.— more, that is definitely part of the landscape of the film. that's really interesting- _ landscape of the film. that's really interesting. really _ landscape of the film. that's really interesting. really interesting. - landscape of the film. that's really| interesting. really interesting. the scariest film you ever watched as you were growing up?— you were growing up? probably rosemary's _ you were growing up? probably rosemary's baby. _ you were growing up? probably rosemary's baby. i— you were growing up? probably rosemary's baby. i think - you were growing up? probably rosemary's baby. i think the . you were growing up? probably - rosemary's baby. i think the shining is one of the — rosemary's baby. i think the shining is one of the scariest _ rosemary's baby. i think the shining is one of the scariest films, - is one of the scariest films, certainly in the early stages, that sense of place. and there is a big sense of place. and there is a big sense of place in this film, house, and it's a wonderful thing in a horror movie to have a building to explore, as it were, in a horror drama. , ., ., , �*, ., drama. yes, and the house, it's a truism, drama. yes, and the house, it's a truism. but _ drama. yes, and the house, it's a truism, but the _ drama. yes, and the house, it's a truism, but the house _ drama. yes, and the house, it's a truism, but the house often - drama. yes, and the house, it's a - truism, but the house often becomes a reflection _ truism, but the house often becomes a reflection of the characters in a state. _ a reflection of the characters in a state. so —
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a reflection of the characters in a state, so the house we are using is quite _ state, so the house we are using is quite corrupted and decrepit and nrouldy— quite corrupted and decrepit and mouldy and there is a strong correlation between that and the central— correlation between that and the central character, so the in a state of heinq _ central character, so the in a state of being. constantly trying to repair— of being. constantly trying to repair the house and patch it up, much _ repair the house and patch it up, much as— repair the house and patch it up, much as he — repair the house and patch it up, much as he is his own crumbling nroral— much as he is his own crumbling moral framework.— much as he is his own crumbling moral framework. quite a bit of diy involved. bad _ moral framework. quite a bit of diy involved. bad diy. _ moral framework. quite a bit of diy involved. bad diy. how— moral framework. quite a bit of diy involved. bad diy. how menacing i moral framework. quite a bit of diyj involved. bad diy. how menacing is involved. bad diy. how menacing is in imelda staunton? _ involved. bad diy. how menacing is in imelda staunton? very _ involved. bad diy. how menacing is in imelda staunton? very menacingj in imelda staunton? very menacing because she — in imelda staunton? very menacing because she is _ in imelda staunton? very menacing because she is normally _ in imelda staunton? very menacing because she is normally the - in imelda staunton? very menacing because she is normally the nicest. because she is normally the nicest person— because she is normally the nicest person you — because she is normally the nicest person you can meet. and it was great, _ person you can meet. and it was great, because i said i'd i would like to— great, because i said i'd i would like to have imelda staunton, so why don't _ like to have imelda staunton, so why don't you _ like to have imelda staunton, so why don't you ask imelda staunton, she is the _ don't you ask imelda staunton, she is the best— don't you ask imelda staunton, she is the best type of imelda staunton, so i is the best type of imelda staunton, so i asked _ is the best type of imelda staunton, so i asked and she said yes which was amazing, but like all truly terrifyinq _ was amazing, but like all truly terrifying actors, and incredibly warm _ terrifying actors, and incredibly warm and — terrifying actors, and incredibly warm and nice person. glad terrifying actors, and incredibly warm and nice person. glad you said that. it is warm and nice person. glad you said that- it is rrot — warm and nice person. glad you said that. it is not nice _ warm and nice person. glad you said that. it is not nice in _ warm and nice person. glad you said that. it is not nice in the _ warm and nice person. glad you said that. it is not nice in the film. - that. it is not nice in the film. lovely talking to you. amulet is out in cinemas tomorrow.
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stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. care home visitation rules in england have been eased by the government, allowing unlimited visits from monday. prince andrew demands a trial byjury in new york, as he denies he was a close friend of convicted sex trafficker, ghislaine maxwell. face coverings are no longer mandatory in england from today, but some big retailers ask customers to continue wearing them. are you being targetted with ads without realising it? today, the advertising watchdog will tell mps about their concerns around posts on social media, which aren't clear marked as adverts. is more regulation needed? i'll explain.
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a great start for england's women in their must win ashes test. but after they take early australia wickets in canberra, the hosts piled on the runs to end the first day in control. and it be a bit grey and damp first thing this morning, but there is plenty of sunshine on the way. good morning. it's thursday, the 27th of january. our main story. it's been announced this morning that the rules for visiting care homes in england will be relaxed from monday. the department for health and social care says there will be no limit on the number of visitors to care homes. self—isolation periods for residents will also be reduced or scrapped. with more, here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. with the omicron surge at the end of last year, the government tightened restrictions on care home visits because of the vulnerability of many residents. now with cases beginning to fall,
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and the rest of society opening up, those restrictions are being removed. from monday, january 31, residents will be able to have unlimited visitors. if they go out on a day trip they won't have to take a test or self—isolate when they get back. patients returning to a home from hospital will have the length of time they have to self—isolate cut from 1a to ten days. at the moment if a care home had an outbreak of the virus it had to close its doors for four weeks. that will be reduced to two weeks. many families believe the restrictions have taken a huge toll on the health and well—being of the people they love. alison holt, bbc news. face coverings are no longer legally required in england after covid rules were relaxed from this morning. many shops — including sainsbury�*s and john lewis — and some transport providers, will still be asking customers to wear one. face coverings continue to be mandatory when shopping in northern ireland,
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scotland and wales. prince andrew is demanding a trial byjury in a civil case brought by virginia giuffre, who has accused him of sexual assault. the prince rejects her claims, and his lawyers have lodged papers with the us court, which include a denial that andrew was a close friend of convicted sex trafficker, ghislaine maxwell. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell has more details. across 11 pages, andrew's lawyers have set out his defence, a denial of the central allegation of sexual abuse made by virginia giuffre, and an assertion in respect of others that andrew lacks sufficient information to either admit or deny what's been claimed. he says, for example, in relation to the widely publicised picture of the two of them, that he doesn't have enough information to admit or deny that there exists photographic evidence of his alleged meeting with miss giuffre. elsewhere, his lawyers assert that virginia giuffre's civil complaint should be dismissed, because she's a permanent resident of australia, and not domiciled
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in the united states. and they say this. finally, they demand this. all of which suggests that andrew is determined to fight it out in court. though lawyers say this doesn't preclude an out—of—court settlement. you can certainly have a settlement further down the road, and it wouldn't shock me at all, between now and a trial, to see something like that happen, you know. and sometimes, though, there are cases where no amount of money will make them go away. there are times when, again, you know, a victim wants their day in court. and that certainly seems to be virginia giuffre's intention. her lawyer has said they look forward to confronting prince andrew with his denials and his attempts to blame miss giuffre for her own abuse at the trial. nicholas witchell, bbc news.
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nick witchell joins us now from london. you have taken us through some of the detail. 11 pages. what does this tell us about the prince's strategy? yes, a wide—ranging set of denials, specifically— yes, a wide—ranging set of denials, specifically of the central charge of sexual — specifically of the central charge of sexual abuse, denying that he was close friends with ghislaine maxwell, that he was a frequent visitor— maxwell, that he was a frequent visitor to — maxwell, that he was a frequent visitor to jeffrey epstein. what maxwell, that he was a frequent visitor tojeffrey epstein. what i think— visitor tojeffrey epstein. what i think it — visitor tojeffrey epstein. what i think it tells us that they are going — think it tells us that they are going to _ think it tells us that they are going to give the impression, or want _ going to give the impression, or want to— going to give the impression, or want to give the impression, that they will— want to give the impression, that they will go in hard and attempt to make _ they will go in hard and attempt to make virginia giuffre's behaviour an issue _ make virginia giuffre's behaviour an issue this— make virginia giuffre's behaviour an issue this is— make virginia giuffre's behaviour an issue. this is this doctrine of unclean _ issue. this is this doctrine of unclean hands. they will attempt to assert _ unclean hands. they will attempt to assert that — unclean hands. they will attempt to assert that her behaviour was so wroanul, — assert that her behaviour was so wrongful, she has freely admitted she procured young girls forjeffrey epstein, _ she procured young girls forjeffrey epstein, they will say this means she has— epstein, they will say this means she has forfeited the right to benefit — she has forfeited the right to benefit from this situation. one must _ benefit from this situation. one must assume that andrew's lawyers
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have weighed this up very carefully. how that— have weighed this up very carefully. how that would play, a british prince — how that would play, a british prince deploying a defence such as that to _ prince deploying a defence such as that to a _ prince deploying a defence such as that to a new yorkjury, one has to wonder— that to a new yorkjury, one has to wonder how— that to a new yorkjury, one has to wonder how that would play, i think. how do _ wonder how that would play, i think. how do you — wonder how that would play, i think. how do you think buckingham palace will do this? i how do you think buckingham palace will do this? ~ will do this? i think with suppressed _ will do this? i think with suppressed horror. - will do this? i think with suppressed horror. i- will do this? i think with . suppressed horror. i mean, will do this? i think with - suppressed horror. i mean, we will do this? i think with _ suppressed horror. i mean, we are now suppressed horror. i mean, we are nowjust _ suppressed horror. i mean, we are nowjust ten — suppressed horror. i mean, we are nowjust ten days from the 70th anniversary of the day the queen came _ anniversary of the day the queen came to — anniversary of the day the queen came to the throne, the beginning of the platinum jubilee. and we are seeing _ the platinum jubilee. and we are seeing this morning in the newspapers that this story is dominating the headlines. buckingham palace _ dominating the headlines. buckingham palace have pushed andrew and the story is— palace have pushed andrew and the story is far— palace have pushed andrew and the story is far away as they possibly can _ story is far away as they possibly can he — story is far away as they possibly can he is— story is far away as they possibly can. he is fighting this case as a private — can. he is fighting this case as a private citizen, whatever that means — private citizen, whatever that means i_ private citizen, whatever that means. i think there will be great concern _ means. i think there will be great concern within buckingham palace at the prospect of this rumbling on throughout this summer of the jubilee — jubilee. thank you. a report into alleged parties at downing street during lockdown is expected to land on the desk of the prime minister today, although it may not be
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published until next week. let's speak to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. 0k, ok, iam ok, i am going to take this with a little bit of a pinch of salt, because like you, we have been waiting for so long. just because if it lands on the prime minister's desk today, it doesn't mean we are going to see it? ihio. desk today, it doesn't mean we are going to see it?— going to see it? no. first of all we understand _ going to see it? no. first of all we understand the _ going to see it? no. first of all we understand the report _ going to see it? no. first of all we understand the report is _ going to see it? no. first of all we understand the report is pretty - going to see it? no. first of all we i understand the report is pretty much done but _ understand the report is pretty much done but it— understand the report is pretty much done but it is undergoing last—minute checks for legal and hr stuff, _ last—minute checks for legal and hr stuff, and _ last—minute checks for legal and hr stuff, and also to make sure it does not cut _ stuff, and also to make sure it does not cut across the police investigation which was announced earlier— investigation which was announced earlier this — investigation which was announced earlier this week. then you have the question— earlier this week. then you have the question of— earlier this week. then you have the question of it being handed over to downing _ question of it being handed over to downing street, they will decide when _ downing street, they will decide when and what to publish. they have insisted _ when and what to publish. they have insisted they will publish the whole thln- insisted they will publish the whole thing but _ insisted they will publish the whole thing but of are reserving the right to take _ thing but of are reserving the right to take out — thing but of are reserving the right to take out any bits if there is confidential information in there. they— confidential information in there. they don't— confidential information in there. they don't know what form it is going _ they don't know what form it is going to — they don't know what form it is going to take. it is a separate process— going to take. it is a separate process from the government. the prime _ process from the government. the prime minister is going to make a statement — prime minister is going to make a statement in parliament and answer questions _ statement in parliament and answer questions when this eventually comes out. questions when this eventually comes out~ if_ questions when this eventually comes out ifyou _ questions when this eventually comes out. if you add all that up together, we are running out of time
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in the _ together, we are running out of time in the parliamentary calendar because _ in the parliamentary calendar because there aren't a lot of mps around _ because there aren't a lot of mps around today, thursday, and there are very _ around today, thursday, and there are very few — around today, thursday, and there are very few mps around in westminster on friday. why would the government want to have the report published _ government want to have the report published and then leave it until the start— published and then leave it until the start of next week for the prime minister— the start of next week for the prime minister to— the start of next week for the prime minister to give his version of events? — minister to give his version of events? that makes me think maybe we could be _ events? that makes me think maybe we could be looking at the start of next _ could be looking at the start of next week rather than today. shall i take it with a _ next week rather than today. shall i take it with a pinch _ next week rather than today. shall i take it with a pinch of— next week rather than today. shall i take it with a pinch of salt? - the united states has rejected russia's demand to bar ukraine from joining the nato alliance of western powers. moscow made the demand after amassing a huge number of troops on its border with ukraine, although it denies it is planning to invade. our correspondent caroline davies is in moscow. just tell us, has there been any reaction in moscow?—
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just tell us, has there been any reaction in moscow? morning. no, at the moment — reaction in moscow? morning. no, at the moment we _ reaction in moscow? morning. no, at the moment we have _ reaction in moscow? morning. no, at the moment we have not _ reaction in moscow? morning. no, at the moment we have not had - reaction in moscow? morning. no, at the moment we have not had any - the moment we have not had any official— the moment we have not had any official response to the demands. we knew that _ official response to the demands. we knew that these demands, the response — knew that these demands, the response from america, was unlikely to contain— response from america, was unlikely to contain anything about ukraine being _ to contain anything about ukraine being barred from joining nato. it is no _ being barred from joining nato. it is no massive surprise to anybody, including _ is no massive surprise to anybody, including to — is no massive surprise to anybody, including to russia, that what that was probably not going to be on the table _ was probably not going to be on the table. nato have been adamant about this from _ table. nato have been adamant about this from the beginning. many think russia _ this from the beginning. many think russia knew that was almost impossible and suggest russia put this out— impossible and suggest russia put this out on the table because they knew— this out on the table because they knew it _ this out on the table because they knew it was a nonstarter to begin with _ knew it was a nonstarter to begin with and — knew it was a nonstarter to begin with. and so for all their talk about— with. and so for all their talk about diplomacy, that actually, realistically, it was never going to id realistically, it was never going to go anywhere. what happens next is the big _ go anywhere. what happens next is the big question. at the moment we don't _ the big question. at the moment we don't know— the big question. at the moment we don't know how russia is going to respond — don't know how russia is going to respond. america did not make public everything _ respond. america did not make public everything that was in that response, although it did talk about ukraine _ response, although it did talk about ukraine and nato. was there enough in there _ ukraine and nato. was there enough in there for— ukraine and nato. was there enough in there for russia to feel like they— in there for russia to feel like they had _ in there for russia to feel like they had something to be able to get their teeth into? they had something to be able to get theirteeth into? do they had something to be able to get their teeth into? do they feel like they have — their teeth into? do they feel like they have got enough out of this? at they have got enough out of this? at the moment we don't know when russia
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is going _ the moment we don't know when russia is going to _ the moment we don't know when russia is going to respond? it took america by the _ is going to respond? it took america by the month and a half to be able to respond — by the month and a half to be able to respond to russia's initial demands. so we are waiting to hear. in demands. so we are waiting to hear. in the _ demands. so we are waiting to hear. in the words— demands. so we are waiting to hear. in the words of the secretary of state, — in the words of the secretary of state, antony blinken, the ball is in their— state, antony blinken, the ball is in their court. thank you. fans of neil young won't able to listen to his music on spotify for much longer. the streaming platform has begun removing young's tracks, after he called for it to choose between him and the us podcasterjoe rogan, whom he accuses of spreading covid vaccine disinformation. joe rogan denies that claim. spotify said it regrets the move, and hopes the issue can be resolved soon. 12 minutes past eight. now the weather. what have you got for us, matt? i have got something better than we have seen— i have got something better than we have seen of late. a wild night to the north— have seen of late. a wild night to the north of scotland where it has
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been _ the north of scotland where it has been a _ the north of scotland where it has been a disturbed night's sleep for some. _ been a disturbed night's sleep for some, particularly in orkney, where winds— some, particularly in orkney, where winds got— some, particularly in orkney, where winds got close to 80 mph. they will continue _ winds got close to 80 mph. they will continue to— winds got close to 80 mph. they will continue to ease down today. it has allowed _ continue to ease down today. it has allowed a _ continue to ease down today. it has allowed a weather front to work south _ allowed a weather front to work south across the country. at the moment— south across the country. at the moment southern counties of bingen, south _ moment southern counties of bingen, south wales, plenty of cloud. outbreaks of rain and drizzle, particularly towards the rest. —— west _ particularly towards the rest. —— west for— particularly towards the rest. —— west. for many it is going to be a sunny— west. for many it is going to be a sunny day — west. for many it is going to be a sunny day a— west. for many it is going to be a sunny day. a few showers. north—west england _ sunny day. a few showers. north—west england, northern ireland, especially to the north and west of scotland — especially to the north and west of scotland. some on the hills will be wintry~ _ scotland. some on the hills will be wintry. particularly cold air closer to shetland and orkney. we could see temperatures milder than recent days _ temperatures milder than recent days ten — temperatures milder than recent days. ten to 12 degrees in the south — days. ten to 12 degrees in the south this _ days. ten to 12 degrees in the south. this evening and overnight as winds— south. this evening and overnight as winds for— south. this evening and overnight as winds for light, some fog across southern — winds for light, some fog across southern then, south wales. increases— southern then, south wales. increases to the west, lifting temperatures. the greater chance of frost to _ temperatures. the greater chance of frost to take us into the start of friday — frost to take us into the start of friday a — frost to take us into the start of friday. a cold start tomorrow. it will be _ friday. a cold start tomorrow. it will be a — friday. a cold start tomorrow. it
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will be a bright start. mist and fog slowly— will be a bright start. mist and fog slowly clearing. cloud increasing from _ slowly clearing. cloud increasing from the — slowly clearing. cloud increasing from the north and west. hazy sunshine — from the north and west. hazy sunshine in southern and eastern areas _ sunshine in southern and eastern areas the — sunshine in southern and eastern areas. the cloud they can offer rain in the _ areas. the cloud they can offer rain in the north— areas. the cloud they can offer rain in the north of scotland. but it will be — in the north of scotland. but it will be a — in the north of scotland. but it will be a day, after the cold start, that gets — will be a day, after the cold start, that gets milder. thank you. it's holocaust memorial day today, marking 77 years since the liberation of the nazi death camp at auschwitz—birkenau, although the day is for the victims of all genocides. seven holocaust survivors have had their portraits painted by different artists, in a special project commissioned by prince charles. our royal correspondent daniela relph has more. arek hersh was one ofjust two members of his family to survive the holocaust. this painting captures him now, at the age of 93. the style is realistic, almost photographic. his right hand rests on his left arm, the arm that bears the number he was marked with at auschwitz.
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creating a gallery of holocaust survivors, the bbc has been following the project. covid made things unconventional for artist massimiliano pironti. i started to paint this portrait in completely opposite process as normal. you should have painted me when i had hair! yeah, that was a while ago. we had like, three virtual sittings. how do you do you feel like, arek? how do you feel? 0k. it was a very challenging experience. your book... oh, yes. months later, came a real life meet—up, as arek shared his story. that was our first camp. 11 years old, i was, 11 years old. that's auschwitz, yeah. and it's where we got our number on the arm.
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these are children who survived at auschwitz. | arek was one of those survivors. but the rest of his family, bar his older sister, never reached liberation. they were some of the six million jews killed in the holocaust. this week, arek met the prince of wales, who commissioned the project. this is my picture. i think it's fantastic. i felt we owed it to these remarkable people just to remember them in this way. there is something very special about the portrait, and about the artist's eye in bringing out the real underlying character, personality and meaning of the person who's sitting for the portrait. the connection between artists and survivors has been strong. the pictures reflect both loss and survival.
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these portraits go to the heart of their individuality and their humanity. what better way of rejecting that kind of philosophy that led to the holocaust, and honouring survivors, than this project? the reality is this extraordinary group of people are now growing smaller every year, but the power of their testimony forms a lasting memory. daniela relph, bbc news, the queen's gallery at buckingham palace. quite a lot of head shaking going on here. it is so wonderful. delighted to say that arek hersh joins us in the studio now, along with the artist massimiliano pironti, who you also saw in that report. let's go through this, i reckon. what think of the painting? i think he has done _
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what think of the painting? i think he has done a _ what think of the painting? i think he has done a very _ what think of the painting? i think he has done a very good _ what think of the painting? i think he has done a very good painting. | what think of the painting? i think i he has done a very good painting. he has done _ he has done a very good painting. he has done one or two of the paintings of the _ has done one or two of the paintings of the survivors. he is a wonderful painter _ of the survivors. he is a wonderful ainter. ., , ., ., . painter. people who watch the film will see that _ painter. people who watch the film will see that there _ painter. people who watch the film will see that there is _ painter. people who watch the film will see that there is a _ painter. people who watch the film will see that there is a joy - painter. people who watch the film will see that there is a joy in - will see that there is a joy in watching you being painted, because your love of life, and your humour, everything comes through in those settings in those early days. it's an absolute delight watching you. thank you very much. what an absolute delight watching you. thank you very much.— thank you very much. what did it feel like? usually, _ thank you very much. what did it feel like? usually, quite - thank you very much. what did it feel like? usually, quite a - thank you very much. what did it feel like? usually, quite a warml feel like? usually, quite a warm erson. i feel like? usually, quite a warm person- i like — feel like? usually, quite a warm person. i like life _ feel like? usually, quite a warm person. i like life and _ feel like? usually, quite a warm person. i like life and so - feel like? usually, quite a warm person. i like life and so on. - feel like? usually, quite a warm| person. i like life and so on. life goes _ person. i like life and so on. life goes on — person. i like life and so on. life goes on i— person. i like life and so on. life goes on itry— person. i like life and so on. life goes on. i try to do everything i can in— goes on. i try to do everything i can in my— goes on. i try to do everything i can in my life and help other human beings _ can in my life and help other human beings as— can in my life and help other human beings as well. i give talks in the schools. — beings as well. i give talks in the schools, universities. i've given
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lot of talks, hundreds of them. i still do it — lot of talks, hundreds of them. i still do it i_ lot of talks, hundreds of them. i still do it. i wrote a book. called the detail— still do it. i wrote a book. called the detail of history. went to school — the detail of history. went to school is _ the detail of history. went to school is a lot. hoping that some young _ school is a lot. hoping that some young people learn the lessons what i had young people learn the lessons what i had to _ young people learn the lessons what i had to go _ young people learn the lessons what i had to go through and so on. massimiliano, what did you know about of the holocaust and what did you know about arek before you start of the virtual session?— of the virtual session? before startin: of the virtual session? before starting our — of the virtual session? before starting our virtual _ of the virtual session? before starting our virtual sittings, i | starting our virtual sittings, i read — starting our virtual sittings, i read erica's _ starting our virtual sittings, i read erica's book. _ starting our virtual sittings, i read erica's book. so - starting our virtual sittings, i read erica's book. so i - starting our virtual sittings, i read erica's book. so i was . starting our virtual sittings, i. read erica's book. so i was well prepared — read erica's book. so i was well prepared for— read erica's book. so i was well prepared for his _ read erica's book. so i was well prepared for his story. - read erica's book. so i was well prepared for his story. i - read erica's book. so i was well prepared for his story. i knew. prepared for his story. i knew already— prepared for his story. i knew already about _ prepared for his story. i knew already about the _ prepared for his story. i knew already about the holocaust i prepared for his story. i knew. already about the holocaust and everything _ already about the holocaust and everything but, _ already about the holocaust and everything. but, i— already about the holocaust and everything. but, i mean, - already about the holocaust and everything. but, i mean, it- already about the holocaust and everything. but, i mean, it hasl already about the holocaust and - everything. but, i mean, it has been such a— everything. but, i mean, it has been such a great— everything. but, i mean, it has been such a great honour— everything. but, i mean, it has been such a great honour for— everything. but, i mean, it has been such a great honour for me - everything. but, i mean, it has been such a great honour for me to - everything. but, i mean, it has been such a great honour for me to paint. such a great honour for me to paint his portrait~ — such a great honour for me to paint his portrait. just— such a great honour for me to paint his portrait. just a _ such a great honour for me to paint his portrait. just a privilege. - his portrait. just a privilege. what's — his portrait. just a privilege. what's so _ his portrait. just a privilege. what's so interesting - his portrait. just a privilege. . what's so interesting watching his portrait. just a privilege. - what's so interesting watching the documentary is watching how the
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artists learn. i don't know if this is normal when you paint somebody�*s portrait, that you learn so much about them, and it almost feels as if that knowledge and relationship is imbued in the actual art itself. is that how it felt?— is that how it felt? yeah, absolutely. _ is that how it felt? yeah, absolutely. the - is that how it felt? yeah, absolutely. the human . is that how it felt? yeah, - absolutely. the human connection is that how it felt? yeah, _ absolutely. the human connection is absolutely— absolutely. the human connection is absolutely fundamental _ absolutely. the human connection is absolutely fundamental for - absolutely. the human connection is absolutely fundamental for me. - absolutely. the human connection is absolutely fundamental for me. it i absolutely. the human connection is absolutely fundamental for me. it is| absolutely fundamental for me. it is the first— absolutely fundamental for me. it is the first thing. — absolutely fundamental for me. it is the first thing, when _ absolutely fundamental for me. it is the first thing, when i— absolutely fundamental for me. it is the first thing, when i start - absolutely fundamental for me. it is the first thing, when i start a - the first thing, when i start a portrait. _ the first thing, when i start a portrait. the _ the first thing, when i start a portrait, the first _ the first thing, when i start a portrait, the first thing - the first thing, when i start a portrait, the first thing is i the first thing, when i start a portrait, the first thing is the human— portrait, the first thing is the human connection. _ portrait, the first thing is the human connection. i- portrait, the first thing is the human connection. i am i portrait, the first thing is the human connection. i am so. portrait, the first thing is the - human connection. i am so grateful for this— human connection. i am so grateful for this friendship _ human connection. i am so grateful for this friendship with _ human connection. i am so grateful for this friendship with arek- human connection. i am so grateful for this friendship with arek and i for this friendship with arek and his family — for this friendship with arek and his family it— for this friendship with arek and his family. it has _ for this friendship with arek and his family. it has helped - for this friendship with arek and his family. it has helped me i for this friendship with arek and his family. it has helped me a l for this friendship with arek and . his family. it has helped me a lot. arek, _ his family. it has helped me a lot. arek, in _ his family. it has helped me a lot. arek, in the — his family. it has helped me a lot. arek, in the picture, _ his family. it has helped me a lot. arek, in the picture, your- his family. it has helped me a lot. arek, in the picture, your hand i his family. it has helped me a lot. arek, in the picture, your hand isi arek, in the picture, your hand is over your left arm. i arek, in the picture, your hand is over your left arm.— over your left arm. i got of the number on _ over your left arm. i got of the number on my _ over your left arm. i got of the number on my left _ over your left arm. i got of the number on my left arm. i over your left arm. i got of the number on my left arm. when | over your left arm. i got of the i number on my left arm. when we over your left arm. i got of the - number on my left arm. when we came to auschwitz, _ number on my left arm. when we came to auschwitz, if you were chosen to live, _ to auschwitz, if you were chosen to live, you _ to auschwitz, if you were chosen to live, you got — to auschwitz, if you were chosen to live, you got a number on your arm. and i_ live, you got a number on your arm. and i got— live, you got a number on your arm. and i got b— live, you got a number on your arm.
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and i got b 7608. live, you got a number on your arm. and | got 3 7608.— and i got b 7608. 7608, b. you holdin: and | got 3 7608. 7608, b. you holding that. — and i got b 7608. 7608, b. you holding that, it _ and i got b 7608. 7608, b. you holding that, it is _ and i got b 7608. 7608, b. you holding that, it is almost i and i got b 7608. 7608, b. you holding that, it is almost like i and i got b 7608. 7608, b. you. holding that, it is almost like you holding that, it is almost like you hold a war wound. massimiliano, that must have been so important, just at that very simple post? it everything, isn't it? i that very simple post? it everything, isn't it? i didn't want to show the _ everything, isn't it? i didn't want to show the number— everything, isn't it? i didn't want to show the number on - everything, isn't it? i didn't want to show the number on the i everything, isn't it? i didn't want i to show the number on the project, so i to show the number on the project, so i decided — to show the number on the project, so i decided to— to show the number on the project, so i decided to put— to show the number on the project, so i decided to put his _ to show the number on the project, so i decided to put his hand - to show the number on the project, so i decided to put his hand on- to show the number on the project, so i decided to put his hand on the| so i decided to put his hand on the left arm _ so i decided to put his hand on the left arm. just _ so i decided to put his hand on the left arm. just showing _ so i decided to put his hand on the left arm. just showing that - so i decided to put his hand on the left arm. just showing that he i so i decided to put his hand on the left arm. just showing that he is i left arm. just showing that he is like touching _ left arm. just showing that he is like touching an _ left arm. just showing that he is like touching an old _ left arm. just showing that he is like touching an old wound. it i left arm. just showing that he is i like touching an old wound. it will be forever— like touching an old wound. it will be forever present _ like touching an old wound. it will be forever present and _ like touching an old wound. it will be forever present and felt. - like touching an old wound. it will be forever present and felt. it i like touching an old wound. it will be forever present and felt. it is i be forever present and felt. it is there _ be forever present and felt. it is there but — be forever present and felt. it is there but he _ be forever present and felt. it is there. but he is _ be forever present and felt. it is there. but he is not _ be forever present and felt. it is there. but he is not showing i be forever present and felt. it isj there. but he is not showing the number — there. but he is not showing the number. if— there. but he is not showing the number. , ., ., ., , there. but he is not showing the number. ., ., , number. if you got a number you were chosen to live. _ number. if you got a number you were chosen to live. sometimes _ number. if you got a number you were chosen to live. sometimes at} - number. if you got a number you were chosen to live. sometimes at} wants, | chosen to live. sometimes at} wants, sometimes _ chosen to live. sometimes at} wants, sometimes six months. —— three months — sometimes six months. —— three months it— sometimes six months. -- three months. ., , , sometimes six months. -- three months. . , , ~ , ., months. it all depends. when did you know that you — months. it all depends. when did you know that you were _ months. it all depends. when did you know that you were one _ months. it all depends. when did you know that you were one of _ months. it all depends. when did you know that you were one of those i know that you were one of those chosen to live? what happened? when
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did you know that you would be one of those chosen? i did you know that you would be one of those chosen?— of those chosen? i didn't. i got off a train. of those chosen? i didn't. i got off a train- we — of those chosen? i didn't. i got off a train. we had _ of those chosen? i didn't. i got off a train. we had good _ of those chosen? i didn't. i got off a train. we had good strains. i of those chosen? i didn't. i got off a train. we had good strains. we i a train. we had good strains. we were _ a train. we had good strains. we were about — a train. we had good strains. we were about 80 to 90 people in a goods— were about 80 to 90 people in a goods train, standing up. we travelled _ goods train, standing up. we travelled for two and a half days. then _ travelled for two and a half days. then we — travelled for two and a half days. then we arrived in a camp and i did not know— then we arrived in a camp and i did not know where we were and what happened — not know where we were and what happened. then we had to go to a selection — happened. then we had to go to a selection. some officers ask you how old you _ selection. some officers ask you how old you are — selection. some officers ask you how old you are i— selection. some officers ask you how old you are. i told them i was two years— old you are. i told them i was two years older— old you are. i told them i was two years older than i was, because i knew— years older than i was, because i knew from — years older than i was, because i knew from my first camp what it was like. knew from my first camp what it was like so _ knew from my first camp what it was like so i_ knew from my first camp what it was like. so i made my old about two years _ like. so i made my old about two years. they— like. so i made my old about two years. they told me to go to the right— years. they told me to go to the right side — years. they told me to go to the right side. and then i was chosen to live. right side. and then i was chosen to live but _ right side. and then i was chosen to live but the — right side. and then i was chosen to live. but the same situation, i could — live. but the same situation, i could have _ live. but the same situation, i could have been chosen to die on
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that day — could have been chosen to die on that day. but i was very lucky in a way _ that day. but i was very lucky in a wa . , , that day. but i was very lucky in a wa. , ,., ., way. this day is about liberation from the camps. _ way. this day is about liberation from the camps. where - way. this day is about liberation from the camps. where were i way. this day is about liberation l from the camps. where were you way. this day is about liberation - from the camps. where were you when that day happened? what was your circumstance and what were your thoughts? i circumstance and what were your thouuhts? . , circumstance and what were your thouuhts? ., , ., ., thoughts? i was, for the whole month, thoughts? i was, for the whole month. and — thoughts? i was, for the whole month, and open _ thoughts? i was, for the whole month, and open wagons i thoughts? i was, for the whole month, and open wagons from j month, and open wagons from buchenwald, eastern germany, a whole train full, _ buchenwald, eastern germany, a whole train full, about eight wagons, open wagons, _ train full, about eight wagons, open wagons, no— train full, about eight wagons, open wagons, no roof, and we went for a whole _ wagons, no roof, and we went for a whole month, we were travelling from one place _ whole month, we were travelling from one place to _ whole month, we were travelling from one place to the other. as the others — one place to the other. as the others closed in, they moved us further— others closed in, they moved us further away. they rarely gave us any food — further away. they rarely gave us any food. we ate grass. i cooked
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grass _ any food. we ate grass. i cooked grass it — any food. we ate grass. i cooked grass. it was impossible. you cooked leather as well? _ grass. it was impossible. you cooked leather as well? it _ grass. it was impossible. you cooked leather as well? it was _ grass. it was impossible. you cooked leather as well? it was just _ leather as well? it was 'ust unbelievable i leather as well? it was 'ust unbelievable what i leather as well? it was just unbelievable what these i leather as well? it was just - unbelievable what these people did. we saw_ unbelievable what these people did. we saw a _ unbelievable what these people did. we saw a man with a gun on our wagon — we saw a man with a gun on our wagon. there was about ten wagons. and they— wagon. there was about ten wagons. and they took us from eastern germany— and they took us from eastern germany all the way in open wagons, to czechoslovakia. and we arrived and we _ to czechoslovakia. and we arrived and we were unloaded. a lot of the people _ and we were unloaded. a lot of the people died on the way. because we -ot people died on the way. because we got no _ people died on the way. because we got no food. i ate grass. i cooked grass _ got no food. i ate grass. i cooked grass and — got no food. i ate grass. i cooked grass. and just a few of us kept togethen — grass. and just a few of us kept together. after the month we were in czechoslovakia. we were unloaded. we
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arrived _ czechoslovakia. we were unloaded. we arrived at _ czechoslovakia. we were unloaded. we arrived at about one fifth of may —— on the _ arrived at about one fifth of may —— on the 5th — arrived at about one fifth of may —— on the 5th of— arrived at about one fifth of may —— on the 5th of may. after a whole month— on the 5th of may. after a whole month on— on the 5th of may. after a whole month on open wagons. we were unloaded. _ month on open wagons. we were unloaded. some people still died after the — unloaded. some people still died after the war. the first few days after _ after the war. the first few days after the — after the war. the first few days after the war. the first few days after the war. starvation.- after the war. starvation. arek, when did you — after the war. starvation. arek, when did you know— after the war. starvation. arek, when did you know that - after the war. starvation. arek, when did you know that you - after the war. starvation. arek, i when did you know that you were free? when did that time come? fin free? when did that time come? on the 8th of may, 1945, we were liberated — the 8th of may, 1945, we were liberated by the russian army. we had people shouting. we woke up. and we could _ had people shouting. we woke up. and we could see different uniforms. it was the _ we could see different uniforms. it was the russian army. they had tanks _ was the russian army. they had tanks. some walked with guns. we could _ tanks. some walked with guns. we could see _ tanks. some walked with guns. we could see we were liberated. the 8th
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of may. _ could see we were liberated. the 8th of may, 1945, the last day of the war _ of may, 1945, the last day of the war a— of may, 1945, the last day of the war. a month travelling.- of may, 1945, the last day of the war. a month travelling. your story is so extraordinary. _ war. a month travelling. your story is so extraordinary. i _ war. a month travelling. your story is so extraordinary. i do _ war. a month travelling. your story is so extraordinary. i do want - war. a month travelling. your story is so extraordinary. i do want to - is so extraordinary. i do want to come back to what i see, and i watched the film, from you and the other people we see, there is an amazing grasp of the joy of life. it leaps out of you. notwithstanding all the horrors you have been through, from all of those people, the joy of life, the celebration of being alive and the families you have had since then, that is sold out do you know what i mean? it absolutely comes out of you? yes. out do you know what i mean? it absolutely comes out of you? yes, i lost my parents- _ absolutely comes out of you? yes, i lost my parents. i _ absolutely comes out of you? yes, i lost my parents. i lost _ absolutely comes out of you? yes, i lost my parents. i lost my _ absolutely comes out of you? yes, i lost my parents. i lost my brother. lost my parents. i lost my brother and sisters — lost my parents. i lost my brother and sisters. the only one i found after— and sisters. the only one i found after my— and sisters. the only one i found after my what was my sister. she escaped — after my what was my sister. she escaped to — after my what was my sister. she escaped to russia. from poland. she survived _ escaped to russia. from poland. she survived. she went to america but she died _ survived. she went to america but she died quite a few years ago. she
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had a _ she died quite a few years ago. she had a family, two daughters. unfortunately, she died. i was the only one _ unfortunately, she died. i was the only one left from the family. we were _ only one left from the family. we were four— only one left from the family. we were four children. my parents, everybody — were four children. my parents, everybody was killed, basically. does _ everybody was killed, basically. does that mean that you savour what you have all the more? trier? does that mean that you savour what you have all the more?— you have all the more? very much. very much- — you have all the more? very much. very much- yes. — you have all the more? very much. very much. yes, i _ you have all the more? very much. very much. yes, i do _ you have all the more? very much. very much. yes, i do savour - you have all the more? very much. i very much. yes, i do savour whatever i very much. yes, i do savour whatever i do _ very much. yes, i do savour whatever i do i_ very much. yes, i do savour whatever i do ialso— very much. yes, i do savour whatever tdo~ tatso go— very much. yes, i do savour whatever i do. i also go round to schools, i give _ i do. i also go round to schools, i give talks— i do. i also go round to schools, i give talks in— i do. i also go round to schools, i give talks in schools. universities. meetings— give talks in schools. universities. meetings as well. this is my life. i talk about— meetings as well. this is my life. i talk about what i went through. to come _ talk about what i went through. to come out — talk about what i went through. to come out from auschwitz was a nriracte — come out from auschwitz was a miracle. then from auschwitz, as the russians— miracle. then from auschwitz, as the russians approached auschwitz, they
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took us _ russians approached auschwitz, they took us on _ russians approached auschwitz, they took us on trains, on open wagons, they took— took us on trains, on open wagons, they took us— took us on trains, on open wagons, they took us to germany. | took us on trains, on open wagons, they took us to germany.— they took us to germany. i feel really honoured _ they took us to germany. i feel really honoured to _ they took us to germany. i feel really honoured to hear - they took us to germany. i feel really honoured to hear the - they took us to germany. i feel i really honoured to hear the story first hand. it's been a real privilege for you as well. it is first hand. it's been a real privilege for you as well. it is an utter privilege. _ privilege for you as well. it is an utter privilege. having - privilege for you as well. it is an utter privilege. having seen - privilege for you as well. it is an utter privilege. having seen the | utter privilege. having seen the film, the portrait _ utter privilege. having seen the film, the portrait film, - utter privilege. having seen the film, the portrait film, it's - utter privilege. having seen the | film, the portrait film, it's worth watching. very moving.- film, the portrait film, it's worth watching. very moving. very moving. and also, watching. very moving. very moving. and also. the — watching. very moving. very moving. and also, the friendships _ watching. very moving. very moving. and also, the friendships that - watching. very moving. very moving. and also, the friendships that you - and also, the friendships that you see and the relationship is just wonderful. and the message you are getting out, making sure this is not forgotten, thank you. and thank you forgotten, thank you. and thank you for talking to us. it has been a real honour to meet you. it’s for talking to us. it has been a real honour to meet you. it's my pleasure- _ real honour to meet you. it's my pleasure- and — real honour to meet you. it's my pleasure. and lovely _ real honour to meet you. it's my pleasure. and lovely to - real honour to meet you. it's my pleasure. and lovely to meet - real honour to meet you. it's my| pleasure. and lovely to meet you massimiliano _ pleasure. and lovely to meet you massimiliano as _ pleasure. and lovely to meet you massimiliano as well. _ pleasure. and lovely to meet you massimiliano as well. that - massimiliano as well. that documentary, and it really is special, is on bbc two at nine o'clock tonight. it is called survivors, portrait of the holocaust. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london,
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i'm victoria hollins. the funeral of 14—year—old jermaine cools will be held later this morning in south london. the teenager was attacked close to west croydon station in november and later died in hospital — the youngest victim of knife crime last year. his family say they want the media to show the "anguish and pain" they are going through in the hope teenagers will stop carrying knives. police in westminster have used footage of drivers doing laps around each other to help in a crackdown against anti—social and dangerous driving. special acoustic cameras similar to these installed in neighbouring kensington and chelsea last summer, help detect loud noises such as drivers revving car engines. westminster city council said 10 vehicles were siezed and five people arrested between the weekend of 14th and 16th of january. now, she's the oldest volunteer in the nhs and possibly the country. beryl carr, who turned ioo—years—old this month, has been
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volunteering at ealing hospital for the past 18 years. born in acton, she moved away but came back to the area to be near her daughter after her husband died, and says working at the hospital cafe has been her lifeline. i enjoy coming, and it's a worthwhilejob, and i'm helping people that are not as fortunate as i am or as well as i am. people say i don't look my age, but no, i'm so lucky. and you can catch more of the wonderful beryl on our lunchtime and evening news at 6.30 — and on our website — bbc.co.uk/london well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning this is how tfl services are looking right now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning apart from minor delays on the dlr and planned closures on the bank branch of the northern line. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. we start the day with temperatures in mid—single figures celsius
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but we wake up to a largely grey and cloudy start and what has been happening overnight is a cold front has been slowly making its way southwards, so the cloud increasing and through this morning we might get a little bit of light, patchy rain, nothing more significant ahead of this cold front clearing, and once it clears, plenty of sunshine. so, this afternoon we have blue sky, a bit breezier this afternoon and the temperature is quite mild, 12 celsius by the end of the day. overnight, the windfalls light and we've got clear skies, so a perfect recipe for the temperature to drop and it will be chilly again with the minimum dropping down to zero and we could see a sparkle or to a frost on friday morning first thing and we could also see one or two mist and fog patches. for friday, a bright start and high pressure there but gradually through the day we could see the cloud increasing from the west. that indicates perhaps it is actually getting a bit milder. temperatures tomorrow perhaps a little chillier than today at nine celsius, and come saturday more unsettled
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and more cloud and certainly breezy but the temperature could reach 14 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. we'll be handing to morning live after the programme, so let's find out from gethin and sam what they've got coming up. coming up on today's morning live, it leaves nearly 9 million people with debilitating joint pain and struggling to move. dr xand explains how you can prevent and treat osteoarthritis. that's right. it's the most common type of arthritis and the cold weather can make it much worse. i'll be taking you through the myths and facts _ i'll be taking you through the myths and facts from turmeric to fish oil.
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also coming up, it's a topic we've been talking about a lot recently, the rising cost of living. they're tackling holidays this week, but today the rip—off britain ladies will be telling us how they're about to turn their attention to household bills and online scams, and there's a massive storyline in eastenders about male breast cancer tonight. we join forces with them to explain how the disease can affect anyone and why men should never ignore a small painless lump in their chests. plus there's a brand new show hitting our screens next week from the makers of the bill. it's called 'hope street�* and it launches on bbc one on monday. we'll catch up with some of it's lead actors to find out why it isn't your average crime drama. also on the show, anna haugh's in the kitchen and we're in for a treat with a twist! it's the perfect time to tuck into some citrus fruits which are in season right now. they're packed with vitamins and also cheap! i'll be showing you how to bake them into a delicious orange upside down cake! upside down, inside out. back to front. it could _ upside down, inside out. back to front. it could all— upside down, inside out. back to front. it could all be _ upside down, inside out. back to front. it could all be happening i front. it could all be happening later. see you at 9:15.
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it's all about the balance, the fitness, the cake, it's all you need. have a good programme. sometimes, it is hard to calibrate sporting achievement. what sometimes, it is hard to calibrate sporting achievement.— sometimes, it is hard to calibrate sporting achievement. what do you have to measure _ sporting achievement. what do you have to measure it _ sporting achievement. what do you have to measure it against? - sporting achievement. what do you have to measure it against? and i sporting achievement. what do you l have to measure it against? and you are talking about alpine sports. pond are talking about alpine sports. and downhill slalom skiing, so the slalom — downhill slalom skiing, so the slalom world cup in one of the biggest — slalom world cup in one of the biggest stories i can remember in the sport— biggest stories i can remember in the sport with the first time a british— the sport with the first time a british person has one abridged alpine — british person has one abridged alpine event, dave ryding, who didn't— alpine event, dave ryding, who didn't race on the snow until he was 14. didn't race on the snow until he was 14 so _ didn't race on the snow until he was 14 so as— didn't race on the snow until he was 14. so as someone said comments like winning _ 14. so as someone said comments like winning the _ 14. so as someone said comments like winning the masters golf having grown _ winning the masters golf having grown up playing crazy gold or winning — grown up playing crazy gold or winning the monaco grand prix having trained _ winning the monaco grand prix having trained in _ winning the monaco grand prix having trained in bumper cars. the scale is quite _ trained in bumper cars. the scale is quite staggering. dave "the rocket" ryding
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has returned home, to lancashire after his incredible gold medal in the world cup slalom race in kitz—boole...britain's first gold, in 55 years of alpine cup racing. it has started well for dave ryding. this is— it has started well for dave ryding. this is largely error—free from the british— this is largely error—free from the british champion. and he leads here try british champion. and he leads here by 038— british champion. and he leads here by 038 of— british champion. and he leads here by 038 of a — british champion. and he leads here by 0.38 of a second. dave ryding wins~ _ by 0.38 of a second. dave ryding wins~ what— by 0.38 of a second. dave ryding wins. what a journey this has been. i'm delighted to say dave joins us and he safely got his feet up i'm delighted to say dave joins us and he safely got his feet up ahead of the winter olympics. tell us about the reaction out there, and one german newspaper with the headlines that it was wow. it’s one german newspaper with the headlines that it was wow. it's hard to take in. — headlines that it was wow. it's hard to take in. the _ headlines that it was wow. it's hard to take in, the magnitude - headlines that it was wow. it's hard to take in, the magnitude of i headlines that it was wow. it's hard to take in, the magnitude of what l headlines that it was wow. it's hard to take in, the magnitude of what i | to take in, the magnitude of what i achieved _ to take in, the magnitude of what i achieved i— to take in, the magnitude of what i achieved. i didn't expect the austrians _ achieved. i didn't expect the austrians to be so happy either. they— austrians to be so happy either. they were — austrians to be so happy either. they were loving it as well, so yes, a lot— they were loving it as well, so yes, a lot of— they were loving it as well, so yes, a lot of emotion and a lot of love
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to nteet— a lot of emotion and a lot of love to meet and i'm just proud of what i achieved _ to meet and i'm just proud of what i achieved 50— to meet and i'm 'ust proud of what i achieved. , ., , ., , to meet and i'm 'ust proud of what i achieved. , ., , ~ , achieved. so you should be. as someone _ achieved. so you should be. as someone who _ achieved. so you should be. as someone who grew _ achieved. so you should be. as someone who grew up - achieved. so you should be. as someone who grew up on i achieved. so you should be. as someone who grew up on a i achieved. so you should be. as someone who grew up on a dryl achieved. so you should be. as i someone who grew up on a dry slope at pendle in lancashire, not on snow, how big is this on the most difficult slalom course in the world, it was compared to winning wimbledon, the masters golf, the monte carlo grand prix. l wimbledon, the masters golf, the monte carlo grand prix.— monte carlo grand prix. i saw that comparison _ monte carlo grand prix. i saw that comparison and _ monte carlo grand prix. i saw that comparison and i'm _ monte carlo grand prix. i saw that comparison and i'm not _ monte carlo grand prix. i saw that comparison and i'm not sure i monte carlo grand prix. i saw that comparison and i'm not sure that| monte carlo grand prix. i saw that i comparison and i'm not sure that the talent _ comparison and i'm not sure that the talent hotbed that is pendle ski club outside clitheroe has that, but i club outside clitheroe has that, but i never _ club outside clitheroe has that, but i never dreamt of that and i rang tim "— i never dreamt of that and i rang tim —— dreams of being ranked in the top 30— tim —— dreams of being ranked in the top30 so— tim —— dreams of being ranked in the top30 so to— tim —— dreams of being ranked in the top 30 so to be chipping off the new things— top 30 so to be chipping off the new things is— top 30 so to be chipping off the new things is testament to the team and our federation for keeping me going on the _ our federation for keeping me going on the young guys for pushing me and it's a real— on the young guys for pushing me and it's a real team effort and i have to thank— it's a real team effort and i have to thank my coach who has been with me for— to thank my coach who has been with me for 12 _ to thank my coach who has been with me for 12 years and like you say, it's some — me for 12 years and like you say, it's some journey. it took me a white — it's some journey. it took me a while but— it's some journey. it took me a while. but we got there in the end. this is— while. but we got there in the end. this is me — while. but we got there in the end. this is me following you down the slope, a camera person as well, but this was four years ago and seeing the technique involved because it's
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such a lottery and slalom. talk us through the winning run on the emotions when you are in that run and anything can happen.- emotions when you are in that run and anything can happen. taking the lead in seeing _ and anything can happen. taking the lead in seeing the _ and anything can happen. taking the lead in seeing the green _ and anything can happen. taking the lead in seeing the green light, i i lead in seeing the green light, i think— lead in seeing the green light, i think i— lead in seeing the green light, i think i let — lead in seeing the green light, i think i let out all of my emotions and when — think i let out all of my emotions and when it dawned on me i had won it, i and when it dawned on me i had won it. i didn't _ and when it dawned on me i had won it, i didn't know what to do or say or anything. — it, i didn't know what to do or say oranything, so it, i didn't know what to do or say or anything, so yes, it, i didn't know what to do or say oranything, so yes, it's it, i didn't know what to do or say or anything, so yes, it's such fine margins — or anything, so yes, it's such fine margins in — or anything, so yes, it's such fine margins in the slalom and two of the races _ margins in the slalom and two of the races t _ margins in the slalom and two of the races i had _ margins in the slalom and two of the races i had struggled with earlier in the _ races i had struggled with earlier in the years where the tip of the ski goes — in the years where the tip of the ski goes the wrong side of the gate, so you _ ski goes the wrong side of the gate, so you are _ ski goes the wrong side of the gate, so you are dealing with millimetres to get— so you are dealing with millimetres to get down there but on saturday i was in _ to get down there but on saturday i was in the — to get down there but on saturday i was in the zone and everything felt natural— was in the zone and everything felt natural and when that happens, you know _ natural and when that happens, you know you _ natural and when that happens, you know you are on a good run and it was my— know you are on a good run and it was my day — know you are on a good run and it was my day-— was my day. what can this mean for the sport? it has changed since you| the sport? it has changed since you were growing up on the dry slopes but what will it mean for future slalom skiers? l but what will it mean for future slalom skiers?— but what will it mean for future slalom skiers? ., , ., , , slalom skiers? i hope we grasp the opportunity- _ slalom skiers? i hope we grasp the opportunity. slalom _ slalom skiers? i hope we grasp the opportunity. slalom now, - slalom skiers? i hope we grasp the opportunity. slalom now, since i opportunity. slalom now, since
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saturday. — opportunity. slalom now, since saturday, has been the main stream new5, _ saturday, has been the main stream news, and _ saturday, has been the main stream news, and that is what we need, more people _ news, and that is what we need, more people that _ news, and that is what we need, more people that can achieve and the better— people that can achieve and the better and hopefully there are some little kids— better and hopefully there are some little kids that have seen it and have _ little kids that have seen it and have this — little kids that have seen it and have this passion lit inside them like i_ have this passion lit inside them like i had — have this passion lit inside them like i had and that is what we need. ialways— like i had and that is what we need. i always say— like i had and that is what we need. i always say it is like cycling, there — i always say it is like cycling, there is— i always say it is like cycling, there is one of the top now and the next generation in four years we need _ next generation in four years we need two — next generation in four years we need two of them and then we have to keep building like that. i'm not sure _ keep building like that. i'm not sure we — keep building like that. i'm not sure we will ever be as big as cycting — sure we will ever be as big as cycling because we don't have the mountains — cycling because we don't have the mountains but we have to capitalise on this— mountains but we have to capitalise on this and — mountains but we have to capitalise on this and really push it forward to the _ on this and really push it forward to the future and the next four years — to the future and the next four years so _ to the future and the next four ears, , ., to the future and the next four ears, y., ., to the future and the next four ears. i. ., . ~ ., ., ~ to the future and the next four ears. ., ., ., ~ , years. so you are back home. talk is throuuh years. so you are back home. talk is through the — years. so you are back home. talk is through the timescales. _ years. so you are back home. talk is through the timescales. a _ years. so you are back home. talk is through the timescales. a quick- years. so you are back home. talk is through the timescales. a quick spin l through the timescales. a quick spin down the dry slope at pendle before heading out to beijing? yes l down the dry slope at pendle before heading out to beijing?— heading out to bei'ing? yes i might to and do heading out to bei'ing? yes i might go and do some — heading out to beijing? yes i might go and do some technical— heading out to beijing? yes i might go and do some technical drills i heading out to beijing? yes i might go and do some technical drills on | go and do some technical drills on the dry— go and do some technical drills on the dry slope and keep my form in check, _ the dry slope and keep my form in check, but. — the dry slope and keep my form in check, but, no, i need a rest. i had a bout— check, but, no, i need a rest. i had a bout of— check, but, no, i need a rest. i had a bout of man _ check, but, no, i need a rest. i had a bout of man flu. i need to put my feet up— a bout of man flu. i need to put my feet up and — a bout of man flu. i need to put my feet up and start training for china — feet up and start training for china. ., ., i. , feet up and start training for china. ., ., y., , ,., feet up and start training for china. ., ., i. , i. china. how do you put your feet up? how do you —
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china. how do you put your feet up? how do you relax — china. how do you put your feet up? how do you relax peshmerga - china. how do you put your feet up? how do you relax peshmerga box i china. how do you put your feet up? | how do you relax peshmerga box set, are you a reader, or music? whatever. you find yourself wasting the day _ whatever. you find yourself wasting the day doing something, drinking coffee _ the day doing something, drinking coffee i_ the day doing something, drinking coffee. i might go to the cafe. i�*ve coffee. i might go to the cafe. i've been there — coffee. i might go to the cafe. i've been there and _ coffee. i might go to the cafe. la: been there and it's lovely. coffee. i might go to the cafe. i9: been there and it's lovely. talking about beijing, it's the fourth olympics for you, 35, are you daring to think about anything at the olympics and i know you will keep your feet on the ground after the success but do you think this might be your chance for an olympic medal? naturally expectations will have gone _ naturally expectations will have gone up — naturally expectations will have gone up from myself and everyone else _ gone up from myself and everyone else t'm _ gone up from myself and everyone else. i'm stilltrying gone up from myself and everyone else. i'm still trying to let the whole — else. i'm still trying to let the whole experience thinking because the magnitude, i can't believe what i did the magnitude, i can't believe what i did and _ the magnitude, i can't believe what i did and i_ the magnitude, i can't believe what i did and i think it will take until the end — i did and i think it will take until the end of— i did and i think it will take until the end of the season for it to finally— the end of the season for it to finally dawned on me, what i've done and i finally dawned on me, what i've done and i will— finally dawned on me, what i've done and i will try— finally dawned on me, what i've done and i will try to ensure the moment before _ and i will try to ensure the moment before -- _ and i will try to ensure the moment before —— enjoy the moment before i buckte _ before —— enjoy the moment before i buckle up— before —— enjoy the moment before i buckle up my boots in china. we before -- enjoy the moment before i buckle up my boots in china.- buckle up my boots in china. we will be with you — buckle up my boots in china. we will be with you all _ buckle up my boots in china. we will be with you all the _ buckle up my boots in china. we will be with you all the way _ buckle up my boots in china. we will be with you all the way in _ buckle up my boots in china. we will be with you all the way in spirit i be with you all the way in spirit and thank you for giving us that
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amazing moment last weekend. the whole nation, and what it all means. dave ryding, enjoy putting those feet up and the little spin down pendle. i got so excited that the button popped off myjacket. it shows what it means. it really is one of those stories that you cannot compare to anything. a game changer. perfect timing. thank you, mike. a year ago today, a small fishing boat called "nicola faith" left its home port of conwy in search of whelks off the north wales coast. the three crew on board would never be seen alive again. now the families of those men — alan minard, ross ballantine and carl mcgrath — are working with the lifeboat service to improve safety at sea. chris dearden went to meet them. man, overboard. this is only a training course, but next time it might be for real. these men and women work as fishing crews around the coast of wales, and they've come to fleetwood
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in lancashire to be shown how to survive if they find themselves in rough waters. a lot easier with a life jacket on? a lot easier. how was it the first i time round without one? hard work. did you expect it to be as hard? yeah, because there's a lot of weighty gear on. but i didn't expect it to be that hard, to be honest. you can relax a lot more, i you can breathe and you can just float around. just shows how well these life jackets actually work. i wouldn't like to be in the water without one anyway. and watching are six people who know what it's like when things go wrong at sea. these are the family members who were left behind when the fishing boat nicola faith sank off colwyn bay on january 27th last year. on board were skipper carl mcgrath, ross ballantine and alan minard. their families have spent the last year supporting each other, and now they're working with the lifeboat service to tell their story as part of the training course. it was ross, it was our brother.
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he's got two sons. we want them to grow up and see that we are doing something positive, and in his name and in all of the men's names. we really have to show that it's real lives and devastating families who were left behind. once they go, they're gone. but it's the people who are stood here today, who have got to live with it for the rest of their lives. and they say it's made it an emotional and difficult year. none of the families knew each other until they found themselves outside llandudno lifeboat station waiting for news of the search. the men's bodies weren't found for over six weeks. their relatives raised money for extra searches, so the wreck of the boat could also be found. and now money left over from that appeal will go to support the work of the lifeboat service. in this instance, we formed a really deep and meaningful relationship with the families of the nicola faith crew, and they're pledging their ongoing support for us, and we're delighted with that. it shows real courage for them in their circumstances to have come
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in our direction and taken that step, and we're really hopeful that working together will save the lives of other fishermen and women moving forward. but working with the lifeboat service is only one of the things on the families' minds. they continue to support each other a year after their loss. and they're still waiting for answers as to how the nicola faith sank in the first place. the boat was raised from the sea bed last may, and an official investigation is due to report back later this year. chris dearden, bbc news. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. what is going on? it looks like las vegas. what is going on? it looks like las veuas. , a, what is going on? it looks like las vegas-_ you - what is going on? it looks like las vegas-_ you got - what is going on? it looks like las vegas._ you got it i what is going on? it looks like las| vegas._ you got it in vegas. maybe miami. you got it in one, vegas. maybe miami. you got it in one. charlie- _ vegas. maybe miami. you got it in one, charlie. i— vegas. maybe miami. you got it in one, charlie. ithought _ vegas. maybe miami. you got it in one, charlie. i thought i _ vegas. maybe miami. you got it in one, charlie. ithought i would i vegas. maybe miami. you got it in | one, charlie. ithought i would give one, charlie. i thought i would give you some _ one, charlie. i thought i would give you some escapism and when you think of miami, _ you some escapism and when you think of miami, you think of warmth, tropical. — of miami, you think of warmth, tropical, the palm trees but this weekend — tropical, the palm trees but this weekend it will actually be colder by night — weekend it will actually be colder by night in miami than it will be here—
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by night in miami than it will be here in— by night in miami than it will be here in the uk and a bit of miami ice because— here in the uk and a bit of miami ice because we go through the weekend — ice because we go through the weekend temperatures will get close to freezing in the city and there will be — to freezing in the city and there will be a — to freezing in the city and there will be a widespread frost across florida _ will be a widespread frost across florida which will have a big impact on the _ florida which will have a big impact on the crops and with those temperatures, iguanas will fall out of the _ temperatures, iguanas will fall out of the trees at those temperatures. they are _ of the trees at those temperatures. they are cold blooded animal and when _ they are cold blooded animal and when temperatures drop they almost io when temperatures drop they almost go into— when temperatures drop they almost go into a _ when temperatures drop they almost go into a state of paralysis but they— go into a state of paralysis but they will— go into a state of paralysis but they will recover and warm up as temperatures rise but a big shock on the way— temperatures rise but a big shock on the way for— temperatures rise but a big shock on the way for them as it will be across— the way for them as it will be across other parts of the us but here _ across other parts of the us but here in— across other parts of the us but here in the _ across other parts of the us but here in the uk, it's looking a good deal milder— here in the uk, it's looking a good deal milder this morning than it has done _ deal milder this morning than it has done of— deal milder this morning than it has done of late, but there will be a bit of— done of late, but there will be a bit of breeze around and after a cloudy — bit of breeze around and after a cloudy start for some, turning much sunnier— cloudy start for some, turning much sunnier across the country, so it's an improvement for some of you compared — an improvement for some of you compared to recent days. still fairly— compared to recent days. still fairly cloudy and patchy rain and drizzle _ fairly cloudy and patchy rain and drizzle to — fairly cloudy and patchy rain and drizzle to get your day going across southern _ drizzle to get your day going across southern england that will become confined _ southern england that will become confined to the channel islands then sunny— confined to the channel islands then sunny spells of the most through the i'll-ht sunny spells of the most through the night and _ sunny spells of the most through the night and north—west england and northern— night and north—west england and northern ireland with isolated showers — northern ireland with isolated showers but the bulk are in the far north— showers but the bulk are in the far north of— showers but the bulk are in the far north of scotland where they could
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be wintry _ north of scotland where they could be wintry over the hills and a cold day across — be wintry over the hills and a cold day across orkney and shetland with temperatures just 4 degrees compared to 12 temperatures just 4 degrees compared to12 or— temperatures just 4 degrees compared to 12 or 13 _ temperatures just 4 degrees compared to 12 or 13 in _ temperatures just 4 degrees compared to 12 or 13 in the south. into the evening — to 12 or 13 in the south. into the evening and overnight although it was milder by day, chili i and i and clear— was milder by day, chili i and i and clear skies. — was milder by day, chili i and i and clear skies, light winds, mist and fo- clear skies, light winds, mist and fog across — clear skies, light winds, mist and fog across southern counties and then _ fog across southern counties and then cloud — fog across southern counties and then cloud increases to the north and west— then cloud increases to the north and west later lifting temperatures but as _ and west later lifting temperatures but as we — and west later lifting temperatures but as we go into tomorrow morning away— but as we go into tomorrow morning away from _ but as we go into tomorrow morning away from the western coasts, a greater— away from the western coasts, a greater chance of frost around to -et greater chance of frost around to get your— greater chance of frost around to get your morning on the way. and that's— get your morning on the way. and that's because we have the area of hi-h that's because we have the area of high pressure, but if you step back, the high—pressure is further south in the _ the high—pressure is further south in the wind — the high—pressure is further south in the wind coming round from the mid—atlantic with milder air on friday— mid—atlantic with milder air on friday and _ mid—atlantic with milder air on friday and into the weekend but with a bit more _ friday and into the weekend but with a bit more breeze and once again a return— a bit more breeze and once again a return to _ a bit more breeze and once again a return to some wet weather across the north_ return to some wet weather across the north of scotland in the rain will become persistent for some as we go _ will become persistent for some as we go through the morning and early afternoon _ we go through the morning and early afternoon. they could be the odd splash _ afternoon. they could be the odd splash of — afternoon. they could be the odd splash of rain in southern scotland and the _ splash of rain in southern scotland and the odd shower in northern england — and the odd shower in northern england but most places will be dry and increasing cloud after a bright star, _ and increasing cloud after a bright star, staying with hazy sunshine across _ star, staying with hazy sunshine across southern and eastern parts of england _ across southern and eastern parts of england and temperatures tomorrow
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back to _ england and temperatures tomorrow back to a _ england and temperatures tomorrow back to a chilly start, a few degrees _ back to a chilly start, a few degrees early in the where we should be in late _ degrees early in the where we should be in late january and a mild night on friday— be in late january and a mild night on friday night into saturday, seeing — on friday night into saturday, seeing double figures in one or two spots _ seeing double figures in one or two spots but _ seeing double figures in one or two spots but as we go into saturday the wind will _ spots but as we go into saturday the wind will pick up and it will be quite — wind will pick up and it will be quite a — wind will pick up and it will be quite a windy day, especially for scotland — quite a windy day, especially for scotland and northern ireland and gales— scotland and northern ireland and gales in— scotland and northern ireland and gales in places and heavy rain through— gales in places and heavy rain through the morning. clearing into sunshine _ through the morning. clearing into sunshine in — through the morning. clearing into sunshine in the afternoon and a bright _ sunshine in the afternoon and a bright start for england and wales and a _ bright start for england and wales and a few— bright start for england and wales and a few splashes of rain and drizzle — and a few splashes of rain and drizzle before the sunshine returns later and _ drizzle before the sunshine returns later and many in the south will stay _ later and many in the south will stay dry— later and many in the south will stay dry and temperatures at 13 but dropping _ stay dry and temperatures at 13 but dropping through the day in the north— dropping through the day in the north of— dropping through the day in the north of scotland but the showers on the hills— north of scotland but the showers on the hills could be wintry. into sunday. _ the hills could be wintry. into sunday. a _ the hills could be wintry. into sunday, a fresh start again, brightest in the south and east but yet another area of rain will spread in, yet another area of rain will spread in. this— yet another area of rain will spread in. this time— yet another area of rain will spread in, this time a bit more widely across— in, this time a bit more widely across northern ireland, scotland and northern england, north wales on the north— and northern england, north wales on the north midlands through the day and we _ the north midlands through the day and we could see snow for a time on the scottish— and we could see snow for a time on the scottish hills with temperatures down a _ the scottish hills with temperatures down a little bit on saturday's values — down a little bit on saturday's values. staying dry in the south and the rainfall— values. staying dry in the south and the rainfall outlook across the uk for the _ the rainfall outlook across the uk for the next few days, very little rain across — for the next few days, very little rain across southern areas but we could _ rain across southern areas but we could see — rain across southern areas but we could see well over 100 millimetres
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of rainfall— could see well over 100 millimetres of rainfall in parts of the highlands and that is how it is looking — highlands and that is how it is looking. enjoy your day. will highlands and that is how it is looking. enjoy your day. looking. en'oy your day. will be get frous and looking. enjoy your day. will be get frogs and iguanas _ looking. enjoy your day. will be get frogs and iguanas falling _ looking. enjoy your day. will be get frogs and iguanas falling out - looking. enjoy your day. will be get frogs and iguanas falling out of- looking. enjoy your day. will be get frogs and iguanas falling out of the | frogs and iguanas falling out of the trees here question might not here. i think they are more used to it. br; i think they are more used to it. by i think they are more used to it. the way, don't i think they are more used to it. b1: the way, don't think that i think they are more used to it. b1 the way, don't think that miami ice didn't go unnoticed. l the way, don't think that miami ice didn't go unnoticed.— didn't go unnoticed. i don't know what ou didn't go unnoticed. i don't know what you mean? _ didn't go unnoticed. i don't know what you mean? i— didn't go unnoticed. i don't know what you mean? i try _ didn't go unnoticed. i don't know what you mean? i try my - didn't go unnoticed. i don't know what you mean? i try my best i didn't go unnoticed. i don't know what you mean? i try my best to| didn't go unnoticed. i don't know i what you mean? i try my best to slip them _ what you mean? i try my best to slip them in _ what you mean? i try my best to slip them in. it�*s— what you mean? i try my best to slip them in. �*, :, ,, ,:, them in. it's good. thanks. see you tomorrow. — them in. it's good. thanks. see you tomorrow, yeah? _ if you're a regular user of social media you've probably spotted more and more people advertising things in their posts. the question is, is that all clear and is it allowed. it feels like a grey area where people — it feels like a grey area where people might post things and put pictures— people might post things and put pictures of what they are doing at that time — pictures of what they are doing at that time and they might be endorsing products and it's whether or not. _ endorsing products and it's whether or not, when you look at the
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picture. _ or not, when you look at the picture, you know if it is an advert or not— picture, you know if it is an advert or not so— picture, you know if it is an advert or not so it — picture, you know if it is an advert or not so it can be tricky. if you're anything lke me you love a scroll through social media to see how the other half lives. the clothes, the holidays, i enjoy looking at what people are eating! and it can make you think — i want a bit of that! which gives people with lots of followers, a lot of power. and that's why they're called influencers; they can influence how we spend our money. and plenty of people have built a career on it. someone like the american model and entrepreneur kylie jenner can earn not that far off a million pounds per post! no implication she's breached any standards. but there are concerns about whether people looking at some content are being made fully aware that what they're looking at is, in fact, an advert. today mps will speak with the advertising standards authority. because if a company has control over what you're putting online because they've paid you — that constitures an advert. and adverts come with rules.
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the body recently looked at about 24,000 instagram posts from uk influencers and found just a third were following advertising rules. take a look at this. this tiktok video by love island's luke mabbott breached the advertising code last year. he wore two outfits, with the captions "which look do you prefer?" and made clear where the outfits were from — with the caption "outfit from boohooman, #boohooman". what he didn't do was ensure that anyone who looked at this was instantly aware that this is an advert — rather than something he's simply bought and really likes. and some experts say the lines are too blurred and more regulation could be needed. so is this another example of technology racing ahead of regulaton? when people think of influences they think of those with millions of followers but they can also include micro—influencers and the need to educate this large number of people coupled with the difficulty in monitoring the amount of content thatis monitoring the amount of content that is posted by these influencers
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means that there is a chance that the powers given to the asa and other regulatory bodies could be broadened, just to assist with this proliferation of content that does need regulation. 50 proliferation of content that does need regulation.— proliferation of content that does need regulation. so not as simple as it looks when — need regulation. so not as simple as it looks when you _ need regulation. so not as simple as it looks when you pick _ need regulation. so not as simple as it looks when you pick up _ need regulation. so not as simple as it looks when you pick up your i it looks when you pick up your phone — it looks when you pick up your phone is— it looks when you pick up your phone. is this another example of technology racing ahead of regulation? joining me now is beckii — her youtube videos went viral when she was 14. and she's used that experience to begin a career in marketing. just explain, you are so young when your profile — just explain, you are so young when your profile boomed. how did it develop — your profile boomed. how did it develop into making money and a career— develop into making money and a career in — develop into making money and a career in marketing? it�*s develop into making money and a career in marketing? it's incredible the ower career in marketing? it's incredible the power of _ career in marketing? it's incredible the power of social _ career in marketing? it's incredible the power of social media - career in marketing? it's incredible the power of social media and i i the power of social media and i started when i was really young and i'm using it as a way to connect with people around the world and i live in a small place on the isle of man and the internet allowed me to really feed into a broader culture, which was incredible. and when i started people won't making money
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off social media accounts and i don't think the word influencers even existed but it does recognise the power that these influencers have over their audiences through social media and through social media you learn incredible skills like video editing, marketing and advertising skills and i used those skills later in my life to co—found a marketing agency, and the whole business. flan a marketing agency, and the whole business. :, , :, , :, a marketing agency, and the whole business. :, , :, business. can you see how somebody how somebody _ business. can you see how somebody how somebody with _ business. can you see how somebody how somebody with a _ business. can you see how somebody how somebody with a few _ business. can you see how somebody how somebody with a few thousand i how somebody with a few thousand followers _ how somebody with a few thousand followers is approached by businesses will give you a bit of money— businesses will give you a bit of money to— businesses will give you a bit of money to wear it on your platform, so how _ money to wear it on your platform, so how does— money to wear it on your platform, so how does it sit with you? how they— so how does it sit with you? how they might — so how does it sit with you? how they might not understand how they were breaching regulations? absolutely. as the guests previously said, there are micro—influencers out there as well, and the truth is, where is the line drawn between a regular user of the insua ——
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internet and influencers who have to follow regulations question what the truth is the industry is nascent and early in the day and i think regulations with advertising disclosure has been learning a lot from terrestrial media and traditional media but it's still very much more reactive than proactive and i think that is what the inquiry in the house of commons is aiming to combat so it can lay out the regulations before we need to react. , , :, to react. very quickly, where do you think the regulations _ to react. very quickly, where do you think the regulations should - think the regulations should likewise not the business approach or the _ likewise not the business approach or the influencers or anyone who has a social— or the influencers or anyone who has a social media cow that needs to take responsibility and face sanctions if they don't go to the regulations —— social media account. i regulations —— social media account. i believe _ regulations —— social media account. i believe the — regulations —— social media account. i believe the social media platforms could support more influencers on the brand is making sure every platform has an across—the—board way in which advertising can be disclosed. right now it is quite diffuse and you could use the word advert or partnership tool or a
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variety of ways. i think we need to streamline and make it clear we are for consumers. bud streamline and make it clear we are for consumers-— for consumers. and then we know where we stand. _ for consumers. and then we know where we stand. thank _ for consumers. and then we know where we stand. thank you. i last week the advertising watchdog took out its own ads against influencers breaking the rules. and ultimately they could face fines. and today they will look at regulations on the regulatory code and it's— regulations on the regulatory code and it's what becky was talking about, — and it's what becky was talking about, who is responsible for making sure it _ about, who is responsible for making sure it is _ about, who is responsible for making sure it is clear it is an advert because _ sure it is clear it is an advert because people might do it without realising _ because people might do it without realising that to be clear, jolly, there _ realising that to be clear, jolly, there is— realising that to be clear, jolly, there is no— realising that to be clear, jolly, there is no hashtag on your favourite _ there is no hashtag on your favourite hair gel on your massive social— favourite hair gel on your massive social media platforms to your millions — social media platforms to your millions of followers. did social media platforms to your millions of followers.- social media platforms to your millions of followers. did that need sa inc ? millions of followers. did that need saying? yes- _ millions of followers. did that need saying? yes. there _ millions of followers. did that need saying? yes. there are _ millions of followers. did that need saying? yes. there are secrets i millions of followers. did that need saying? yes. there are secrets to l saying? yes. there are secrets to that that we _ saying? yes. there are secrets to that that we all _ saying? yes. there are secrets to that that we all want _ saying? yes. there are secrets to that that we all want to _ saying? yes. there are secrets to that that we all want to know, i saying? yes. there are secrets to i that that we all want to know, don't we? , :, :, :, :, :, :, , we? they are worth a lot of money. monetise it- — if you were watching breakfast last tuesday you may have seen an interview with the wasps rugby player malakai fekitoa, who was desperately worried about his family in tonga, following the volcanic
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eruption and tsunami. well, we're pleased to say that malakai has an update for us. and it's good news... good morning to you. you must be so relieved. tell us what you have found. , :, :, relieved. tell us what you have found. ,:, :, :, relieved. tell us what you have found. :, , , found. good morning, guys. obviously. _ found. good morning, guys. obviously, it's _ found. good morning, guys. obviously, it's been - found. good morning, guys. obviously, it's been a i found. good morning, guys. obviously, it's been a very l found. good morning, guys. i obviously, it's been a very long week— obviously, it's been a very long week for— obviously, it's been a very long week for me and a couple of days ago. _ week for me and a couple of days ago. my— week for me and a couple of days ago, my mum, she called and it's been _ ago, my mum, she called and it's been ten — ago, my mum, she called and it's been ten days since the event and i'm been ten days since the event and l'm just _ been ten days since the event and i'm just relieved and, you know, i can relax — i'm just relieved and, you know, i can relax and _ i'm just relieved and, you know, i can relax and focus on the rugby a bit and _ can relax and focus on the rugby a bit and from — can relax and focus on the rugby a bit and from yesterday, it's been great _ bit and from yesterday, it's been great news. bit and from yesterday, it's been great news-— great news. obviously if you can focus on the _ great news. obviously if you can focus on the rugby, _ great news. obviously if you can focus on the rugby, in _ great news. obviously if you can focus on the rugby, in much i great news. obviously if you can focus on the rugby, in much the | focus on the rugby, in much the great relief. how did you finally get in contact with your mum? —— it must have been a great relief. l’gre must have been a great relief. i've been trying _ must have been a great relief. i've been trying every day in the past
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week— been trying every day in the past week and — been trying every day in the past week and i— been trying every day in the past week and i couldn't get through and at midnight yesterday, just had a phone _ at midnight yesterday, just had a phone call from a random number and i phone call from a random number and l answered _ phone call from a random number and l answered it— phone call from a random number and i answered it and it was someone from _ i answered it and it was someone from a _ i answered it and it was someone from a company who had a satellite phone _ from a company who had a satellite phone and — from a company who had a satellite phone and i— from a company who had a satellite phone and i could ask if she could use it _ phone and i could ask if she could use it to— phone and i could ask if she could use it to contact me and i wasjust relieved _ use it to contact me and i wasjust relieved and happy and we didn't talk about anything else but making sure everyone was ok and, yes... i�*m sure everyone was ok and, yes... i'm very pleased _ sure everyone was ok and, yes... very pleased for sure everyone was ok and, yes... l“n very pleased for you because i know it's been a worrying time, but some things remain the case and you will be well aware of the damage that has been done to a lot of places that you will know well and there is an ongoing effort to try to make things better for people, ongoing effort to try to make things betterfor people, isn't ongoing effort to try to make things better for people, isn't there? ongoing effort to try to make things betterfor people, isn't there? it better for people, isn't there? it is. from a small country like us, it will take _ is. from a small country like us, it will take a — is. from a small country like us, it will take a little while for people to get _
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will take a little while for people to get back on their feet and i think— to get back on their feet and i think the _ to get back on their feet and i think the problem is they've got a lot of— think the problem is they've got a lot of help — think the problem is they've got a lot of help now and the aid arrived and people have been helping out, but the _ and people have been helping out, but the problem will be in the next six months. — but the problem will be in the next six months, from now, and obviously people _ six months, from now, and obviously people live _ six months, from now, and obviously people live off the land of the fish in the _ people live off the land of the fish in the water is very important and i've in the water is very important and we heard — in the water is very important and i've heard from my mum that there is a shortage _ i've heard from my mum that there is a shortage of— i've heard from my mum that there is a shortage of water at the moment and we _ a shortage of water at the moment and we will— a shortage of water at the moment and we will have to wait for the army— and we will have to wait for the army to — and we will have to wait for the army to come around with dropping off water— army to come around with dropping off water and stuff like that. i think— off water and stuff like that. i think it's _ off water and stuff like that. i think it's going to be tough. i know ou are think it's going to be tough. i know you are raising _ think it's going to be tough. i know you are raising money— think it's going to be tough. i know you are raising money yourself- think it's going to be tough. i know you are raising money yourself andl think it's going to be tough. i knowl you are raising money yourself and i imagine that work will go on as well. , ~ imagine that work will go on as well. , ,, , :, well. yes, like i said before, massive _ well. yes, like i said before, massive support _ well. yes, like i said before, massive support from i well. yes, like i said before, | massive support from people well. yes, like i said before, i massive support from people in well. yes, like i said before, - massive support from people in the uk and _ massive support from people in the uk and the — massive support from people in the uk and the rugby community. in my
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club, _ uk and the rugby community. in my club, my— uk and the rugby community. in my club, my team—mates at wasps, this weekend _ club, my team—mates at wasps, this weekend we — club, my team—mates at wasps, this weekend we are playing saracens on sunday— weekend we are playing saracens on sunday and wasps are donating 20% of the ticket _ sunday and wasps are donating 20% of the ticket revenue to help people as well, so _ the ticket revenue to help people as well, so it's— the ticket revenue to help people as well, so it's really great to see the sport _ well, so it's really great to see the sport-— well, so it's really great to see the sort. �*, :, :, :, :, the sport. it's amazing. you look at somethin: the sport. it's amazing. you look at something as _ the sport. it's amazing. you look at something as simple _ the sport. it's amazing. you look at something as simple as _ the sport. it's amazing. you look at something as simple as any - the sport. it's amazing. you look at something as simple as any sport i the sport. it's amazing. you look at i something as simple as any sport and the camaraderie that happens when you come together and of course when you come together and of course when you are playing against wasps you will be up against them and whatever team you are playing, you will be up against them and determined to win, but when it comes to basic human kindness and human nature, it shines through, doesn't it? it kindness and human nature, it shines through, doesn't it?— through, doesn't it? it is, and it is incredible _ through, doesn't it? it is, and it is incredible to _ through, doesn't it? it is, and it is incredible to see. _ through, doesn't it? it is, and it is incredible to see. tonga i through, doesn't it? it is, and it is incredible to see. tonga is i through, doesn't it? it is, and it is incredible to see. tonga is so| is incredible to see. tonga is so far away— is incredible to see. tonga is so far away from here and i am just amazed — far away from here and i am just amazed with all the support and love of people _ amazed with all the support and love of people on this side of the uk and i of people on this side of the uk and l think— of people on this side of the uk and i think there is something to play for this— i think there is something to play for this weekend, so i'm encouraging everyone _ for this weekend, so i'm encouraging everyone to — for this weekend, so i'm encouraging everyone to come and support the guys _ everyone to come and support the nu s. :, everyone to come and support the i u s, ., , ., everyone to come and support the t u s. :, , :, :, :, everyone to come and support the tu s, :, g , everyone to come and support the guys. that is all good. just one thou . ht guys. that is all good. just one thought away _ guys. that is all good. just one thought away from _ guys. that is all good. just one thought away from all- guys. that is all good. just one thought away from all of i guys. that is all good. just one thought away from all of those | thought away from all of those troubles, i will ask you to predict
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who will win the six nations. here is your opportunity. you can stand aside and give us a view.— is your opportunity. you can stand aside and give us a view. look, i've -la ed in aside and give us a view. look, i've played in the _ aside and give us a view. look, i've played in the premiership - aside and give us a view. look, i've played in the premiership for- aside and give us a view. look, i've played in the premiership for a i aside and give us a view. look, i've played in the premiership for a few| played in the premiership for a few years— played in the premiership for a few years now— played in the premiership for a few years now and i quite like the new team _ years now and i quite like the new team and — years now and i quite like the new team and they have good talent, england. — team and they have good talent, england, and new players and new attacking _ england, and new players and new attacking mentality. ithink england, and new players and new attacking mentality. i think marcus smith— attacking mentality. ! think marcus smith is— attacking mentality. i think marcus smith is a — attacking mentality. i think marcus smith is a great young talent and i think— smith is a great young talent and i think he _ smith is a great young talent and i think he could lead england to a win but france _ think he could lead england to a win but france have been building nicely in the _ but france have been building nicely in the last— but france have been building nicely in the last few years and beat the 0blak— in the last few years and beat the 0blak and — in the last few years and beat the oblak and those two would be the top -- they— oblak and those two would be the top -- they beat— oblak and those two would be the top —— they beat the all blacks. good -- they beat the all blacks. good luck when you play. _ -- they beat the all blacks. good luck when you play. is _ -- they beat the all blacks. good luck when you play. is it - -- they beat the all blacks. good luck when you play. is it this i luck when you play. is it this weekend?— luck when you play. is it this weekend? , :, , ., weekend? yes, we are playing on sunda . weekend? yes, we are playing on sunday- good _ weekend? yes, we are playing on sunday. good luck— weekend? yes, we are playing on sunday. good luck and _ weekend? yes, we are playing on sunday. good luck and i'm - weekend? yes, we are playing on sunday. good luck and i'm glad i weekend? yes, we are playing on i sunday. good luck and i'm glad money is safe and no — sunday. good luck and i'm glad money is safe and no doubt _ sunday. good luck and i'm glad money is safe and no doubt she _ sunday. good luck and i'm glad money is safe and no doubt she will _ sunday. good luck and i'm glad money is safe and no doubt she will be - is safe and no doubt she will be watching as well. great news to hear and i'm glad the families back together. take care. you're watching bbc breakfast.
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this is bbc news, this is bbc news, with the latest headlines. with the latest headlines. covid rules on care homes covid rules on care homes
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in england have been in england have been eased by the government, allowing unlimited eased by the government, allowing unlimited visits from monday. visits from monday. resident campaign groups say they welcome the move. i could actually cry with relief. we've actually been asking our members to write to their mps asking for all visiting restrictions to be lifted because we know that it is definitely safer now. face coverings are no longer mandatory in england from today, but some big retailers ask customers to continue wearing them. prince andrew's lawyers say he's happy to face a trial byjury in new york in the sexual abuse case brought by victoria giuffre. he's once again denied all the allegations against him.

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