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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 26, 2022 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm james reynolds. the headlines at 8pm — westminster waits for the report that could determine the prime minister's future as he rejects calls for him to resign. the ministerial code says that ministers who knowingly mislead parliament will be expected to offer their resignation. does the prime minister believe that applies to him? mr speaker, of course, but let me tell the house that i think he's inviting a question about an investigation which, as you know, mr speaker, i can't comment. the duke of york has demanded a jury trial as he seeks to defend a sexual assault case according to a legal document filed in the us tonight. press enter has consistently denied
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the claims made against him. —— prince andrew has denied... uk covid infections — the numbers are falling just under 3 million people had covid in the uk last week, but infections among schoolchildren are on the rise. russia carries out military exercises close to the ukrainian border as the us says it fears president putin could use force against ukraine within weeks. the ons will change the way it counts statistics for property after intervention by the food campaigner jack munroe and we will speak to jack munroe and we will speak to jackin jack munroe and we will speak to jack in the next hour so do stay with us for that. and the story of the little girl who vanished for days in australia more than half a century ago. finally answers about what happened to her. good evening, and welcome to bbc news. the prime minister has vowed to fight on amid more calls for him to resign as westminster waits
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for the publication of sue gray's highly anticipated report into parties in downing street during lockdown. during prime minister's questions, today the labour leader, sir keir starmer, urged borisjohnson to publish the official report in full once it has been released. the metropolitan police is carrying out its own probe to establish if the gatherings broke coronavirus legislation. number 10 has said mr johnson doesn't believe he has broken the law. here's our political editor laura kuenssberg. busy doing nothing much. waiting, wondering if the findings of a report into rule—breaking in downing street will make life impossible for boris johnson. other ministers trying to concentrate on serious matters of the day... can you survive this, prime minister? - ..anxiety, anticipation about what the next few hours would bring. the prime minister eager not to show
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any nerves to his backbench troops. cheered at lunchtime, but with questions pressing, can that mood prevail? how much damage are the prime minister and his cabinet prepared to do to save his skin? let me just remind the house what's been going on in downing street. we've been prioritising the covid backlogs, mr speaker. and when the official verdict into what really went on is ready, will we see it all? can the prime minister confirm that he will publish the full sue gray report as he receives it? of course i will do exactly what i said. remember the official civil service inquiry isn't the only one that lurks. we now have the shameful spectacle of a prime minister of the united kingdom being subject to a police investigation. isn't this a prime minister and a government that have shown nothing but contempt for the decency, honesty and respect that define this country?
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and for all sorts of reasons, many people may want me out of the way, but i'll tell you the reason he wants me out of the way, it's because he knows that this government can be trusted to deliver. and we're, and particularly i am getting on with the job. a public show of force. but it's the private world behind number 10's show that's been exposed. it's a business meeting! allegations of parties in the press office exploded with a cringeworthy video of staffers joking about how they'd explain it away. and it's not socially distanced. can you stop? i'm going to make - a statement, you don't... the tears of the former press spokesperson allegra stratton, the first casualty of this whole mess. then admissions of various other gatherings in whitehall when the country was locked down. revelations of bring your own booze drinks in the downing street garden, organised by none other than martin reynolds, one of the most senior staff by borisjohnson�*s side. a basement booze—up during the national
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mourning for prince philip. and then, just this week, news of a birthday celebration for the prime minister in the cabinet room during lockdown. lulu, why did you go - to borisjohnson's party? lulu lytle, the interior designer of the renovation of the number 10 flat, briefly there, along with borisjohnson's wife. the painful question all the way through — how could the people who wrote the lockdown rules have broken them, too? this whole place is in a deeply uncomfortable limbo. the report into what went on in downing street is still not out even though it was essentially complete, apart from last—minute checks, last night. the questions about the integrity and truthfulness of what happened have still not been answered, and just when those doubts are swirling thick and fast, a new, separate contradiction has emerged. remember this? the desperate images of the evacuation of kabul when it fell to the taliban.
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there are claims that the prime minister interfered to prioritise rescuing animals from a british man, penn farthing's, charity. that was fiercely denied at the time. but e—mails published by a westminster committee today give a very different picture, referring to the "prime minister's decision", saying in writing... that's a total contradiction of what borisjohnson said last month. did you intervene in that way? no, that's complete nonsense... marrying up different versions of events has been part of this government's problem. mps sent home tonight without the official report into parties coming out, so accusations hover, still waiting for a verdict. the prime minister hopes for political escape. with me is sonia sodha, columnist at the observer and former special adviser to ed miliband, and with me isjo anne nadler,
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political commentator and former tory adviser at conservative central office. thank you both forjoining me. we are all still in the waiting room with the sue gray reports were to think stanton i?— think stanton i? things have not shifted that _ think stanton i? things have not shifted that much _ think stanton i? things have not shifted that much significantly . shifted that much significantly today in the sense we still don't have the sue gray report. it meant police investigation into what has been going on at number ten has obviously been launched, so i think that's really what westminster is waiting for and that is going to be key to boris johnson's survival. waiting for and that is going to be key to borisjohnson's survival. he serves at the pleasure of the conservative parliamentary party and for the moment there are not enough letters, it's 5a letters required to go to the 1922 committee to tour a vote of no—confidence and at the moment those letters are not there depending on what the sue gray report says come of their variable
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could be advanced to move very fast. in the things they forget date that actually has shifted all the revelations about penn farthing in the rescue of 150 cats and dogs out of afghanistan. we were told by the prime minister last year that he was not involved in authorising that rescue, and lets river that rescue happened while they were afghan people who had worked with british forces who could not get out of afghanistan and people who needed to be rescued from afghanistan who did not make it out but somehow there was the british government authorising the removal of 150 cats and dogs. we now know actually that thatis and dogs. we now know actually that that is wrong and that borisjohnson lied to the public and there have been two e—mails come out then have revealed that the prime minister did authorise that rescue. and i think that's significant because it's yet another example of the prime minister miss leading parliament which is very serious and it's one
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of the things that the labour leader brought up in prime minister questions today. we cannot trust with the prime minister tells the country is accurate so where does this governing authority come from? how do you see things tonight? i how do you see things tonight? i agree that the further revelations today— agree that the further revelations today will certainly put the already very peerless position of the prime minister_ very peerless position of the prime minister even closer to the edge of peril as _ minister even closer to the edge of peril as it_ minister even closer to the edge of peril as it were. i think that this story— peril as it were. i think that this story about _ peril as it were. i think that this story about afghanistan and whether or not _ story about afghanistan and whether or not the _ story about afghanistan and whether or not the prime minister was directly— or not the prime minister was directly involved with sanctioning the removal of these animals, it really— the removal of these animals, it really brings into sharp relief a number— really brings into sharp relief a number of the different things that are informing this whole crisis for him _ are informing this whole crisis for him one — are informing this whole crisis for him one of— are informing this whole crisis for him. one of which obviously is whether— him. one of which obviously is whether or— him. one of which obviously is whether or not he is trustworthy, whether— whether or not he is trustworthy, whether he — whether or not he is trustworthy, whether he is an honest broker. and
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the other— whether he is an honest broker. and the other is— whether he is an honest broker. and the other is whether he is really running — the other is whether he is really running a — the other is whether he is really running a government that is competent. now obviously this is the message _ competent. now obviously this is the message that he and his team had been _ message that he and his team had been trying, with a little bit of renewed — been trying, with a little bit of renewed success i think of the last few days, — renewed success i think of the last few days, to state the various things— few days, to state the various things the government has achieved, and yet _ things the government has achieved, and yet here we are again reminded of one_ and yet here we are again reminded of one of— and yet here we are again reminded of one of the worst examples of incompetent management, not exhibit leaked _ incompetent management, not exhibit leaked hy— incompetent management, not exhibit leaked by the prime minister but by his government and by the foreign office _ his government and by the foreign office iri— his government and by the foreign office. in very graphic terms again. ithink— office. in very graphic terms again. i think trustable is a word so we can have that one. if you would come down and had not followed that british politics and had followed the half hour of prime minister's questions without any previous knowledge, it might be hard to tell that was a prime minister in trouble. he looks energetic and had plenty of cheers from the backbenchers and they are the ones who will decide his fate in any no—confidence vote. what do you make of the support he had in the house
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of the support he had in the house of commons in his performance there? i think it shows that for the moment there are enough mps in his party that are supporting him but we already knew that in a sense that there was not a thresh over these letters and it has not been breached. in my view, i think prime minister's questions today was always going to be, it was not going to be that significant because we know that this is a prime minister who is prepared to ride through very difficult questions from the leader of the opposition. he is prepared to ride through the fact that he has definitely misled parliament about whether he was at parties. and i think... ., whether he was at parties. and i think... . , . ., think... that still incident for debate but — think... that still incident for debate but do _ think... that still incident for debate but do continue. - think... that still incident for| debate but do continue. let's think... that still incident for . debate but do continue. let's go over that because _ debate but do continue. let's go over that because in _ debate but do continue. let's go over that because in december i debate but do continue. let's go i over that because in december he said that he was furious and angry to see members of his staffjoking about parties and making light of the lock down. now we know that he
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attended gatherings which lots of experts, legal experts, think are in breach of or were in breach of the lockdown regulations at the time. for me that is strong, downing street is saying that is him not misleading us because a party he did not realise is a for me that is not enough evidence that he is misleading but that is my opinion i think it's probably of the opinion that much of the country to be but i think that getting back to this issue, i think a pm cues, i think pm cues is always never going to be what clinched it for borisjohnson this week. what is much more important is the impact that his mps feel that the sioux great report and any developments in the met police investigation will have on the public�*s confidence in borisjohnson because those mps are making a calculation about what's best for them personally at the next election, whether it's better to ditch borisjohnson now and choose a
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successor. i’zre ditch boris johnson now and choose a successor. �* ., . . successor. i've noticed in recent da s successor. i've noticed in recent days some _ successor. i've noticed in recent days some of — successor. i've noticed in recent days some of the _ successor. i've noticed in recent days some of the prime - successor. i've noticed in recent l days some of the prime minister's supporters have talked about proportion and this is all being grown out of proportion and essentially preparing the way if the findings say rules were broken and that those rules were minor and don't merit sacking. what do you make of this tactic? i don't merit sacking. what do you make of this tactic?— make of this tactic? i think there has been a _ make of this tactic? i think there has been a degree _ make of this tactic? i think there has been a degree of— make of this tactic? i think there has been a degree of success - make of this tactic? i think there has been a degree of success in | make of this tactic? i think there i has been a degree of success in the last few— has been a degree of success in the last few days in terms of a sense that there — last few days in terms of a sense that there is actually a concerted effort _ that there is actually a concerted effort about or around boris johnson by certain— effort about or around boris johnson by certain prominent figures to shore — by certain prominent figures to shore up — by certain prominent figures to shore up his leadership. and to a certain— shore up his leadership. and to a certain extent you can say nothing succeeds — certain extent you can say nothing succeeds like success and if he feels _ succeeds like success and if he feels a — succeeds like success and if he feels a bit _ succeeds like success and if he feels a bit more confident, then perhaps— feels a bit more confident, then perhaps he has a proper sort of praetorian_ perhaps he has a proper sort of praetorian guard and he performs better— praetorian guard and he performs better as — praetorian guard and he performs better as he did at prime minister's questions — better as he did at prime minister's questions today. that he mightjust be able _ questions today. that he mightjust be able to— questions today. that he mightjust be able to keep this thing afloat. i don't _
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be able to keep this thing afloat. i don't tend — be able to keep this thing afloat. i don't tend to agree with her that this is— don't tend to agree with her that this isjust — don't tend to agree with her that this isjust about mps making calculations about their own seats but they _ calculations about their own seats but they are making calculations, i have no— but they are making calculations, i have no doubt, about whether or not it is actually— have no doubt, about whether or not it is actually beneficial for the conservative party and more portly for the _ conservative party and more portly for the country to be thrown into a period _ for the country to be thrown into a period of— for the country to be thrown into a period of real insecurity and with leadership election that they won't necessarily be able to predict the outconre — necessarily be able to predict the outcome of and how long it's going to take it— outcome of and how long it's going to take it with a period of transition might be to a dilute leadership so i think there are a lot of— leadership so i think there are a lot of pleasures on conservative mps over the _ lot of pleasures on conservative mps over the decision and is not quite as straightforward as suggesting it'sjust — as straightforward as suggesting it's just self—interest. as straightforward as suggesting it's just self-interest.— it's 'ust self-interest. thank you to it's just self-interest. thank you to ou it's just self-interest. thank you to you both _ it's just self-interest. thank you to you both so — it's just self-interest. thank you to you both so much. _ and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30pm and 11:30pm this evening in the papers. our guestsjoining me tonight arejessica elgot, deputy political editor at the guardian, and peter foster, public policy editor at the financial times.
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some breaking news. lawyers for prince andrew have filed documents demanding a trial byjury in a civil case for sexual assault in the us the 11 page document sets out the duke's response to allegations made by virginia giuffre, strongly denying he abused her when she was 17 and that includes arguments the claims should be dismissed because virginia giuffre is now a permanent resident of australia. prince andrew has denied the claims made against them consistently we will get the latest from our correspondent in new york later in the hour. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. britain's alfie hewett could claim a second title at melbourne park when he plays shingo kunieda in the wheelchair singles final in the early hours of tomorrow. he's already won one title.
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earlier he and gordon reid won a record ninth consecutive grand slam with victory in the wheelchair doubles. the pair beat argentina's gustavo fernandez and kunieda ofjapan 6—2, 4—6, 10—7. they've not lost a slam final together since wimbledon in 2019, and have now won back—to—back calendar grand slams since the us open two years ago. and there was more success for great britain with andy lapthorne winning the quad—wheelchair doubles alongside american partner david wagner. they won after a 10—7 match—tie break. it's lapthorne's 15th grand slam title and his 6th at the australian open. idid not i did not have many people to look up i did not have many people to look up to is no one like me was really on tv so that the change is mass of people to have his abilities as a people like themselves. it only helps grow the profile and only helps the next generation and i truly believe that the next generation of wiltshire tennis players as you are already seeing with the dutch kids who play tonight is going to be incredible and the more we can get this stuff on tv, the better. england women cricketers are in action a little later on as they look to salvage what's
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been a disappointing ashes series so far. they lost the first t20 by nine wickets, and then the next two matches had to be abandoned because of rain. but the start of the only test in the multi—format series is scheduled to begin in a few hours' time. it begins at the manuka oval in canberra at 11pm tonight. australia lead 4—2, so a victory for them will guarantee that they retain the ashes, as england would only be able to secure a draw. looking to get into the ashes series to be honest and it was a bit of a stranger with the first game and the other two reigned off but we are so excited and love playing test cricket. we got the opportunity to get back in the series that we can be successful in this test at what a great position to be in it with that going into the early ice we had to look to try and do that again. over in barbados, england's men have chosen to bowl after winning the toss ahead of their third t20 against west indies. the five match series is currently level 1—1. the side will be captained by moeen ali after eoin morgan was injured. to the africa cup of nations then,
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where egypt are through to the quarterfinals after a dramatic penalty shoot—out win over ivory coast. liverpool striker mo salah struck the winning spot—kick for egypt after the sides finished 0—0. egypt will now face morocco in the last eight in yaounde on sunday. in tonight's other game, mali against equitorial guniea is still goalless into the second half there. england head coach eddiejones has said it's disappointing for england that captain owen farrell has been ruled out of the entire six nations tournament as his ankle injury requires surgery. the 30—year—old, who has 94 caps, was in a collision whilst training with his club saracens. he's expected to undergo surgery today and will be unavailable to play for the six nations. with ten days to go until the start of the tournament, jones said farrell would contribute, just not on the pitch. he is disappointed but he knows his part of the game and he will get the operation and do his rehab and will
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get back as quickly as possible. though we have had a couple of quick chats and he will continue to do little bits and pieces for us behind the scenes and keep involved. but he will cope with situation really well. just to bring you up to date with the one game women's super league tonight, chelsea currently 1—0 up against west ham, beth england with the goal. that's all the sport for now. we'll have more for you on the bbc news channel later on. a complaint against the bbc�*s coverage of an incident in which a group ofjewish men was abused in central london last month has been partially upheld by the corporation's executive complaints unit. the unit is part of the bbc, but is independent of programme—makers. it's tasked with judging complaints about bbc output against the bbc�*s editorial standards. let's speak to our culture editor katie razzall. remind us please of the background to this. , . .,
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to this. viewers might recall shockin: to this. viewers might recall shocking footage _ to this. viewers might recall shocking footage shot - to this. viewers might recall shocking footage shot on . to this. viewers might recall shocking footage shot on a i to this. viewers might recall- shocking footage shot on a mobile phone that happened towards the end of last year when a group ofjewish students were travelling on a privately hired bus around london to celebrate hanukkah. at one point they got off the bus according to a rabbi who was also with them and they began dancing in the street listening to hanukkah music and submit approached and they claim they began playing arabic music and began abusing them to the students get back on the bus to get away but the footage which was shot from inside the bus shows the man came a very shocking, spitting, shouting, abusing them and what they say it was clearly anti—semitic way and are banging as she on the bus and potentially looks like a nazi salutes of this happened and that was bad enough. but then the police were investigating this as a hate crime with the board of british jewish people and that he fed by all complained that bbc coverage of the incident. find complained that bbc coverage of the incident. �* ., complained that bbc coverage of the incident. . . ., , . ., , ., incident. and what was the complaint then? the story _ incident. and what was the complaint then? the story aired _ incident. and what was the complaint then? the story aired live _ incident. and what was the complaint then? the story aired live on - incident. and what was the complaint then? the story aired live on bbc - then? the story aired live on bbc london and _ then? the story aired live on bbc london and also _ then? the story aired live on bbc london and also was _ then? the story aired live on bbc london and also was an - then? the story aired live on bbc london and also was an online i then? the story aired live on bbc - london and also was an online report and that was amended quite soon afterward to include with the bbc
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first reported as claims that racial slurs against muslims could be heard inside the bus. in other words the jewish passengers on the bus had responded to the abuse against them by abusing the people outside in return and that is vehemently denied by those involved. the main dispute seems to be about whether there was a slur in english or whether in fact it was a call for help in hebrew that was misheard or mistranslated. so the executive complaints unit were asked to investigate whether the bc was justified were asked to investigate whether the bc wasjustified in including that detail about the racial slur as well as whether the bbc coverage had lacked impartiality and had effectively victim shamed the jewish passengers by implying they bore some or possibly for what happened. and what then has been found? the executive and what then has been found? tie: executive complaints unit does not accept the coverage lacked impartiality with the chart is a victim when we were born to but i do really original report did not meet bbc standards of accuracy and while they say the bbc reported the claims
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of a racial slur in good faith, and they say the analysis of the video suggest it could have been said, but there was doubt so in words that they could have been saying something completely different in hebrew and the bbc should have reflected that out at an earlier stage in the coverage. so they upheld partially the complaint against the bc. bud upheld partially the complaint against the bc.— upheld partially the complaint against the bc. and what kind of resonse against the bc. and what kind of response has — against the bc. and what kind of response has there _ against the bc. and what kind of response has there been - against the bc. and what kind of response has there been tonightj against the bc. and what kind of - response has there been tonight was met the board of deputies certainly are not happy and they said they are dismayed. ibibfc are not happy and they said they are disma ed. �* �* .., are not happy and they said they are disma ed. �* �* , ., are not happy and they said they are disma ed. “ , ., , , dismayed. bbc can use to 'ustify what they uni dismayed. bbc can use to 'ustify what they call erroneous _ dismayed. bbc can use to justify | what they call erroneous editorial decisions that they say compound the distress of people involved in the bbc in his response apologised for not doing more to highlight that these details were contested but they said the bbc should reflect this and act sooner but there has been a rather dramatic intervention tonight because off, the ruckus regulator has announced a new investigation and it says it's reviewed the bbc response of the complaints and it considers it raises questions under due accuracy rules so this really is not the end
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of the matter.— rules so this really is not the end of the matter. katie, thank you so much. just under 3 million people in the uk had coronavirus last week, according to the latest research. that's roughly one in 20 people, a fall of half a million from the week before. but the number of children getting covid has increased. in northern ireland, the use of vaccine passports in some indoor settings such as pubs, restaurants and cinemas has today been scrapped. our health editor hugh pym has the latest. it's the last day in england for compulsory mask—wearing in some indoor public spaces. tomorrow, plan b measures will end, with covid passes as well as face coverings no longer mandatory. but some, like tom, are anxious that people remain cautious. he has an immune deficiency and knows he's at higher risk from covid. putting a mask on may restrict you for the one minute that you're in the shop or the two minutes you do your grocery shopping, but actually, it will make the individual feel
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better, it will allow them to live more of a normal life and it will definitely reduce their anxiety, so just awareness of others would be amazing. restrictions in northern ireland are being eased today, with nightclubs reopening and indoor standing events such as concerts allowed again, though proof of vaccination or a negative test result will be required. the latest office for national statistics survey suggests there were just under 3 million people who had the virus in the uk last week. that was down, although falling at a slower rate than before. in england, where one in 20 had the virus, wales one in 30 and scotland one in 30, case rates were lower, but, in northern ireland, with one in 20, the trend was said to be uncertain. at the population level, things are looking much better than they were a few weeks ago. most if not all of the indicators are moving in the right direction and that's good news. we just need to keep a steady state and watch,
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of course, the changes that are being introduced in terms of policies, what their impact will be on infections in the community. infections in england fell in all age groups except among children. since the return of schools earlier this month, cases have picked up, with increases in the last week among primary and secondary school pupils. we've got children off across the school. - i think we're up to the high 20s of children who've - tested positive but, on top of that, we have staff whose children - have tested positive, - so they are trying to juggle childcare with their partners. it's really difficult. the question now — will infection rising among children spread through to older age groups? there's uncertainty, too, around new variants. there is one under investigation in the uk after growth in denmark. experts, though, say it's early days, that more data is needed and there is, as of now, no cause for concern. hugh pym, bbc news. the latest coronavirus figures show there were more than 102,000 new infections
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in the latest 24—hour period. it means there were 92,000 new cases on average per day in the last week. the number of people in hospital with covid has fallen again. it isjust over 16,500. another 346 deaths were reported, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test. on average in the past week, there were 262 deaths per day. on vaccinations, just over 37 million people have had a boosterjab. that's nearly 6a.5% of those aged 12 and over. meanwhile, from tomorrow, the legal requirement for face coverings in public places in england will be dropped, but some businesses, transport and retailers are still advising customers to wear them. our correspondent colletta smith explained more from manchester. from tomorrow morning here in england, you won't have to wear a mask if you're going into the shops, if you're using public transport, in those public areas that, until now, you've had to wear masks for, but that of course plunges customers back into that difficult
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situation, that grey area we all are facing, facing different rules and requirements depending exactly where you are. because different retailers today say they are going to be making different requests of their customers. we've heard from sainsbury�*s and john lewis, who of course run waitrose as well, saying they are going to be urging their customers, the signs will stay up and they'll still make those tannoy announcements to say please continue to wear your masks. at the other end, we've got morrisons saying they're just going to stick to the government guidance. curry�*s say they're going to ask staff to wear masks, but not necessarily their customers. when it comes to transport, though, the picture is different across england, where we have transport for london, the tube and the buses there, requiring passengers to wear masks, whereas that's not the case here in manchester and elsewhere across the uk. and, of course, in scotland, wales and northern ireland, worth reiterating that you still need to wear your mask whether you're shopping or on public transport.
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but to breaking news the past hour as lawyers of prince andrew have demanded a trial byjury in a civil case for sexual assault and the duke has made consistent denials on the claims against them. our correspondent in new york, what we learn to not? this correspondent in new york, what we learn to not?— learn to not? this was prince andrews _ learn to not? this was prince andrew's legal _ learn to not? this was prince andrew's legal team's - learn to not? this was prince| andrew's legal team's formal response to the complaint that was put forward by virginia giuffre in regard to all the parts of the complaint, the prince's team either denied them, admitted them or so they lacked evidence or sufficient information to admit or deny the allegations. so for example he denied that he ever had sex with virginia giuffre on those alleged three occasions in the us virgin islands, london and new york. he denies that virginia giuffre was ever went out to him byjeffrey epstein for sexual purposes. and he
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denies certain assertions like forcible that he was a close friend ghislaine maxwell's or a frequent guest ofjeffrey epstein's even though he did stay in some of his properties and he even denied heat through virginia giuffre a birthday party at sandringham in 2013 and the epstein was invited. so the some key details in the complaint that he is responding to but interestingly that notorious photo where prince andrew is seen with his arms around virginia giuffre with ghislaine maxwell in the background but in the past he said in that photo was doctored. in this legal document, his lawyer state that they lacked sufficient information to admit or deny the existence of photographic evidence of that particular photo. and they also say that they lacked sufficient information to admit or deny that prince andrew sent ghislaine maxwell an e—mail in 2015
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asking to speak to her about virginia giuffre. so this will certainly give us some insight into how prince andrew will defend himself in this case for that is of course if it does go to trial. thank ou so course if it does go to trial. thank you so much _ course if it does go to trial. thank you so much for— course if it does go to trial. thank you so much for that _ course if it does go to trial. thank you so much for that update. - course if it does go to trial. thank you so much for that update. to l you so much for that update. to remind you what we said in the introduction to this piece of the duke of york has denied the allegations consistently made against him. the united states has... the united states has urged its citizens to leave ukraine, warning that russian troops massed on its border could use force within weeks. tonight, the us secretary of state, antony blinken, told russia that there could be no compromise on the issue of ukraine's sovereignty. moscow has deployed an estimated 100,000 soldiers near the border in both belarus and russia. president putin has accused western nations of aggressive expansion into russia's sphere of influence. he says that one of his key concerns is the expansion of nato,
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the military alliance of european states with the us and canada. many countries in eastern europe became members after the fall of the soviet union. our correspondent in kyiv, sarah rainsford, has been out in the city to see if people are preparing for all—out war. matches, needle, etc. medicals and bandages, medicine. yuri is getting ready for a war he hopes he never sees. he's packed an emergency bag to grab and go if russian bombs or troops reach kyiv. a basic survival kit for the worst possible scenario. what does it actually feel like to be doing this? it's unbelievable. so, i understand that i'm leaving now in 21st century. i'm amazed that i should do this, that i should pack this bag. but this is what i have to do to keep my family safe. yuri thinks the major escalation in ukraine's eight—year—long war with russia is unlikely. he just feels better
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being prepared for it. there's no sense of tension on the streets here. ukraine calls western talk of a major russian incursion alarmist, but the government's not ignoring the build—up of troops on its border. a few weeks ago, the authorities here actually released a map with all the bomb shelters. and just look at it, there's thousands of them. 5,000, in fact, all over the city. marking a map, though, is the easy bit. the door�*s locked. and this is one of the official bomb shelters, supposedly. so, either nobody here is expecting war to break out any minute now, or they're just not very well prepared for it. the metro might be a safer bet. deep below ground. if the air raid siren sounds, people will have 20 minutes to get down here. there's so much talk now outside ukraine about the possibility
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of the conflict escalating, of an imminent russian invasion, and it's quite weird being here inside kyiv itself and realising that people are just going about their ordinary lives. there's no sense of panic here at all. do you think it's possible that the conflict could actually reach kyiv? i don't know. i don't have any information about it, so i'm just living my best life right now and hoping that everything will be ok. did you make any kind of preparations or any emergency...? no, no, no. so, as western governments wrestle with moscow's ultimatums and demands, ukrainians — for now — are getting on with a life they've long lived in the shadow of russian threats and aggression. sarah rainsford, bbc news, kyiv. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith—lucas. good evening. wednesday brought us a largely dry day, and there was even some
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glimpses of sunshine around. it's been quite a long time coming for some of us. now, as we head through this evening, we've got an area of cloud bringing rain and wind across the north of the uk. stays a little bit drier and more settled for longer further south. but we've got this band of rain, this is a weather front which is moving out of scotland and northern ireland into parts of northern england and wales through the early hours of thursday. meanwhile, further north, gales or severe gales across the north of scotland could bring some travel disruption to caithness and orkney for instance. most of us frost—free overnight with enough of a breeze and enough cloud around to stop those temperatures falling too far. and to start thursday morning, we're going to be seeing this cold front draped across southern england and south wales, too. hello this is bbc news. the headlines:
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westminster waits for the report that could determine the prime minister's future — as he rejects calls for him to resign. the ministerial code says that ministers who knowingly mislead parliament will be expected to offer their resignation, does the prime minister believe that applies to him? of course. but let me tell the house i think he's inviting a question about an investigation which is, that as you know mr speaker, i can't comment. the duke of york has demanded a jury trial as he seeks to defend a civil sex case brought by virginia giuffre, according a legal document filed in the united states tonight. prince andrew has consistently denied the claims against him. the numbers are falling — just under three million people had
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covid in the uk last week — but the story of the little girl who vanished for days in australia more than half a century ago — now finally answers about what happened to her. the office for national statistics has said it will change the way it calculates the cost of living to reflect how it affects people on different incomes — a change that has been welcomed by food poverty campaignerjack monroe. earlier this week, she explained how people on the lowest incomes were facing price rises of more than the official 5.2% level of inflation. she tweeted: this time last year, the cheapest pasta in my local supermarket (one of the big four, was 29p for 500g. today it's 70p. that's a 1a1% price increase as it hits the poorest and most vulnerable households. this time last year, the cheapest rice at the same supermarket was 45p for a kilogram bag. today it's £1 for 500g. that's a 344% price increase as it
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hits the poorest and most vulnerable households. the ons says the changes it has planned will offer a more accurate reflection of overall price rises. let's talk to jack monroe now sense it has been thinking of changing its calculations anyway. what are your conversations like? very receptive and very open to change and that announcement today that they are going to measure a broader range of products and broader range of products and broader range of price points is phenomenal because it means there are reports that they produce live report on how people across all economic brackets and all kinds of households are spending their money and how price rises and the impact of those price rises will affect people notjust people who are buying theatre tickets to people who are buying the most basic value—added products at supermarkets. why would these
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products not be properly calculated before? nick the way the data was gathered before can focus on goods or focus on very narrow margins of products that did not take into account the basics and the value range products available from supermarkets so in the ons words they say there are no longer going to measure the price of one type at the supermarkets but rather every different kind at the supermarket which means people will be fairly represented and the fluctuating prices of the basic value range products at the supermarkets will be documented and recorded. flan products at the supermarkets will be documented and recorded.— documented and recorded. can you tell us about _ documented and recorded. can you tell us about the _ documented and recorded. can you tell us about the reaction _ documented and recorded. can you tell us about the reaction you've i tell us about the reaction you've had from people who are struggling to buy food and might welcome the change in this calculation? i to buy food and might welcome the change in this calculation?- change in this calculation? i think that i've change in this calculation? i think that i've had _ change in this calculation? i think that i've had a _ change in this calculation? i think that i've had a lot _ change in this calculation? i think that i've had a lot of— change in this calculation? i think that i've had a lot of very - change in this calculation? i think that i've had a lot of very positivej that i've had a lot of very positive responses from people because obviously the ons is an official body that records its data and that information can be used to lobby
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governments for better wages and better in work and unemployment support can be used to basically document and show how people are living rather thanjust document and show how people are living rather than just a small subset of society so the avalanche impact they have the potential to be enormous. ~ ., impact they have the potential to be enormous. ~ . , ., , ., ., enormous. what the people who are well off in britain _ enormous. what the people who are well off in britain comfortable i enormous. what the people who are well off in britain comfortable not i well off in britain comfortable not understand about people who are struggling to buy food? it’s understand about people who are struggling to buy food?— struggling to buy food? it's the difference between _ struggling to buy food? it's the difference between putting i struggling to buy food? it's the i difference between putting buying a 29p bag of pasta and a £70 bag of pasta although that difference might sound like pennies when you are watching every single one of those pennies in your on such a low oil and income you tend to have a lot less despair and non—discretionary items like food and fuel cell having those changes tracked will go into show how people are genuinely living and it can then be used to inform policy and a fair and accurate
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manner. ., policy and a fair and accurate manner. . ._ ., ., ., manner. changing the way information is calculated is — manner. changing the way information is calculated is one _ manner. changing the way information is calculated is one thing _ manner. changing the way information is calculated is one thing but _ is calculated is one thing but changing the way property is tackled is something else. you have said it will lead to more accurate information but do you believe a more accurate information released to the kind of changes that you are campaigning for more widely? i campaigning for more widely? i believe it could be because for the last ten years i have been campaigning against poverty and at done a lot of work around for the banks and loads of different charitable organisations to try to hammer the message home to the government that 12 years austerity cuts is desperately harming people who are absolutely on the redline and the emotional argument does not seem to have cut through to the people who make those decisions so now hopefully the economic argument in a language that they understand and respect might actually be the catalyst needed to make those changes.
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catalyst needed to make those chances. ~ ., ., , catalyst needed to make those chances. ., ., , , , . changes. what does the public make ofthe changes. what does the public make of the continuing _ changes. what does the public make of the continuing drama _ changes. what does the public make of the continuing drama in _ changes. what does the public make of the continuing drama in downing i of the continuing drama in downing street? as officials and mps continue to wait for sue gray's report, what do the public make of the drama in downing street. a political research group held a focus group with conservative voters from 2019 to discover what they thought about boris johnson, sir keir starmer and partygate. i'm joined now by chris hopkins, political research director for polling company savanta comres. what did you discover? we did this research through _ what did you discover? we did this research through the _ what did you discover? we did this research through the the _ what did you discover? we did this research through the the planet i research through the the planet questions and obviously is quite petricka and days left of what a paper leaving and a lot of shouting but what we really wanted to achieve was to get a group of conservative voters that are no longer voting for different party i might ask the undecided to be any kind of cut through and make some sense of the stories of the day and i think in general they were quite impressed with boris johnson general they were quite impressed with borisjohnson today general they were quite impressed with boris johnson today and compared to last week where they seem to be coming out swinging a bit
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today and some of his answers to questions make not directly answer some of the questions to him and i think some of the response is talking about his record on delivery and the fact the conservative party and the fact the conservative party and government want to get on with tapping the cost of living and things like that. that did resonate with what we did today more so some of cara starmer is questioning and aping the group will surprise may be present in the that's pleasantly surprised by the prime minister's response. they felt he struggled to land his punches and acting in general they did not feel particularly attracted to him as an electoral prospect and a lot of the voters we spoke to today tell us they were more put off by labour in 2019 and one of the reasons why they went to vote for conservatives was not because they were attracted to borisjohnson but because they were put off byjeremy corbyn and therefore some of these militaries
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may might well be their natural home but keir starmer still is not doing enough to bring them back and i think while some of them would say they would willingly labour tomorrow at the ones that are undecided may be easier for borisjohnson to bring back despite the party gate scandal at the moment.— at the moment. what did you find about the snp _ at the moment. what did you find about the snp west _ at the moment. what did you find about the snp west minister i about the snp west minister leader is mac i think it's interesting. young fred has an interesting in relatively at prime minister's questions having a limited number. he is that of every week and i think that his passion and the way that he helped the government to account today was seen by a group as more effective questioning to the prime minister and the cast armour presented and aping equally boris johnson's response to ian blackford was seen as patronising and that did more damage to borisjohnson in any of his responses to keir starmer�*s questions and i think if he has anything to take away from this although he is naturally quite
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methodical and his background as a lawyer comes through i think voters would like to see more punch and more passion in the dispatch box and maybe that would put borisjohnson on the works a bit more similar to what we saw last week rather than today. a wider point. do voters consider who to vote for it through the prime minister's questions? i'm thinking of the bear year when he would get bashed about the whole time and he did not make a difference at the ballot box in 2001. i think that was interesting points made on this week byjacob saying in a parliamentary democracy is more presidential than ever and while the same photo does not book prime minister's questions at least in 30 minutes of the it is on the six o'clock news and picked up on the ten o'clock news and it will be on the news channel and i think the bits that do come through will come from prime minister's questions and ultimately what we will try to do today was not assess what voters
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think we know it's theatrical and we now it's not the greatest way to hold the government to account but it does give voters a favour of the leaders they may end up voting for the next general election and what we found today was they were quite surprised and pleasantly surprised by borisjohnson and they feel a little bit let down thank chest armour because it of the difficulties the government is going through at the moment. the government says it will appeal — after its national disability strategy was ruled unlawful by the high court. the judge said the plan failed to properly consult people when it was drawn up. it was published last july, and set out ways to improve the lives of disabled people. but campaigners argued that a consultation had been inadequate. a government spokesperson said: "we engaged with disabled people, disabled people's organisations, carers and others as part of the national disability strategy. we remain committed to improving
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the everyday lives of disabled people, and the national disability strategy has already made significant doug paulley is one of the claimants. when the difference too and something was not right? when doing the actual consultation, government said it was an information exercise but they serve that they did winter before last was a really simplistic and quite concerning in both the subject matter and its contents and the way it was put across in the questions that was asking and it was quite concerning about some of the things it's asking about and what it was not asking about in a way it was asking it and it was not in any and effective manner of asking people what they wanted out of the strategy given the information about what the strategy would include. so it was not turning real basis for making the strategy up to be honest. lute the strategy up to be honest. we have the strategy up to be honest. - have thought the government spokesperson who said we engage with disabled people or organisations as part of the national disability strategy. we part of the national disability strate: . ~ ., ., strategy. we remain committed to imrovin: strategy. we remain committed to improving their — strategy. we remain committed to improving their everyday - strategy. we remain committed to improving their everyday lives i strategy. we remain committed to improving their everyday lives of l improving their everyday lives of
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disabled people and the national disability strategy has already made significant inroads. your response to the high court decision? i am relieved that _ to the high court decision? i am relieved that the _ to the high court decision? i am relieved that the high _ to the high court decision? i —n relieved that the high court has decided that consultation because thatis decided that consultation because that is what it was as far as we're concerned with the inadequate that it was both a government lawyer and our lawyer have agreed in order that says that both the consultation and the strategy that resulted from it is unlawful and really sad that it has to get to the stage before the government has been forced to come to the realisation of the way they have gone about this and their exclusion of disabled people and disabled people organisations and it should not have come to this. how miaht this should not have come to this. how might this decision _ should not have come to this. how might this decision change peoples lives? ., , , ., .,
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lives? hopefully if that government does not lives? hopefully if that government does rrot get _ lives? hopefully if that government does not get permission _ lives? hopefully if that government does not get permission to - lives? hopefully if that government does not get permission to appeal. lives? hopefully if that government i does not get permission to appeal or leaving the appeal it will force the government to reassess with disabled people and disabled people organisations not charities for disabled people what we need in our lives and what the government can do to enable us to do the same things that everybody else takes for granted and will inform a new and better disability strategy. he says the discovery had a profound effect upon his life and he set out to discover how many other siblings separated by the care system and what impact it has on their lives. by what impact it has on their lives. by law but his insistence should be kept to where possible but new information from more than 200 local authorities revealed they are around half of sibling groups in care.
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i was only a toddler when i entered the care system and i didn't leave until i was 18. to the knowledge of my various social workers and foster parents, i had no siblings. i was an only child. then what happens, in my mid—to—late 20s, as i'm still coming to terms with my own childhood, i get a message from a man on facebook who tells me that he's my brother. it was completely crazy, because, for a long time, i thought that i was kind of isolated in terms of family, that i didn't have anyone. this personal revelation made me think about the state of sibling relationships in today's care system, so i decided to investigate. freedom of information requests sent to over 200 uk local authorities have revealed that more than 12,000 looked after children are not living with at least one of their siblings. in their adoptive home, saskia and her two brothers suffered physical abuse and neglect
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for a decade. when they went back into council care, they were separated across different areas. i lost such a key part of myself, i think, because it was, like, us three against the world, you know? it always has been. and so, being so far away from them, it's like, oh, i'm not as strong any more. the law says siblings should be placed together when it is safe and possible to do so. where this is not appropriate, contact should be prioritised if this is right for the child. how are you feeling about meeting your brothers? excited. yeah? yeah. in scotland, new laws are giving siblings more control over their relationships. karen morrison is a veteran foster carer instrumental in these changes. ourfamily are foster carers and it didn't take long for us to realise, you know, that these children are going into the care system and they're not going to the same place together. in fact, they don't even
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know when they're going to see each other again. just imagine the trauma, it must be awful. karen also runs siblings reunited, a charity providing a safe space for split—up siblings in care to meet every few months. how excited have you guys been to meet today? good. ten out of ten. ten out of ten. just because i know it's halloween. 9,000. 9,000?! an independent review of the england care system is currently under way, with findings and recommendations expected to be published later this year. in scotland, new laws are giving siblings more control over their relationships. for these brothers, however, it's time to say goodbye for now. ashleyjohn—baptiste, bbc news. he attended the scene after the companion called my my man. he was
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about ten metres from the top of the cliff and sipping when rescuers helped him to safety. the coast guard said it was a tough rescue in darkness on a steep and cramping cliff. earlier this month the bbc launched a new podcast series called "fairy meadow" — about the disappearance of a little girl in australia. cheryl grimmer vanished from a beach near sydney more than 50 years ago. she was never seen again. while researching that story, our correspondentjon kay has uncovered the case of another girl — kathy wrethman — who went missing nearby, at around the same time. but her story has a much happier ending. june 1968. and kathy wrethman was safe. the toddler had been missing for three days. but she was found, alone, in new south wales, almost 20 miles from home. now a grandma, this is the first time kathy has ever spoken publicly about what happened. the person that took
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me didn't hurt me. the only thing kathy could tell her parents was that there was a man. and the only clue, whoever took her from the family home, cut her hair. nobody was ever charged. i can only remember a dog. and a room, being in a room. someone coming in, opening this door, and saying "go to sleep". i do remember that. and the dog under my bed. it was a big dog. i think it was an alsatian. what is it like for you now, even now, not really knowing where you were and who you were with during those few days? it's mind—boggling. i came across kathy's story while i was making the bbc podcast series fairy meadow about the disappearance of cheryl grimmer in australia at around the same time. she was never found and the two cases have never been formally linked.
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of course i feel like the luckiest lady in the world. kathy was found wandering in a creek by some schoolboys who were skipping lessons. but she's never seen them since. what would you say to them? thank you. i mean, thank you wouldn't be enough, for saving your life. because what i've got now is my family, and i wouldn't be sitting here if it wasn't for them.
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i want to introduce you to somebody. who? who is that? this is mark. mark. how are you? long time, no see! this is mark. so mark byrne was one of those three boys who found you. we were wagging school. like, we weren't good boys at school! but we had a good outcome that day! thank you so much for wagging school! i can't believe it. this is a dream. i just wanted to thank you. oh, my god. thank you is not enough. i love you, and you are always going to be my hero. you're always going to be my hero. five decades on, at least one mystery has been solved. jon kay, bbc news. and you can listen to the latest episodes ofjon's podcast series "fairy meadow" on bbc sounds or wherever you get your podcasts now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith—lucas. good evening. it might of felt like a long time coming but most of us did see some glimpses of sunshine on wednesday. this was the picture in nottinghamshire. we've had quite a breeze to help to break up that cloud. it's going to be staying quite windy through the evening and tonight across northern parts of scotland. some wind and rain moving in from the
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north through this evening and through tonight. further south most places say a bit more settled, we've got high—pressure to the south of the uk and this weather front here just slowly slipping its way south, was quite a few isobars on the map and it's going to be particularly windy through tonight across the north of scotland for the likes of cape ness and orkney severe gales possible here, some disruptive, strong winds and large waves. further south we've got this weather front just sinking it's way south through the early hours of thursday through central parts of england and wales. for most of us there is enough cloud and enough of a breeze to keep things frost free, could be just a touch of frost across parts of scotland, perhaps in the far south of england. heading through into thursday morning we've got this weather front initially, just drapped across central england and south wales with that that
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will bring a zone of cloudy skies with patchy rain in the far south. also very windy to start the day across the north of scotland but these winds slowly ease. showers moving in on this northwesterly breeze across northern and western parts of scotland further south and east most places looking drier and after the cloud clears away from the south, should be some sunshine for most. temperatures ten to 13 degrees for most of us, colder across the north of scotland. moving through thursday evening and overnight into friday high pressure still with us. we've got the next front approaching from the northwest into friday that could bring some rain initially to the northwest of scotland, perhaps a few splashes of light rain across other northern and western areas. for central and eastern england you're likely to keep the sunny spells through the day on friday. breezy, particularly the further north and west you are but milder temperatures, ten or 11 degrees of scotland and northern ireland, england and wales eight to 10 degrees. heading on towards the weekend and high pressure not far away, sitting to south or southwest of the uk. we got this weather front approaching again from the northwest. i think, through the course of the weekend plenty of dry and settled weather around. mild on saturday but certainly breezy. the weather front bringing cold the day on sunday with some outbreaks of rain, especially across the north and
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the northwest.
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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching context on bbc news. prince andrew demands a jury trial to defend allegations that have been made in a civil sex case in new york. the duke strenuously denies the allegations that have been brought by virginia giuffre. the united states and nato tell the kremlin they will not give in to its security demands on eastern europe or compromise on ukrainian sovereignty. usjustice stephen breyer is set to retire, giving president biden the chance to make his first pick to sit on the supreme court. we have more from panel but we have technical problems at the moment but they will be with us very shortly.

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