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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  January 26, 2022 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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as westminster awaits the report of a senior civil servant into lockdown parties in government, borisjohnson faced mps in a rowdy house of commons. as questions about whether covid rules were breached continue to dominate, the labour leader again called on the prime minister to step down. the ministerial code says that ministers who knowingly mislead parliament will be expected to offer their resignation. does the prime minister believe that applies to him? prime minister. mr speaker, of course, but let me tell the house that i think he is inviting a question about an investigation which, as you know, mr speaker, i can't comment. the report by sue gray is said to be complete and its publication is expected soon. we'll have all the latest from westminster. also this lunchtime. new figures on covid reinfection.
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two—thirds of people recently infected say they've had it before. as russia maintains its huge military presence on its borders with ukraine, talks take place in paris to try to defuse tensions. and we have a special report on siblings separated by the care system. and coming up on the bbc news channel. british pair alfie hewett and gordon reid claim a record breaking ninth consecutive grand slam title with victory in the australian open wheelchair doubles. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the prime minister borisjohnson has told mps he would not comment on an imminent report into lockdown parties in government during
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a raucous prime minister's questions in the commons this lunchtime. the labour leader sir keir starmer said the conservatives had done immense damage to public trust, and called again on mr johnson to resign. the official report by the senior civil servant sue gray is now complete, although it hasn't yet been handed to number ten. it is expected to be released soon although it's not clear whether it will be published in full. the metropolitan police have also announced their own investigation into potential government breaches of the law, heaping yet more pressure on the prime minister. here's our political correspondentjonathan blake. westminster is waiting. the prime minister left downing street this morning with his fate hanging in the balance. expectations could not be higher as he arrived at the house of commons to face prime minister's questions. but for now, the question is the answer is sounded like more of the same. the is the answer is sounded like more of the same-—
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of the same. the ministerial code sa s that of the same. the ministerial code says that ministers _ of the same. the ministerial code says that ministers who _ of the same. the ministerial code | says that ministers who knowingly mislead parliament will be expected to offer their resignation. does the prime minister believe that applies to him? ~ , ~ ,,, ., ~ to him? prime minister. mr speaker, of course, to him? prime minister. mr speaker, of course. but _ to him? prime minister. mr speaker, of course, but let _ to him? prime minister. mr speaker, of course, but let me _ to him? prime minister. mr speaker, of course, but let me tell— to him? prime minister. mr speaker, of course, but let me tell the - to him? prime minister. mr speaker, of course, but let me tell the house | of course, but let me tell the house i think_ of course, but let me tell the house i think he's— of course, but let me tell the house i think he's inviting a question about— i think he's inviting a question about an _ i think he's inviting a question about an investigation which as you know, _ about an investigation which as you know. mr_ about an investigation which as you know, mr speaker, ican't about an investigation which as you know, mr speaker, i can't comment. boris _ know, mr speaker, i can't comment. borisjohnson was know, mr speaker, i can't comment. boris johnson was challenged to make borisjohnson was challenged to make public the results of the enquiry into events that may have broken covid rules. flan into events that may have broken covid rules-_ into events that may have broken covid rules. . ~ , covid rules. can the prime minister confirmed he _ covid rules. can the prime minister confirmed he will _ covid rules. can the prime minister confirmed he will publish _ covid rules. can the prime minister confirmed he will publish the - covid rules. can the prime minister confirmed he will publish the full . confirmed he will publish the full sue gray report as he receives it? mr speaker, i can tell him that we have _ mr speaker, i can tell him that we have got— mr speaker, i can tell him that we have got to — mr speaker, i can tell him that we have got to leave thought to the independent investigators, as he knows, _ independent investigators, as he knows, and then of course, when i receive _ knows, and then of course, when i receive it — knows, and then of course, when i receive it of — knows, and then of course, when i receive it of course i will do exactly _ receive it of course i will do exactly what i said.- receive it of course i will do exactly what i said. labour trying to aint a exactly what i said. labour trying to paint a picture _ exactly what i said. labour trying to paint a picture of _ exactly what i said. labour trying to paint a picture of a _ exactly what i said. labour trying to paint a picture of a prime - to paint a picture of a prime minister on borrowed time. whatever he sa s in minister on borrowed time. whatever he says in his — minister on borrowed time. whatever he says in his statement _ minister on borrowed time. whatever he says in his statement later- he says in his statement later today or tomorrow won't change the facts, isn't this a prime minister and the
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government that have showed nothing but contempt for the decency, honesty and respect that define this country? honesty and respect that define this count ? �* ., , honesty and respect that define this count ? honesty and respect that define this count ., country? boris johnson was defiant, soundin: country? boris johnson was defiant, sounding intent _ country? boris johnson was defiant, sounding intent on _ country? boris johnson was defiant, sounding intent on staying - country? boris johnson was defiant, sounding intent on staying put. - country? boris johnson was defiant, sounding intent on staying put. we | sounding intent on staying put. we have taken the tough decisions. we have taken the tough decisions. we have got— have taken the tough decisions. we have got the big calls right, and i am getting on with the job. sifter am getting on with the 'ob. after the first accusations _ am getting on with the job. he the first accusations emerged of a christmas party during the first covid knock—down, the denialfrom borisjohnson was covid knock—down, the denialfrom boris johnson was firm. what covid knock-down, the denial from boris johnson was firm.— boris johnson was firm. what i can tell the right _ boris johnson was firm. what i can tell the right honourable - boris johnson was firm. what i can i tell the right honourable gentleman is that_ tell the right honourable gentleman is that all— tell the right honourable gentleman is that all guidance was followed completely during number ten. from then on it emerged _ completely during number ten. from then on it emerged in _ completely during number ten. from then on it emerged in may _ completely during number ten. fr'rrrn then on it emerged in may 2020 around 100 staff were invited to drinks in the downing street garden. the prime minister said he thought was a work event. the following month, staff gathered in the cabinet room of number ten to celebrate boris johnson's room of number ten to celebrate borisjohnson�*s birthday room of number ten to celebrate boris johnson's birthday with cake and picnic food when social gatherings where band and in april last year, the night before the queen sat alone at prince philip
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funeral, two leaving parties were held at number ten. the prime minister is a senior adviser turned theatre critic dominic cummings has given his account in writing to the sue gray enquiry. for those still working on number ten, the scrutiny has been intense. the consequence is uncertain. the weight won't last much longerfor uncertain. the weight won't last much longer for what's been uncertain. the weight won't last much longerfor what's been promised as a definitive version of events. jonathan blake, bbc news. live now to our political correspondent iain watson. everyone is waiting for this report from sue gray. any idea when it is likely to be published? 1 from sue gray. any idea when it is likely to be published?— likely to be published? i can't tell ou that likely to be published? i can't tell you that at _ likely to be published? i can't tell you that at the _ likely to be published? i can't tell you that at the moment - likely to be published? i can't tell you that at the moment but - likely to be published? i can't tell you that at the moment but what| likely to be published? i can't tell| you that at the moment but what i can tell you, though, is downing street have confirmed they haven't yet got this report, so a lot of anticipation here at westminster but they haven't received the report. if i tell you what they intend to do when they get the report, it will be published a short time before boris johnson comes to the house of
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commons to make a statement on the contents of that report and how he is going to be reacting to that report. that means we, along with the opposition, will see that before the opposition, will see that before the prime minister stands up to allay concerns opposition mps would be bounced, but they given a guarantee. we had keir starmer pushing for the report to be published in full and downing street are saying this lunchtime it's their intention to publish the report in the form in which they are giving it by sue gray of the senior civil servant, who's been conducting the enquiry, but they are giving themselves wiggle room and saying they also want reassurance that nothing in it will cut across the police investigations too. that question isn't yet decisively answered. borisjohnson of course, at pmqs, will make it clear he's getting on with the job, a very defiant tone, but is it possibly can devote himself 100% of that task because at pmqs it emerged that some of the details of this operation
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going on to try to keep them in this job amongst his own mps, a former minister standing up saying a long—awaited meeting you wanted with the prime minister on an issue close to his heart was granted only yesterday and i can tell you the prime minister saw at least five of colleagues face—to—face yes they do try to persuade them to stay onside. there is a lot of cheers in the chamber today for the prime minister from his own side but that's largely because they don't want to give an end to the opposition and not necessarily means they will be cheering when that report comes out. many people will be familiar with the famous play waiting for godot which combines tragedy, comedy and tedium and today we are for gray. many thanks. two—thirds of people recently infected with the 0micron variant of coronavirus say they've had covid before, according to research. the findings come from the react—1 study which also found that earlier this month, one in 23 people in england would have tested positive. that's the highest
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rate ever recorded. here's our health correspondent, anna collinson. unprecedented amounts of covid, that's a scientist behind one of england's largest infection studies have described the start of 2022. with the delta variant all but wiped out by the more transmissible omicron. the react study collected more than 100,000 swabs from volunteers during the first weeks in january. its findings suggest around one in 23 people in england would have tested positive for covid, the highest rate ever recorded. researchers also found around two in three people, 65%, who had recently been infected with covid, had also reported a past infection. further work is needed to understand how many of these cases where true reinfection is, but it sought certain groups like key workers and parents are more at risk. timer;r certain groups like key workers and parents are more at risk.— parents are more at risk. they are more likely _ parents are more at risk. they are more likely to _ parents are more at risk. they are more likely to be _ parents are more at risk. they are more likely to be the _ parents are more at risk. they are more likely to be the types - parents are more at risk. they are more likely to be the types of -
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more likely to be the types of people who are meeting other people and who might get infected. for example, people who live in large households are coming into contact with more people at home and certainly we see the people from large households do have a higher infection rate.— infection rate. while adult infection _ infection rate. while adult infection rates _ infection rate. while adult infection rates have - infection rate. while adult infection rates have been | infection rate. while adult - infection rates have been falling, having pupils back in the classroom after the christmas break may explain the rise amongst children. prevalence in the north—east are said to be particularly high. the situation in _ said to be particularly high. tue: situation in school said to be particularly high. tte: situation in school at said to be particularly high. t"t2 situation in school at the said to be particularly high. tt2 situation in school at the moment said to be particularly high. t“t2 situation in school at the moment is a nightmare. we've got more staff testing positive every week and i'm dreading tonight because we tested twice a week and we are expecting more staff to go down with it tonight. we've got children off across the school, i think in the high 20s now, children who tested positive, but on top of that, we've got staff of children testing positive so they are trying to juggle positive so they are trying to juggle childcare with their partners. it's very difficult. high levels of covid _ partners. it's very difficult. high levels of covid among _ partners. it's very difficult. high levels of covid among children can then be passed on to adults
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including the hundreds of thousands of people who are at higher risk of serious illness. it's thought about what happened to tom, who has primal immuno deficiency and required hospital treatment after catching covid despite isolating. plan b measures are being dropped in england from tomorrow but health advice for people like tom remains. while he understands people need for normality he's anxious. t while he understands people need for normality he's anxious.— normality he's anxious. i think it's a massive — normality he's anxious. i think it's a massive step — normality he's anxious. i think it's a massive step and _ normality he's anxious. i think it's a massive step and i _ normality he's anxious. i think it's a massive step and i think- normality he's anxious. i think it'sl a massive step and i think arguably things— a massive step and i think arguably things could be slowed down to protect — things could be slowed down to protect people like myself with a vaccine _ protect people like myself with a vaccine hasn't given us a response. so vaccine hasn't given us a response. 50 from _ vaccine hasn't given us a response. so from tomorrow, face coverings will not be compulsory, what will be a message to people watching about whether they should wear them or not? ., whether they should wear them or not? . ., , ~ whether they should wear them or not? . ., ,~' ., ._ whether they should wear them or not? . . ., , . not? putting a mask on may restrict ou for not? putting a mask on may restrict you for the — not? putting a mask on may restrict you for the one _ not? putting a mask on may restrict you for the one minute _ not? putting a mask on may restrict you for the one minute you - not? putting a mask on may restrict you for the one minute you are - not? putting a mask on may restrict you for the one minute you are in i you for the one minute you are in the short. — you for the one minute you are in the shop, two minutes you do your grocery— the shop, two minutes you do your grocery shopping, but actually, it will make — grocery shopping, but actually, it will make the individual feel better, _ will make the individual feel better, it will allow them to live more _ better, it will allow them to live more than — better, it will allow them to live more than normal life, and will definitely— more than normal life, and will definitely reduce their anxieties are just — definitely reduce their anxieties are just awareness of others would be amazing.
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anna collinson, bbc news. northern ireland eased more of its covid restrictions today, mainly in the hospitality industry. nightclubs can re—open and indoor standing events such as concerts can take place. the stormont executive is continuing to recommend that people work from home where they can. live now to our ireland correspondent, chris page, who's in belfast. chris, more freedom for people from today? chris, more freedom for people from toda ? , ., �* , chris, more freedom for people from toda ? , . �* , , chris, more freedom for people from toda? , , today? yes, that's right. this does feel like another _ today? yes, that's right. this does feel like another one _ today? yes, that's right. this does feel like another one of _ today? yes, that's right. this does feel like another one of those - today? yes, that's right. this does feel like another one of those days where there is a shift back towards pre—macro—covid life but political leaders and their scientific advisers also follows been stressing the virus is still very much here. so people should still very much exercise a degree of caution. most checks for so—called vaccine passports have stopped. almost all hospitality businesses had to ask customers for either proof of
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vaccination, negative test result is proof they'd had the coronavirus within the last six months or so, but bars, restaurants and cinemas no longer have to go through that process. you will still be asked, though, for your proof of covid stages if you're going out clubbing. this evening, night clubs will be open, i have been closed since christmas, another change is that events with indoor standing audiences, such as concerts, they have been banned for a few weeks, but they are allowed to go ahead again as of today. there are also a few changes to rules for the workplace. for example, the legal requirement for offices to operate to meet a social distancing if they can at all, that has been lifted and employers not to carry out a risk assessment instead. people are being asked to work from home where they can, but also people are being asked to continue taking regular lateral flow tests particularly if they are going out and about either for work
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orfor their social going out and about either for work or for their social life to meet people. ministers in that government at stormont are clear northern ireland is past the worst of the omicron wave, hospital admissions are falling, case numbers though do remain high, and the remaining restrictions will be reviewed on the 10th of february when ministers in the five parties in the power—sharing executive will consider what's left including matters such as face coverings. maw; matters such as face coverings. many thanks. ukraine's foreign minister has played down concerns that a russian invasion might be imminent. dmytro kuleba said moscow had not yet massed enough forces for an invasion, but he acknowledged that the risks were high. talks are taking place in paris between france, germany, russia and ukraine to try to defuse the situation. here, the foreign secretary, liz truss, said the government would not rule out imposing personal sanctions against vladimir putin if russia were to invade ukraine. here's our diplomatic correspondent, caroline hawley.
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new russian military manoeuvres amid escalating tensions. this is western russia close to ukraine. moscow now has around 100,000 troops massed on the borders of the former soviet republic with more still arriving. the ukrainian government says russia's aim is to sow panic. tt russia's aim is to sow panic. tit poses russia's aim is to sow panic. tt poses a threat to ukraine, a direct threat to ukraine, however, at the moment, as we speak, this number is insufficient for the full—scale offensive against ukraine along the entire ukrainian border. 5titt. offensive against ukraine along the entire ukrainian border.— entire ukrainian border. still, as the russian _ entire ukrainian border. still, as the russian build-up— entire ukrainian border. still, as the russian build-up continues, | entire ukrainian border. still, as i the russian build-up continues, an the russian build—up continues, an arm is growing in western capitals. fears of what could be the most serious concentration in the region since the cold war. these fighter jets are heading to belarus. western warnings to russia, threats of
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punishment, are getting louder. there would be severe economic costs to russia if they were to stage an incursion into ukraine. we are also helping ukraine with the supply of defensive weapons and we are strengthening our support to nato, as well. , , ., strengthening our support to nato, as well. ,, . . . , strengthening our support to nato, aswell. ,, . . ., , �*, as well. russia claims it's the worst that — as well. russia claims it's the worst that escalating - as well. russia claims it's the worst that escalating the - as well. russia claims it's the i worst that escalating the crisis. the us and its allies have abandoned diplomatic— the us and its allies have abandoned diplomatic rules and have been seeking — diplomatic rules and have been seeking to undermine our country with unilateral sanctions as well as increasing — with unilateral sanctions as well as increasing military pressure on russia — increasing military pressure on russia with manoeuvres along the russian _ russia with manoeuvres along the russian borders. they are trying to draw— russian borders. they are trying to draw tears — russian borders. they are trying to draw tears into making provocations against _ draw tears into making provocations against russia. draw tears into making provocations against russia-— against russia. near the capital k iv, against russia. near the capital kyiv, ukrainians _ against russia. near the capital kyiv, ukrainians prepare - against russia. near the capital kyiv, ukrainians prepare for - against russia. near the capital kyiv, ukrainians prepare for the worst. the civilians are part of a countries defence plan, if russia does invade. it is normal life, this man works in the just expert every saturday he trains as a soldier. he has wanted to do this, he says, since russia's invasion in 2014 of
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crimea. now a new danger looms. t am crimea. now a new danger looms. i am read to crimea. now a new danger looms. i am ready to fight — crimea. now a new danger looms. i am ready to fight back. _ crimea. now a new danger looms. i am ready to fight back. i _ crimea. now a new danger looms. t —n ready to fight back. i am confident the enemy will not reach kyiv. we ukrainians have always been good at self organisation. and we will be the first to support the ukrainian army. the first to support the ukrainian arm . , ., the first to support the ukrainian arm . , . , army. they have said they will defend their _ army. they have said they will defend their capital _ army. they have said they will defend their capital street - defend their capital street by street if they have to do. if diplomacy to deter an invasion fails. caroline hawley, bbc news. our top story this lunchtime. borisjohnson faces mps in a rowdy house of commons as westminster awaits the report into lockdown parties in government. coming up: the little girl who disappeared in australia and was found by schoolboys. we reunite her with one of her rescuers more than 50 years on. coming up on the bbc news channel. a blow for england ahead of the six nations. captain 0wen farrell will miss the entire tournament with an ankle injury that requires surgery.
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siblings separated by the care system have told the bbc of the trauma of not seeing each other — in some cases for years. details from over 200 local authorities have revealed that around half of sibling groups in care are currently split up. the law says brothers and sisters should be placed together and, where this is not possible, contact should be prioritised when it's right for each child. the children's commissioner for england has told the bbc she would support a new law to keep siblings together. 0ur reporter ashleyjohn—baptiste grew up in care, and recently discovered he had a sibling he never knew about. he explores what it means to those who have been in the care system. how are you feeling about meeting your brothers? excited. yeah? yeah. for children growing up in care, their brothers and sisters can often be the only family left, but across the uk, thousands of them
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are currently split up. in fife, in scotland, someone trying to reunite them is veteran foster carer karen morrison. 0urfamily are foster carers and it didn't take long for us to realise, you know, that these children are going into the care system and they're not going to the same place together. in fact, they don't even know when they're going to see each other again. just imagine that trauma. it must be awful. siblings reunited is a charity providing a safe space for split—up groups in care to meet every few months. how excited have you guys been to meet today? ten out of ten. ten out of ten? 9,000. 9,000? for karen, it's not only about sibling relationships, but about creating better chances in life. we're not only making a difference now, but fast—forward to when they leave the care system, and imagine if they had each other.
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freedom of information requests sent to over 200 uk local authorities have revealed that more than 12,000 looked—after children are not living with at least one of their siblings. in manchester, 24—year—old saskia has recently become a social worker. in their adoptive home, saskia and her two brothers suffered physical abuse and neglect for a decade. when they went back into council care, they were separated across different areas. i lost such a key part of myself, i think, because it was, like, it's us three against the world, you know, it always has been. and so, being so far away from them, it's like, oh, i'm not as strong any more. sometimes, siblings is all you've got left, and if you take those away, you're taking the last thing away, like... the last bit of hope. yeah. yeah, yeah, the last bit of your identity.
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an independent review of the england care system is currently under way, with findings and recommendations expected to be published later this year. in scotland, new laws are giving siblings more control over their relationships. for these brothers, however, it's time to say bye for now. bye! ashleyjohn—baptiste, bbc news. you can watch split up in care: life without siblings on bbc iplayer. borisjohnson authorised animals under the care of the charity nowzad to be evacuated from afghanistan during the taliban takeover, according to written evidence produced by a former foreign office official. the prime minister has previously dismissed claims that he prioritised animals during the evacuation as "nonsense". live now to our political correspondent, nick eardley — just remind us of the events. and what does this evidence mean for
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the prime minister?— the prime minister? looking back to au:ust in the prime minister? looking back to august in last _ the prime minister? looking back to august in last year _ the prime minister? looking back to august in last year and _ the prime minister? looking back to august in last year and the - the prime minister? looking back to august in last year and the taliban l august in last year and the taliban was rapidly advancing on afghanistan and its capital. there was a lot of controversy over the decision to help with the evacuation of around 150 animals that belong to the nowzad charity. there was criticism from some but that had led to some people being left behind. there were accusations last year that boris johnson had personally authorised that decision. when the prime minister was asked about it at the time he denied it on tape and said it was complete nonsense. however to date we have e—mails published from a member of staff in the foreign office says specifically that the office says specifically that the prime minister had authorised the staff and animals to be evacuated. the latest from number ten is they do not think this contradicts what the prime minister said before and
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they are still adamant this was not a decision made by borisjohnson but made more broadly with all the different factors that had to be taken into account on the ground in kabul. i suspect this will lead to further questions for the prime minister in the coming days and further questions about the answer he has given to some really difficult questions in the last year. difficult questions in the last ear. . ~' difficult questions in the last ear. ., ~' difficult questions in the last ear. ., ~ us coast guard officials are searching for 39 people who are feared missing after their boat capsized off the coast of florida. officials were alerted after a man was found clinging to the hull of the vessel 45 miles off the coast of fort pierce. it's thought the boat may have been part of a human trafficking operation which set out from the bahamas on saturday. more than 87,000 people in the uk rely on british sign language to communicate. but it has no legal status
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and in large parts of the country people have problems accessing it in places like schools and hospitals. the labour mp rosie cooper and the strictly star rose ayling ellis are two of the people hoping to change that with a bill to be discussed in parliament this week. yvonne cobb, from the bbc�*s see hear programme, reports. for 35—year—old marius, who has been deaf since birth, everyday activities can be a challenge. hello! hold on... i'm deaf. please could you lower your mask? ok, here. let's have it here. when you go out to places such as cafes, do you struggle to communicate? yes, it's hard. if people have a mask, then i gesture or take things on my phone. but sometimes they just stare at me blankly. sometimes the other person will lower their mask, or use gestures to communicate. so really, it depends. but it can be frustrating.
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british sign language has been around for centuries, with one of the earliest records dating back to the 15th century. just like the english language, there are regional variations and dialects for words. for instance, there are 22 signs for the colour purple. it's estimated there are over 87,000 deaf people using british sign language in the uk. it is recognised as a language, but unlike welsh and gaelic, it has no legal status. deaf people such as strictly winner rose and campaigners in england are now calling for a change in the law. if i go to the doctor and there is no interpreter, it means i have to bring a family member with me. but i don't want that, i want privacy. 0k, can ijust say something crazy? i love crazy! # and its nothing like i've ever known before! #. why doesn't this country legally recognise bsl? it's our language. it feels wrong. it's not right. it should be accepted and not ignored. deaf people have been
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sidelined for a long time. but i feel like saying "no, we are here, so accept us." mp rosie cooper's parents are both deaf, so she grew up seeing first hand how they struggled. she has made suggestions for changes to the law that would see bsl declared as an official language of the united kingdom. the minister will say that she will organise a committee of deaf bsl users to report to the secretary of state, the boss, on what deaf people need each year. so you will be seeing what the government are doing, you will have recognition and you will have deaf voices to say, "that was rubbish, this is good." but with bsl interpreters costing an average £280 per day, will the bill be passed? the government has engaged with rosie cooper mp and is currently considering
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the private members bill. there are similar campaigns in wales and northern ireland, while scotland has already passed the bsl act back in 2015. we hope the whole of the uk will finally give bsl the legal recognition it deserves so that the deaf community can finally feel part of society. yvonne cobb, bbc news. sir eltonjohn says he's massively disappointed to have to postpone two of his concerts in texas, after testing positive for covid. the 74—year—old said he was fully vaccinated and boosted, and was experiencing only mild symptoms. he assured fans they would be contacted once new dates had been announced. earlier this month the bbc launched a new podcast series called "fairy meadow" about the disappearance of a little girl in australia. cheryl grimmer vanished from a beach near sydney more than 50 years ago. she was never seen again. while researching that story, our correspondentjon kay has uncovered the case of another girl,
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kathy wrethman, who went missing nearby at around the same time. but her story has a much happier ending. june 1968. and kathy wrethman was safe. the toddler had been missing for three days. but she was found, alone, in new south wales, almost 20 miles from home. now a grandma, this is the first time kathy has ever spoken publicly about what happened. the person that took me didn't hurt me. the only thing kathy could tell her parents was that there was a man. and the only clue, whoever took her from the family home, cut her hair. nobody was ever charged. i can only remember a dog. and a room, being in a room. someone coming in, opening this door, and saying "go to sleep". i do remember that. and the dog under my bed.
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it was a big dog. i think it was an alsatian. what is it like for you now, even now, not really knowing where you were and who you were with during those few days? it's mind—boggling. i came across kathy's story while i was making the bbc podcast series fairy meadow about the disappearance of cheryl grimmer in australia at around the same time. she was never found and the two cases have never been formally linked. of course i feel like the luckiest lady in the world. kathy was found wandering in a creek by some schoolboys who were skipping lessons. but she's never seen them since. what would you say to them? thank you. i mean, thank you wouldn't be enough, for saving your life. because what i've got now is my family, and i wouldn't be sitting here if it wasn't for them. i want to introduce you to somebody. who? who is that?
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this is mark. mark. oh, my god! how are you? long time, no see! this is mark. so mark byrne was one of those three boys who found you. we were wagging school. like, we weren't good boys at school! but we had a good outcome that day! thank you so much for wagging school! i can't believe it. this is a dream. i just wanted to thank you. oh, my god. thank you is not enough. i love you, and you are always going to be my hero. you're always going to be my hero. five decades on, at least one mystery has been solved. jon kay, bbc news. and you can listen to the latest episodes ofjon's podcast series
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"fairy meadow" on bbc sounds or wherever you get your podcasts. time for a look at the weather. here's sarah keith lucas. blue skies, i have forgotten what they look like! it has been cloudy with sunshine in short supply and this month some parts of the uk had much less sunshine than we would expect at this time of year but for other areas we had quite a lot of blue skies especially the east of england. more blue sky out there today especially towards the east and this is the picture in norfolk. glorious blue skies. not quite so clear and sunny for all of us. we have got more cloud across some parts of england and particularly done towards the channel islands but in general across much of england and were we are seeing brighter skies developing today. and also
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milderfor england and

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