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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  January 26, 2022 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. we will start in the uk as well as still waits for that report that could determine the prime ministers future. mrjohnson has rejected for the calls for him to resign. the ministerial code says that ministers who knowingly mislead parliament will be expected to offer their resignation. does the prime minister believe that applies to him? mr speaker, of course. let me tell the house that i think he's inviting a question about investigation which is you know, mr speaker, i cannot comment. russia still has his troops very close to the border of ukraine
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and all the diplomatic side, moscow's formal demand for nato to pull back in eastern europe received this response from the us. the? pull back in eastern europe received this response from the us.- this response from the us. they are to ass this response from the us. they are to pass and — this response from the us. they are to pass and also _ this response from the us. they are to pass and also a _ this response from the us. they are to pass and also a path _ this response from the us. they are to pass and also a path of _ to pass and also a path of defence and deterrence and if russia chooses aggression the path will lead to massive consequences. and aggression the path will lead to massive consequences. and the oldest member of the — massive consequences. and the oldest member of the supreme _ massive consequences. and the oldest member of the supreme court - massive consequences. and the oldest member of the supreme court has - member of the supreme court has stood down for the president biden the now have a chance to nominate a successor for him. borisjohnson has again said he won't resign — as the uk waits for the publication of an official report on lockdown parties in no. 10. during a predictably rowdy prime minister's questions, borisjohnson repeatedly didn't answer questions about the sue gray inquiry, which still has yet to be published. this was parliament earlier. the ministerial code says that ministers who knowingly mislead
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the government will be expected to offer their resignation. does the prime minister believe that applies to him? mr speaker, of course. but let me tell the house thatj i think he's inviting a question about an investigation that - as you know, mr speaker, i can't comment and which he as a lawyer will know that i can't comment on. the backdrop is sue gray's investigation into gatherings at downing street and whether they broke covid—i9 regulations at the time. we understand her report is essentially complete, but that it hasn't been sent it to noio yet. regardless of what's in it, the position from the opposition is this. on the 1st of december the prime minister told this house in relation to parties during lockdown, all guidance was followed completely at number 10, from that dispatch box. on the 8th of december, he looks quizzical, he said it,
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on the 8th of december the prime minister told this house, i have been repeatedly assured since these allegations emerged there was no party. so sensi acknowledges the ministerial code applies to him, will he resign? prime minister. no, mrspeaker. but since he asks, since he asks about covid restrictions let me just remind the house and indeed remind the country that he has been relentlessly opportunistic. he has flip—flopped from one side to the other. to be clear — while the timing of when the report is handed to no 10 is up to sue gray — whether the report is published, is up to borisjohnson. on that, the times reports.
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keir starmer is piling pressure. on the 8th of december he told this house, i will place a copy of the report in the library in the house of commons. his spokesperson has repeatedly stated that means the full report, not part of the report, not a summary of the report, not in edited copy. so can the prime minister confirmed that he will publish the full ssoo gray report as he receives a? prime minister. mr speaker, i can tell him that we've got to leaves the report to the independent investigators, he knows. of course when i receive it of course i will do exactly what i said. so borisjohnson says he will do as he said. two significant developments this week have added further pressure.
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on monday itv reported that borisjohnson had a birthday gathering in no ten injune, 2020. 30 people are said to have attended. no 10 says mrjohnson was there for less than ten minutes. then on tuesday, the police said it would investigate whether alleged parties during lockdown, broke the law. this is the leader of the scottish nationalist party in westminster, ian blackford. 40 a0 cuts, brexit and pushed millions of family into poverty. the impending national insurance hangs like a guillotine while they eat cake. this is nothing short of a crisis. and the only root out, the only route to restore public trust is for the prime minister to go. how much longer will tory mps let this go on for? how much more damage are they willing to do? it is time to get this over with. show the prime minister theodore! boris johnson's future
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is in the hands of tory mps. for weeks many have said they're waiting for the sue gray report to be published before they decide what to do next. 5a letters are needed to trigger a confidence vote. and his loyalists are shoring up their support. liz truss is foreign secretary. there clearly needs to be a change in culture. the prime minister has said that mistakes are made, his apologise for what has happened. that mistakes are made, we need to get the results of the report, we need to look at the results and fix the issues there are. that shouldn't diminish the fantastic work that has been done under this government and under this prime minister. and on the matter of whether boris johnson has been transparent, here's tory mp shailash vash. i think hayes been very open and i think_ i think hayes been very open and i think he's— i think hayes been very open and i think he's been very honest in recognising that mistakes have been made _ recognising that mistakes have been made for— recognising that mistakes have been made for which he has apologised
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profuselx — made for which he has apologised profusely. he fully appreciates the enormous — profusely. he fully appreciates the enormous heart and sacrifice made by millions_ enormous heart and sacrifice made by millions of— enormous heart and sacrifice made by millions of people throughout the country~ — millions of people throughout the country. and we all do. i get letters— country. and we all do. i get letters from my constituents. but he has made _ letters from my constituents. but he has made a — letters from my constituents. but he has made a fulsome and heart full apology— has made a fulsome and heart full apology for that. i think we also need _ apology for that. i think we also need to— apology for that. i think we also need to consider that in this extraordinary two—year period he has made _ extraordinary two—year period he has made a _ extraordinary two—year period he has made a number of very good decisions _ made a number of very good decisions. there was no a—z on how to deal— decisions. there was no a—z on how to deal with — decisions. there was no a—z on how to deal with the pandemic. this is been _ to deal with the pandemic. this is been something that we've had to deal wilh— been something that we've had to deal with as we've gone on. well, the house of commons has finished for the day. on where this goes next, here's the leader of the house of commons jacob rees—mogg. well, the house will sit tomorrow from 930, it will be possible to have a statement tomorrow. and actually friday is a sitting friday. so the business of the house carries on, an important statement of this kind can come to the house with considerable flexibility. the issue here is, how do you give the parties
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proper time to consider it without taking the risk that it leaks before parliament gets to hear about a? it is constitutionally proper that the house of commons should hear first but to have a proper discussion the opposition parties each other time to look at it that it's trying to get that balance right. i'm not going to say 70 minutes per page depending on the length of report but the government looks at the normal courtesies. ione wells, westminster. we heard the normal courtesies but some people are thinking there is no set formula for how this is done. i set formula for how this is done. i cannot be? this is a bit of an unprecedented report. we don't really have any set idea of the exact timing support. as he was sitting there, the plan is to allow considerable flexibility, in his words, when it does come to allow parliament to essentially be suspended for a period of time to allowed mps the time to read that report and properly digested before
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the prime minister gives his statement in response to it so that the opposition parties have a fair chance to read it through and scrutinise it before the prime minister makes a statement to the house. we don't really have a precedent for it. because it is an independent report, the point being it is separate in that sense from government. in speaking to people in government. in speaking to people in government today, speaking to ministerial advisers, tory mps, the picture is very mixed and people are pretty uncertain now when it could drop. some people saying still could be as soon as tomorrow, friday, some even suggesting it could now be be, potentially could have to revise that within moments at that point. in terms of politics of this, last week we saw a couple of tory mps making a push to get the prime minister to go. is that colder in a holding pattern? i minister to go. is that colder in a holding pattern?— minister to go. is that colder in a holding pattern? i wouldn't say it has cooled. _ holding pattern? i wouldn't say it has cooled, certainly _ holding pattern? i wouldn't say it has cooled, certainly the - holding pattern? i wouldn't say it has cooled, certainly the mood . holding pattern? i wouldn't say it| has cooled, certainly the mood as solid a little bit since the climax that we saw last week when many mps
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were publicly coming out and saying that they had already sent letters of no confidence about the prime minister. i think certainly now we are in this little bit of a holding pattern until he gets to the point of publication of this report itself i think would that report does come thatis i think would that report does come that is going to be a really decisive moment for a number of conservative mps who aren't happy with boris johnson's conservative mps who aren't happy with borisjohnson's handling of this whole affair. some of them have already made their minds up, they don't want him to stay as leader of the conservative party, they are waiting on this report out of due process, really. and essentially waiting to give them back cover we need to call for him to go. others generally want to see what is exactly in the report. it's been 70 reports in newspapers, speculations about weight may or may not be na, who was exactly at this party, what the purpose of them was. remember, the purpose of them was. remember, the prime minister is claimed that some of these parties will work events and this report should clarify exactly the nature of these events. the rcmp is genuinely undecided but i think once that
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report lands we will certainly start to see more people coming out publicly saying they want the prime minister to stay or go. which is why we have seen over the last couple days supporters of them privately trying to shore up support behind the scenes here in west minister, urgently trying to meet with different mps who might be wavering to try and guarantee some of that support is this report that sooner and sooner. support is this report that sooner and sooner-— support is this report that sooner and sooner. ., ~ i. ., . ~ and sooner. thank you. come back if there are any shifts. let's turn to the tensions on the ukrainian border. the us has warned that there's every indication that president putin in response to that here is the us secretary of state. i to that here is the us secretary of state. , ,., , . , to that here is the us secretary of state. , , . , ., state. i response reflects a resetting — state. i response reflects a resetting kia _ state. i response reflects a resetting kia come - state. i response reflects a resetting kia come up - state. i response reflects a l resetting kia come up berlin state. i response reflects a - resetting kia come up berlin and geneva last week, we are open to dialogue, we prefer diplomacy. and we are prepared to move forward where there is the possibility of
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cooperation. if russia de—escalate its integration towards ukraine, stops the inflammatory rhetoric and approaches discussions about the future security in europe in a spirit of reciprocity. the secretary-general - spirit of reciprocity. the secretary-general of i spirit of reciprocity. the secretary—general of nato also has a message for moscow. this was in the last few minutes.— last few minutes. every nation has to riaht last few minutes. every nation has to ri . ht to last few minutes. every nation has to right to choose _ last few minutes. every nation has to right to choose its _ last few minutes. every nation has to right to choose its own - last few minutes. every nation has to right to choose its own path. i last few minutes. every nation has to right to choose its own path. so nato _ to right to choose its own path. so nato exe— to right to choose its own path. so nato exc sunak respects the country or elation— nato exc sunak respects the country or elation when it decides to apply for nato _ or elation when it decides to apply for nato membership as for instance ukraine _ for nato membership as for instance ukraine or— for nato membership as for instance ukraine orwhen for nato membership as for instance ukraine or when they decide not to apply— ukraine or when they decide not to apply for— ukraine or when they decide not to apply for nato membership as finland and sweden have done. this is about respecting the right for self—determination. respecting the right for self—determination. a reminder of what this is all about. the focus is the border between ukraine and russia. over 100,000 russian troops are massed there. we know russian troops are also in neighbouring belarus. here they are conducting military drills today. here's the russian foreign minister.
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the us and its allies have abandoned diplomatic rules and have been seeking to undermine our country with unilateral sanctions as well as increasing military pressure on russia with manoeuvres along the russian borders. they are trying to draw care into making against russia. —— kiera. the us embassy in ukraine has urged its citizens to consider leaving the country immediately. in a statement today, it said the situation in the country was... but the ukrainian foreign minister has played down fears of an imminent invasion. the number of russian troops amassed along the border of ukraine and in the occupied territories of ukraine is large, it poses a threat to ukraine, a direct threat to ukraine. however, at the moment, as we speak,
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this number is insufficient for a full—scale offensive. economic sanctions are one of the main weapons the west has in their arsenal. this trust has been a learning what that could look like. we are about to legislate to introduce even tougher sanctions on russia should they stage an incursion. and the type of sanctions were talking about would target individuals within the elite, the target financial institutions and they would target important companies. remember, russia denies that it's planning to invade. but it's also said in the past that it could take �*unspecified military action' — unless the west agrees to its demands. several western countries, including the us,
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have been sending military equipment to ukraine — known as lethal aid. this is a us shipment from earlier today. let's hear from a former us ambassador. this is new, this is bigger, this is a greater threat that the ukrainians have to fight. , face. they don't want to panic. ukrainians are not prone to panic, they do need to take it seriously. the west needs to deter president putin for making this bad decision. deterrence is coming in forms of military equipment and resupply and reinforcements to nato as well as very harsh sanctions even on president putin himself. very harsh sanctions even on president putin himself. let's head straight to washington and speak to our correspondent, barbara plett usher. your expert at reading the message and coming out of the white house, what do you make of what they've come out with today? this
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what do you make of what they've come out with today?— what do you make of what they've come out with today? this is exactly where we we — come out with today? this is exactly where we we were _ come out with today? this is exactly where we we were expecting - come out with today? this is exactly where we we were expecting them l come out with today? this is exactly| where we we were expecting them to get to because they have been telegraphing it quite significantly. they put out this paper, written responses to the russian demands, something that the kremlin had been insisting on getting, they've done that. it was delivered to the ministry of foreign affairs by us ambassador. in that paper again, the americans reject the main russian demands, denying nato membership to ukraine, pulling back the nato presents from eastern europe. at least that's what we understand. we can see the paper but mr blinken said there'd been no concessions made in every principle had been upheld. he elaborated on those areas where he thinks that there are some common ground that they could talk to the russians about in terms of security concerns, that has to do with missile deployments, military exercises, confidence building measures and that sort of thing. they basically put it down in writing what they've been telling
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the russians verbally. back writing what they've been telling the russians verbally.— writing what they've been telling the russians verbally. back in 2014 when russia _ the russians verbally. back in 2014 when russia and _ the russians verbally. back in 2014 when russia and primary, - the russians verbally. back in 2014 when russia and primary, when - the russians verbally. back in 2014 when russia and primary, when it. when russia and primary, when it supported separatist and east of ukraine cover the west issued any amount of condemnation and in the end introduce sanctions. it didn't take military action. what are the american saying about what they might do if russia were to invade this on? , ., might do if russia were to invade this on? , . ,._ might do if russia were to invade this on? , . __ ., this on? they are saying there would be severe economic _ this on? they are saying there would be severe economic sanctions, - be severe economic sanctions, sanctions that were not even on the table in 201a and would really hit the financial and industrial section of russia really hard. they are saying they would increase weapons support to ukraine, which they are already doing, the college defensive military aid. and they're saying they would bolster nato's present in eastern europe, which they have recently put a thousand 500 troops on alert to do just that, if it's decided that's necessary for that those are the things they say they do, they will not send troops to ukraine, president biden is been quite clear that truth will not be fighting there. ukraine is not a
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nato member, there is no obligation to do so and americans do not want to get caught up in that kind of a direct war with the russians. finally, as you talk to your contacts within the defence and state department community, how do they categorise this moment, how did they categorise this moment, how did they categorise this threat compared to where we been the last few years? they've been quite outspoken about the alarm they feel given the kind of deployment they've seen on ukraine's borders. just today another cs during eight senior us official has said their calculations are that dirt russians can take military action within the race to enact last week basing that on an understanding that that would have to be done in winter because the ground needs to be frozen enough. they are looking at deployments and saying, this could happen at any moment. there also saying you don't know for sure if mr putin has made the decision and they are admitting that he might not want to do so when
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the olympic star, he might not want to anger china by doing that. that starts next week. that says something about timing. but given that they have now presented this paper even though it says similar things to what the goal has said, at least a diplomatic channel will continue for a bit because after the paper two comes more talk between the diplomats. paper two comes more talk between the diplomats-— you very much. just under 3 million people in the uk had coronavirus last week — according to the latest research — that's roughly one in 20 people — a fall of half a million from the week before. but the number of children getting covid has increased. in northern ireland you no longer need to restrictions eased too, in england from tomorrow, many of the restrictions will be relaxed including the wearing of face coverings.
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it is the last day in england for compulsory mask wearing in some indoor public spaces. tomorrow, plan b measures will end, with covid passes as well as face coverings no longer mandatory. but some, like tom, are anxious that people remain cautious. he has an immune deficiency and knows he is at higher risk from covid. putting a mask on may restrict you for the one minute you are in the shop or the two minutes you do your grocery shopping, but, actually, it will make the individual feel better, allow them to live more of a normal life and it will definitely reduce their anxiety, so just awareness of others would be amazing. restrictions in northern ireland are being eased today, with nightclubs reopening and indoor standing events such as concerts allowed again, though proof of vaccination or a negative test result will be required. the latest statistics in a survey suggest there were just
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under three million people who had the virus in the uk last week. that was down, although falling at a slower rate than before. in england, where one in 20 had the virus, wales one in 30 and scotland one in 30, case rates were lower, but, in northern ireland, with one in 20, the trend was said to be uncertain. at the population level, things are looking much better than they were a few weeks ago. most if not all of the indicators are moving in the right direction and that is good news, wejust need to keep a steady state and watch, of course, the changes that are being introduced in terms of policies, what their impact will be on infections in the community. infections in england fell in all age groups except among children. since the return of schools earlier this month, cases have picked up, with increases in the last week among primary and secondary school pupils. we've got children off across the school, i think we are up to the high 20s of children who have tested positive but, on top of
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that, we have staff whose children have tested positive, so they are trying to juggle childcare with their partners. it's really difficult. the question now, will infection rising among children spread through to older age groups? there is uncertainty too around new variants — there is one under investigation in the uk after growth in denmark. experts, though, say it is early days, that more data is needed and there is, as of now, no cause for concern. hugh pym, bbc news, sort every day an outside source we bring you the best reporting all of the world. we turn to south america to chile to be precise. we wa nt to want to look at the second—hand clothing trade. traders import unwanted garments mainly from europe and the us, to resell locally and to other latin american nations. but each year, tens of thousands of tons of imported clothes end up in illegal desert landfills, with dire consequences
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for the environment and the local community. bbc mundo's fernanda paul reports from the atacama desert in chile. atacama the driest place on earth. runs a river of unwanted clothes. around a0,000 pounds of unwanted clothes make its way here from the us, europe and asia every year. every thing from jeans, shoes or even a halloween hat. so what could we suppose about this at? well, it's polyester, likely made in china and sold in the us. it was worn once then donated to a charity, the charity then pass it onto dealer who sells it to it importer. in this
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port close arrive in huge mixed bails. here they are categorised according to condition. the vast majority aren't good enough to sell. translation: the problem is that only 15% of clothing is sold, 85% ends up in illegal dumps. but only 1596 of clothing is sold, 85% ends up in illegal dumps. but who is responsible? — ends up in illegal dumps. but who is responsible? with _ ends up in illegal dumps. but who is responsible? with such _ ends up in illegal dumps. but who is responsible? with such a _ ends up in illegal dumps. but who is responsible? with such a complex i responsible? with such a complex business model it is hard to pinpoint blame. business model it is hard to --inoint blame. ~ ,, ~ , ., pinpoint blame. translation: is not eas to pinpoint blame. translation: is not easy to recognise _ pinpoint blame. translation: is not easy to recognise so _ pinpoint blame. translation: is not easy to recognise so much _ pinpoint blame. translation: is not easy to recognise so much interest i easy to recognise so much interest such as _ easy to recognise so much interest such as prohibiting these clothing, it's not— such as prohibiting these clothing, it's not visible. this is not important garbage. but developed countries — important garbage. but developed countries also need to take responsibility. what is happening here in— responsibility. what is happening here in chile has environmental consequences for the planet. the fashion consequences for the planet. iie: fashion industry consequences for the planet. tie: fashion industry is consequences for the planet. ti2 fashion industry is one of the most polluted in the world. some of these garments will take almost 200 years
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to disintegrate.— to disintegrate. translation: this is clearl a to disintegrate. translation: this is clearly a polyester. _ to disintegrate. translation: this is clearly a polyester. in _ to disintegrate. translation: this is clearly a polyester. in ancient - is clearly a polyester. in ancient times we use cotton now it's polyester, it takes many years to biodegrade compared to cotton. this threatens not only the deserts biodiversity but also help of the local communities. with no means of disposal bails are often burned and smoke pollution is a big problem. translation: populations that live inside _ translation: populations that live inside the stair directly inhaling the gases that can get produced and they can _ the gases that can get produced and they can get respiratory diseases. there _ they can get respiratory diseases. there is— they can get respiratory diseases. there is no— they can get respiratory diseases. there is no end in sight, this dump is growing as fast as the fashion that feeds it. perhaps something to think about next time we buy again. if you speak spanish you can get
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news through bbc mundo .com. i will see you in a couple of minutes. it might of felt like a long time coming but most of us are glimmers of sunshine on wednesday. this was the picture in nottingham sure. with had quite a breeze to help us pick up had quite a breeze to help us pick up the clock to date quite windy through the evening and unite across northern parts of scotland. some wind and rain moving in from the north through this evening and through the night. further south most places say a bit more subtle, with a high—pressure to the south of the uk and this was a friend here just slowly slipping its way south, was quite a few ice bars on the map and it could be particularly windy through tonight across the north of scotland for the likes of kate or org needs to be a gales disruptive winds and large waves. for south we this waterfront sinking south
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through the early hours of thursday through the early hours of thursday through central parts of england and wales. for most of us there is enough clout and enough of a breeze to keep things frost free, could be just a touch of frost across parts of scotland, perhaps in the far south of england. heading through into thursday morning we've got this weather front initially, just dragged across central england and south wales with that that will bring a zone of cloudy skies with patchy rain in the far south of the windy to start the day across the north of scotland, these women slowly ease. showers moving in on this northwesterly breeze across northern and western parts of scotland further south and east most places looking drier and after the chroniclers away from the south should be some sunshine for most of the temperatures ten to 13 degrees, cold across the north of scotland. moving through thursday evening and overnight into friday high pressure still with us. we've got the next front approaching from the northwest enter freddy that could bring some rain initially to the northwest of scotland, perhaps a few spots as a bright line across seven northern and western areas. for central and eastern england you're likely to
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keep the sunny spells of the day on friday. breezy particularly the further north and west you are but milder temperatures was up ten or ii milder temperatures was up ten or 11 degrees of scotland and northern ireland england and wales eight to 10 degrees. heading on towards the weekend and high pressure not far away, sitting to south and southwest of the uk. we got this weather front approaching again from the northwest of the through the course of the weekend plenty of dry and settled weather around. mild on saturday but it certainly breezy. the weather front bringing cold the day on sunday with some abrasive rain, especially across the north and the northwest. bye for now.
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hello, i'm ros atkins with outside source. we are turning back to westminster, because everyone there across the uk are waiting for this report that could determine the prime minister's future, and all about those parties and gatherings. he has been rejecting for the call to resign. the code says that ministers who knowingly mislead parliament will be expected to offer their resignation. does the prime minister believe that applies to him? mr prime minister believe that applies to him? ~ ,,, ., ,, ., prime minister believe that applies tohim? ~ ., , , to him? mr speaker, of course, but let me tell— to him? mr speaker, of course, but let me tell the _ to him? mr speaker, of course, but let me tell the house _ to him? mr speaker, of course, but let me tell the house that - to him? mr speaker, of course, but let me tell the house that i - let me tell the house that i think he's inviting a question about an investigation which as you know, i
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can't _ investigation which as you know, i can't comment.— investigation which as you know, i can't comment. russia still has its troo -s on can't comment. russia still has its troops on the _ can't comment. russia still has its troops on the border _ can't comment. russia still has its troops on the border of _ ukraine on the diplomatic truck. moscow's demands received this response from the us. also a path of defence and deterrence _ also a path of defence and deterrence and _ also a path of defence and deterrence and if - also a path of defence and deterrence and if russia i also a path of defence and - deterrence and if russia chooses aggression. _ deterrence and if russia chooses aggression. a _ deterrence and if russia chooses aggression. a path _ deterrence and if russia chooses aggression, a path that- deterrence and if russia chooses aggression, a path that will- deterrence and if russia chooses aggression, a path that will lead| deterrence and if russia chooses . aggression, a path that will lead to massive _ aggression, a path that will lead to massive consequences. _ the oldest member of the us supreme court will stand down. president biden will now eliminate a successor. there are now two investigations into lockdown parties held at number ten — sue gray's, and now the met police. let's look at both more closely, and how they differ. we'll start with sue gray's inquiry, which was ordered by borisjohnson himself. sue gray is a civil servant who has carried out internal investigations before. this one will establish "a general understanding of the gatherings, including attendance, the setting and the purpose,
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with reference to adherence, to the guidance in place at the time". it's unclear how many gatherings she's investigating, or even how many took place. reality check says, based on media reports, i7 gatherings allegedly took place in government during lockdown. we know for certain that boris johnson attended at least two. ryan heath used to work with sue gray in the civil service. this is his experience. she's very good at gathering the evidence, she's extremely well—connected in the cabinet office, in downing street, so she won't have had any trouble collecting the evidence she needs to figure out the facts in this case. then it may still be up to the party or parliament to decide what happens to borisjohnson, but sue will have a fairly formidable set of evidence when this report comes out. sue gray's investigation team has been given access to all relevant records. that's likely to include internal
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emails, whatsapp messages, calendar invites and downing street exit and entry logs. she's also been interviewing staff, like this man — boris johnson's former adviser, dominic cummings. according to the terms of the inquiry, her report will give a factual account of what happened. it also states... and then yesterday, this happened. ican i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took— investigating a number of events that took place at downing street in the last— that took place at downing street in the last two years in relation to potential— the last two years in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. that was the announcement of the other investigation by the police. sue gray has passed her findings onto them. catherine haddon, from the institute of government, explains the significance. she is not a court of law or the
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police, — she is not a court of law or the police, she _ she is not a court of law or the police, she cannot _ she is not a court of law or the police, she cannot abate - she is not a court of law or the . police, she cannot abate criminal activity~ what _ police, she cannot abate criminal activity. what she _ police, she cannot abate criminal activity. what she was _ police, she cannot abate criminal activity. what she was able - police, she cannot abate criminal activity. what she was able to doj police, she cannot abate criminal. activity. what she was able to do is look at _ activity. what she was able to do is look at all— activity. what she was able to do is look at all the _ activity. what she was able to do is look at all the evidence _ activity. what she was able to do is look at all the evidence and - activity. what she was able to do is look at all the evidence and say- activity. what she was able to do is| look at all the evidence and say she thinks _ look at all the evidence and say she thinks there — look at all the evidence and say she thinks there could _ look at all the evidence and say she thinks there could be a _ look at all the evidence and say she thinks there could be a case for- look at all the evidence and say she thinks there could be a case for it. thinks there could be a case for it to go— thinks there could be a case for it to go to the — thinks there could be a case for it to go to the police, _ thinks there could be a case for it to go to the police, this - thinks there could be a case for it to go to the police, this could - to go to the police, this could have breached _ to go to the police, this could have breached the — to go to the police, this could have breached the covid _ to go to the police, this could have breached the covid laws. _ to go to the police, this could have breached the covid laws. the - to go to the police, this could havei breached the covid laws. the police have said not — breached the covid laws. the police have said not only— breached the covid laws. the police have said not only they _ breached the covid laws. the police have said not only they will - breached the covid laws. the police have said not only they will do so, i have said not only they will do so, but they're — have said not only they will do so, but they're only _ have said not only they will do so, but they're only doing _ have said not only they will do so, but they're only doing so - have said not only they will do so, but they're only doing so becausel but they're only doing so because they think— but they're only doing so because they think it's _ but they're only doing so because they think it's sufficiently - they think it's sufficiently egregious _ they think it's sufficiently egregious and _ they think it's sufficiently egregious and might - they think it's sufficiently - egregious and might undermine they think it's sufficiently _ egregious and might undermine public confidence _ it's unusual for a sitting prime minister to be investigated by the police. the last time this happened was in 2007, when tony blair was prime minister. he was questioned three times as a witness into claims that secret labour party donors were nominated by him for peerages. nobody, including tony blair, was charged by the police. in this police investigation — because, as we know, holding gatherings during lockdown was against the law — police are investigating if downing street broke criminal law. a breach of covid lockdown rules is punishable by fines. it does not come with prison sentences. as daniel sanford, the bbc�*s home affairs correspondent summarised...
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rob watson is our uk political correspondent. always good to get you on the programme. what are your thoughts on this was ne evening? like programme. what are your thoughts on this was ne evening?— this was ne evening? like everybody else, i'm this was ne evening? like everybody else. im waiting _ this was ne evening? like everybody else, i'm waiting for— this was ne evening? like everybody else, i'm waiting for this _ this was ne evening? like everybody else, i'm waiting for this report -- i else, i'm waiting for this report —— wednesday evening. the prime minister has made it into such a key moment, and a moment he has to survive. my thoughts from what we've experienced today as anyone who thought the prime minister was somehow going to walk away, absolutely not. borisjohnson is going to fight with any fibre in his body to stay leader of the conservative party. to body to stay leader of the conservative party. body to stay leader of the conservative pa . ., . conservative party. to what degree it is this disrupting _ conservative party. to what degree it is this disrupting the _ conservative party. to what degree it is this disrupting the other- conservative party. to what degree it is this disrupting the other work i it is this disrupting the other work of government? the
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it is this disrupting the other work of government?— it is this disrupting the other work of government? the criticism that's been made — of government? the criticism that's been made of _ of government? the criticism that's been made of the _ of government? the criticism that's been made of the government, - of government? the criticism that's i been made of the government, indeed by conservative mps, notjust from the opposition, is that for the last few weeks and months, the downing street operation has been utterly paralysed because you're answering questions from investigators, looking over your shoulder. morale has been low and down in the dumps, and of course, now you have the problem of the police doing an investigation as well. that absolutely has the charge and it's one of the arguments made by that group of mps who think maybe there should be a vote of no—confidence. talk to me about the labour party's strategy and how you seen it involve as they maximise this opportunity. well, of course, what many people are saying is they are confronted with the largest open goal in british politics. it'sjust a question of slacking the ball in between the posts. i think what's
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been interesting is the sort of broadening out that attack be on borisjohnson, trying to somehow say, if he goes, the whole of the british government will be responsible for having stood by him. of responsible for having stood by him. of course, to make that argument, that this isn'tjust of course, to make that argument, that this isn't just about cakes of course, to make that argument, that this isn'tjust about cakes and a few drinks, but it's damaging the entire fabric of british politics and the trust people have in politicians. of course, there will be plenty of people in the country nodding along and saying absolutely, the polls suggest there's a lot of people nodding along and saying absolutely. also, there is a large minority who think this is a fuss about nothing, or out of proportion. rob, always good to get your help. thank you very much.
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it often gets adjudicate on some of the biggest issues facing america. one of the three justices who make up the liberal wing of the court, stephen breyer, is going to retire. his retirement means president biden will get to nominate a replacement whilst the democrats control the senate. stephen breyer has served on the court for 27 years and is the oldest on the court. justices can serve for life, but us media are reporting justice breyer has chosen to stand down at the end of the court's current term in june. six of the nine currentjustices were appointed by republican presidents and typically lean conservative, so replacing justice breyer is unlikely to change the overall balance on the court. katie barlow is from scotusblog, which covers the supreme court. katie, thank you very much for joining us. tell us aboutjustice maximal who, many viewers will not know them well —— justice breyer.
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has served on the court for almost 28 years, appointed by president bill clinton in i99a. he's a very pragmaticjudge, the way he approaches hisjudging to make sure that the law works for the people, so he's very practical in his approach to his work and his approach to his work and his approach to the opinions. but as you pointed out, he is now the senior member of the court �*s's liberal wing, so he's favouring reproductive rights, and he has been opposed to the constitutionality to the death penalty. nearly three decades on the court. it's quite a legacy that he leaves on the court, and he will wrap up his work on the court at the end of this term, which proves to be a potential blockbuster. there are major issues like access to abortion, abortion rights and gun rights quite presumably, justice breyer may not address this, he is standing down now because the democrats know there's peril coming
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in the midterms. the united states is facing the midterm elections in november, and right now, our upper houseis november, and right now, our upper house is split 50—50 with conservatives and liberals. there's a very narrow window of time for a president biden to appoint and hopefully get confirmed his nominee to replace justice hopefully get confirmed his nominee to replacejustice breyer. if the democrats were to lose this, which is a possibility, it is possible that the republicans would block any nominee that president biden would make, similarto nominee that president biden would make, similar to what republicans did in the final days of president obama's presidential term when he nominated judge merrick garland and the republicans blocked that. that's part of the consideration, not
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something the supreme court is talking about. not something that i expectjustice breyer will talk about, but this timing indicates thatis about, but this timing indicates that is part of the consideration. i know you've alluded to this, but lots of people have been following theissue lots of people have been following the issue of abortion rights in the us and the fact the supreme court is now very much involved with that. will that be resolved one way or another before a change of staff in the court? i another before a change of staff in the court? , ,., ~ the court? i believe so. i think one ofthe the court? i believe so. i think one of the reasons _ the court? i believe so. i think one of the reasons why _ the court? i believe so. i think one of the reasons why justice - the court? i believe so. i think one of the reasons why justice breyer i of the reasons whyjustice breyer decide to stay on, this is my guess, the court decided to take up this usually critical issue of abortion rights and having spent 28 years on the court, he offered more capability perhaps then a brand—new justice and as the leader of the liberal court. but that decision, the court has art he heard an argument that could overturn roe v
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wade after a9 years. that will likely come out injune at the end of the term, but we understand that justice breyer plans to stay on, so he will stay on through that decision. ., he will stay on through that decision-— he will stay on through that decision. ., . ~' , ., , decision. katie, thank you very much. if decision. katie, thank you very much- if you — decision. katie, thank you very much. if you want _ decision. katie, thank you very much. if you want to _ decision. katie, thank you very much. if you want to read - decision. katie, thank you very | much. if you want to read katie decision. katie, thank you very - much. if you want to read katie and her colleagues, you can do so at scotusblog. stay with us on outside source because still to come... we're going to talk about some leaked for office e—mails by a whistle—blower which appears to show borisjohnson did approve the evacuation of pin farthing and his animals from afghanistan. storm anna has killed almost a6 people with up to 50 being injured. here's more from stephanie prentiss. this is now home for these families
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in the madagascar capital. a crowded emergency accommodation site with no infrastructure or privacy, and few resources. translation: the reason we are staying here is part of our house has collapsed. we asked for help. we can't live at home because it's flooded. if we leave here, we have nowhere to go. translation: we had to leave because all the mattresses are wet and the baby got sick. mattresses are wet and the baby got sick we _ mattresses are wet and the baby got sick. we had no house and we had to come _ sick. we had no house and we had to come here _ sick. we had no house and we had to come here-— come here. outside the flooding has claimed thousands _ come here. outside the flooding has claimed thousands of _ come here. outside the flooding has claimed thousands of homes - come here. outside the flooding has claimed thousands of homes and - claimed thousands of homes and rescue agencies are still working their way in boats through what was once farmland to evacuate those who are trapped. while some have lost everything they own in this storm, many others lost their lives. authorities are working on recovery as well as rescue, searching for bodies in the floodwaters. the cyclone which form to mainland
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africa, knocking out powerfor tens of thousands in mozambique and malawi. charcoal suddenly became like gold as homes and businesses were plunged into complete darkness overnight. translation: customer started two by two —— get carter— customer started two by two —— get carter coal~ — customer started two by two —— get carter coal. usually _ customer started two by two —— get carter coal. usually i _ customer started two by two —— get carter coal. usually i make - customer started two by two —— get carter coal. usually i make 300 - customer started two by two —— get carter coal. usually i make 300 perj carter coal. usually i make 300 per day -- _ carter coal. usually i make 300 per day -- charcoal~ _ carter coal. usually i make 300 per day —— charcoal. yesterday, - carter coal. usually i make 300 per day —— charcoal. yesterday, i- carter coal. usually i make 300 per day —— charcoal. yesterday, i madej day —— charcoal. yesterday, i made 10,000 _ day -- charcoal. yesterday, i made 10,000. ' . ., , ., , ., 10,000. officials in mozambique also re ”ortin 10,000. officials in mozambique also reporting some _ 10,000. officials in mozambique also reporting some people found - 10,000. officials in mozambique also reporting some people found dead i reporting some people found dead with official told still coming in and saying more than half1 million people have been impacted by the floodwaters. but despite attempts to get things back to normal, whether experts are forecasting another a—6 powerful cyclones between now and late march. stephanie prentiss, bbc news.
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we're here in the bbc news room. westminster waits for a report that could determine borisjohnson's you sir. he's been rejecting further calls to resign today. —— future. the us has told russia there could be no compromise on the issue of ukraine sovereignty. for his part, president putin is accusing western nations of aggressive expansion into what he considers russia's sphere of influence. he claims one of his key concerns is the expansion of nato, the military defence alliance of states. many countries in eastern europe became nato members after the fall of the soviet union. here's more from sarah rainsford. matches, needle, etc. medicals and bandages, medicine.
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yuri is getting ready for a war he hopes he never sees. he's packed an emergency bag to grab and go if russian bombs or troops reach kyiv, a basic survival kit for the worst possible scenario. what does it actually feel like to be doing this? it's unbelievable. so, i understand that i'm leaving now in 21st century. i'm amazed that i should do this, that i should pack this bag. but this is what i have to do to keep my family safe. yurii thinks the major escalation in ukraine's eight—year—long war with russia is unlikely. he just feels better being prepared for it. there's no sense of tension on the streets here. ukraine calls western talk of a major russian incursion alarmist, but the government's not ignoring the build—up of troops on its border. a few weeks ago, the authorities here actually released a map with all the bomb shelters.
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and just look at it, there's thousands of them. and just look at it — there's thousands of them. 5,000, in fact, all over the city. marking a map, though, is the easy bit. the door�*s locked. and this is one of the official bomb shelters, supposedly. so, either nobody here is expecting war to break out any minute now, or they're just not very well prepared for it. the metro might be a safer bet. deep below ground. if the air raid siren sounds, people will have 20 minutes to get down here. there's so much talk now outside ukraine about the possibility of the conflict escalating, of an imminent russian invasion, and it's quite weird being here inside kyiv itself and realising that people are just going about their ordinary lives. there's no sense of panic here at all. do you think it's possible that the conflict could actually reach kyiv? i don't know. i don't have any information about it, so i'm just living my best life right now and hoping that
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everything will be ok. did you make any kind of preparations or any emergency...? no, no, no. so, as western governments wrestle with moscow's ultimatums and demands, ukrainians — for now — are getting on with a life they've long lived in the shadow of russian threats and aggression. sarah rainsford, bbc news, kyiv. to another controversy hitting the british government. the question of whether boris johnson intervened to assist the evacuation of around 170 stray dogs and cats from afghanistan last summer. foreign office emails just released appear to suggest he did. the first email, from a foreign office official dated 25 august, lobbies for the rescue of a second animal charity. it says...
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a second email, sent between foreign office officials in the afternoon of the same day, repeats the point. this is important because when asked back in december whether he did intervene, borisjohnson said this. the select committee heard from an official who said the response to the situation was chaotic, and suggested that you yourself intervene to try and get the nowzad animals out and they got priority over some afghan people. did you intervene in that way?— intervene in that way? that's complete _ intervene in that way? that's complete nonsense. - intervene in that way? that's complete nonsense. the i intervene in that way? that's. complete nonsense. the story intervene in that way? that's i complete nonsense. the story dates back to august. kabul in the final stages of its takeover of afghanistan. that led to chaotic scenes like these at kabul airport. thousands tried to flee afghanistan as the taliban advanced. pen farthing was also trying to get out. he's the founder of the charity nowzad, which ran an animal
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shelter in afghanistan. he campaigned for his staff and theirfamilies, as well as 1a0 dogs and 60 cats, to be evacuated. on the 23rd of august, farthing announced the uk government had pen farthing's 68 staff did later leave afghanistan. the whole saga was controversial. many afghans who worked with the government and theirfamilies never managed to leave afghanistan, and some believed they should have been prioritised over the animals. then, in december, this happened. this whistle—blower in the british government said the foreign office's handling of the evacuation of kabul was dysfunctional, chaotic and arbitrary. raphael marshall had worked in london on the uk's operation to get people out. he also wrote this about the animal evacuation. we've voiced his words. that led to boris being asked
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about his role in the evacuation, and his denial that we heard earlier. that same day, downing street had said... and earlier today, the defence secretary, ben wallace, said this. nothing to do with the prime minister, never has he got in touch with the _ minister, never has he got in touch with the claims that have been made in e-mails _ with the claims that have been made in e—mails from the forest hot —— for an— in e—mails from the forest hot —— for an office. _ in e—mails from the forest hot —— for an office, who are not responsible, i don't know or they come _ responsible, i don't know or they come from —— foreign office. they certainly— come from —— foreign office. they certainly don't show the reality. if you cast your mind back to august when the television was on the advance, there was a law of controversy the fact that animals were airlifted out of kabul with the authorisation of the uk government.
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as you heard in that clip, the prime minister has always denied that he was involved. you heard the defence secretary saying that he still denying that that's the case, but this e—mail which is from a member of staff in the foreign office, for lord goldsmith, saying the prime minister had given the go—ahead. it creates another difficult question for the prime minister. we are getting some breaking news from the us. we understand prince andrew is demanding a jury trial as he seeks to defend a civil lawsuit by the virginia giuffre. that's according to the legal document. giuffre is suing the do duke of york, saying she was trafficked and forced to have sex with prince andrew when she was 17. in an 11 page document, sets out the series of offences, including the claims should be defence because virginia
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giuffre is a resident of australia. they argued her claims to be dispensed because of a previous agreement. between giuffre and jeffrey epstein. sir eltonjohn said he's massively disappointed to cancel two concerts in texas after testing positive for covid. the singer reassured fans on instagram that he was fully vaccinated and boosted and only suffering mild symptoms. dan singerfrom dallas morning news told us more. this is one of the most anticipated concerts of this year on our calendar. it's also one that was originally announced for 2020, so his fans have been waiting quite a long time. it looks like it's going to be longer now. some of the public frustration stems from the fact that the region scheduled date aren't announced immediately, but they really have their hands tied because when they have to make a split second decision, there's no time to be scheduled. one of the global
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concert industry, it was with the expectation that cases were calming down and things would be able to proceed. but with the omicron wave, it hasn't been like that. these concert promoters are committed to still doing shows, but what we've seen is that the postponements and delays and cancellations will be a persistent issue as long as the shows are happening in this pandemic. 2s. shows are happening in this pandemic-— shows are happening in this andemic. �* w' shows are happening in this andemic. �* w , ., shows are happening in this andemic. �* pandemic. a quick reminder, you can find more reports _ pandemic. a quick reminder, you can find more reports from _ pandemic. a quick reminder, you can find more reports from the _ pandemic. a quick reminder, you can find more reports from the bbc i pandemic. a quick reminder, you can find more reports from the bbc in i find more reports from the bbc in the uk, you can find it in our news category of iplayer wherever you are. you can listen to our audio versions via the bbc sound app, also via a smart speaker. most of our bdc �*s via a smart speaker. most of our bdc is __ via a smart speaker. most of our bdc �*s —— videos are on the bbc website. just a quick reminder that it's been another dramatic day in westminster. borisjohnson has another dramatic day in westminster. boris johnson has faced another dramatic day in westminster. borisjohnson has faced a feverish house of commons during prime minister's questions as the country continues to wait for the publication of those reports on the
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lockdown parties in number ten, and keir starmer called on the prime minister to keir starmer called on the prime ministerto resign. he keir starmer called on the prime minister to resign. he declined to do so, and as you imagine, things remain feverish as mrjohnson says wait for the report, and the labour party says already, it is unacceptable that the prime minister has been saying, look at this report and also saying, look, there's a police investigation as well. that will, he says, draw a line. as for when sue gray's report will be published, i know everyone has been asking this, but i'm afraid we still do not know. today, the prime minister was asked by the opposition, will he publish the report in full. he has promised to do so, and mrjohnson said yes. if you want even more background, you can do that through the bbc website. bbc .com/ news. you can download the 3pp bbc .com/ news. you can download the app and get the same information
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there. thanks for watching. we'll see you soon. good evening. it might of felt like a long time coming but most of us did see some glimpses of sunshine on wednesday. this was the picture in nottinghamshire. —— might have felt. we've had quite a breeze to help to break up that cloud. it's going to be staying quite windy through the evening and tonight across northern parts of scotland. some wind and rain moving in from the north through this evening and through tonight. further south most places say a bit more settled, we've got high—pressure to the south of the uk and this weather front here just slowly slipping its way south, was quite a few isobars on the map and it's going to be particularly windy through tonight across the north of scotland for the likes of cape for the likes of caithness further south, we've got this weather front just sinking it's way south through the early hours of thursday
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through central parts of england and wales. for most of us there is enough cloud and enough of a breeze to keep things frost free, could be just a touch of frost across parts of scotland, perhaps in the far south of england. heading through into thursday morning we've got this weather front initially, just drapped across central england and south wales with that that will bring a zone of cloudy skies with patchy rain in the far south. also very windy to start the day across the north of scotland but these winds slowly ease. showers moving in on this northwesterly breeze across northern and western parts of scotland further south and east most places looking drier and after the cloud clears away from the south, should be some sunshine for most. temperatures ten to 13 degrees for most of us, colder across the north of scotland. moving through thursday evening and overnight into friday high pressure still with us. we've got the next front approaching from the northwest into friday that could bring some rain initially to the northwest of scotland, perhaps a few splashes of light rain across other northern and western areas. for central and eastern england you're likely to
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keep the sunny spells through the day on friday. breezy, particularly the further north and west you are but milder temperatures, ten or 11 degrees of scotland and northern ireland, england and wales eight to 10 degrees. heading on towards the weekend and high pressure not far away, sitting to south or southwest of the uk. we got this weather front approaching again from the northwest. i think, through the course of the weekend, plenty of dry and settled weather around. mild on saturday but certainly breezy. the weather front bringing cold the day on sunday with some outbreaks of rain, especially across the north and the northwest. bye for now.
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this is bbc news. i'm james reynolds. the headlines at 8pm — westminster waits for the report that could determine the prime minister's future as he rejects calls for him to resign. the ministerial code says that ministers who knowingly mislead parliament will be expected to offer their resignation. does the prime minister believe that applies to him? mr speaker, of course, but let me tell the house that i think he's inviting a question about an investigation which, as you know, mr speaker, i can't comment. the duke of york has demanded a jury trial as he seeks to defend a sexual assault case according to a legal document filed in the us tonight. press enter has consistently denied
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the claims made against him.

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