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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 26, 2022 10:45pm-11:01pm GMT

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story the bbc news leads on the same story the bbc news at 10pm let on. "andrew: it's trial byjury." it is worth us saying that andrew has denied allegations made against him. peter, this is now a story we will see repeatedly, this civil case in new york? it story we will see repeatedly, this civil case in new york? it becomes clear why the _ civil case in new york? it becomes clear why the palace _ civil case in new york? it becomes clear why the palace took - civil case in new york? it becomes clear why the palace took the - civil case in new york? it becomes clear why the palace took the view| clear why the palace took the view that prince — clear why the palace took the view that prince andrew had to fight this case as— that prince andrew had to fight this case as a _ that prince andrew had to fight this case as a private citizen, you know, it'll end _ case as a private citizen, you know, it'll end up— case as a private citizen, you know, it'll end up in— case as a private citizen, you know, it'll end up in one presumes a televised _ it'll end up in one presumes a televised trial byjury. the other side's _ televised trial byjury. the other side's lawyers have said bring it on, side's lawyers have said bring it on. we — side's lawyers have said bring it on, we look forward to our day in court _ on, we look forward to our day in court it— on, we look forward to our day in court it will_ on, we look forward to our day in court. it will be an incredibly, intensely— court. it will be an incredibly, intensely high—profile trial, as you say, prince — intensely high—profile trial, as you say, prince andrew has always denied these _ say, prince andrew has always denied these allegations, he'll have to get around _ these allegations, he'll have to get around that photograph of him with his arm _ around that photograph of him with his arm around virginia giuffre. the
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e-n1aii_ his arm around virginia giuffre. the email that — his arm around virginia giuffre. the e—mail that he sent in 2015 took glean— e—mail that he sent in 2015 took glean maxwell saying he wanted to talk about virginia giuffre — if the case _ talk about virginia giuffre — if the case gets— talk about virginia giuffre — if the case gets that far and he's determined not to settle, it's hard to see _ determined not to settle, it's hard to see how — determined not to settle, it's hard to see how he can settle and retain his reputation —— elaine maxwell. it's his reputation —— elaine maxwell. it's clear— his reputation —— elaine maxwell. it's clear why he had to fight it as a private — it's clear why he had to fight it as a private citizen, and it will be extremely— a private citizen, and it will be extremely difficult now for the royal — extremely difficult now for the royal family because it will drag on, royal family because it will drag on. it“— royal family because it will drag on, it'll fill news bulletins, the cable — on, it'll fill news bulletins, the cable networks in the states will be absolutely catnip, and it will be a long. _ absolutely catnip, and it will be a long, arduous battle, i suspect. sometimes there's a story about the prime minister, on the same day there is a developing on that prince andrew case. how do you see this
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story? andrew case. how do you see this sto ? �* , ., ., ., andrew case. how do you see this sto ? �*, ., ., .,�* ., �*, story? it's not great for britain's international _ story? it's not great for britain's international reputation - story? it's not great for britain's international reputation to - story? it's not great for britain's international reputation to have | story? it's not great for britain'sl international reputation to have a prime minister on which there is now a criminal investigation going into the operation that he runs, and a royalfamily the operation that he runs, and a royal family where there is this incredibly damaging sexual abuse lawsuit against one of its senior members. the damaging thing is that, in demanding a trial byjury on all the allegations asserted by virginia giuffre, it drags it out and makes it a very public spot, and it makes things very difficult for the royal family. not that there reputation should be the main consideration here, butjustice for should be the main consideration here, but justice for those should be the main consideration here, butjustice for those who are making these allegations. finta here, butjustice for those who are making these allegations. onto our last --aer, making these allegations. onto our last paper. the _ making these allegations. onto our last paper, the guardian _ making these allegations. onto our last paper, the guardian - - making these allegations. onto our last paper, the guardian - the - making these allegations. onto our| last paper, the guardian - the front last paper, the guardian — the front page, this is a continuation of what we were discussing before in the daily telegraph about prices
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rising,... peter fosterfrom daily telegraph about prices rising,... peter foster from the financial times, rising,... peter foster from the financialtimes, i rising,... peter foster from the financial times, i spoke to them earlier this evening on the bbc news channel, she had been campaigning for the inflation to be measured using foods that people with very little money are struggling to buy, saying the prices of those goods has gone up dramatically over the last year or so — gone up dramatically over the last year orso — and gone up dramatically over the last year or so — and it looks like she's had an effect. could you talk us through it? it’s had an effect. could you talk us through it?— through it? it's always controversial, - through it? it's always controversial, the - through it? it's always controversial, the wayi through it? it's always - controversial, the way that through it? it's always _ controversial, the way that some feeis _ controversial, the way that some feels the — controversial, the way that some feels the basket doesn't fairly represent the lived experience of different — represent the lived experience of different segments who are affected by inflation. with things like price rises _ by inflation. with things like price rises for— by inflation. with things like price rises for food and energy, etc, it's often _ rises for food and energy, etc, it's often very— rises for food and energy, etc, it's often very dangerous to take the average — often very dangerous to take the average outcome for most people. politically, — average outcome for most people. politically, certainly, you need to
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look at _ politically, certainly, you need to look at the — politically, certainly, you need to look at the small people who will be really _ look at the small people who will be really badly affected, the people at one end _ really badly affected, the people at one end of the distribution or the other~ _ one end of the distribution or the other~ the — one end of the distribution or the other. the kids they are often the people _ other. the kids they are often the people who make the biggest clinical headlines— people who make the biggest clinical headlines in the biggest political headaches. we saw that go way back with the _ headaches. we saw that go way back with the poll tax, when the assessments were first about what they would land for people in their extra _ they would land for people in their extra hiiis, — they would land for people in their extra bills, the government looked at the _ extra bills, the government looked at the median level and thought it might— at the median level and thought it might be — at the median level and thought it might be £300. people were getting bills for— might be £300. people were getting bills for thousands of pounds, and you don't— bills for thousands of pounds, and you don't need many stories for people — you don't need many stories for people who are struggling financially who were really hit by these _ financially who were really hit by these price rises, to really obscure the experience of the average. and i think that's — the experience of the average. and i think that's where the government will have _ think that's where the government will have to be very careful going forward — will have to be very careful going forward. , ,, .., , will have to be very careful going forward, ,, , .,, will have to be very careful going forward, ,, , , will have to be very careful going forward, , , forward. jessica, this last story is forward. jessica, this last story is for a paper _ forward. jessica, this last story is for a paper you — forward. jessica, this last story is for a paper you work for. - forward. jessica, this last story is for a paper you work for. would l forward. jessica, this last story is| for a paper you work for. would it be fair to say that jack for a paper you work for. would it be fair to say thatjack munro has made a rather comic story about
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inflation a lot more understandable for people, highlighting the inequality in counting inflation? she makes a point, shut up dust she's absolutely right, if your pot is going up by 20p —— pasta, that's a huge hit... you'll potentially find yourself unable to pay for heating or have to cut down on your own food in order to feed your child. it's an experience, but it's beyond so many politicians's comprehension of having to count things so precisely every week that you go to the supermarket. and she speaks very movingly about her own experience of having to keep track of those prices in a way that we expect statisticians to keep track of. so i think it is clearly
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something that more and more people are taking into account. i was talking to tory mps about what to do about rising energy prices, and a lot of them will say it's easy for us to give targeted help, to give it to the most vulnerable people or who are on benefits, universal credit, whatever. but actually there are lots of people for whom they might have a higher dependence on gas and electricity for some reason who are still really struggling and making ends meet who don't fall into those categories will find themselves pushed into real poverty and debt by these price rises. so maybe a slightly more blanket approach is needed. it's a very difficult balance to strike.— needed. it's a very difficult balance to strike. thanks to you both so much. _ that's it for the papers this hour. jessica and peter will be back again at 11.30pm. goodbye for now.
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good evening. this is your update from the bbc sport centre. britain's alfie hewett could claim a second title at this years australian open, when he plays shingo kunieda in the wheelchair singles final in the early hours of thursday. he's already won one title at melbourne park this week. earlier, he and gordon reid won a record ninth consecutive grand slam with victory in the wheelchair doubles. patrick gearey reports. for alfie hewett and gordon reid, this is like reading an old friend, a reunion that's become a tradition. —— greeting an old friend. on the top of your screen — and soon on top of the match — this was the road to their ninth straight grand slam title. there was a diversion. the accomplished pair fought back to nip the second set. but, when you've done it as often as hewett and reid, victory becomes a sort of muscle memory.
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this was the third australian open, but winning never becomes boring. in the past two years, they have seized every grand slam available. different surfaces, climates, and opponents — with one formidable constant. i think i've got a good leader next to me. ever since we first partnered, which was nine years ago now, he's always took me under his wing and mentored me. i think that relationship never changed. i'm just a little bit fearless out there, and he's the more composed, rational on the court. it would be easy to take glory for granted — but repeated success requires that you keep going up that hill. it sometimes hurts. and when they won wimbledon last year, there was worry behind the finals. hewett was awaiting rule change, which could have excluded him from the sport he had given much of his life to. last november, he was cleared — and he might be coming back with even more excess baggage than his partner. he has the single final on thursday, but whatever happens,
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hewett and reid return at champions of the closest thing to a guarantee. patrick gearey, bbc news. meanwhile, there were boos for the russian daniil medvedev, after he said he was inspired by novak djokovic to get through to the semi—finals. medvedev came back from two sets down against canadian felix auger alliasime to win in a thrilling five set match. it was the canadian who impressed early, taking the first two sets. but medvedev reacted quickly, going on to win the third and fourth. it could have gone either way in the fifth, but it was the russian who took the deciding set 6—4. when asked how he did it, medvedev name—checked the world number one, who was deported from australia because of his vaccination status. that prompted boos from the crowd. i didn't really know what to do, so i was like, i don't know if people like it, but i told myself, "what novak djokovic would do?" booing. and it worked. i managed to raise my level during the game, especially in the tie—break.
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when they closed the roof, i suddenly felt the momentum changing my game, ifelt i could go through the court more and serve better, just started playing better. to football, where rangers remain four points clear at the top of the scottish premiership after a 1—0 win over livingston. scott arfield with the only goal at ibrox. celtic stay in second place. they were 2—0 up against hearts, reo hatate with a brilliant opening goal. but hearts' liam boyce missed this chance for an equaliser from the penalty spot. 2—1, it finished there. chelsea are back up to second in the women's super leagueafter a 2—0 victory over west ham. the blues opened the scoring when a shot from erin cuthbert set substitute beth england up for their first goal. cuthbert then added a late second with a fine finish from the edge of the box. it's chelsea's second victory against the hammers in seven days, having got past their london rivals in the quarterfinals of the women's continental league cup last week. they're nowjust a point behind arsenal at the top.
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to the africa cup of nations, then, where egypt are through to the quarter finals after a dramatic penalty shoot—out win over ivory coast. liverpool striker mo salah struck the winning spot—kick for egypt after the sides finished o—o. egypt will now face morocco in the last eight in yaounde on sunday. tonight's other game also went to penalties, after no goals in normal time. equitorial guniea beating mali, falaye sacko missing the all—importa nt kick. to the premier league now — and it's been decided that clubs must have at least four players who have tested positive for coronavirus in their squad before they apply to have their match postponed, and also that covid passes will no longer be a condition of entry for supporters to a premier league match. the new rules will come into effect ahead of next weekend's twice—postponed burnley watford match at turf moor. it follows a premier league meeting of clubs to discuss updating guidence. previously some clubs were criticised for citing injuries and international call—ups as reasons — along with covid — for having matches postponed. england head coach, eddiejones, has said it's disappointing for england that captain owen farrell has been
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ruled out of the entire six nations tournament, as his ankle injury requires surgery. the 30—year—old, who has 94 caps, was in a collision whilst training with his club saracens. he's expected to undergo surgery today and won't be available to play in the six nations. with ten days to go until the start of the tournament, jones said farrell would contribute — just not on the pitch. janik whilst it's enormously disappointing, it'sjust part janik whilst it's enormously disappointing, it's just part of the game. disappointing, it's “ust part of the name. �* .,, ., ., disappointing, it's “ust part of the name. �* ., ., ., game. he'll get the operation, do his rehab, — game. he'll get the operation, do his rehab, and _ game. he'll get the operation, do his rehab, and he'll— game. he'll get the operation, do his rehab, and he'll get— game. he'll get the operation, do his rehab, and he'll get back - game. he'll get the operation, do his rehab, and he'll get back as i his rehab, and he'll get back as quick as possible. we had a couple quick as possible. we had a couple quick chats. he'll do little bits and pieces for us behind the scenes to keep him viable. but he'll cope with the situation really well. and it's a big night for england's mens and women's cricket teams, with both of them in action. all the very latest over on the bbc sport webside, that's bbc.co.uk/sport.
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but that's all from me for now. hello there. it should be a frost—free start to thursday. we've still got some strong winds in the north, and a band of cloud, light and patchy rain is continuing southwards across england and wales. that'll eventually clear away from southern parts of england. sunshine then follows on. still a few more showers continuing, mainly in northern and western scotland, but the winds will continue to ease. even though it's a northwesterly wind, it's not going to feel particularly chilly. it will feel cooler, though, than of late across northern parts of scotland. as the winds ease overnight, it could get quite chilly across england and wales. 1—2 mist and fog patches too. then if we look out into the atlantic, we've got more weather systems mainly to bring some rain into scotland on friday, but also drawing in some very mild south—westerly winds. a chilly start, though, for england and wales. mist and fog will soon lift, some early sunshine and we may keep the sunshine in the southeast. for many, though, it's going to cloud over through the day. some rain, too, mainly, ithink, running eastwards across scotland. temperatures will be reaching
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10—11 degrees as the wind strengthens through the day.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore. i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines: britain's prince andrew demands a trial byjury in new york, as he rejects the allegations of sexual assault made by virginia giuffre. the us rejects russian security demands on ukraine and eastern europe and says further talks will address moscow's concerns. the ball is in their court. we'll see what we do. as i've said repeatedly, whether they choose the path of diplomacy and dialogue, whether they decide to renew aggression against ukraine, we're prepared either way.
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westminster waits for the report that could determine

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