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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 26, 2022 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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against him by virginia giuffre. she says she was forced to have sex with the prince when she was 17. in a court document filed on wednesday, his lawyers deny the allegations. the us secretary of state has told russia there'll be no compromise on ukrainian sovereignty and on nato�*s open door policy. he was briefing reporters on washington's response to a set of russian security demands over ukraine. russia has some 120,000 troops near the ukrainian border — and us officials believe they're likely to attack ukraine over the next three weeks. the british prime minister has insisted he won't resign, as the uk waits for the release of an offical report into parties held at downing street during coronavirus lockdowns.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me arejessica elgot, deputy political editor at the guardian, and peter foster, public policy editor at the financial times. tomorrow's front pages. the metro says prince andrew will not settle his civil sex abuse case, and is set for a showdown in front of a jury in new york. it's the same lead story for the express, which also has an image of borisjohnson saying the conservative party are rallying behind him. the guardian covers the latest attack on the prime minister's credibility, after he was accused of lying over the rescue of a charity's cats and dogs from afghanistan. boris johnson accused of telling "another whopper" in the daily star — that's a claim he denies, of course. the i says he's is being kept in suspense by the sue gray report, which is still yet to be released. the planned rise in national insurance is the focus of the telegraph, which has a report from mps who say it'll lead
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to higher prices in shops. and the ft says the european central bank has warned lenders with significant russian exposure, to ready themselves for international sanctions against moscow if it invades ukraine. let's get stuck in, and we will start with jessica's own newspaper, and on the front page, the lead story — it's not sue gray, but a different story involving the prime minister. i think plenty in the audience will remember that story in those days in mid august. take us through that, please.— through that, please. yes, and because we — through that, please. yes, and because we haven't _ through that, please. yes, and because we haven't actually i through that, please. yes, and| because we haven't actually got through that, please. yes, and - because we haven't actually got the sue gray report... you because we haven't actually got the sue gray report. . .— sue gray report... you can't report! it 'ust sue gray report... you can't report! it just shows — sue gray report... you can't report! it just shows you — sue gray report... you can't report! it just shows you how _ sue gray report... you can't report! itjust shows you how many - sue gray report... you can't report! itjust shows you how many other. itjust shows you how many other fronts the prime minister is facing, we will talk about national insurance but this is the afghanistan withdrawal in this
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controversy that keeps coming up again about the authorisation of the rescue of these cats and dogs from a british charity in afghanistan. and it's the release of two more internal e—mails by the foreign affairs select committee, which essentially both allege that the prime minister authorised these animals to be taken out. for an office staff has gone on record saying that they believe it was at the expense of the evacuation of people. now that has been fiercely denied by downing street, it's denied by downing street, it's denied by downing street, it's denied by the charity themselves, who say it wasn't. at this e—mail includes one from the forest the micro foreign office minister, a former mp known to be very close with the prime minister, lobbying...
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citing precedent. again, downing street denying it today, but it is something that really gets to people — it challenges a sense of fairness, and i think it will lead to a lot of renewed anger.— and i think it will lead to a lot of renewed anger. let's look at the oane renewed anger. let's look at the online newspaper _ renewed anger. let's look at the online newspaper now, - renewed anger. let's look at the online newspaper now, which . renewed anger. let's look at the | online newspaper now, which has renewed anger. let's look at the i online newspaper now, which has a picture of borisjohnson in the back seat of the newspaper —— the i. i've tried to figure out what phone he's using and ifailed. "publish and be damned: pm waiting on his feet." peter, that headline almost could have been used in the last few weeks ago, but this report has yet to be published. how do you see it? clearly, almost regardless of what sue gray's — clearly, almost regardless of what sue gray's report, this has been going _ sue gray's report, this has been going on— sue gray's report, this has been going on for so long now that it looks_ going on for so long now that it looks increasingly likely that there will have _ looks increasingly likely that there will have to be a vote of no
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confidence in borisjohnson — if only— confidence in borisjohnson — if only to — confidence in borisjohnson — if only to lance the boil, to try and draw_ only to lance the boil, to try and draw a _ only to lance the boil, to try and draw a line — only to lance the boil, to try and draw a line under it. i suspect downing — draw a line under it. i suspect downing street will do its absolute best to _ downing street will do its absolute best to be muscular and make an apology. — best to be muscular and make an apology, and move on and avoid those 54 letters _ apology, and move on and avoid those 54 letters going in. but increasingly, i think if you are a tory— increasingly, i think if you are a tory mp— increasingly, i think if you are a tory mp and you've got this drip of allegations that seem to come out, theres— allegations that seem to come out, there's a _ allegations that seem to come out, there's a sense of the people who are feeding these allegations into the press probably have more in their_ the press probably have more in their locker — how will you put a stop _ their locker — how will you put a stop to — their locker — how will you put a stop to this? if sue gray's report comes_ stop to this? if sue gray's report comes out, — stop to this? if sue gray's report comes out, johnson apologises again, the police _ comes out, johnson apologises again, the police investigation goes off, how do— the police investigation goes off, how do you draw a line under this as far how do you draw a line under this as for as _ how do you draw a line under this as far asjohnson is how do you draw a line under this as far as johnson is concerned? how do you draw a line under this as far asjohnson is concerned? because if he just— far asjohnson is concerned? because if he just continues to limp on, then— if he just continues to limp on, then this — if he just continues to limp on, then thisjust becomes if he just continues to limp on, then this just becomes a running source — then this just becomes a running source -- — then this just becomes a running source. —— running sore. mps might wout— source. —— running sore. mps might
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worrtto— source. —— running sore. mps might want to restore confidence in johnson, _ want to restore confidence in johnson, but they might accept that this situation has gone on so long that it's _ this situation has gone on so long that it's probably inevitable that there _ that it's probably inevitable that there will have to be a vote of confidence injohnson sooner there will have to be a vote of confidence in johnson sooner or later— confidence in johnson sooner or later - — confidence in johnson sooner or later - and _ confidence in johnson sooner or later — and better sooner than later, — later — and better sooner than later, that's always the hive mind of the _ later, that's always the hive mind of the 360 — later, that's always the hive mind of the 360 odd tory mps, it seems to me that _ of the 360 odd tory mps, it seems to me that the _ of the 360 odd tory mps, it seems to me that the sue gray report on its own woh't— me that the sue gray report on its own won't draw a line under this. let's _ own won't draw a line under this. let's look— own won't draw a line under this. let's look at _ own won't draw a line under this. let's look at the daily mail now. on a reasonably similar subject, "tory mps tell boris to spike the tax hike and we will back you." it's hard to read the hive mind of the 360 odd tory mps— one person paid to do that isjessica. so with your ability to read the minds of 359 tory mps, how do you see this story? i read the minds of 359 tory mps, how do you see this story?— do you see this story? i think boris johnson is seeing _ do you see this story? i think boris johnson is seeing an _ do you see this story? i think boris johnson is seeing an awful - do you see this story? i think boris johnson is seeing an awful lot - johnson is seeing an awful lot of tory mps at the moment, especially those wavering. 0ne
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tory mps at the moment, especially those wavering. one of the big asks if there is amongst a certain constituency of those mps, and it should be said this is not necessarily a view of the whole party that he should rethink this national insurance hike, which is coming in aprilamid national insurance hike, which is coming in april amid a cost—of—living crisis amongst rising energy bills and inflation. several say this is just not what a conservative party should be doing in this situation. i think it's fair to say there are others that the nhs backlog, which is the most immediate problem the £12 billion the national insurance tax hike is aimed at targeting, there are other problems that may be potentially more damaging to thejohnson�*s prospects than the national insurance hike — which by the way, in terms of people's pockets, the actual money it will cost people pales in comparison to the huge rises people will see in the cost of living,
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especially in energy. but one of the things about it is borisjohnson himself is not keen to cancel this rise, although he does waver a lot, and rishi sunak is certainly not keen at all to cancel this at all, he might resign before he does so. so it will be a tricky one for boris to get out and do, if that's what they are pressuring him to do. jessica, i want to put you completely unfairly on the spot — could you give us a rough estimate of three categories? the number of tory mps who you think want to pry minister out, the number of tory mps who are die—hard committed to him, and the rest? you who are die-hard committed to him, and the rest?— and the rest? you could probably rou~hl and the rest? you could probably roughly split _ and the rest? you could probably roughly split it — and the rest? you could probably roughly split it by _ and the rest? you could probably roughly split it by thirds - and the rest? you could probably roughly split it by thirds at - and the rest? you could probably roughly split it by thirds at the i roughly split it by thirds at the moment. at the moment there is 100 mps technically in a support group who are meeting twice, sometimes three times a day trying to shore up support for the pry minister. ——
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prime minister. there certainly aren't yet 54 people themselves who have sent letters in. someone wrote today that the group boris johnson should really look out for are those middle—aged, particularly white men in the tory party who feel their prospects are not that great under this pry minister, he's not promoted them yet, they've always had a few doubts about his suitability to be prime minister. and that's quite a lot of tory mps, there's a number of those who are not currently on the ministerial payroll — and if he loses their confidence, he could loses their confidence, he could lose a confidence vote.— loses their confidence, he could lose a confidence vote. let's look to another— lose a confidence vote. let's look to another story _ lose a confidence vote. let's look to another story in _ lose a confidence vote. let's look to another story in the _ lose a confidence vote. let's look to another story in the daily - to another story in the daily telegraph, on the front page. "britishjoins telegraph, on the front page. "british joins democrat troops poised to join bulwark against
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russia." russia has amassed more than 100,000 troops on its border with ukraine, attempting to perhaps make this a wider renegotiation of the end of the cold war three decades ago. how do you see both those tensions between russia and ukraine, and more specifically this telegraph story? we will come to the ft and a bit. telegraph story? we will come to the ft and a bit-— ft and a bit. indeed, it rumbles on- when putin — ft and a bit. indeed, it rumbles on- when putin annexed _ ft and a bit. indeed, it rumbles on- when putin annexed crimea, - ft and a bit. indeed, it rumbles on- when putin annexed crimea, he - ft and a bit. indeed, it rumbles on- l when putin annexed crimea, he wants to use _ when putin annexed crimea, he wants to use the _ when putin annexed crimea, he wants to use the situation in ukraine to really— to use the situation in ukraine to really draw— to use the situation in ukraine to really draw a line to prevent any further — really draw a line to prevent any further expansion eastwards of nato. 0f further expansion eastwards of nato. of course _ further expansion eastwards of nato. of course, that ignores ukraine prospect— of course, that ignores ukraine prospect right to self—determination and determination to have democratic rule. and determination to have democratic rule the _ and determination to have democratic rule. the last thing vladimir putin wants— rule. the last thing vladimir putin wants is— rule. the last thing vladimir putin wants is a — rule. the last thing vladimir putin wants is a successful and democratic ukraine _ wants is a successful and democratic ukraine on— wants is a successful and democratic ukraine on his doorstep because it might— ukraine on his doorstep because it might give — ukraine on his doorstep because it might give ideas to his own population. the kremlin continues to ratchet _ population. the kremlin continues to ratchet up _ population. the kremlin continues to ratchet up the pressure by amassing forces _ ratchet up the pressure by amassing forces - _
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ratchet up the pressure by amassing forces - irr— ratchet up the pressure by amassing forces — in response, we've got british— forces — in response, we've got british to — forces — in response, we've got british to send small amounts, a few hundred _ british to send small amounts, a few hundred troops to the eastern flank of nato, _ hundred troops to the eastern flank of nato, to— hundred troops to the eastern flank of nato, to poland, and the other states _ of nato, to poland, and the other states that — of nato, to poland, and the other states that border the potential conflict — states that border the potential conflict zone. that is ultimately symbolic, — conflict zone. that is ultimately symbolic, they call it the tripwire. ithink— symbolic, they call it the tripwire. i think if— symbolic, they call it the tripwire. i think if putin does ignore the warnings — i think if putin does ignore the warnings of europe and the western powers. _ warnings of europe and the western powers, the real retaliation will be financial — powers, the real retaliation will be financial. we've seen the ruble come under— financial. we've seen the ruble come under pressure, russian markets coming _ under pressure, russian markets coming under pressure — and as my paper— coming under pressure — and as my paper reports, the ecb is now going around _ paper reports, the ecb is now going around its _ paper reports, the ecb is now going around its major banks asking them to stress— around its major banks asking them to stress test and examine whether they would — to stress test and examine whether they would be placed if the most serious _ they would be placed if the most serious sanctions were taken against the russians, where that would leave their banks _
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the russians, where that would leave their banks given the level of russian — their banks given the level of russian investment in and around europe _ russian investment in and around europe and — russian investment in and around europe and their own exposure to russian _ europe and their own exposure to russian finances. and that i think is a sign — russian finances. and that i think is a sign that if putin does push the button, washington certainly, and it's— the button, washington certainly, and it's always washington that puts the cursor— and it's always washington that puts the cursor on these financial sections. _ the cursor on these financial sections, because ultimately it's us financial— sections, because ultimately it's us financial markets that still dominate the globe, will force europe — dominate the globe, will force europe - — dominate the globe, will force europe — particularly nations like italy europe — particularly nations like italy and — europe — particularly nations like italy and germany, where there is less obvious enthusiasm for economic confrontation and more exposure to russia _ confrontation and more exposure to russia - _ confrontation and more exposure to russia - to— confrontation and more exposure to russia — to take some difficult knocks — russia — to take some difficult knocks if— russia — to take some difficult knocks if we get to the really tough financial _ knocks if we get to the really tough financial sanctions.— financial sanctions. peter, you've covered the _ financial sanctions. peter, you've covered the financial _ financial sanctions. peter, you've covered the financial angle - financial sanctions. peter, you've covered the financial angle very l covered the financial angle very ably. jessica, cover the british clinical angle of the story. how
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important is ukraine to the palace of westminster? fine important is ukraine to the palace of westminster?— important is ukraine to the palace of westminster? one of the things it's tuite of westminster? one of the things it's quite clear _ of westminster? one of the things it's quite clear in _ of westminster? one of the things it's quite clear in terms _ of westminster? one of the things it's quite clear in terms of - of westminster? one of the things it's quite clear in terms of guiding | it's quite clear in terms of guiding tory mp's views and whether to back the prime minister, is what do you do if the threshold of 54 letters is reached as tanks rolled over the border? can you really go through a leadership election, one potentially lasting six weeks or more, during what is an international crisis? british investments are likely to be severely exposed, especially if there is these very severe sanctions that have to take place. and while there needs to be a unified international coherent response — it's hard to argue that downing street could be more distracted from other events of borisjohnson's job then they are at the moment, he is
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incredibly distracted from lots of other events, notjust the crisis in ukraine. but it's also hard to argue that things would be any different under a different tory leader, very unlikely for there to be a different approach from someone like rishi sunak, or even keir starmer in a parallel universe. so it's not something under a great deal of contention in westminster — and that probably is one of the reasons why it's not as much on the forefront of tory mps's mines as much as it should be. tory mps's mines as much as it should be— tory mps's mines as much as it should be. , , ., , ., should be. this story hit the front .ae. should be. this story hit the front -a~e of should be. this story hit the front page of the _ should be. this story hit the front page of the sun _ should be. this story hit the front page of the sun - _ should be. this story hit the front page of the sun - we _ should be. this story hit the front page of the sun - we see - should be. this story hit the front page of the sun - we see it's - page of the sun — we see it's described as a royal bombshell. "andrew: i'll go to trial, no sweat." it's worth us saying as we begin our story, prince enter has
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denied wrongdoing. your assessment of the story, please?— of the story, please? cheek he there, of the story, please? cheek he there. no _ of the story, please? cheek he there, no sweat _ of the story, please? cheek he there, no sweat as _ of the story, please? cheek he there, no sweat as a _ of the story, please? cheek he there, no sweat as a reference| of the story, please? cheek he i there, no sweat as a reference to the prince — there, no sweat as a reference to the prince andrew's interview with newsnight saying he was unable to sweat, _ newsnight saying he was unable to sweat, as — newsnight saying he was unable to sweat, as a way of challenging virginia — sweat, as a way of challenging virginia giuffre's testimony that he was very— virginia giuffre's testimony that he was very sweaty in a nightclub. these — was very sweaty in a nightclub. these gory details willjust be awful— these gory details willjust be awful for— these gory details willjust be awful for the palace. these gory details willjust be awfulforthe palace. i these gory details willjust be awful for the palace. i see the daily— awful for the palace. i see the daily mail is reporting that the palace — daily mail is reporting that the palace is — daily mail is reporting that the palace is desperate for andrew to settle _ palace is desperate for andrew to settle i_ palace is desperate for andrew to settle. i guess, palace is desperate for andrew to settle. iguess, but palace is desperate for andrew to settle. i guess, but on the other hand, _ settle. i guess, but on the other hand. if— settle. i guess, but on the other hand. if he — settle. i guess, but on the other hand, if he settles, it'll be taken as a widespread admission of guilt. as you _ as a widespread admission of guilt. as you said — as a widespread admission of guilt. as you said at the top, he's absolutely adamantly denied this. he's fighting it as a private citizen, _ he's fighting it as a private citizen, which i guess laid the groundwork for this decision to push on with—
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groundwork for this decision to push on with the — groundwork for this decision to push on with the jury trial. but win, lose _ on with the jury trial. but win, lose or— on with the jury trial. but win, lose or draw, the queen has 70 years on the _ lose or draw, the queen has 70 years on the throne, her diamond jubilee... sorry, iget on the throne, her diamond jubilee... sorry, i get my numbers denrocrat— jubilee... sorry, i get my numbers democrat anniversaries wrong! the platinum _ democrat anniversaries wrong! the platinum jubilee, apologies, your majesty — platinum jubilee, apologies, your majesty. the platinum jubilee — and this will— majesty. the platinum jubilee — and this willjust be horrible! it's salacious, titillating in the worst possible — salacious, titillating in the worst possible way. i don't mean about the possible way. idon't mean about the crimes— possible way. i don't mean about the crimes committed against the victims. — crimes committed against the victims. i_ crimes committed against the victims, i mean in terms of royal tittle _ victims, i mean in terms of royal tittle tattle, but it does for the royal _ tittle tattle, but it does for the royal family. tittle tattle, but it does for the royalfamily. it's tittle tattle, but it does for the royal family. it's very, very unfortunate and i don't know whether in the _ unfortunate and i don't know whether in the long _ unfortunate and i don't know whether in the long run prince andrew does his repetition more harm or not, but it will— his repetition more harm or not, but it will quickly— his repetition more harm or not, but it will quickly be seen to be quite a selfish — it will quickly be seen to be quite a selfish and damaging decision, given— a selfish and damaging decision, given the — a selfish and damaging decision, given the general national love towards — given the general national love towards the queen. i think that will be really— towards the queen. i think that will be really nasty.
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towards the queen. i think that will be really nasty-— be really nasty. jessica, earlier ou be really nasty. jessica, earlier you were _ be really nasty. jessica, earlier you were making _ be really nasty. jessica, earlier you were making a _ be really nasty. jessica, earlier you were making a point - be really nasty. jessica, earlier you were making a point aboutj you were making a point about britain's international reputation? absolutely, and i think you can see now one of the reasons why the queen acted the way she did two weeks ago, taking his title away, prince andrew effectively fighting the case as a public citizen. it would drag things on in an unseemly way which will be very embarrassing for the royal family. and as i said before, i don't really actually think the embarrassment of the royal family is the point, actually, when it comes to getting to the truth about these allegations, but there's no doubt that's what it will be.— that's what it will be. that's look at the times _ that's what it will be. that's look at the times newspaper - that's what it will be. that's look at the times newspaper which i that's what it will be. that's look i at the times newspaper which looks ahead to the path of 0micron on the front page. "shops and trains stick to plot the makeup masks as plan b ends." what happens when i go to a
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shop, what do i do now? i ends.�* what happens when i go to a shop, what do i do now?— shop, what do i do now? i think everyone _ shop, what do i do now? i think everyone gets _ shop, what do i do now? i think everyone gets himself- shop, what do i do now? i think everyone gets himself into - shop, what do i do now? i think everyone gets himself into a tisj everyone gets himself into a tis about— everyone gets himself into a tis about this, "what happens if i go to tesco— about this, "what happens if i go to tesco and _ about this, "what happens if i go to tesco and i— about this, "what happens if i go to tesco and i have to put a mask on?" my guess— tesco and i have to put a mask on?" my guess is— tesco and i have to put a mask on?" my guess is all of this will be resolved _ my guess is all of this will be resolved. i suspect if you walk into sainsbury's— resolved. i suspect if you walk into sainsbury's without your mess, you are unlikely— sainsbury's without your mess, you are unlikely to be clapped in irons and marched out again dashed without your mask~ _ and marched out again dashed without your mask. you can already feel in london, certainly in london where i've london, certainly in london where i've been— london, certainly in london where i've been today, you can feel people getting _ i've been today, you can feel people getting more relaxed — and i suspect that as _ getting more relaxed — and i suspect that as the _ getting more relaxed — and i suspect that as the omicron numbers drop, we don't got _ that as the omicron numbers drop, we don't got another variant and go back— don't got another variant and go back into — don't got another variant and go back into measures, over time people willjust— back into measures, over time people willjust gradually stop wearing masks~ — willjust gradually stop wearing masks. they aren't great for social interactions, sure if you're in a very— interactions, sure if you're in a very crowded railway carriage, put a mask— very crowded railway carriage, put a mask on— very crowded railway carriage, put a mask on if— very crowded railway carriage, put a mask on if that makes you feel more comfortable. but my guess is that
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trolling _ comfortable. but my guess is that trolling around the aisles at sainsbury or tesco, quite soon the mask— sainsbury or tesco, quite soon the mask will— sainsbury or tesco, quite soon the mask will feel superfluous, and we will all— mask will feel superfluous, and we will all wonder why we got ourselves into guite _ will all wonder why we got ourselves into quite a — will all wonder why we got ourselves into quite a twist about which shop was using — into quite a twist about which shop was using which measures. there'll a si-n was using which measures. there'll a sign on _ was using which measures. there'll a sign on the _ was using which measures. there'll a sign on the front door.— sign on the front door. that's my answer, sign on the front door. that's my answer. the _ sign on the front door. that's my answer, the sign _ sign on the front door. that's my answer, the sign on _ sign on the front door. that's my answer, the sign on the - sign on the front door. that's my answer, the sign on the door. i answer, the sign on the door. jessica, i'll try you with the trains. what happens on trains now? i suspect similarly, sadiq khan said he'll be _ i suspect similarly, sadiq khan said he'll be enforcing masks. butl he'll be enforcing masks. but i think by and — he'll be enforcing masks. but i think by and large _ he'll be enforcing masks. but i think by and large in _ he'll be enforcing masks. but i think by and large in london, i he'll be enforcing masks. elti think by and large in london, i've not seen a huge amount of mask wearing, although most seem to be wearing them still at the moment. and i think one of the reasons they are is that it doesn't quite feel yet like those days of late summer, or actually it felt like the cases were really dropping off. i don't
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know about you but i know so many people whose children are currently having to isolate with covid, some people have had covid three times — in a sense, that is an indication that we are eventually going to have to move into a place where we just live with this disease. i think we are basically getting to that place now, but i think people are still being slightly cautious, in my very anecdotal observations of this, and that there is so much of this still around. , ,, .., that there is so much of this still around. ,, ., that there is so much of this still around. . ,, ., ., ~ that there is so much of this still around. . ,, ., ., ,, i. around. jessica and peter, thank you both so much- _ the papers will be back again tomorrow evening, presented by geeta guru—murthy. joining her will be kevin schofield, from huff post uk, and the daily telegraph columninst, madeline grant. dojoin us then if you can,
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but for now, goodnight. good evening. this is your update from the bbc sport centre. britain's alfie hewett could claim a second title at this year's australian open, when he plays shingo kunieda in the wheelchair singles final in the early hours of thursday. he's already won one title at melbourne park this week. earlier, he and gordon reid won a record ninth consecutive grand slam with victory in the wheelchair doubles. patrick gearey reports. for alfie hewett and gordon reid, this is like greeting an old friend, a reunion that's become a tradition. on the top of your screen — and soon on top of the match — this was the road to their ninth straight grand slam title. there was a diversion — the accomplished pair of shingo kunieda and gustavo fernandez fought back to nip the second set. but, when you've done it
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as often as hewett and reid, victory becomes a sort of muscle memory. this was the third australian open, but winning never becomes boring. in the past two years, they have seized every grand slam available. different surfaces, climates, and opponents — with one formidable constant. i think i've got a good leader next to me. ever since we first partnered, which was nine years ago now, he's always took me under his wing and mentored me. i think that relationship never changed. i'm just a little bit fearless out there, and he's the more composed, rational one on the court. it would be easy to take glory for granted, but repeated success requires that you keep going up that hill. it sometimes hurts — and when they won wimbledon last year, there was worry behind the smiles. hewett was awaiting news on a rule change, which could have excluded him from the sport he'd given much of his life to. last november, he was cleared to play.
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and now, he might be coming back with even more excess baggage than his partner — he has the singles final on thursday. but whatever happens, hewett and reid return as champions — and the closest thing in british sport to a guarantee. patrick gearey, bbc news. meanwhile, there were boos for the russian daniil medvedev, after he said he was inspired by novak djokovic to get through to the semi—finals. medvedev came back from two sets down against canadian felix auger alliasime to win in a thrilling five set match. it was the canadian who impressed early, taking the first two sets. but medvedev reacted quickly, going on to win the third and fourth. it could have gone either way in the fifth, but it was the russian who took the deciding set 6—4. when asked how he did it, medvedev name—checked the world number one, who was deported from australia because of his vaccination status. that prompted boos from the crowd. i didn't really know what to do, so i was like, i don't know if people will like it, but i told myself,
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"what would novak djokovic do?" booing and it worked, i managed to raise my level during the game, especially in the tie—break. what's funny, when they closed the roof, i suddenly felt the momentum changing my game, ifelt i could go through the court more and serve better. and yeah, ijust started playing better. to football, where rangers remain four points clear at the top of the scottish premiership after a 1—0 win over livingston. scott arfield with the only goal at ibrox. celtic stay in second place. they were 2—0 up against hearts, reo hatate with a brilliant opening goal. but hearts' liam boyce missed this chance for an equaliser from the penalty spot. 2—1, it finished there. chelsea are back up to second in the women's super leagueafter a 2—0 victory over west ham. the blues opened the scoring when a shot from erin cuthbert set substitute beth england up for their first goal. cuthbert then added a late second with a fine finish from the edge of the box. it's chelsea's second victory against the hammers in seven days, having got past their london rivals
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in the quarterfinals of the women's continental league cup last week. they're nowjust a point behind arsenal at the top. to the africa cup of nations, then, where egypt are through to the quarter finals after a dramatic penalty shoot—out win over ivory coast. liverpool striker mo salah struck the winning spot—kick for egypt after the sides finished 0—0. egypt will now face morocco in the last eight in yaounde on sunday. tonight's other game also went to penalties, after no goals in normal time. equitorial guniea beating mali, falaye sacko missing the all—importa nt kick. to the premier league now — and it's been decided that clubs must have at least four players who have tested positive for coronavirus in their squad before they apply to have their match postponed, and also that covid passes will no longer be a condition of entry for supporters to a premier league match. the new rules will come into effect ahead of next weekend's twice—postponed burnley—watford match at turf moor. it follows a premier league meeting of clubs to discuss updating guidence. previously, some clubs were criticised for citing injuries and international call—ups
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as reasons, along with covid, for having matches postponed. england head coach, eddiejones, has said it's disappointing for england that captain owen farrell has been ruled out of the entire six nations tournament, as his ankle injury requires surgery. the 30—year—old, who has 94 caps, was in a collision whilst training with his club saracens. he's expected to undergo surgery today and won't be available to play in the six nations. with ten days to go until the start of the tournament, jones said farrell would contribute — just not on the pitch. whilst it's enormously disappointing, it's just part of the game. and he'll get the operation, do his rehab, and he'll get back as quickly as possible. so we've had a couple quick chats. yeah, he'll continue to do little bits and pieces for us behind the scenes to keep involved. but he'll cope with the situation really well. and it's a big night for england's men's and women's cricket teams, with both of them in action. all the very latest over
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on the bbc sport webside, that's bbc.co.uk/sport. but that's all from me for now. hello there. it should be a frost—free start to thursday. we've still got some strong winds in the north, and a band of cloud, light and patchy rain is continuing southwards across england and wales. that'll eventually clear away from southern parts of england. sunshine then follows on. still a few more showers continuing, mainly in northern and western scotland, but the winds will continue to ease. even though it's a northwesterly wind, it's not going to feel particularly chilly. it will feel cooler, though, than of late across northern parts of scotland. as the winds ease overnight, it could get quite chilly across england and wales, 1—2 mist and fog patches, too. then if we look out into the atlantic, we've got more weather systems mainly to bring some rain into scotland on friday, but also drawing in some very mild south—westerly winds. a chilly start, though, for england and wales. mist and fog will soon lift,
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some early sunshine and we may keep the sunshine in the southeast. for many, though, it's going to cloud over through the day. some rain, too, mainly, ithink, running eastwards across scotland. temperatures will be reaching 10—11 celsius as the wind strengthens through the day.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore. i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines: britain's prince andrew demands a trial byjury, as he rejects the allegations of sexual assault made by virginia giuffre. the us rejects russian security demands on ukraine and eastern europe and says further talks will address moscow's concerns. the ball is in their court. we'll see what we do. as i've said repeatedly, whether they choose the path of diplomacy and dialogue, whether they decide to renew aggression against ukraine, we're prepared either way. westminster waits for the report that could determine the prime minister's future, as borisjohnson rejects calls for him to resign.

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