Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 25, 2022 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

2:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm ben brown live in downing street, the headlines: the police say they will now investigate multiple events that took place in downing street during lockdown. i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years, in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. i welcome the met's decision to conduct its own investigation because i believe this will help to give the public the clarity it needs and help to draw a line under matters. sue gray's report will not be published while the met
2:01 pm
police investigate — so what do tory mps do next? we'll be getting analysis and reaction throughout the afternoon. i'm martine croxall — the other main news. foreign secretary liz truss says she will be visiting ukraine as tensions with russia grow there. she warns an invasion from russia would be a massive strategic mistake. the president of cameroon orders an inquiry into a deadly crush at a stadium hosting the africa cup of nations — at least eight people have been killed. and it took upto 300 people to rescue him — we'll hear from the man trapped in a welsh cave for sa hours. hello and welcome to bbc news live
2:02 pm
from downing street. the metropolitan police is investigating gatherings at number ten and across government, to see if breaches of covid restrictions took place. the commisioner of britain's biggest force, cressida dick, confirmed that her officers are now looking into potential rule—breaking, as a result of information provided by civil servants, who are also compiling a report on what happened. that report, by sue gray, won't now be published in full until the police have finished investigating. borisjohnson says he welcomes the investigation and believes it will �*help to draw a line under matters�*. our political corresspondent, jonathan blake, has the latest. ministers meeting in person this
2:03 pm
morning amid new claims about a birthday celebration for boris johnson during lockdown. as they gathered an already serious situation for the government will take another dramatic turn. police had said they would not investigate claims of parties in whitehall that the government —— unless a government enquiry found evidence of criminality, until now. $5 a government enquiry found evidence of criminality, until now.— criminality, until now. as a result firstl of criminality, until now. as a result firstly of information _ criminality, until now. as a result firstly of information provided - criminality, until now. as a result firstly of information provided by| firstly of information provided by the cabinet office enquiry team and secondly my officers' own assessment, i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years. in relation to potential breaches of covid regulations. the commissioner did not specify which events were under investigation but promised updates at significant points. as the news broke one minister came to boris
2:04 pm
johnson's defence. the broke one minister came to boris johnson's defence. the leadership of boris johnson _ johnson's defence. the leadership of boris johnson as _ johnson's defence. the leadership of boris johnson as has _ johnson's defence. the leadership of boris johnson as has had _ johnson's defence. the leadership of boris johnson as has had has - johnson's defence. the leadership of boris johnson as has had has been i johnson's defence. the leadership of| boris johnson as has had has been so borisjohnson as has had has been so brilliant that it has got us through this incredibly difficult period and got all the big decisions right. an got all the big decisions right. an event on the prime minister's a birthday injune 2020 is the latest to come to light, downing street admitted staff gathered in the cabinet room, how many is disputed but one person present set up to 30 were there including the interior designer needing refurbishment of the number ten flat. who we are told those present for around ten minutes, was given the cake. at the time social gatherings indoors were banned, laura oakley�*s father died weeks earlier. the banned, laura oakley's father died weeks earlier.— weeks earlier. the 19th ofjune would have _ weeks earlier. the 19th ofjune would have been _ weeks earlier. the 19th ofjune would have been his _ weeks earlier. the 19th ofjune would have been his 60th - weeks earlier. the 19th ofjune - would have been his 60th birthday and boris is having fun with his pals in government. it brings everything back, not being able to grieve because we are only allowed ten people at the funeral, we were not allowed to have a wake and just
2:05 pm
when you think you're getting over at the crest of the wave this kind of stuff comes up.— at the crest of the wave this kind of stuff comes up. boris johnson had a knowledge — of stuff comes up. boris johnson had a knowledge of— of stuff comes up. boris johnson had a knowledge of public— of stuff comes up. boris johnson had a knowledge of public anger - of stuff comes up. boris johnson had a knowledge of public anger but - of stuff comes up. boris johnson had a knowledge of public anger but it's. a knowledge of public anger but it's sounded upbeat today. i commissioned an independent — sounded upbeat today. i commissioned an independent enquiry _ sounded upbeat today. i commissioned an independent enquiry if— sounded upbeat today. i commissioned an independent enquiry if you - sounded upbeat today. i commissioned an independent enquiry if you weeks i an independent enquiry if you weeks ago —— a few weeks ago, that process has quite properly involves sharing information continuously with the metropolitan police so i welcome the met�*s a decision to conduct its own investigation because i believe this will give the public the clarity it needs and help draw a line under matters. ~ . , ., ., matters. whatever the investigation concludes his _ matters. whatever the investigation concludes his opponent _ matters. whatever the investigation concludes his opponent say - matters. whatever the investigation concludes his opponent say his - matters. whatever the investigation concludes his opponent say his timej concludes his opponent say his time is the app. concludes his opponent say his time isthea--. , concludes his opponent say his time istheau. concludes his opponent say his time isthea.._ concludes his opponent say his time istheau. ., is the app. boris johnson has now deuraded is the app. boris johnson has now degraded the _ is the app. boris johnson has now degraded the office _ is the app. boris johnson has now degraded the office of— is the app. boris johnson has now degraded the office of prime - degraded the office of prime minister, it is distracting everybody from the serious cost of living _ everybody from the serious cost of living and — everybody from the serious cost of living and other issues in the country— living and other issues in the country faces and disrespecting the sacrifices _ country faces and disrespecting the sacrifices everyone else has made. that is _ sacrifices everyone else has made. that is why — sacrifices everyone else has made. that is why he must go now. we got here because _ that is why he must go now. we got here because the _ that is why he must go now. we got here because the prime _ that is why he must go now. we got here because the prime minister - here because the prime minister
2:06 pm
cannot tell the truth, he has lied continually and be dishonest to parliament and to the british people. frankly, he has to go. you should resign. downing street says the prime minister does not believe he has broken the law. the question now, how does a police investigation affect attempts from some of his own mps to remove him? we update you on some lines from a downing street briefing. the prime minister doesn't believe he's broken any law and also saying anyone who is required to co—operate with the police would be expected to do so. downing street saying part of the soo great report that are not being the police could be released —— part of the report could be released possibly within a few days. saying those parts of an investigation that the police are not looking into it could be published. we also heard
2:07 pm
that the prime minister was told about the police investigation shortly before this morning's cabinet meeting but he chose not to tell the cabinet about it at that time. the metropolitan police had previously said it wouldn't usually investigate past complaints about lockdown breaches. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, explains why they have now begun an inquiry. for months, whitehall has been gripped by arguments around alleged parties and breaches of coronavirus regulations in downing street and its garden. the metropolitan police has said nothing except it was in touch with sue gray, who is leading the cabinet office investigation. but the head of the force cressida dick, speaking to the london assembly police and crime commissioner this morning, said while the met was generally reluctant to investigate breaches of regulations that took place months ago, three factors might change that. the three factors were and are there
2:08 pm
was evidence that those involved new or ought to have known that what they were doing was an offence, where not investigating would significantly undermine the law, and where there was little ambiguity around the absence of any reasonable defence. the met has been heavily criticised for not investigating earlier but has waited for the cabinet office to gather evidence first and has now decided it should actively investigate some of the alleged parties. but what about the officers who work in downing street every day? didn't they notice the events when they were happening? it sounds like there was a culture of lawbreaking parties, rather than a single one—off event. we have heard reports of suitcases of drink clanking through security. surely some officers were concerned about
2:09 pm
what they were seeing at the time? cressida dick would not comment on that today except to say that if it was relevant it would be included in the investigation. even two months into the first lockdown, police had still been actively patrolling public spaces, making sure nobody was mixing with people outside their household, so there remains a worry about double standards. there is no question, there is a huge level of public concern about this and no matter what the met had said it looks like one law for them and another for another. anyone found to have attended an illegal gathering in downing street during lockdown faces a fine. at the start of the pandemic they were £60, later rising to 100. daniel sandford, bbc news. let's speak to our political correspondent alex forsyth.
2:10 pm
alex, i suppose we don't know how long it will be, this a police investigation, when we will see the results, could be weeks or months, same with the sue gray report, where does all this leave the prime minister and those tory mps who are unhappy with his leadership? that minister and those tory mps who are unhappy with his leadership?- unhappy with his leadership? that is the key question _ unhappy with his leadership? that is the key question at _ unhappy with his leadership? that is the key question at this _ unhappy with his leadership? that is the key question at this point - the key question at this point because of course what dame cressida dick said this morning was significant in its own right, the metropolitan police are investigating potential breaches of covid rules in the heart of downing street and across whitehall but it is significant because there were lots of conservative mps who were waiting for the sue gray report before they decided the fate of the prime minister, whether or not there should be a vote of confidence in his leadership. as you say, because of that for this investigation we know parts at least of that sue gray report will be delayed, waiting for
2:11 pm
the police to finish that investigation first, we are told downing street says there are parts that could be published but do not cross over it with the police investigation but we don't know if they will and what they will involve and of course the more serious allegations would not be included. what is pretty clear is that even if we get some element of the sue gray report published in the next few days or so, that is a big if, it would be —— and won't that be the definitive point some mps thought they might be. some mps think the spy they might be. some mps think the spy minister some time because they will want to wait for the conclusions of the police report, others think this simply cannot carry on with an ongoing police investigation and a drip of reports which have been very damaging for the prime minister. i spoke to look at someone who thinks the prime minister should stay for now, sir edward leave. i personally believe when europe stands _ i personally believe when europe stands on — i personally believe when europe stands on the brink of war and nutrienl— stands on the brink of war and nutrient we need a sense of
2:12 pm
proportion. the papers this morning have been_ proportion. the papers this morning have been full of the prime minister was given— have been full of the prime minister was given on his birthday a piece of cake hy— was given on his birthday a piece of cake by his — was given on his birthday a piece of cake by his own staff in his own office — cake by his own staff in his own office to— cake by his own staff in his own office. to me, that is far less important _ office. to me, that is far less important than the cost of living crisis _ important than the cost of living crisis or— important than the cost of living crisis or ukraine. people will be angry about what they see as a late lubricant when they were being asked rules. —— what they see as a rule breaking. of —— what they see as a rule breaking. of course i understand the anger. they also have reasonable people, a sense _ they also have reasonable people, a sense of— they also have reasonable people, a sense of proportion and when we are in such— sense of proportion and when we are in such a _ sense of proportion and when we are in such a perilous situation i think they will— in such a perilous situation i think they will understand the prime minister— they will understand the prime minister has to stay, in the national— minister has to stay, in the national interest. this is not the time _ national interest. this is not the time to— national interest. this is not the time to change prime minister. the fact there is — time to change prime minister. tue: fact there is now time to change prime minister. tte: fact there is now a time to change prime minister. t"t2 fact there is now a police investigation, what do you think that says? investigation, what do you think that sa s? , ., . investigation, what do you think that sa s? ,., . ., investigation, what do you think that sa s? . ., , that says? the police have been asked to look _ that says? the police have been asked to look into _ that says? the police have been asked to look into this - that says? the police have been asked to look into this matter, i j asked to look into this matter, i cannot— asked to look into this matter, i
2:13 pm
cannot possibly comment on a police investigation. if they find there has been — investigation. if they find there has been conduct which brakes the law and _ has been conduct which brakes the law and of— has been conduct which brakes the law and of course action will be taken _ law and of course action will be taken but — law and of course action will be taken but what that result in i do not know — taken but what that result in i do not know. today, i fully support the prime _ not know. today, i fully support the prime minister and not know. today, i fully support the prime ministerand i not know. today, i fully support the prime minister and i think we need to have _ prime minister and i think we need to have a _ prime minister and i think we need to have a sense of proportion. do ou to have a sense of proportion. you get you to have a sense of proportion. drr you get you set —— the sense your colleagues are putting letters in? no. i think the mood has calmed down _ no. i think the mood has calmed down i— no. i think the mood has calmed down. i think the conservative party is rallying _ down. i think the conservative party is rallying around, particularly as the labour— is rallying around, particularly as the labour party for political properties wants to punch this bruise — properties wants to punch this bruise again and again. it bruise again and again. it is _ bruise again and again. it is worth saying there is that lots of anger and frustration with the leadership right across the conservative party. mps saying the police investigation means the prime minister should go sooner rather than later but that doesn't seem to be any immediate consensus about what comes next. we gather the prime minister was told about this police investigation
2:14 pm
by the met just told about this police investigation by the metjust before the cabinet meeting in downing street this morning but he chose not to discuss it or tell the cabinet about it. he said he welcomes the police decision to investigate but at the same time it must have been a body blow politically to him.— politically to him. that's right, cabinet was — politically to him. that's right, cabinet was meeting _ politically to him. that's right, cabinet was meeting for - politically to him. that's right, cabinet was meeting for the i politically to him. that's right, l cabinet was meeting for the first in—person cabinet since the extra covid restrictions, members gathered in downing street, always at the same time dame cressida dick period before the london assembly to make her statement about the police investigation and we understand borisjohnson was told in advance and he did not rate it during that meeting and after that cabinet meeting and after that cabinet meeting jacob rees—mogg came out and gave a full throated defence of the prime minister but that had not been discussed during the cabinet meeting. downing street is saying the pipe minister does not believe he has broken the law and —— does
2:15 pm
not believe the prime minister has broken the law. let's not get away from the fact that there is still a lot of public anger at what has happened with these parties in downing street and whitehall and that is now a police investigation into those parties so whatever the politics of it, you cannot get away from those basics. thank you very much. the prime minister said he welcomes the metropolitan police a's decision to investigate the events in downing street and he says he hopes it will help give the public clarity and it will draw a line on the matters and something else we now know is who exactly will be doing the investigation, deputy assistant commissionerjane connors, the lead on covid. we could think perhaps now
2:16 pm
two people have the prime minister's future in their hands, two women, sue gray, the civil servant, and jane connors for the metropolitan police. that still it is from downing street for now but much more from me throughout the afternoon. back now to the studio. the headlines on bbc news... the police say they will now investigate multiple events that took place in downing street during lockdown. foreign secretary liz truss says she will be visiting ukraine — it's as tensions with russia grow there — she warns an invasion from russia would be a massive strategic mistake. and it took up to 300 people to rescue him — we'll hear from the man trapped in a welsh cave for sa hours... the kremlin has said it's greatly concerned by washington's
2:17 pm
decision to put thousands of us troops on alert because of fears of russian aggression against ukraine — accusing the united states of "whipping up tensions." it comes after the prime minister, president biden and other nato leaders met via video link to talk about how to stop russia invading ukraine. tension in the region has been building — with around 100,000 russian troops gathered near ukraine's borders. president putin has publicly stated his belief that russia and ukraine are one people. he claims one of his key concerns is the expansion of nato — that's the military alliance of european and north american countries. many nations in eastern europe became members after the break—up of the soviet union. the russian president's demand that ukraine will never be allowed tojoin nato has been rejected. our world affairs correspondent, caroline hawley reports. the might of the russian army on display and its ally belarus, ukraine's northern neighbour.
2:18 pm
joint military exercises are planned for next month as moscow also builds up troops on ukraine's eastern border. some 100,000 soldiers in all,with growing fears of a russian invasion, another war in europe. together with our allies we are standing up to russian aggression. the foreign secretary has just announced she will visit ukraine next week. a further military incursion by russia into ukraine would be a massive strategic mistake and come with a severe cost on russia's economy, including coordinated sanctions. this is a danish frigate on its way to the baltic sea. joe biden says western leaders are unanimous about how to respond, he has placed 8500 american troops on alert to deploy at short notice to europe if they need to. the west also threatens an unprecedented range of sanctions
2:19 pm
if president putin indeed gives orders to invade. a sovereign and independent ukraine is a direct affront to his ambitions to restore russia as a great power, given the nature of his demands, given he has rejected the only reasonable compromise, it is hard for me to see how he can avoid having to follow through to some extent. in the ukrainian capital kyiv there is a wary, uncertain calm, some quietly calculating what they will do, how they will keep their family safe. moscow insists it has no such plans and has accused the americans of whipping up tensions by touching troops on alert, but it has also made clear that diplomacy is not yet dead, leaving a glimmer of hope that a new conflict could still be averted. caroline hawley, bbc news. borisjohnson made a statement in the commons in the last hour. and every contact with russia at the
2:20 pm
uk and our allies stressed unity and adherence to the vital point of principle. we cannot bargain away the vision of a europe whole and free that emerged in those amazing years from 1989 to 1991, healing the division of our content by the iron curtain. we will not reopen that divide by agreeing to overturn the european security order because russia has placed the gun to ukraine's head. nor can we accept the doctrine implicit in russian is that all states are sovereign but some are more than others. royal mail plans to cut around 700 managementjobs. the company says the move will deliver annual savings
2:21 pm
of around £40 million. a royal mail spokesperson says it's currently discussing the changes with trade unions representing its staff. three children and two adults have been taken to hospital after a double—decker bus hit a shop in north—east london. police said it happened at around 20 past eight this morning. labour mayor of london sadiq khan said his thoughts were with those affected by the "terrible incident". the caver trapped in the brecon beacons in what became britain's longest cave rescue has been reunited with the volunteers that saved his life. george linnane broke his leg, jaw and ribs in a fall underground and was stuck there for sa hours before 300 caving volunteers from all over the uk worked together to rescue him. george is now training to join a rescue team, as hywel griffith reports. did you think that you might not survive? honestly? yes, at times. i sort of flipped between two states. there was the, "i'm going to fight this thing and i'm going to survive" state, which then became, "i really don't care, and i wish you'd stop talking to me." back in november, george found himself at the centre of britain's
2:22 pm
longest ever cave rescue. he'd been here in the brecon beacons dozens of times. but on that day, deep underground, his life changed in a split second. the first thing i knew about it was this... ..instantaneous feeling of legs whirling around in mid—air and arms grabbing for something and just this kind of feeling that, you know, one second i was caving, the next minute the world went mad. and then it all went black. and then two minutes later, i kind of woke up in a very different state to... to when i'd started. his friend went to raise the alarm. george had broken his leg, his jaw, several ribs and was bleeding. after three hours, the first rescuers arrived. i remember hearing the voices in the distance and realising that this time they weren't in my head. they were actually real people that were coming. i remember those first aiders turning up. i've basically lost somewhere between 12 and 18 hours, probably towards the 18 hour end.
2:23 pm
so there's bits of rescue that i don't remember. are you all right? how are you doing? nice to see you. i know who you are! to help george piece together what happened, we reunited him with some of the 300 volunteers from around britain who stopped what they were doing to answer the call. it's in human nature, isn't it? and, erm, we've all been in those remote situations, and we know that if something happened to us, our colleagues would come and get us. and part of that is to do the reverse and do whatever is necessary, and everybody brought their a—game. so we've got rope set up 30 metres. despite his injuries, george says he will return to caving. and to show his gratitude, he's training tojoin the team who rescued him. for 300 people to come to my aid from across the country, all come together to achieve one thing as a team, and the single bloody mindedness of it as well, you know? there's no way they were
2:24 pm
going to leave you? there's no way they were going to let anything other than a good outcome happen, you know? i take my hat off to them. at least eight people have been killed, and 38 injured, in a crush outside an africa cup of nations match in cameroon. witnesses described chaotic scenes outside the stadium in the capital yaounde, as thousands of football fans struggled to get in. our correspondent nick cavell reports. one of only about three gates along here that actually was open yesterday evening for the match between cameron and comoros. there was other gates around the stadium but these were the only ones that were open and everybody was trying to get through here. people also were having to go through covid tests just in front of us, that created a bottleneck, it was getting closer to the match. between the hosts to try to get into that stadium there was a lot of noise in their early on. it was meant to be only 80% full,
2:25 pm
of 60,000 capacity. i was inside during the game and it was a lot fuller than 80%. yes, a lot of people were trying to get in here and unfortunately that led to the crush that happened here yesterday evening and in the last few minutes the head of the confederation of african football has been passed here looking at the scene of the accident. he's also just an announcement over in another part of town, that there will be a minute's silence before the games and the match that was due to take place here on sunday has now been moved across town to yaounde, to another stadium here in town. a lot older and a lot less new than this one, so that will be happening on sunday. bradford council is to lose control of its children's services, after the death of star hobson, the 16—month—old out into the zen 20 after months of neglect, cruelty and injury at the hands of her
2:26 pm
—— the 16—month—old died after months of neglect. we have a press release when the leader of bradford city council said nothing is more important than the protection of children, all children deserve to have a happy childhood and full opportunity. you could want to say, we've worked hard to improve children's services to the pandemic and the government commissioner has recognised this. our commitment is evident in the significant investment in services and wider support from across the council but we note the pace of improvement needs to quicken. in response to the report she says bradford council is creating a council owned children's company, working positively and constructively with government in the best interest of our children giving our valued social care staff certainty over the future direction of the service and the opportunity to draw on expertise and resources nationally. she goes on to say,
2:27 pm
inevitably this will take time, we asked the government to collaborate and create in the commission outlet improvement board to allow us to focus on delivering consistently high quality care. our front line staff are key to this and we recognise the hard work they do every day, entering homes and some other challenging circumstances in society and we are committed to supporting them. we do not yet have details of this children's company thatis details of this children's company that is due to be created, and how it will actually fit with the council if it is going to a council owned, so lots of questions still to ask but bradford council been stripped of its responsibility for children's services. an investigation into the fire that destroyed glasgow school of art in 2018 has failed to find a cause. the scottish fire and rescue service spent more than three years investigating the blaze but said the damage was so bad that any
2:28 pm
possible evidence was lost. it broke out during a multi—million pound restoration of the world—renowned mackintosh building following another fire, unique, iconic and ravaged by fire not once but twice in the space of four years. the second blaze ripped through the mackintosh building at the glasgow school of art, bare stone and brick were almost all that remain. the key finding from this, the largest and most complex investigation into any fire in scotland as the cause remains undetermined. brute scotland as the cause remains undetermined.— scotland as the cause remains undetermined. ~ , , ., undetermined. we fully understand the historical— undetermined. we fully understand the historical significance _ undetermined. we fully understand the historical significance of - undetermined. we fully understand the historical significance of the - the historical significance of the premises and a lot of people hold it very dear to their heart and we've done everything we possibly could to reach a definitive conclusion, it's just been really unfortunate the scale of destruction has not made that possible. scale of destruction has not made that possible-— that possible. investigators said there was no — that possible. investigators said there was no evidence - that possible. investigators said there was no evidence of - that possible. investigators said there was no evidence of an - there was no evidence of an electrical fault or the fire had been started deliberately but they couldn't rule out either. experts
2:29 pm
who looked at the report say the lack of a definitive answer into what started the fire is unusual but given the extent of the damage is not surprising. t given the extent of the damage is not surprising-— not surprising. i think it is incredibly _ not surprising. i think it is incredibly unusual. - not surprising. i think it is incredibly unusual. that's| not surprising. i think it is - incredibly unusual. that's the disappointing thing, the cause of the fire, what caused it, it is not known. not to cast any blame on anyone else butjust to move forward and learn lessons. th anyone else butjust to move forward and learn lessons. in a anyone else butjust to move forward and learn lessons.— and learn lessons. in a statement a spokesperson _ and learn lessons. in a statement a spokesperson for — and learn lessons. in a statement a spokesperson for the _ and learn lessons. in a statement a spokesperson for the glasgow - and learn lessons. in a statement a i spokesperson for the glasgow school of art said that... the report recommends a fire safety measures should be introduced as soon as possible during construction on historic structures and —— an expensive lesson for the loss of a building considered by many to be a work of art. now it's time for a
2:30 pm
look at the weather. another cold day with the cloud and the mist across a large part of wales and north—east england, trying to brighten up. as it will towards western counties of northern ireland. scotland, the sun checked in north—east, cloud and chance of rain across northern scotland. lowest temperatures where we have the low cloud and mistiness. as we go through tonight some breaks in the cloud in scotland and northern ireland and parts of northern england, down the eastern side of the uk we see temperatures are falling close to freezing. could be some drizzly rain for south—west scotland tomorrow, most other places looking drier, brighter day overall in wales and england than recently, becoming cloudy and northern ireland and rain turning heavy for north—west scotland with stronger winds, gale is developing for the
2:31 pm
northern isles as the day goes on. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: police say they will now investigate multiple events that took place in downing street during lockdown. i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years, in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. i welcome the met's decision to conduct its own investigation because i believe this will help to give the public the clarity it needs and help to draw a line under matters. bradford council is going to lose control of it's children's services. it comes after the death of star hobson.
2:32 pm
the 16—month—old died in 2020 after months of "neglect, cruelty and injury" foreign secretary liz truss says she will be visiting ukraine — it's as tensions with russia grow there — she warns an invasion from russia would be a massive strategic mistake. the president of cameroon orders an inquiry into a deadly crush at a stadium hosting the africa cup of nations — at least eight people are killed and many more are injured. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. from the bbc sport centre. the former england manager roy hodgson looks set to return to management in the premier league — he's expected to be appointed at watford later today. hodgson left crystal palace at the end of last season, but kept them in the top tier of english football in the four seasons he was in charge. he was already the oldest manager in the premier league and at 7a will be so again. his career has taken in 22 clubs and spans over a0 years. it comes after the departure of claudio ranieri who was sacked afterjust14 games. manchester united's anthony martial willjoin sevilla on loan for the rest of the season,
2:33 pm
subject to a medical. there is no option to buy and no loan fee but the spanish club will cover the striker�*s wages. hejoined united from monaco in 2015 and told boss ralf rangnick he wanted a change of scenery. england midfielderjill scott has joined aston villa on loan from manchester city for the rest of the season. scott has been at city for eight years, and spent the second half of last season on loan at everton. she'll be looking for more game time to boost her hopes of being picked for this summer's european championship. some sad news from the world of football and former celtic manager wim jansen has died. the dutchman made his name as a player with feyenoord and will be remembered for leading celtic to the league title in his only season in charge in 1997/98, stopping rangers from winning 10 in a row. he also signed henrik larsson and won the league cup. jansen was 75 and had been living with dementia
2:34 pm
at the australian open, home favourite and world number one ashleigh barty made it look easy as she progressed to the semi finals. she dominated the americanjessicca pegula in straight sets, 6—2, 6—0, in her bid to become the first australian to win the singles title in 44 years. and she will face madison keys who's into her first grand slam semi—final for four years after beating french open champion barbora krejcikova 6—3, 6—2. in the men's draw, rafa nadal�*s hopes of a 21st grand slam are still alive. he was cruising two sets up, only to drop the next two against canada's denis shapovolov. he had the trainer out, and said afterwards he was feeling sick. but he was back out for a thrilling winner takes all in the fifth se. which he recovered to win in his first five setter of the tournament so far. i was completely destroyed after that. yes, very tough day, very warm. honestly, i didn't practise for it. i am not 21 any more, so... after this, these matches,
2:35 pm
it's great to have two days off. i think i felt quite good physically, in terms of movement, but it's true that the conditions here haven't been that hard for the last week and a half. and england bowler kate cross has said the side need to force a positive result after weather frustration during the t20 series — as they prepare to take on australia in a women's ashes test that starts on wednesday evening in canberra. it doesn't happen often, winning test matches in the women's game, so being able to get that win would boost us so much as a group and the confidence and momentum that you can then take into the last three games, going into the one—day series, that would be absolutely enormous. we know it will be hard work and i think everyone is up for that fight and we have worked so hard on our fitness and being able to cope with the demands of four—day cricket. we are all chomping at the bit to get out there.
2:36 pm
that's all the sport for now. about a third of households in rural areas rely on oil for their heating because they're not connected to mains gas. the price cap does not cover oil and with domestic oil prices rising by 50% in the last year, some are now struggling to pay their bills. our correspondent sarah dickins reports from ceredigion in west wales. these homes are hardly old stone cottages, they're relatively modern, but like so many others in rural communities, they're not connected to the mains gas and are dependent on oilfor their heating and hot water. one in three homes in this county have oil heating, and most of rural wales is the same. this is the oil tank. i keep it, at the minute, it's about here. to fill it up to here is about £1,000. sarah bate is widowed, lives with her teenage daughter and is looking for work. with £220 a fortnight for the two of them, filling the oil tank is impossible.
2:37 pm
she buys in smaller quantities, but that's more expensive. i have it on if it's freezing. if it's not freezing, we don't have it on. and i don't leave it running all the time. i don't have too many luxuries, to be honest, you know, to be fair. everything's gone a bit more basic. basic food, basic washing, basic... i need new shoes, but they're going to have to wait! i could get rid of my car, but then, you see, i'm looking for work, and round here, if you're looking for work, you need a car because we don't have a bus service any more. oil tanks dominate the gardens here and concern is widespread about how to pay the bills. all these prices are just creeping up and up and up, and it's putting so much pressure on people. people having to make the choice as to whether they heat or eat. there is no regulation as to a maximum _ there is no regulation as to a maximum that people can be charged as there _ maximum that people can be charged as there is _ maximum that people can be charged as there is for electricity or mains
2:38 pm
.as as there is for electricity or mains gas so _ as there is for electricity or mains gas so people don't get that advantage. it would be wrong to suggest that the regulator's price cap doesn't help families' bills, it clearly does, but come to a community like this — and many others across wales — and we're reminded of a time when houses were built fuelled by coal, and then oil, because they were cheap. they certainly aren't now, and prices are expected to go further. and household bills would continue to be under pressure. the oil price is up about 57% on year ago, the oil price is up about 57% on yearago, not the oil price is up about 57% on year ago, not as bad as gas prices but the oil price nevertheless has moved up to around $87 per barrel which is to 60% higher than where it was a year ago. it is hard to see prices going down very much in the short term because there has been a period of underinvestment. the experience in wales is repeated across rural england, too, with communities in cumbria, norfolk, suffolk, amongst others, seeing around one in four homes dependent on oil heating. those households on oil for heating still have their electricity bills protected by the regulator's price
2:39 pm
cap, and the uk government says protected by the regulator's price they can be eligible for warm home discount of £140 a year. also, that there are winter fuel and cold weather payments for vulnerable and low—income households. in wales, the welsh government offers an additional £100 winter fuel supplement for people on certain benefits, and oil customers like sarah can apply for £250 a year towards their fuel bills from the discretionary assistance fund. the fact that they're saying it's going to go up again worries me more because i do think, well, what will we do then, you know? am i going to have longer and longer periods without heat? but the price rises are a result of global changes and are expected to rise further. sarah dickins, bbc news, ceredigion. the world's most powerful telescope has reached its final destination — a million miles from earth. the james webb telescope took 30 days to get there — and will now spend five months studying the
2:40 pm
universe's earliest stars. dr renske smit from liverpool john moores university is one of only a handful of uk—based astronomers who'll be using the telescope. it isa it is a very expensive piece of kit. why is it important for you to be able to make use of it?- why is it important for you to be able to make use of it? what i am really excited _ able to make use of it? what i am really excited to _ able to make use of it? what i am really excited to do _ able to make use of it? what i am really excited to do with _ able to make use of it? what i am really excited to do with james - able to make use of it? what i am i really excited to do with james webb is to look back in time, 30.5 billion years and see how the first stars in the first galaxies in the first black holes were formed, so everything we have today in the universe, how that came to be, that is what i want to look at. iloathed universe, how that came to be, that is what i want to look at.— is what i want to look at. what can ou see is what i want to look at. what can you see and _ is what i want to look at. what can you see and what _ is what i want to look at. what can you see and what do _ is what i want to look at. what can you see and what do you _ is what i want to look at. what can you see and what do you know - is what i want to look at. what can l you see and what do you know about so far? i'm trying to establish, where are the gaps in the knowledge? we can only look back so far already 13 billion years in time and if we do that with the hubble telescope every day, in my work, but we still
2:41 pm
can't see the first stars so we still have a bit more to go and this is where james webb is going to answer that question, when the first beginnings were. talk answer that question, when the first beginnings were.— beginnings were. talk to us about the sequence _ beginnings were. talk to us about the sequence of— beginnings were. talk to us about the sequence of events, - beginnings were. talk to us about the sequence of events, after - beginnings were. talk to us about the sequence of events, after the | the sequence of events, after the big bang there was an afterglow, and what happened within the afterglow and after it? �* ., ., and after it? after the afterglow, there is a period _ and after it? after the afterglow, there is a period we _ and after it? after the afterglow, there is a period we call - and after it? after the afterglow, there is a period we call the - and after it? after the afterglow, there is a period we call the dark| there is a period we call the dark ages, sometimes, though starlight and the universe is quite... it takes a long time for gravity to pull material together —— no starlight. untilthere pull material together —— no starlight. until there is enough gravitational pull to bring about the first stars, basically, and that takes a few hundred million years. but that moment, the universe lights up but that moment, the universe lights up and the first starlight, that is what we want to see.— up and the first starlight, that is what we want to see. explain, how do ou what we want to see. explain, how do you interpret — what we want to see. explain, how do you interpret what _ what we want to see. explain, how do you interpret what you _ what we want to see. explain, how do you interpret what you are _ what we want to see. explain, how do you interpret what you are looking - you interpret what you are looking at? ., , you interpret what you are looking
2:42 pm
at? . , ., at? that is a good question. multile at? that is a good question. multiple instruments - at? that is a good question. multiple instruments on - at? that is a good question. l multiple instruments on board at? that is a good question. - multiple instruments on board where we will first look at images that look at thousands and thousands of galaxies at the same time but most of those galaxies will be much closer to home, so we need to find the needle in the galaxy that we think is is really far away, and then we have our instruments where we can look at more detail and see, for example, how the first oxygen and carbon atoms are formed in the galaxy. that is very excited, to have that combination of looking in detail in learning so much about what is happening in the universe as well as being able to find these very first objects.— well as being able to find these very first objects. very first ob'ects. there is a sun shield on very first objects. there is a sun shield on the _ very first objects. there is a sun shield on the telescope - very first objects. there is a sun shield on the telescope which i very first objects. there is a sun shield on the telescope which is| very first objects. there is a sun i shield on the telescope which is the size of a tennis court, what function does that serve? tt size of a tennis court, what function does that serve? if we want to look back — function does that serve? if we want to look back in _ function does that serve? if we want to look back in time _ function does that serve? if we want to look back in time we _ function does that serve? if we want to look back in time we have - function does that serve? if we want to look back in time we have got i function does that serve? if we want to look back in time we have got to l to look back in time we have got to look with infrared and the stars we see with the naked eye on earth, when we look back in time, and so we
2:43 pm
need, because heat radiation also radiates infrared and we need to cool the telescope down so we have a sun shield which is anytime between the sun and the mirror to allow the mirror to be cooling down, a few degrees above absolute zero. that is to get really sensitive images from very faint fuzzy galaxy is very far away. t very faint fuzzy galaxy is very far awa . , ., . very faint fuzzy galaxy is very far awa . , . . ., . away. i remember watching the launch on christmas — away. i remember watching the launch on christmas day, _ away. i remember watching the launch on christmas day, very _ away. i remember watching the launch on christmas day, very exciting, - away. i remember watching the launch on christmas day, very exciting, but . on christmas day, very exciting, but also perilous because it had to travel a long way and also each stage of the completion of that journey at the opening up of the telescope when it got into the right position has many risks attached. what is the next thing that could go wrong? we don't want to lose this mission. , , ., ., mission. very few things that would actually completely _ mission. very few things that would actually completely lose _ mission. very few things that would actually completely lose the - actually completely lose the mission, and we were collaborating, the mirror will be calibrated and there is no reason that could go
2:44 pm
wrong, and it is built to be able to adjust at any point during the lifetime of the mission, so we can keep adjusting it until we get the right result. as the telescope cools down, each instrument on—board will be turned on and that is when we will find if something is wrong, if in the launch, these instruments have been damaged, and if there is one instrument, it won't cancel out any of the others but each one is built for unique signs and it would be a real loss if they were damaged. it is always a joy to talk to astronomers because you are always so excited talking about your subject but why do you want to know this stuff and why do you want to know about this particular phase, the beginnings of earth? it is know about this particular phase, the beginnings of earth?- the beginnings of earth? it is 'ust the beginnings of earth? it is 'ust the fundamental i the beginnings of earth? it is 'ust the fundamental curiosity, i the beginnings of earth? it isjust the fundamental curiosity, the i the fundamental curiosity, the question of, where do we come from? we were not always here, the stars and planets and galaxies were not
2:45 pm
always here, so how did that come to be? such a fundamental thing of being human, to wonder about that, thatis being human, to wonder about that, that is what i want to find out. extraordinary that we are here at all, isn't it? extraordinary that we are here at all. isn't it?— extraordinary that we are here at all, isn't it?_ for- extraordinary that we are here at all, isn't it?_ for now, | all, isn't it? yes, it is. for now, thanks for— all, isn't it? yes, it is. for now, thanks forjoining _ all, isn't it? yes, it is. for now, thanks forjoining us. _ all, isn't it? yes, it is. for now, thanks forjoining us. i- all, isn't it? yes, it is. for now, thanks forjoining us. i hope i all, isn't it? yes, it is. for now,| thanks forjoining us. i hope you really enjoy what the telescope shows you. it's 73 miles long, runs from tyneside to the solway firth and this year marks the 1900th anniversary of the building of hadrian's wall. it marked the northern boundary of the roman empire, and is one of the most important historical sites in the country, but archaeologists now say that climate change is threatening the survival of some of the extraordinary treasures buried there. here's our climate editor, justin rowlatt. for the romans, this was the end of civilization.
2:46 pm
at 73 miles long, hadrian's wall is the greatest roman structure in britain. it's reckoned it took 15,000 men six years to build, and the sites around the wall have been the source of some of the most incredible roman artifacts everfound in britain. the waterlogged peat soils here mean organic materials, like this child's shoe, don't rot. they've found boxing gloves, some of the oldest handwritten messages in the world, even a roman toilet seat. but now climate change is threatening the ancient objects preserved along the wall. so what we've got here is a field where it should be very, very wet. but what's happening is it's drying out throughout the year, and the land is dropping. this is magna, one of the biggest roman forts. the site has never been dug, and now archaeologists are worried because the treasures buried here could begin to rot away. pretty much everything
2:47 pm
that they used on this site for 300 or 400 years has the potential to be preserved in more or less the same state it was thrown away in, under the ground where we're standing, which is an incredible opportunity. just think of the range of stuff that we could be standing on right now, and what kind of story that can tell us about life here almost 2,000 years ago. they've dug boreholes to monitor what's happening, and at teesside university, they're analysing soil samples. specifically, we're looking at moisture levels, total carbon, total nitrogen, the chemistry and microbiology changes that go on with the drying out of that peat area. and what if it is continuing to dry out? what does that mean for the archaeological remains? they will disappear. we will lose our heritage. and it isn'tjust roman remains at risk. there are reckoned to be more than 22,000 archaeological sites in uk peatlands. peatland represents such a small l part of the ecology of britain, l
2:48 pm
but the stories that they can tell is massive, and it has such- a big implication for not. just our personal history, but also our climatic history. and our environmental history, and we need to protect them. who knows what else will be lost unless these sites are preserved? justin rowlatt, bbc news, hadrian's wall. we can take you back to the story we reported a few moments ago about bradford council being stripped of its children's and social care services in the wake of the case of star hobson. she was a 16—month—old girl who was murdered by her mother's girlfriend. she had been subject to months of cruelty and injury. we now know that there will be a trust established which will drive rapid improvements after
2:49 pm
recommendations from the education secretary to the children services commission in bradford. the council have been in contact with star hobson's family in the months before she died. the education secretary said keeping vulnerable children safe from harm is non—negotiable and when a council is not meeting its duties we will take action to protect children and put their needs first. he says it is clear from the recommendations made by the commission that the council needs support to improve and he's pleased that bradford council has agreed to establish a new trust that will bring positive change for the council and independent oversight that drives improvement. the department instead will be overseen by that trust led by an independent chairperson and it will be known as the children's company which will be council owned but importantly have that independent oversight that has just been set up.
2:50 pm
the headlines on bbc news... police say they will now investigate multiple events that took place in downing street during lockdown. the president of cameroon orders an inquiry into a deadly crush at a stadium hosting the africa cup of nations — at least eight people are killed and many more are injured. foreign secretary liz truss says she will be visiting ukraine next week — she's warned a russian invasion would be a massive strategic mistake for moscow. a covid outbreak on an australian navy ship could hold up the delivery of aid to tonga, following the volcanic eruption and tsunami in the region. more than 20 personnel aboard the adelaide have tested positive for covid—19. some relief supplies have so far been delivered without contact. our correspondent shaimaa khalil is in the fijian capital suva and gave us this update. the outbreak onboard the australian
2:51 pm
navy ship is exactly what the tongan government has been nervous about. this is why, so far, the tongan authorities have been adamant that much—needed supplies have been allowed in, but that aid workers have not been allowed into the country. and this is because, as you say, covid—19, so far, has been mostly outside this country and they've only had one case. otherwise they have been covid—free. and what they don't want to do is they don't want to be dealing with the aftermath of the destruction, after the volcanic eruption and the subsequent tsunami, and only to invite covid—19 in with aid workers and aid. so they have been really careful and really reluctant about inviting personnel in. and then case in point, what happened with the hmas adelaide, the australian navy ship that was carrying aid to tonga. 23 personnel have tested positive for covid—19 and now we have heard from the australian defence minister peter dutton, who says,
2:52 pm
"we are currently in conversation with the tongan authorities about what to do next, whether we actually port and deliver the aid, including, crucially, chinook helicopters which could air drop aid and supplies to further parts of tonga, or we just stand off." it is a very, very fine balance on what to do. there is crucial need for basic supplies, whether it's water supplies, shelter kits, food. we are only over a week after this happened and i've been speaking to locals on the ground who say, "look, water and food is what we are concerned about." but also there is a health risk about covid—19, and the australian authorities say the last thing they want to do is bring covid to tonga, especially the neighbouring pacific nations, like here in fiji, for example, they are experiencing their third wave. kiribati has gone into lockdown, you are talking about samoa
2:53 pm
and the solomon islands already dealing with a spike in covid—19 cases and remember, not too far ago they were covid—19 free as well so it's just a scenario that the tongans want to avoid at all costs right now. but it is a very, very difficult balance right now between a desperate need for humanitarian aid and public health concerns. in ten days, the sporting world will be looking to china as the beijing winter olympics begin. they're being held two years after covid emerged in the country, and with the highly infectious omicron variant continuing to spread. officials have imposed a strict olympic isolation system to control the virus and decided not to sell tickets to the public. our china correspondent stephen mcdonell has been to see skating enthusiasts in beijing. screaming
2:54 pm
the olympics is expected to produce a boom in winter sports here, sports which in the past haven't really involved mass participation. ice skating, though, is something of an exception. there have been scenes like this in cities across the north of china for quite a while now. really?
2:55 pm
you can see there are plenty of people enjoying themselves today. everyone we've spoken to says they're really looking forward to the olympics, and that they have faith that officials can still control the coronavirus. however, we are yet to see the omicron variant really take off here, so that could change.
2:56 pm
that is some seriously sick ice, isn't it? now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. our weather is about to turn more unsettled, which means it's the last day of the widespread cloud and cold underneath that cloud, especially weather, low cloud and the mist is hanging on throughout the day, as it will across parts of wales and england again. there has been some sunshine so far today in northeast scotland, though, clouding over and through the afternoon this weather frontjust moving through, taking a few outbreaks of rain across northern scotland, whereas elsewhere,
2:57 pm
despite all of the cloud, with the exception of perhaps a little drizzle, it is dry. you can see the extent of the cloud, though, it's western counties of northern ireland, perhaps northeast wales, a few spots in northeast england seeing some sunny spells breaking through, though nowhere near as bright as it was yesterday in northeast england. and these temperatures, well, actually where you have the thickest low cloud and mistjust around two or three degrees celsius, that's why it's feeling so cold out there. but notice overnight tonight, some breaks around, some clear spells in scotland, northern ireland and also towards northern england. parts of wales and the midlands later in the night, as well as a breeze, picks up across the northern half of the uk, and the lowest temperatures will be across eastern parts, with any of those clear spells allowing for a touch of frost. now it may be the far south, southeast of england staying mostly cloudy tomorrow, but elsewhere it is looking like a brighter days so that will be different, especially through wales and england, but notice the rain gathering and turning heavier towards northwest scotland as the day goes on. here and into the northern isles, too, a strengthening wind will see
2:58 pm
some gales developing, turning breezy elsewhere, just allowing that cloud to break up more. back into double figures, the temperatures in northern ireland and scotland, but higher too. we get some brighter spells in wales and england. this system working its way southwards overnight and into thursday. behind it severe gales developing for a time towards orkney in particular, the wind slowly easing on thursday. not much rain on this system as it moves through southern england on thursday. it takes a while for the cloud to clear away, whereas elsewhere it's a much brighter day. some sunshine, a scattering of showers, a colder feel again in scotland, whereas much of wales and england see temperatures bounce back into double figures. frost and fog could be around on friday morning, turning wet again in scotland as friday goes on. a weather system moving south overnight and into saturday. a windy day on saturday. and then on sunday we could see another area of low pressure heading our way. the chance of some rain, perhaps even a little snow in places, too. we'll keep you updated.
2:59 pm
3:00 pm
winds, gale is developing for the northern isles as the day goes on. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown live in downing street. the headlines: the police say they will now investigate multiple events that took place in downing street during lockdown i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years, in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. i welcome the met's decision to conduct its own investigation because i believe this will help to give the public the clarity it needs and help to draw a line under matters. sue gray's report will not be published while the met police investigate — so what do tory mps do next? we'll be getting analysis
3:01 pm
and reaction throughout the afternoon. i'm martine croxall — the other main news. bradford council is going to lose control of its children's services. it comes after the death of star hobson. the 16—month—old died in 2020 after months of neglect, cruelty and injury. foreign secretary liz truss says she will be visiting ukraine next week. it's as tensions with russia grow there — she warns an invasion from russia would be a massive strategic mistake.
3:02 pm
hello and welcome to bbc news live from downing street. the metropolitan police is investigating gatherings at number ten and across government, to see if breaches of covid restrictions took place. the commisioner of britain's biggest force, cressida dick, confirmed that her officers are now looking into potential rule—breaking, as a result of information provided by civil servants, who are also compiling a report on what happened. that report, by sue gray, won't now be published in full until the police have finished investigating. borisjohnson says he welcomes the investigation and believes it will �*help to draw a line under matters'. our political corresspondent, jonathan blake, has the latest. reporter: was it right. to have a party in downing street, ms dorries? questions for cabinet ministers. was it right to have a birthday gathering in downing street?
3:03 pm
meeting in person this morning now rules have been relaxed amid new claims about a birthday celebration for boris police had said they would not investigate claims of parties in whitehall unless a government enquiry found evidence of criminality — until now. as a result, firstly of information provided by the cabinet office enquiry team, and secondly my officers' own assessment, i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years in relation to potential breaches of covid regulations. the commissioner did not specify which events
3:04 pm
were under investigation, but promised updates at significant points. as the news broke, one minister came to borisjohnson's defence. the leadership of borisjohnson has had has been so brilliant that he has got us through this incredibly difficult period and got all the big decisions right. an event on the prime minister's a birthday injune 2020 is the latest to come to light. downing street admitted staff gathered in the cabinet eoom — how many is disputed, but one person present said up to 30 were there including the interior designer lulu lytle leading refurbishment of the number ten flat. borisjohnston, who we are told was present for around ten minutes, was given a cake. laura oakley�*s father died weeks earlier. the 19th ofjune would have been his 68th birthday party, and to find out boris is having fun with his pals in government, it brings everything back, we'd not been able to grieve because we were only allowed ten people at the funeral, we were not allowed to have a wake, and just when you think you're getting over the crest of the wave
3:05 pm
this kind of stuff comes up. borisjohnson had acknowledged public anger, but sounded upbeat today about what this could mean. mr speaker, a few weeks ago i commissioned an independent enquiry into a series of events in downing street, the cabinet office as well as some other whitehall departments may have constituted potential breaches of the covid regulations. that process has quite properly involved sharing information continuously with the metropolitan police, so i welcome the met�*s decision to conduct its own investigation because i believe this will help to give the public the clarity it needs and help draw a line under matters. whatever the investigation concludes his opponent say his time is already up. borisjohnson has now degraded the office of prime minister, it is distracting everybody from the serious cost of living and other issues the country faces, and disrespected the sacrifices everyone else has made. that is why he must go now. we got here because the prime minister cannot tell the truth, he has lied continually and been dishonest to parliament and to the british people.
3:06 pm
frankly, he has to go. he should resign, that's the only way to clear up this mess. downing street says the prime minister does not believe he has broken the law. the question now, how does a police investigation affect attempts from some of his own mps to remove him? jonathan blake, bbc news. the metropolitan police previously said it wouldn't usually investigate past complaints about lockdown breaches. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, explains why they have now begun an inquiry. for months, whitehall has been gripped by arguments around alleged parties and breaches of coronavirus regulations in downing street and its garden. the metropolitan police has said nothing except it was in touch with sue gray, who is leading the cabinet office investigation.
3:07 pm
but the head of the force cressida dick, speaking to the london assembly police and crime commissioner this morning, said while the met was generally reluctant to investigate breaches of regulations that took place months ago, three factors might change that. the three factors were and are there was evidence that those involved new or ought to have known that what they were doing was an offence, where not investigating would significantly undermine the law, and where there was little ambiguity around the absence of any reasonable defence. the met has been heavily criticised for not investigating earlier but has waited for the cabinet office to gather evidence first and has now decided it should actively investigate some of the alleged parties. but what about the officers who work in downing street every day? didn't they notice the events when they were happening? it sounds like there was a culture of lawbreaking parties, rather than a single one—off event. we have heard reports of suitcases
3:08 pm
of drink clanking through security. surely some officers were concerned about what they were seeing at the time? cressida dick would not comment on that today except to say that if it was relevant it would be included in the investigation. even two months into the first lockdown, police had still been actively patrolling public spaces, making sure nobody was mixing with people outside their household, so there remains a worry about double standards. there is no question, there is a huge level of public concern about this and no matter what the met had said it looks like one law for them and another for another. anyone found to have attended an illegal gathering in downing street during lockdown faces a fine. at the start of the pandemic they were £60, later rising to 100. daniel sandford, bbc news.
3:09 pm
our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford is there. what sort of police investigation will this be? presumably much of the leg work has been done by sue gray, do the re—interview the people she has spoke to, how long might this take? �* . ., . . has spoke to, how long might this take? . , , , take? it's an incredible sensitive investigation, _ take? it's an incredible sensitive investigation, usually _ take? it's an incredible sensitive investigation, usually a - take? it's an incredible sensitive| investigation, usually a politically important and very important for those involved. it's a very straightforward investigation, in some ways. very simple offence, the maximum penalty is fine, the question is now they've decided which of these events was illegal, who was at them? and much of the legwork will have been done on that, was that an e—mail or staff pass showing somebody�*s presence, and then did they have a good reason to be there because it might be some people had a good reason to be there
3:10 pm
are others did not, perhaps it was the work place for some and not others. it should be quite straightforward, particularly people are prepared to —— accept their fate. it gets more complicated if people dispute events but this isn't a multi—month investigation, this should be containable in a small number of weeks. as you say, incredibly politically sensitive. we've already spoke about the sue gray potentially having the fate of the prime minister in her hands and there it is jane connors, who will be leading this investigation for the police. aha, investigation for the police. small number of officers will do a lot of the work, not a massive investigation that needs a massive police computer, it's a simple discrete number of events, discrete number of people, who was there and that they have a good reason and do
3:11 pm
they accept that they have breached they accept that they have breached the rules? there will still be arguments, iam the rules? there will still be arguments, i am sure, about whether or not if you are having a drink in your workplace after work, without that stricly breached the rules. whether people want to be having those arguments weren't caught in an act of potential political hypocrisy is a different matter. there are loads of police in downing street all the time, as they were when these alleged events were happening, that makes it even trickierfor happening, that makes it even trickier for the police, happening, that makes it even trickierfor the police, doesn't it? at the same time the police were walking through parks telling people not to officer outside downing street might have heard the chatter of a party from the garden and some members of the london assembly and some labour mps are asking why did the police officer is not at the time, the problem is that as an element of trust in downing street, police officers who guard downing street,
3:12 pm
theirjob is to protect the people who work here and also the physical place itself, they do not think it is theirjob to try and catch people out on breaches of health regulations. whether people agree with that is a different matter. the police are probably prepared to take the embarrassment that they think the embarrassment that they think the job of the officers here is to protect people and it was not whether to see where they were taking bottles in for a drink after work. it does not mean that embarrassment will go away, some people still very angry about that. lots of pressure on chris so that dick to mount some sort of investigation —— lots of pressure on cressida dick, what do you think has persuaded herfinally cressida dick, what do you think has persuaded her finally to investigate? there are two factors, first of all, how easy was it for the police to get the evidence that sue gray has got? it but harderfor get the evidence that sue gray has got? it but harder for the get the evidence that sue gray has got? it but harderfor the police because the powers for them to go
3:13 pm
into e—mails and staff movements are much less than sue gray, it is harderfor the police. because a summary offence is not massively serious and you could argue to ask for people's e—mails would not be proportionate. partly they needed to wait for sue gray to garret the evidence but then also at the commissioner spilled out some of the reasons why they might have specifically gone for this investigation retrospectively come were people breaching rules they really knew they were breaching and obviously this is the place that made the rules so that is at really quite straightforward reason. is there an issue around public trust involved? clearly if people are preaching these rules and if people are saying if they are breaking the rules that i don't have to. it's a combination of the evidence already gathered in these very specific reasons why you might look at these
3:14 pm
specific events as being one is that you would retrospectively investigate. thank you very much. let's speak to our political correspondent alex forsyth. she is on the palace of westminster. we heard from the prime minister as he spoke about ukraine saying he welcomes this police investigation and thinks it will give the public clarity and help draw a line under matters but also a huge political dangers for him.— matters but also a huge political dangers for him. without a doubt. cast our minds _ dangers for him. without a doubt. cast our minds back _ dangers for him. without a doubt. cast our minds back to _ dangers for him. without a doubt. cast our minds back to this - dangers for him. without a doubt. i cast our minds back to this morning before we heard from cressida dick, all eyes were on the sue gray report, being led by this senior civil servant and many conservative mps said they wanted to see the report before making a decision about the prime minister's future. when cressida dick made her
3:15 pm
statement we heard fairly swiftly from downing street that that would mean some part of that report by sue gray wouldn't be published in the coming days as expected. they would wait for the outcome of the police investigation. now there's a suggestion that some of the report, if not all, might still be published. fairto if not all, might still be published. fair to say this as an evolving situation. the key question for many conservative mps is what should happen now? some think this has been so damaging it is time for a vote of confidence, others think it is right to wait for the outcome of the investigation is currently i'm joined by a conservative mp, former whip and minister. what do you make of the police decision to investigate?- what do you make of the police decision to investigate? that's a matter for _ decision to investigate? that's a matter for the _ decision to investigate? that's a matter for the police _ decision to investigate? that's a matter for the police and - decision to investigate? that's a matter for the police and what l decision to investigate? that's a i matter for the police and what we've got to do is wait for the enquiry to take its course. as far as the sue gray enquiry is concerned, the prime
3:16 pm
minister himself set that up and that will be published when it is decided to do so. i think the prime minister is keen this matter is resolved and draw a line in the sand and move on to many other issues of such importance to the british public. for example we've got energy prices rising, cost of living issues and on a global perspective, we've got 100,000 russian troops on ukrainian border and nato is involved and we are a major player involved and we are a major player in nato. there are all these issues that need to be dealt with and it was encouraging to see the prime minister in the chamber today speaking about ukraine and doing what he does best, leading from the front and addressing the issues that really concern britain. you front and addressing the issues that really concern britain.— really concern britain. you will note some _ really concern britain. you will note some of _ really concern britain. you will note some of your _ really concern britain. you will note some of your colleaguesl really concern britain. you will- note some of your colleagues think his leadership has been so damaged by this episode there is a lot of trust within the party as well as parts of the public, but it is difficult to draw a line under this and be better think would be to have
3:17 pm
and be better think would be to have a vote of no confidence now, what do you think about that? $5 a vote of no confidence now, what do you think about that?— you think about that? as far as the issues concerned _ you think about that? as far as the issues concerned about _ you think about that? as far as the issues concerned about breaches l issues concerned about breaches during the pandemic, the prime ministerfully during the pandemic, the prime minister fully understands the enormous hurt and anger of millions of people across the country who underwent a few sacrifices but he's made an apology as far as the 20th of may 2020 incident was concerned. that along with many other gatherings in downing street and other departments are being looked at by the report by sue gray and the best thing is to wait for that outcome, as far as let being submitted, that is a process that takes its own course and it's a matter for individual mps —— takes its own course and it's a matterfor individual mps —— as takes its own course and it's a matter for individual mps —— as far as letters being submitted. for my part i think the prime minister has given a full apology and it is important to recognise he's done extraordinarily well and extraordinarily well and extraordinarily difficult circumstances, the vaccine roll—out has been the best in europe in one
3:18 pm
of the best in the world, we've also got our economy, it's improving better than any other g7 economy, the fact that over £400 billion was made available to the british companies and individuals about for payments and grants and loans, these are mergers helping the uk get out of the pandemic much faster and much swifter than almost all the other countries across the world. there is a lot of good this prime minister has done and it's important to put things into perspective and recognise he has taken a huge number of decisions which have served well in the long term. thank you. it's worth saying there some conservatives who don't necessarily share that view and have some frustration with the prime minister, no real consensus on what will happen now, the timing of the publication of the soo great report will be crucial because conservative mps are looking at the options and
3:19 pm
thinking, what comes next —— the sue gray report. let's speak now to kieron mcardle from warwickshire. in march of last year, he was fined £100 for having three friends in his garden on his birthday — he paid the money, as did his mates. he's got some strong views about what has happened in downing street. thank you for being with us. tell us first of all about your gathering, shall we call it, and why you had it? ., ., ., it? good afternoon. it was an unseasonably _ it? good afternoon. it was an unseasonably warm - it? good afternoon. it was an unseasonably warm day - it? good afternoon. it was an unseasonably warm day last. it? good afternoon. it was an - unseasonably warm day last march, and three friends took it upon themselves to surprise me on my birthday, they felt i had been low, i was living alone at the time and we knew it we are breaking the rules, we said we'd have a quick drink, check your ok and be on our
3:20 pm
way and within one hour at the police arrived, our details were taken, fined £200, if you paid within seven days it was £100. we accept that what we did was wrong and paid the fine and did not do it again and moved on. you thought it was a fair cop, so to speak? fist you thought it was a fair cop, so to seak? �* you thought it was a fair cop, so to s-eak? �* , . ~ you thought it was a fair cop, so to seak? �* , ., ~ ~ speak? at the time, yeah. we knew we should not be — speak? at the time, yeah. we knew we should not be doing _ speak? at the time, yeah. we knew we should not be doing this, _ speak? at the time, yeah. we knew we should not be doing this, we _ speak? at the time, yeah. we knew we should not be doing this, we broke i should not be doing this, we broke the rules, so we paid the fine and make sure we didn't do it again. it was particularly galling healing over the last few weeks about these various parties, when it seems to have been swept under the carpet for them, when they should hold their hands up and accept the responsibility like we did. they made the rules and didn't stick to them. they need to hold their hands up them. they need to hold their hands up and everybody should be named as well. ., , , , ., , up and everybody should be named as well. ., , ,, ., , , up and everybody should be named as well. ., , , , ., , , well. how surprised have yet been as ou have well. how surprised have yet been as you have seen _ well. how surprised have yet been as you have seen all _ well. how surprised have yet been as
3:21 pm
you have seen all these _ well. how surprised have yet been as you have seen all these revelations i you have seen all these revelations coming out about various gatherings and parties, the garden party back in may 2020 in the first lockdown, birthday party we've heard more about now, a couple of parties in downing street, the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral. as you've seen all about that what has gone through your mind?— you've seen all about that what has gone through your mind? people have known about — gone through your mind? people have known about this _ gone through your mind? people have known about this for _ gone through your mind? people have known about this for a _ gone through your mind? people have known about this for a long _ gone through your mind? people have known about this for a long time - gone through your mind? people have known about this for a long time and i known about this for a long time and it all seems to be coming out now, at last count i think it was 14 parties, gatherings, the timing of this i find extraordinary. are we going to find the results of the enquiry now it has been handed over to the met police? this prime minister, he wants his cake and eat it. ., , ., minister, he wants his cake and eat it. ., i. ., minister, he wants his cake and eat it. you paid your fine for what you admits was _ it. you paid your fine for what you admits was no _ it. you paid your fine for what you admits was no wrongdoing, - it. you paid your fine for what you admits was no wrongdoing, you . it. you paid your fine for what you i admits was no wrongdoing, you would expect anyone who is found guilty
3:22 pm
here in downing street by the police, whether in government or a civil servant or whatever to pay their fines if it comes to that? that was my whole point, i have no issue from the beginning with paying my fine and accepting what i did, this government seems to be making the rules and sake that is one rule for us and one for them. —— they seem to be saying. they set the guidance and they need to stick to the rules. i believe they need to be named and shamed as we were ashamed and we accept our responsibilities. it is time to get this done once and for all. it is time to get this done once and forall. no it is time to get this done once and for all. no more cover—ups. goad it is time to get this done once and for all. no more cover-ups. good to talk to you- — for all. no more cover-ups. good to talk to you. thank _ for all. no more cover-ups. good to talk to you. thank you _ for all. no more cover-ups. good to talk to you. thank you for _ for all. no more cover-ups. good to talk to you. thank you forjoining i talk to you. thank you forjoining us here on bbc news. let me up date you on some lines of the downing street press briefings. downing street press briefings. downing street spokesperson saying the prime minister doesn't believe he broken the law, anyone required to
3:23 pm
co—operate with this police investigation will be expected to. and also the prime minister was told about the police investigation this morning just before chaining a cabinet meeting but decided not to tell the cabinet about it, did not talk to the cabinet about the police investigation. that's the latest from outside downing street. i will hand you back to the studio. bradford council is going to lose control of its children's services. it follows the death of star hobson, the 16—month—old who died in 2020 after months of "neglect, cruelty and injury" at the hands of her mother frankie smith and smith's partner savannah brockhill. they will be taken into a trust which will "drive rapid improvements" after recommendations from the education secretary nadhim za hawi. mrzahawi said in a statement: "keeping vulnerable children safe from harm is non—negotiable. where a council is not
3:24 pm
meeting its duty to do this, we will take action to protect children and put their needs first. joining me now is our correspondent nick garnett with more on this. remind us more of the background to this. bradford's children services happen under review for a considerable amount of time, that has been led by steve walker from leeds city council and he has been brought in to look at what was happening and how things could be improved. it's his findings that led to the changes today. that hasn't really been brought into place by the case of star hobson, the 16—month—old girl killed by her mother's partner. in that trial it was heard time and time again family and relatives had brought up worries about her and her health on five separate occasions, they'd been in touch with the local authority and on each occasion nothing happened. that is the catalyst for the change
3:25 pm
announced. we spoke to social workers in the city over the last few weeks and they talked about the tremendous pressures they've been under, they say there is a huge caseload and there has been a rapid turnover in staff and new and experienced members have been brought in who had to deal with caseloads as soon as they've touched the ground. and they've not had enough time to get ready and get ready for that. as well as that there's been a huge caseload, far more than some other part of the country. this new trust now in place is made up of an independent chair and a board of directors and it comes after the services were rated first of all inadequate in 2018. it's not the first time these powers have been used by the government. it started, one springing to mind was when doncaster was taken over in 2013, the powers most recently when used in sunderland. it allows fast
3:26 pm
changes to be made and brought in. education secretary said keeping vulnerable children safe from harm is non—negotiable. where our council isn't meeting its duty, we will take action to protect children and put —— where a council is admitting its duty. this won't be for ever but allows a new set of managers and directors to take charge and responsibility to improve things in our very short space of time. to what extent will the staff from the children services department at bradford council be involved in this new entity? they will be very much involved but it is not bringing in a whole new set of staff, it is looking at how things operate and looking at things such as responsibility and the way that there has been a rapid turnover of staff and these new members of staff have been brought in and been told to get on with the work without
3:27 pm
having perhaps the full amount of on the road training they would otherwise have. they will be involved and be allowed to have their say. involved and be allowed to have theirsay. it's, involved and be allowed to have their say. it's, what the process does is it allows that change to happen at a very quick pace, pump starting things and it will change so the authority hopes, make those changes possible in a very quick period of time. for the moment, nick, thank you very much. the foreign secretary, liz truss, is to visit ukraine next week, as fears grow about a potential russian invasion. speaking in the commons, she told mps that a russian incursion into ukraine would be a "massive strategic mistake" that would be met with harsh economic sanctions. thousands of russian troops are stationed at the border although the kremlin has insisted it has no intention of launching an attack. our world affairs correspondent, caroline hawley reports. the might of the russian army on display and its ally belarus, ukraine's northern neighbour.
3:28 pm
joint military exercises are planned for next month as moscow also builds up troops on ukraine's eastern border. some 100,000 soldiers in all, amid growing fears of a russian invasion, another war in europe. western leaders held virtual crisis talks last night. together with our allies we are standing up to russian aggression. the foreign secretary has just announced she will visit ukraine next week. a further military incursion by russia into ukraine would be a massive strategic mistake and come with a severe cost on russia's economy, including coordinated sanctions. the west is trying desperately to deter a russian attack. this is a danish frigate on its way to the baltic sea. joe biden insists western leaders are unanimous about how to respond, he has placed 8500 american troops on alert to deploy at short notice to europe if they need to. the west is also threatening an unprecedented range of sanctions if president putin does indeed gives orders to invade.
3:29 pm
we must not underestimate how serious he is. a sovereign and independent ukraine is a direct affront to his ambitions, as he sees them, to restore russia as a great power. given the maximal nature of his demands, given he has rejected the only reasonable compromise, it is hard for me to see how he can avoid having to follow through to some extent. in the ukrainian capital kyiv there is a wary, uncertain calm, some quietly calculating what they will do, how they will keep their family safe if russia does invade. moscow insists it has no such plans and has accused the americans of whipping up tensions by putting its troops on alert, but it has also made clear that diplomacy is not yet dead, leaving a glimmer of hope that a new conflict could still be averted. caroline hawley, bbc news. borisjohnson made a statement in the commons on ukraine this afternoon.
3:30 pm
in every contact with russia, the uk and our allies have stressed our unity and adherence to vital points of principle. we cannot bargain away the vision of a europe whole and free that emerged in those amazing years from 1989 to 1991, healing the division of our content by the iron curtain. we will not reopen that divide by agreeing to overturn the european security order because russia has placed the gun to ukraine's head. nor can we accept the doctrine implicit in russian proposals that all states are sovereign but some are more sovereign than others. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. another cold day out there, where the cloud and the mist hangs on all day, it is across a large part of wales and england. north—east wales, parts
3:31 pm
of north—east england trying to brighten up at times, as it will be towards western counties of northern ireland. in scotland, we are seeing some sunshine towards the north—east but cloud and the chance of a little rain moving across northern scotland as the day goes on. lowest temperatures are certainly where we have that low cloud and mistiness hanging on, around two or three celsius in some spots. as we go through tonight, some breaks in the clouds of scotland, northern ireland, parts of northern england, wales, and the midlands developing, too. it is down the eastern side of the uk we will see temperatures fall close to freezing for a touch of frost in places, it could be a bit of drizzly rain toward south—west scotland as we start tomorrow, most other places looking dry. overall, a brighter day in wales and england than recently. becoming cloudy again in northern ireland, and the rain turning heavier towards north—west scotland, with stronger winds, gales developing in the far north and northern isles as the day goes on. hello, this is bbc news.
3:32 pm
the headlines: police say they will now investigate multiple events that took place in downing street during lockdown. i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years, in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. i welcome the met's decision to conduct its own investigation because i believe this will help to give the public the clarity it needs and help to draw a line under matters. bradford council is going to lose control of its children's services. it comes after the death of star hobson. the 16—month—old died in 2020 after months of neglect, cruelty and injury. foreign secretary liz truss says she will be visiting ukraine next week — it's as tensions with russia grow there — she warns an invasion from russia would be a massive
3:33 pm
strategic mistake. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. former england manager roy hodgson looks set to return to management in the premier league — we're expecting his appointment at watford later today. hodgson left crystal palace at the end of last season, but kept them in the top tier of english football in the four seasons he was in charge. he was already the oldest manager in the premier league and at 74 will be so again. his career has taken in 22 clubs and spans over 40 years. it comes after the departure of claudio ranieri who was sacked afterjust 14 games. manchester united's anthony martial willjoin sevilla on loan for the rest of the season, subject to a medical. there is no option to buy and no loan fee but the spanish club will cover the striker�*s wages. hejoined united from monaco in 2015 and told boss ralf rangnick he wanted a change of scenery. england midfielderjill scott has joined aston villa on loan from manchester city for the rest of the season.
3:34 pm
scott has been at city for eight years, and spent the second half of last season on loan at everton. she'll be looking for more game time to boost her hopes of being picked for this summer's european championship. some sad news from the world of football — former celtic manager wimjansen has died. the dutchman made his name as a player with feyenoord and will be remembered for leading celtic to the league title in his only season in charge in 1997/98, stopping rangers from winning 10 in a row. he also signed henrik larsson and won the league cup. jansen was 75 and had been living with dementia. at the australian open, home favourite and world number one ashleigh barty made it look easy as she progressed to the semi finals. she dominated the americanjessica pegula in straight sets, 6—2, 6—0, in her bid to become the first australian to win the singles title in 44 years. i the singles title in 44 years. have grown as a perst player i have grown as a person and as a player and ifeel like i have grown as a person and as a player and i feel like a i have grown as a person and as a player and ifeel like a more complete tennis player. i've got a couple more years of experience under my belt and in handling
3:35 pm
different situations and solving problems out on court and it is a credit to my team because they have done so much work with me to make me the best version of myself. i'm loving playing out here, it is bringing a smile to myself, regardless of what is happening during the points, it has been a lot of fun so far and hopefully there is a bit more left. and she will face madison keys, who's into her first grand slam semi—final for four years, after beating french open champion barbora krejcikova 6—3, 6—2. in the men's draw, rafa nadal�*s hopes of a 21st grand slam are still alive. he came out on top against canada's denis shapovolov in his first five setter of the tournament so far. i was completely destroyed after that. yes, very tough day, very warm. honestly, i didn't practise for it. i am not 21 any more, so... after this, these matches, it's great to have two days off. i think i felt quite good
3:36 pm
physically, in terms of movement, but it's true that the conditions here haven't been that hard for the last week and a half. he always manages to find a way, doesn't he? and england bowler kate cross has said the side need to force a positive result after weather frustration during the t20 series — as they prepare to take on australia in a women's ashes test that starts on wednesday evening in canberra. it doesn't happen often, winning test matches in the women's game, so being able to get that win would boost us so much as a group and the confidence and momentum that you can then take into the last three games, going into the one—day series, that would be absolutely enormous. we know it will be hard work and i think everyone is up for that fight and we have worked so hard on our fitness and being able to cope with the demands of four—day cricket. we are all chomping at the bit to get out there. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour.
3:37 pm
throughout this year, events are being held to mark 1,900 years since the building of hadrian's wall. but there are concerns that climate change could now be threatening the ancient site. justin rowlatt reports. for the romans, this was the end of civilization. at 73 miles long, hadrian's wall is the greatest roman structure in britain. it's reckoned it took 15,000 men six years to build, and the sites around the wall have been the source of some of the most incredible roman artifacts everfound in britain. the waterlogged peat soils here mean organic materials, like this child's shoe, don't rot. they've found boxing gloves, some of the oldest handwritten messages in the world, even a roman toilet seat. but now climate change is threatening the ancient objects
3:38 pm
preserved along the wall. so what we've got here is a field where it should be very, very wet. but what's happening is it's drying out throughout the year, and the land is dropping. this is magna, one of the biggest roman forts. the site has never been dug, and now archaeologists are worried because the treasures buried here could begin to rot away. pretty much everything that they used on this site for 300 or 400 years has the potential to be preserved in more or less the same state it was thrown away in, under the ground where we're standing, which is an incredible opportunity. just think of the range of stuff that we could be standing on right now, and what kind of story that can tell us about life here almost 2,000 years ago. they've dug boreholes to monitor what's happening, and at teesside university they're analysing soil samples. specifically, we're looking at moisture levels, total carbon, total nitrogen, the chemistry and microbiology changes that
3:39 pm
go on with the drying out of that peat area. and what if it is continuing to dry out? what does that mean for the archaeological remains? they will disappear. we will lose our heritage. and it isn'tjust roman remains at risk. there are reckoned to be more than 22,000 archaeological sites in uk peatlands. peatland represents such a small l part of the ecology of britain, l but the stories that they can tell is massive, and it has such- a big implication for not. just our personal history, but also our climatic history. and our environmental history, and we need to protect them. who knows what else will be lost unless these sites are preserved? justin rowlatt, bbc news, hadrian's wall. an investigation into the fire that destroyed glasgow school of art in 2018 has failed to find a cause. the scottish fire and rescue service spent more than three years investigating the blaze but said the damage was so bad that any possible evidence was lost.
3:40 pm
it broke out during a multimillion pound restoration of the world—renowned mackintosh building, following a previous blaze as our scotland correspondent lorna gordon reports. unique, iconic and ravaged by fire, not once but twice, in the space of four years. the second blaze ripped through the mackintosh building at the glasgow school of art — bare stone and brickwork almost all that remained. the key finding from this, the largest and most complex investigation into any fire in scotland, is that the cause remains undetermined. we fully understand the historical significance of the premises, and a lot of people hold it very dear to their heart, and we've done everything we possibly could to reach a definitive conclusion, it's just been really unfortunate the scale of destruction has not made that possible. investigators said there was no evidence of an electrical fault
3:41 pm
or the fire had been started deliberately, but they couldn't rule out either cause. experts who looked at the report say the lack of a definitive answer into what started the fire is unusual but, given the extent of the damage, not surprising. i think it is incredibly unusual. that's the disappointing thing, the cause of the fire, what caused it, how it started, it's not known. not to cast any blame on anyone else, butjust to move forward and learn lessons. in a statement a spokesperson for the glasgow school of art said that... the report recommends fire safety measures should be introduced as soon as possible during construction
3:42 pm
on historic structures — an expensive lesson from the loss of a building considered by many to be a work of art. lorna gordon, bbc news, glasgow. the world's most powerful telescope has reached its final destination — a million miles from earth. the james webb telescope took 30 days to get there — and will now spend five months studying the universe's earliest stars. dr renske smit from liverpool john moores university is one of only a handful of uk—based astronomers who'll use the telescope. earlier she told me about the work she'll be doing. what i am really excited to do with james webb is to look back in time, 30.5 billion years, and see how the first stars in the first galaxies in the first black holes were formed, so everything we have today in the universe, how that came to be, that is what i want to look at. what can you see and what do you know about so far? i'm trying to establish, where are the gaps in the knowledge? we can only look back so far already 13 billion years in time
3:43 pm
and we do that with the hubble telescope every day, in my work, but we still can't see the first stars so we still have a bit more to go and this is where james webb is going to answer that question, when the first beginnings were. talk to us about the sequence of events, after the big bang there was an afterglow, and what happened within the afterglow and after it? the dark ages sometimes, though starlight and the universe is quite... it takes a long time for gravity to pull material together. until there is enough gravitational pull to bring about the first stars, basically, and that takes a few hundred million years. but that moment, the universe lights up and the first starlight, that is what we want to see. explain, how do you interpret
3:44 pm
what you are looking at? that is a good question. multiple instruments on board where we will first look at images that look at thousands and thousands of galaxies at the same time that look at thousands and thousands but most of those galaxies will be much closer to home, so we need to find the needle in the halaxy that we think is is really far away, and then we have other instruments where we can look at more detail and see, for example, how the first oxygen and carbon atoms were formed in the galaxy. that is very exciting, to have that combination of looking in detail in learning so much about what is happening in the universe as well as being able to find these very first objects. there is a sun shield on the telescope which is the size of a tennis court, what function does that serve? if we want to look back in time we have got to look with infrared and the stars we see with the naked
3:45 pm
eye on earth, when we look back in time, and so we need, because heat radiation also radiates in infrared and we need to cool the telescope down so we have a sun shield which is at any time between the sun and the mirror to allow the mirror to be cooling down, a few degrees above absolute zero. that is to get really sensitive images from these very faint fuzzy galaxies very far away. the headlines on bbc news... police say they're investigating multiple events at downing street and whitehall for potential breaches of covid restrictions. bradford council is going to lose control of its children's services. it comes after the death of star hobson. the 16—month—old died in 2020 after months of neglect, cruelty and injury. foreign secretary liz truss says she will be visiting ukraine next week —
3:46 pm
it's as tensions with russia grow there — she warns an invasion from russia would be a massive strategic mistake. john lennon's eldest son julian is selling several pieces of music history from his personal collection. however, he will keep the physical items as each piece of memorabilia will be sold as a non—fungible token, more commonly known as an nft. items being auctioned include a black cape worn by his father in the film help! and handwritten notes for the beatles song heyjude. let's speak now to bernadine brocker wieder. she is the ceo of vastari labs — they consult with lots of different organisations, including museums, on how nfts and the metaverse can impact theirfuture. you have got to help us, what exactly is being sold? laughter
3:47 pm
it is interesting, in this auction, talking about the memorabilia being auction, it is not the physical items, not the digital items, but what some would call a digital twin of the physical item that is being auctioned. ., ., ., ., , auctioned. you have got one behind ou. this auctioned. you have got one behind you- this is— auctioned. you have got one behind you- this is not— auctioned. you have got one behind you. this is not a _ auctioned. you have got one behind you. this is not a digital— auctioned. you have got one behind you. this is not a digital twin, - you. this is not a digital twin, this is a digital— you. this is not a digital twin, this is a digital artwork- you. this is not a digital twin, this is a digital artwork that l you. this is not a digital twin, l this is a digital artwork that was produced by an artist and has been put on an nft for sale and i bought it. in the case of the headline today, it is not going to be a work that was originally digital but it is a digital equivalent that is being auctioned. t is a digital equivalent that is being auctioned. is a digital equivalent that is bein: auctioned. , . ., being auctioned. i understand what ou have being auctioned. i understand what you have got _ being auctioned. i understand what you have got behind _ being auctioned. i understand what you have got behind you, _ being auctioned. i understand what you have got behind you, can - being auctioned. i understand what you have got behind you, can you i you have got behind you, can you help me out with what is the difference between a digital copy of something and an original digital c°pyr something and an original digital copy, if you like, and a digital twin of something? t copy, if you like, and a digital twin of something?— copy, if you like, and a digital twin of something? i like to talk about the difference _ twin of something? i like to talk about the difference between i twin of something? i like to talk- about the difference between digital artwork and digitised artwork. when
3:48 pm
you are talking about digital art it is something where it has been made in a digitalform and there are many artists out there producing work with digital tools and that is something of this work behind me, for example, that was produced using artificial intelligence and coding, and it is completely unique for me by the artist. but in the case of a digitised item you have something that represents something that is in the physical world but you have the digital copy. i like to think about, for example, there are five copies of things which have been sold throughout history, —— verified copies. people buy a poster of a painting in a museum of the painting they want to have at home that is a verified copy of that original, so i think of that as the digital equivalent.— think of that as the digital eauivalent. ~ , ., ., ., ., equivalent. why would anyone want to bu a diaital equivalent. why would anyone want to buy a digital twin _ equivalent. why would anyone want to buy a digital twin of _ equivalent. why would anyone want to buy a digital twin of something? it i buy a digital twin of something? tt is interesting, and we increasingly live digital lives and we increasingly have digital assets and we put a lot of value on some of
3:49 pm
those digital assets. so these other things we interact with digital lives, and what many people don't realise is that this is in a movement of people who have items in a crypto wallet and interact with each other through the items in the crypto wallet. the owner of the nft is going to show off they have this in their crypto wallet. flan is going to show off they have this in their crypto wallet.— in their crypto wallet. can you tell me what a — in their crypto wallet. can you tell me what a crypto _ in their crypto wallet. can you tell me what a crypto wallet _ in their crypto wallet. can you tell me what a crypto wallet is? it i in their crypto wallet. can you tell me what a crypto wallet is? it is l me what a crypto wallet is? it is basically like — me what a crypto wallet is? it is basically like an _ me what a crypto wallet is? tt 3 basically like an online version of your wallet but you can put crypto currency or nfts or any other tokens inside and interact with different things online, websites, games, whatever types of experiences you are doing online. this non-fungible token is unique _ are doing online. this non-fungible token is unique to _ are doing online. this non-fungible token is unique to you, _ are doing online. this non-fungible token is unique to you, is _ are doing online. this non-fungible token is unique to you, is that i token is unique to you, is that right? tt token is unique to you, is that riuht? . ., token is unique to you, is that riuht? , ., . ., , right? it gets even more complex than that because _ right? it gets even more complex than that because you _ right? it gets even more complex than that because you can - right? it gets even more complex than that because you can have . than that because you can have
3:50 pm
tokens that are part of a series or an edition, but the thing about non—fungible, it stands for the fact the token you have can't be replicated and you are the only one who has it, so whoever buys this piece, this copy that was created by john lennon's son, no one else will have one like that stop if they ever want to sell that in the future, they will be able to. tim want to sell that in the future, they will be able to.— they will be able to. i'm really struggling _ they will be able to. i'm really struggling with _ they will be able to. i'm really struggling with this. _ they will be able to. i'm really struggling with this. i - they will be able to. i'm really struggling with this. i hope i they will be able to. i'm really| struggling with this. i hope i'm they will be able to. i'm really i struggling with this. i hope i'm not boring the viewers because i'm hoping that they are as baffled as i am. if you take the black cape, for example, which is going to be made into an nft, a digital twin? is it john lennon wearing it orjust a picture of the cake? —— cape. john lennon wearing it orjust a picture of the cake? -- cape. there can be all— picture of the cake? -- cape. there can be all sorts _ picture of the cake? -- cape. there can be all sorts of _ picture of the cake? -- cape. there can be all sorts of different - picture of the cake? -- cape. there can be all sorts of different items i can be all sorts of different items which are digitised and sometimes it
3:51 pm
is an artwork which is two—dimensional but sometimes it can be an artefact that is three—dimensional. people even have avatars just like if you were playing for a night or blocks where you can wear those three—dimensional objects or display them, so probably within the code of the nft it will indicate a lot of different things about the work, whether it is a three—dimensional object or two—dimensional, that type of information is included in the token. ., , information is included in the token. ., ., information is included in the token. ., , , token. how risky is it to buy these thins? it token. how risky is it to buy these things? it is _ token. how risky is it to buy these things? it is still— token. how risky is it to buy these things? it is still very _ token. how risky is it to buy these things? it is still very early - token. how risky is it to buy these things? it is still very early so i token. how risky is it to buy these things? it is still very early so it i things? it is still very early so it is definitely _ things? it is still very early so it is definitely risky, _ things? it is still very early so it is definitely risky, getting i is definitely risky, getting involved in these types of things, and most new technologies, when there is a big boom or a gold rush, like all want to profit and there are scammers and there are dark sides but if you look between the lines
3:52 pm
and read what is happening here, something really interesting happening. when we have our digital assets online today, if you publish assets online today, if you publish a photo on facebook or whatever else, often you are giving the copy right away to these large platforms and you are licensing it back from them. what this movement is about is taking ownership of our digital assets as we interact online and saying, you can use them anywhere but remember, this is mine. iloathed but remember, this is mine. what ha--ens but remember, this is mine. what ha ens if but remember, this is mine. what happens if you _ but remember, this is mine. what happens if you put _ but remember, this is mine. what happens if you put your _ but remember, this is mine. what happens if you put your nft on facebook?— facebook? that is a really interesting _ facebook? that is a really interesting question i facebook? that is a really interesting question and l facebook? that is a really i interesting question and that facebook? that is a really - interesting question and that has not really been defined legally yet in terms of how that works and with copyright law being made for other forms of use, it still needs to be updated on how that exactly works, so if you have a work that has an nft and is published on a platform that claims copyright, what does that claims copyright, what does that mean? we haven't seen that in court and we don't know yet. tt is
3:53 pm
court and we don't know yet. it is all very new. _ court and we don't know yet. it is all very new. as _ court and we don't know yet. it is all very new, as you _ court and we don't know yet. it is all very new, as you say, and i haven't quite got my analogue brain around it yet! but i appreciate your valiant effort to try and explain. hopefully i have provided some clarity. hopefully i have provided some clari . . hopefully i have provided some clari . , , clarity. maybe if i ever exist in the matter— clarity. maybe if i ever exist in the matter verse _ clarity. maybe if i ever exist in the matter verse i _ clarity. maybe if i ever exist in the matter verse i will - clarity. maybe if i ever exist in the matter verse i will need i clarity. maybe if i ever exist in the matter verse i will need a | clarity. maybe if i ever exist in i the matter verse i will need a black cape thatjohn lennon was wearing in help! maybe that is what i need. thanks forjoining us. i hope you were paying attention because there will be a test later! a runaway wallaby which evaded capture for nearly three weeks has finally been caught and returned home. ant, named after tv host ant mcpartlin. is now reunited with his brother, dec. jake zuckerman has the story. finally, after three weeks on the run, here we have... ..ant the wallaby.
3:54 pm
at last, the moment they'd been waiting for after a long and frustrating chase. it's just overwhelming, really. when you think three weeks, we'd almost got to the point where we didn't think we'd see them again. since escaping from a farm at thirlby in lincolnshire onjanuary 5th, ant has evaded capture time after time. he's kept one hop ahead of his pursuers, and even skipped town when it looked like he was caught in this trap. weirdly, i've actually got experience of catching two wallabies previously. so i thought, i've got something to bring to the party. and sure enough, yeah. it was just great to see him there. and we knew that the trap that we've got this time was far more...far more substantial and better suited to larger animals. but now he's back home, waiting to be reunited with his brother dec. this is our wallaby enclosure. i can't show you in the enclosure at the moment because ant is resting following his... ..following his escapade. he's got food, plenty of food and water in there. we do keep checking on him
3:55 pm
to make sure he's ok. and he will have to stay there until the vets give him the all—clear. thankfully, ant seems unharmed by his experience, which has seen him become a local celebrity. other than the little knock on the nose, he looks to be an absolute picture of health. if anything, from what i gather, he's grown quite a lot. so he's clearly had some decent diet out and about where he's been, but, yeah, he's certainly none the worse for wear. volunteers have reinforced the fences around the wallaby enclosure, and they're hoping that this is the last time ant manages to get the jump on them. jake zukerman, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. our weather is about to turn more unsettled, which means it's the last day of the widespread cloud and cold underneath that cloud, especially where the low cloud and the mist is hanging on throughout the day, as it will across parts of wales and england again. there has been some sunshine so far today in northeast scotland,
3:56 pm
though, clouding over and through the afternoon this weather frontjust moving through, taking a few outbreaks of rain across northern scotland, whereas elsewhere, despite all of the cloud, with the exception of perhaps a little drizzle, it is dry. you can see the extent of the cloud, though, it's western counties of northern ireland, perhaps northeast wales, a few spots in northeast england seeing some sunny spells breaking through, though nowhere near as bright as it was yesterday in northeast england. and these temperatures, well, actually where you have the thickest low cloud and mistjust around two or three degrees celsius, that's why it's feeling so cold out there. but notice overnight tonight, some breaks around, some clear spells in scotland, northern ireland and also towards northern england. parts of wales and the midlands later in the night, as well as a breeze, picks up across the northern half of the uk, and the lowest temperatures will be across eastern parts, with any of those clear spells allowing for a touch of frost. now, it may be the far south, southeast of england staying mostly cloudy tomorrow, but elsewhere it is looking like a brighter days so that will be different, especially through wales and england, but notice the rain gathering and turning heavier towards northwest scotland as the day goes on. here and into the northern isles,
3:57 pm
too, a strengthening wind will see some gales developing, turning breezy elsewhere, just allowing that cloud to break up more. back into double figures, the temperatures in northern ireland and scotland, but higher too. we get some brighter spells in wales and england. this system working its way southwards overnight and into thursday. behind it, severe gales developing for a time towards orkney in particular, the wind slowly easing on thursday. not much rain on this system as it moves through southern england on thursday. it takes a while for the cloud to clear away, whereas elsewhere it's a much brighter day. some sunshine, a scattering of showers, a colder feel again in scotland, whereas much of wales and england see temperatures bounce back into double figures. frost and fog could be around on friday morning, turning wet again in scotland as friday goes on. a weather system moving south overnight and into saturday. a windy day on saturday. and then on sunday we could see another area of low pressure heading our way. the chance of some rain, perhaps even a little snow in places, too. we'll keep you updated.
3:58 pm
3:59 pm
4:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm ben brown live in downing street. the police say they are investigating multiple events that took place in downing street during lockdown. i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years, in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. i welcome the met's decision to conduct its own investigation because i believe this will help to give the public the clarity it needs and help to draw a line under matters. and the bbc understands — with no
4:01 pm
objection from the met police — sue gray's report may be published sooner rather than later. i'm martine croxall — the other main news. bradford council is going to lose control of its children's services. it comes after the death of star hobson. the 16—month—old died in 2020 after months of neglect, cruelty and injury. foreign secretary liz truss says she will be visiting ukraine next week — it's as tensions with russia grow there — she warns an invasion from russia would be a massive strategic mistake. and it took upto 300 people to rescue him — we'll hear from the man trapped in a welsh cave for 54 hours. hello and welcome to bbc news live
4:02 pm
from downing street. the metropolitan police is investigating gatherings at number ten and across government, to see if breaches of covid restrictions took place. the commisioner of britain's biggest force, cressida dick, confirmed that her officers are now looking into potential rule—breaking, as a result of information provided by civil servants, who are also compiling a report on what happened. the bbc understands the met police has no objection to that report, by sue gray, being published while their investigation is ongoing so it may still be published in the coming days. borisjohnson says he welcomes the investigation and believes it will �*help to draw a line under matters'. our political corresspondent, jonathan blake, has the latest. reporter: was it right.
4:03 pm
to have a party in downing street, ms dorries? questions for cabinet ministers. was it right to have a birthday gathering in downing street? meeting in person this morning now rules have been relaxed amid new claims about a birthday celebration for boris johnson during lockdown. as they gathered an already serious situation for the government would take another dramatic turn. police had said they would not investigate claims of parties in whitehall unless a government enquiry found evidence of criminality — until now. as a result, firstly of information provided by the cabinet office enquiry team, and secondly my officers' own assessment, i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years in relation to potential breaches of covid regulations. the commissioner did not specify which events were under investigation, but promised updates
4:04 pm
at significant points. as the news broke, one minister came to borisjohnson's defence. the leadership of borisjohnson has had has been so brilliant that he has got us through this incredibly difficult period and got all the big decisions right. an event on the prime minister's a birthday injune 2020 is the latest to come to light. downing street admitted staff gathered in the cabinet eoom — how many is disputed, but one person present said up to 30 were there including the interior designer lulu lytle leading refurbishment of the number ten flat. borisjohnston, who we are told was present for around ten minutes, was given a cake. at the time social gatherings indoors were banned. laura oakley�*s father died weeks earlier. the 19th ofjune would have been his 68th birthday party, and to find out boris is having fun with his pals in government,
4:05 pm
it brings everything back, we'd not been able to grieve because we were only allowed ten people at the funeral, we were not allowed to have a wake, and just when you think you're getting over the crest of the wave this kind of stuff comes up. borisjohnson had acknowledged public anger, but sounded upbeat today about what this could mean. mr speaker, a few weeks ago i commissioned an independent enquiry into a series of events in downing street, the cabinet office as well as some other whitehall departments may have constituted potential breaches of the covid regulations. that process has quite properly involved sharing information continuously with the metropolitan police, so i welcome the met�*s decision to conduct its own investigation because i believe this will help to give the public the clarity it needs and help draw a line under matters. whatever the investigation concludes his opponent say his time is already up. borisjohnson has now degraded the office of prime minister, it is distracting everybody from the serious cost of living and other issues the country faces,
4:06 pm
and disrespected the sacrifices everyone else has made. that is why he must go now. we got here because the prime minister cannot tell the truth, he has lied continually and been dishonest to parliament and to the british people. frankly, he has to go. he should resign, that's the only way to clear up this mess. downing street says the prime minister does not believe he has broken the law. the question now, how does a police investigation affect attempts from some of his own mps to remove him? jonathan blake, bbc news. a spokesperson for number ten said the prime minister doesn't believe he has broken the law and also saying downing street will require anyone to cooperate with this police investigation who is included in it. and also that the prime minister was told that there is going to be this
4:07 pm
metropolitan police investigation shortly before the cabinet meeting here this morning but he decided not to tell his fellow members of the cabinet about it. the metropolitan police previously said it wouldn't usually investigate past complaints about lockdown breaches. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, explains why they have now begun an inquiry. for months, whitehall has been gripped by arguments around alleged parties and breaches of coronavirus regulations in downing street and its garden. the metropolitan police has said nothing except it was in touch with sue gray, who is leading the cabinet office investigation. but the head of the force cressida dick, speaking to the london assembly police and crime commissioner this morning, said while the met was generally reluctant to investigate breaches of regulations that took place months ago, three factors might change that.
4:08 pm
the three factors were and are there was evidence that those involved new or ought to have known that what they were doing was an offence, where not investigating would significantly undermine the law, and where there was little ambiguity around the absence of any reasonable defence. the met has been heavily criticised for not investigating earlier but has waited for the cabinet office to gather evidence first and has now decided it should actively investigate some of the alleged parties. but what about the officers who work in downing street every day? didn't they notice the events when they were happening? it sounds like there was a culture of lawbreaking parties, rather than a single one—off event. we have heard reports of suitcases of drink clanking through security. surely some officers were concerned about what they were seeing at the time?
4:09 pm
cressida dick would not comment on that today except to say that if it was relevant it would be included in the investigation. even two months into the first lockdown, police had still been actively patrolling public spaces, making sure nobody was mixing with people outside their household, so there remains a worry about double standards. there is no question, there is a huge level of public concern about this and no matter what the met had said it looks like one law for them and another for another. anyone found to have attended an illegal gathering in downing street during lockdown faces a fine. at the start of the pandemic they were £60, later rising to £100. daniel sandford, bbc news. the prime minister has just returned here after a hearing in the house of
4:10 pm
commons he spoke about ukraine. let's speak to our political correspondent alex forsyth. it's getting complicated because we've got this police investigation and also the sue gray enquiry and that report from the sue gray was originally due we thought perhaps this week. are we still, whilst the police investigation is going on, are we still going to get that? you are we still going to get that? you are riaht, are we still going to get that? you are right. it's— are we still going to get that? gm. are right, it's getting pretty complicated. sue gray is a senior civil servant carrying out an investigation into various allegations on behalf of the cabinet office and lots of conservative mps were waiting for that report before deciding what action they might take next against the prime minister. we were told this morning when the metropolitan police launch their own investigation, that, parts of that sue gray report that crossed over with the police investigation wouldn't be published, there was an expectation there at very least would be a delay when it came to the
4:11 pm
most serious allegations in the sue gray report. this afternoon we are hearing, in fact, there could be part of that sue gray report published, we don't know when that might be end to what extent. it seems to be an evolving situation and there are conversations on going in government about what, if any or all come of that sue gray report could still come. the reason it matters so much is because that report, the findings of official investigations of what a lot of mps are looking for, conservative mps are looking for, conservative mps are looking for before deciding whether the pm will keep the support of whether they will move against him. i suppose that's one of the key questions is politically, what is going on on the tory backbenches? we know some may be just a few, had sentin know some may be just a few, had sent in letters of no confidence to the chairman of the 1922 committee, if they get 54, that could trigger a
4:12 pm
vote, would trigger a no—confidence vote. is all of this, these developments about the police investigation, likely to inspire more tory mps who do not like once been going on to send in letters to the 1922 committee or will they wait and see what sue gray and the police say? and see what sue gray and the police sa ? ., �* . and see what sue gray and the police sa? ., .,. say? that's the million-dollar ruestion say? that's the million-dollar question and _ say? that's the million-dollar question and i _ say? that's the million-dollar question and i think _ say? that's the million-dollar question and i think there i say? that's the million-dollar question and i think there are j question and i think there are different schools of thought, as there has been throughout the whole process. some conservative mps earlier today, following the news of that investigation by the police said, this is becoming too damaging, this is the time we need to take a look about whether boris johnson is the right person to lead. they wanted other colleagues not to delay any further and press on with a vote of no confidence. other conservative mps are thought the police investigation had effectively bought borisjohnson some time, they were saying them and their colleagues
4:13 pm
wanted to see the conclusions of the police enquiry before deciding what if any course of action should follow. now the big question is whether or not we will get part, all or none of the sue gray report, that could change things quite considerable if that comes. that is still a big if, it's a very fluid situation and things are still moving. what it is worth noting is that there is and has been unhappiness and frustration across the conservative party at the way this whole episode has been handled, there is no that you speak to that doesn't recognise this has been a damaging episode for the conservative party but what there isn't and hasn't been as any real consensus on what comes next. it's safe to say this is far from over. safe to say borisjohnson's political future still hangs in the balance. precisely what comes next, we are waiting to see. thank you very much indeed.
4:14 pm
with me is the politics reporter for bloomberg joe mayes. let's pick up on the point, what is the level of danger right now for borisjohnson the level of danger right now for boris johnson with the level of danger right now for borisjohnson with this bombshell news that the police are investigating what has happened here over the past couple of years? the dancer over the past couple of years? the danger level _ over the past couple of years? tt2 danger level is very high still. if it was found he had committed a crime or down a treat official had that would clearly be very damaging but —— or officials. i get the impression it is not as bad as yesterday because they feel this has been cut on for a bit too long now and there are major issues such as the crisis in ukraine and the cost of living crisis, they feel perhaps too much focus has been put on this issueis too much focus has been put on this issue is anything now is the time to rally around. my sense is he is in
4:15 pm
less danger than a day or so ago, that sounds perhaps counterintuitive but the heat seems to have been drawn out compared with a couple of days ago. tt drawn out compared with a couple of da s auo. , drawn out compared with a couple of da s auo. . drawn out compared with a couple of da s auo. , ., days ago. it might be weeks or months before _ days ago. it might be weeks or months before we _ days ago. it might be weeks or months before we get - days ago. it might be weeks or months before we get the i days ago. it might be weeks or. months before we get the police report. sue gray's report which she has been carrying out for quite a while, it was thought that would be this week, do you still think it could be this week because apparently the police have said they do not mind if she publishes it. t do not mind if she publishes it. i think it could still come this do not mind if she publishes it. t think it could still come this week, there was confusion earlier about whether some parts might be kept back but it seems like that isn't the case and we could have this double whammy where the sue gray report comes out and then the prospect of the police investigation which could find i the prime minister later down the line so you have an interim period, perhaps, whether it is hanging over the prime minister. potentially very damaging period after the sue gray report comes out. we
4:16 pm
period after the sue gray report comes out-— period after the sue gray report comes out. ~ ., �* ~ ., ., . ., comes out. we don't know how much of the sue gray — comes out. we don't know how much of the sue gray report _ comes out. we don't know how much of the sue gray report we _ comes out. we don't know how much of the sue gray report we will _ comes out. we don't know how much of the sue gray report we will get - comes out. we don't know how much of the sue gray report we will get to i the sue gray report we will get to see, that's another area of controversy.— see, that's another area of controversy. see, that's another area of controvers. �*, a, , a, �* controversy. it's a question we've ut to controversy. it's a question we've put to downing — controversy. it's a question we've put to downing street _ controversy. it's a question we've put to downing street every - controversy. it's a question we've put to downing street every day, | put to downing street every day, which is will you give us the findings will be which is will you give us the findings will he get the whole thing unredacted? my sense is the public would like full transparency and want to see as much as possible. we need to see what comes out when it is published. it’s need to see what comes out when it is published-— is published. it's interesting what ha--ened is published. it's interesting what happened this — is published. it's interesting what happened this morning _ is published. it's interesting what happened this morning because l is published. it's interesting what i happened this morning because we gather that the prime minister was told, it must have been pretty unwelcome news, the police were investigating, he then went to the cabinet but did not tell the cabinet this. �* , , ., cabinet but did not tell the cabinet this. �* ,, ., ., , cabinet but did not tell the cabinet this. ., ., , this. assuming that many cabinet ministers were _ this. assuming that many cabinet ministers were upset _ this. assuming that many cabinet ministers were upset to _ this. assuming that many cabinet ministers were upset to learn - this. assuming that many cabinet| ministers were upset to learn that crucial news from the media rather than the prime minister telling them himself. quite an embarrassing moment in thejoke himself. quite an embarrassing moment in the joke was made that the cabinet what the last people in britain to learn that the room they were in was a potential crime scene.
4:17 pm
not the best moment for them that the prime minister was holding that back because he wanted them to hear it from the police. joe. back because he wanted them to hear it from the police.— it from the police. joe, thank you very much- _ it from the police. joe, thank you very much- on — it from the police. joe, thank you very much. on another _ it from the police. joe, thank you very much. on another day - it from the police. joe, thank you very much. on another day of. it from the police. joe, thank you - very much. on another day of intense political drama here in downing street, the prime minister did a just before he made remarks about ukraine in the house of commons that he welcomes the news there will be a police investigation and he said he thinks it will help give the public clarity and it will help draw a line under the matter. we will see whether it does draw a line under it matters, and what it means for his political future. that's the latest from here. back to martine in the studio. bradford council is going to lose control of its children's services. it follows the death of star hobson, the 16—month—old who died in 2020 after months of "neglect, cruelty and injury" at the hands of her mother frankie smith and smith's partner savannah brockhill. the services will be taken
4:18 pm
into a trust which will "drive rapid improvements" after recommendations from the education secretary nadhim za hawi. mrzahawi said in a statement: "keeping vulnerable children safe from harm is non—negotiable. where a council is not meeting its duty to do this, we will take action to protect children and put their needs first. our correspondent nick garnett is in bradford and has more on this. bradford's children surfaces have been under review for some considerable time, that has been led by steve walker from leeds city council and he has been brought in to look at what was happening and how things could be improved. it is a findings which have led to the changes today. that hasn't really been brought into play by the case of star hobson, 16—month—old girl killed by her mother's partner. in that trial it was heard time and time againfamily that trial it was heard time and time again family and relatives had brought up worries about her and her
4:19 pm
health on five separate occasions they have been in touch with the local authority and on each occasion nothing had happened. that is the catalyst for the change being announced. we have spoken to social workers in the city over the last few weeks and they talk about the tremendous pressures they've been under and eight site there is a huge caseload and there has been a rapid turnover in staff and new inexperience members have been brought in who have had to deal with caseloads as soon as they've touched the ground and not had enough time to get ready and ready for that workload. as well as that there's been a huge caseload, far more than in some other parts of the country. this new trust now in place is made up this new trust now in place is made up of an independent chair and board of directors and it comes after the services were rated inadequate in 2018. it's not the first time these powers have been used by the government. it started, one that
4:20 pm
springs to mind was doncaster being taken over in 2013, the same powers most recently used in sunderland. it allows fast changes to be made and brought into play. education secretary said keeping vulnerable children safe from harm is non—negotiable. we are a council meeting its duty to do this we will take action to protect children put their needs first. this might be forever but it allows a new set of senior managers and directors to take charge and responsibility to improve things in at very short space of time. to what extent will the staff from the children's services department in bradford council be involved in this new entity? they will be very much involved but it is not bringing in a whole new set of staff, looking at the way things operate, the way they work and looking at things such as responsibility and the way that
4:21 pm
there has been a rapid turnover of staff and these new members of staff have been brought in with very little notice and been told to get on with the work without having perhaps the full amount on the road training they would otherwise have. they will be involved and they will be allowed to have their say. what this process does is it allows that change to happen at a very quick time, it is pump starting things and it will change, so the authority hopes, it will make those changes possible in our very quick period of time. susan hinchcliffe is the leader of bradford council. asa as a leader i think responsibility for this place very seriously, and everything that happened in it, and i want to make sure we move things forward now because this is a real moment in time to show that things are going to change and attract new expert social workers and support
4:22 pm
the social workers we have here who are doing good work, to make sure we can move forward together. it is time to get politics out of children's services and work with the government to move forward together. everyone has the best interests of children in bradford at heart and we want to work together to make that happen. a is—year—old boy remains in hospital — although with injuries not believed to be life—threatening — after being stabbed at a school in cumbria. another student at the school — a i6—year—old boy — remains in police custody having been arrested on suspicion of grievous bodily harm. in a statement cumbria police said officers were in attendance at the school and reassured the public and parents that there is no perceived wider threat. the foreign secretary, liz truss, is to visit ukraine next week, as fears grow about a potential russian invasion. speaking in the commons, she told mps that a russian incursion into ukraine would be a "massive strategic mistake" that would be met with harsh economic sanctions. thousands of russian troops are stationed at the border although the kremlin has insisted it has no intention of launching an attack.
4:23 pm
our world affairs correspondent, caroline hawley reports. the might of the russian army on display and its ally belarus, ukraine's northern neighbour. joint military exercises are planned for next month as moscow also builds up troops on ukraine's eastern border. some io0,000 soldiers in all, amid growing fears of a russian invasion, another war in europe. western leaders held a virtual crisis talks last night. together with our allies we are standing up to russian aggression. the foreign secretary has just announced she will visit ukraine next week. a further military incursion by russia into ukraine would be a massive strategic mistake and come with a severe cost on russia's economy, including coordinated sanctions. the west is trying desperately to deter a russian attack. this is a danish frigate on its way to the baltic sea. joe biden insists western leaders
4:24 pm
are unanimous about how to respond, he has placed 8500 american troops on alert to deploy at short notice to europe if they need to. the west is also threatening an unprecedented range of sanctions if president putin does indeed gives orders to invade. we must not underestimate how serious he is. a sovereign and independent ukraine is a direct affront to his ambitions, as he sees them, to restore russia as a great power. given the maximal nature of his demands, given he has rejected the only reasonable compromise, it is hard for me to see how he can avoid having to follow through to some extent. in the ukrainian capital kyiv there is a wary, uncertain calm, some quietly calculating what they will do, how they will keep their family safe if russia does invade. moscow insists it has no such plans and has accused the americans of whipping up tensions
4:25 pm
by putting its troops on alert, but it has also made clear that diplomacy is not yet dead, leaving a glimmer of hope that a new conflict could still be averted. caroline hawley, bbc news. borisjohnson made a statement in the commons on ukraine this afternoon. he said the freedoms gained in europe since the fall of the berlin wall, must be maintained. in every contact with russia, the uk and our allies have stressed our unity and adherence to vital points of principle. we cannot bargain away the vision of a europe whole and free that emerged in those amazing years from 1989 to 1991, healing the division of our content by the iron curtain. we will not reopen that divide by agreeing to overturn the european security order because russia has placed the gun to ukraine's head. nor can we accept the doctrine implicit in russian proposals that all states are sovereign but some are more sovereign than others.
4:26 pm
guidance urging people to work from home wherever possible in scotland is to be relaxed in favour of a "hybrid" system of office and remote working. employers have been asked to phase workers back into spending some time in the office from monday 31st january. first minister nicola sturgeon said the move was possible due to a "significant" fall in covid—i9 cases. but she warned that a "mass return" to offices overnight could run the risk of pushing infection levels up again. royal mail plans to cut around 700 managementjobs. the company says the move will deliver annual savings of around £40 million. a royal mail spokesperson says it's discussing the changes with trade unions. three children and two adults have been taken to hospital after a double—decker bus hit a shop in north—east london. police said it happened at around 20 past eight this morning. labour mayor of london sadiq khan
4:27 pm
said his thoughts were with those affected by the "terrible incident". at least eight people have been killed and 38 injured in a crush outside an africa cup of nations match in cameroon. witnesses described chaotic scenes outside the stadium in the capital yaounde as thousands of football fans struggled to get in. our correspondent nick cavell has the latest. one of only about three gates along here that actually was open yesterday evening for the match between cameron and comoros. there was other gates around the stadium but these were the only ones that were open and everybody was trying to get through here. people also were having to go through covid tests just in front of us, that created a bottleneck, it was getting closer to the match. between the hosts to try to get into that stadium there was a lot of noise in their early on. it was meant to be only 80% full, of 60,000 capacity. i was inside during the game and it was a lot fuller than 80%. yes, a lot of people were trying to get in here and unfortunately that led to the crush that happened here yesterday evening and in the last few minutes the head of the
4:28 pm
confederation of african football has been passed here looking at the scene of the accident. he's also just an announcement over in another part of town, that there will be a minute's silence before the games and the match that was due to take place here on sunday has now been moved across town to yaounde, to another stadium here in town. a lot older and a lot less new than this one, so that will be happening on sunday. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hopefully it will be a little less and grade tomorrow than today, really is a very grey and cold out there today with temperatures only barely above freezing this afternoon and some drizzle in some spots as well. different in northern scotland, mild and windier, some patchy rain drifting further south through parts of scotland into
4:29 pm
tonight. there will be some clear spells developing here and there as the breeze picks up, a touch of frost for eastern scotland and parts of wales and england. tomorrow is looking like a brighter day, large areas of cloud but some holes allowing bright or sunny spells. most places looking dry. northern ireland getting some rain to end day. heavy and persistent rain with gales, mild across wales and england. as the rain moves south on wednesday night, severe deals for a time in the northern isles, that clears southern areas into thursday, more rain into western scotland on friday.
4:30 pm
hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: police say they will now investigate multiple events that took place in downing street during lockdown. i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years, in relation to potential breaches of covid—i9 regulations. i welcome the met's decision to conduct its own investigation because i believe this will help to give the public the clarity it needs and help to draw a line
4:31 pm
under matters. bradford council is going to lose control of its children's services. it comes after the death of star hobson. the i6—month—old died in 2020 after months of neglect, cruelty and injury. foreign secretary liz truss says she will be visiting ukraine next week — it's as tensions with russia grow there — she warns an invasion from russia would be a massive strategic mistake. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. former england manager roy hodgson looks set to return to management in the premier league — we're expecting his appointment at watford later today. hodgson left crystal palace at the end of last season, but kept them in the top tier of english football in the four seasons he was in charge. he was already the oldest manager in the premier league and at 7a will be so again. his career has taken in 22 clubs and spans over 40 years. it comes after the departure of claudio ranieri who was sacked afterjust 14 games.
4:32 pm
championship side hull city have sacked manager grant mccann less than a week after being taken over by a turkish—based consortium. mccann guided the club back to the championship last season following relegation. he's been dismissed despite back—to—back wins to move the club 10 points clear of the relegation zone manchester united's anthony martial willjoin sevilla on loan for the rest of the season, subject to a medical. there is no option to buy and no loan fee but the spanish club will cover the striker�*s wages. hejoined united from monaco in 2015 and told boss ralf rangnick he wanted a change of scenery. england midfielderjill scott has joined aston villa on loan from manchester city for the rest of the season. scott has been at city for eight years, and spent the second half of last season on loan at everton. she'll be looking for more game time to boost her hopes of being picked for this summer's european championship. some sad news from the world of football — former celtic manager wimjansen has died. the dutchman made his name as a player with feyenoord and will be remembered for leading celtic to the league
4:33 pm
title in his only season in charge in 1997/98, stopping rangers from winning 10 in a row. he also signed henrik larsson and won the league cup. jansen was 75 and had been living with dementia. at the australian open, home favourite and world number one ashleigh barty made it look easy as she progressed to the semi finals. she dominated the americanjessica pegula in straight sets, 6—2, 6—0, in her bid to become the first australian to win the singles title in 44 years. i've grown as a person and as a player and i feel like a more complete tennis player. i've got a couple more years of experience under my belt and in handling different situations and solving problems out on court and it's a credit to my team because they have done so much work with me to make me the best version of myself. i'm loving playing out here, it is bringing a smile to myself, regardless of what is happening during the points, it has been a lot of fun so far and hopefully there is a bit more left. and she will face madison keys, who's into her first
4:34 pm
grand slam semi—final for four years after beating french open champion barbora krejcikova 6—3, 6—2. in the men's draw, rafa nadal�*s hopes of a 21st grand slam are still alive. he came out on top against canada's denis shapovolov in his first five setter of the tournament so far. and england bowler kate cross has said the side need to force a positive result after weather frustration during the t20 series — as they prepare to take on australia in a women's ashes test that starts on wednesday evening in canberra. it doesn't happen often, winning test matches in the women's game, so being able to get that win would boost us so much as a group and the confidence and momentum that you can then take into the last three games, going into the one—day series, that would be absolutely enormous. we know it will be hard work and i think everyone is up for that fight and we have worked so hard on our fitness and being able to cope with the demands of four—day cricket.
4:35 pm
we're all chomping at the bit to get out there. and just before we go, senegal are in action at the africa cup of nations — they're one of the favourites — they're up against cape verde. you can find updates from that — and all the rest of the day's stories — on the bbc sport website. thousands of families are being hit by rising energy bills despite the price cap being in place. around a third of households in some rural areas rely on oil because they're not connected to mains gas. the price cap does not cover oil and with domestic oil prices rising by 50% in the last year some are now struggling to pay their bills. our correspondent sarah dickins reports from ceredigion in west wales. these homes are hardly old stone cottages, they're relatively modern, but like so many others in rural communities, they're not connected to the mains gas and are dependent
4:36 pm
on oilfor their heating and hot water. one in three homes in this county have oil heating, and most of rural wales is the same. this is the oil tank. i keep it, at the minute, it's about here. to fill it up to here is about £1,000. sarah bate is widowed, lives with her teenage daughter and is looking for work. with £220 a fortnight for the two of them, filling the oil tank is impossible. she buys in smaller quantities, but that's more expensive. i have it on if it's freezing. if it's not freezing, we don't have it on. and i don't leave it running all the time. i don't have too many luxuries, to be honest, you know, to be fair. everything's gone a bit more basic. basic food, basic washing, basic... i need new shoes, but they're going to have to wait! i could get rid of my car, but then, you see, i'm looking for work, and round here, if you're looking for work, you need a car because we don't have a bus service any more. oil tanks dominate the gardens here and concern is widespread about how to pay the bills.
4:37 pm
all these prices are just creeping up and up and up, and it's putting so much pressure on people. people having to make the choice as to whether they heat or eat. there's no regulation as to a maximum that people can be charged, as there is for electricity or mains gas, so people don't get that advantage. it would be wrong to suggest that the regulator's price cap doesn't help families' bills, it clearly does, but come to a community like this — and many others across wales — and we're reminded of a time when houses were built fuelled by coal, and then oil, because they were cheap. they certainly aren't now, and prices are expected to go further. and household bills would continue to be under pressure. 50, oil prices are up- about 57% on a year ago. i it's not as bad as gas prices but, i nevertheless, the oil price has now moved up to around $87 a barrel, |which is, you know, close to 60%j higher than where it was a year ago. it's hard to see prices going down
4:38 pm
very much in the short term - because there's been - a period of underinvestment. the experience in wales is repeated across rural england, too, with communities in cumbria, norfolk, suffolk, amongst others, seeing around one in four homes dependent on oil heating. those households on oil for heating still have their electricity bills protected by the regulator's price cap, and the uk government says they can be eligible for warm home discount of £140 a year. also, that there are winter fuel and cold weather payments for vulnerable and low—income households. in wales, the welsh government offers an additional £100 winter fuel supplement for people on certain benefits, and oil customers like sarah can apply for £250 a year towards their fuel bills from the discretionary assistance fund. the fact that they're saying it's going to go up again worries me more because i do think, well, what will we do then, you know? am i going to have longer and longer periods without heat? but the price rises are a result of global changes
4:39 pm
and are expected to rise further. sarah dickins, bbc news, ceredigion. a woman who was stabbed in the street in west london before her suspected killer was allegedly hit by a car has been named by police. 43—year—old yasmin chkaifi, from maida vale, was pronounced dead yesterday after suffering stab wounds. 41—year—old leon mccaskre, who police say had previously been in a relationship with her, died after being hit by a car. the driver of the car, a 26—year—old man, has been arrested on suspicion of murder and bailed until mid—february. an investigation into the fire that destroyed glasgow school of art in 2018 has failed to find a cause. the scottish fire and rescue service spent more than three years investigating the blaze, but said the damage was so bad that any possible evidence was lost. the fire broke out during a multimillion pound restoration of the world—renowned charles rennie mackintosh building following another fire four years before. the world's most
4:40 pm
powerful telescope has reached its final destination — a million miles from earth. the james webb telescope took 30 days to get there — and will now spend five months studying the universe's earliest stars. dr renske smit from liverpool john moores university is one of only a handful of uk—based astronomers who'll use the telescope. earlier, she told me about the work she'll be doing. what i am really excited to do with james webb is to look back in time, 30.5 billion years, and see how the first stars in the first galaxies in the first black holes were formed, so everything we have today in the universe, how that came to be, that is what i want to look at. what can you see and what do you know about so far? i'm trying to establish, where are the gaps in the knowledge? we can look back so far already 13 billion years in time and we do that with the hubble telescope every day, in my work,
4:41 pm
but we still can't see the first stars so we still have a bit more to go and this is where james webb is going to answer that question, of when the first beginnings were. talk to us about the sequence of events, after the big bang there was an afterglow, and what happened within the afterglow and after it? after the afterglow, there is a period we call the dark ages sometimes, there's no starlight and the universe is quite empty. it takes a long time for gravity to pull material together. until there is enough gravitational pull to bring about the first stars, basically, and that takes a few hundred million years. but that moment, the universe lights up and the first starlight, that is what we want to see. explain, how do you interpret what you are looking at? that is a good question.
4:42 pm
multiple instruments on board where we will first look at images that look at thousands and thousands of galaxies at the same time but most of those galaxies will be much closer to home, so we need to find the needle in the hay stack, that galaxy that we think is is really far away, and then we have other instruments where we can look at more detail and see, for example, how the first oxygen and carbon atoms were formed in the galaxy. that is very exciting, to have that combination of looking in detail and learning so much about what is happening in the universe as well as being able to find these very first objects. there is a sun shield on the telescope which is the size of a tennis court, what function does that serve? if we want to look back in time we have got to look with infrared and the stars we see with the naked eye on earth, when we look back in time, and so we need,
4:43 pm
because heat radiation also radiates in infrared and we need to cool the telescope down so we have a sun shield which is at any time between the sun and the mirror to allow the mirror to be cooling down, a few degrees above absolute zero. that is to get really sensitive images from these very faint fuzzy galaxies very far away. throughout this year, events are being held to mark 1,900 years since the building of hadrian's wall. but there are concerns that climate change could now be threatening the ancient site. justin rowlatt reports. for the romans, this was the end of civilization. at 73 miles long, hadrian's wall is the greatest roman structure in britain. it's reckoned it took 15,000 men six years to build,
4:44 pm
and the sites around the wall have been the source of some of the most incredible roman artifacts everfound in britain. the waterlogged peat soils here mean organic materials, like this child's shoe, don't rot. they've found boxing gloves, some of the oldest handwritten messages in the world, even a roman toilet seat. but now climate change is threatening the ancient objects preserved along the wall. so what we've got here is a field where it should be very, very wet. but what's happening is it's drying out throughout the year, and the land is dropping. this is magna, one of the biggest roman forts. the site has never been dug, and now archaeologists are worried because the treasures buried here could begin to rot away. pretty much everything that they used on this site for 300 or 400 years has the potential to be preserved in more or less the same state it was thrown away in, under the ground where we're
4:45 pm
standing, which is an incredible opportunity. just think of the range of stuff that we could be standing on right now, and what kind of story that can tell us about life here almost 2,000 years ago. they've dug boreholes to monitor what's happening, and at teesside university they're analysing soil samples. specifically, we're looking at moisture levels, total carbon, total nitrogen, the chemistry and microbiology changes that go on with the drying out of that peat area. and what if it is continuing to dry out? what does that mean for the archaeological remains? they will disappear. we will lose our heritage. and it isn'tjust roman remains at risk. there are reckoned to be more than 22,000 archaeological sites in uk peatlands. peatland represents such a small l part of the ecology of britain, l but the stories that they can tell is massive, and it has such- a big implication for not. just our personal history, but also our climatic history.
4:46 pm
and our environmental history, and we need to protect them. who knows what else will be lost unless these sites are preserved? justin rowlatt, bbc news, hadrian's wall. the headlines on bbc news... police say they are investigating multiple events that took place in downing street during lockdown. bradford council is going to lose control of its children's services. it comes after the death of star hobson. the i6—month—old died in 2020 after months of neglect, cruelty and injury. foreign secretary liz truss says she will be visiting ukraine next week — as tensions with russia grow there — she warns an invasion from russia would be a massive strategic mistake. the caver trapped in the brecon beacons in what became britain's longest cave rescue has been reunited with the volunteers that saved his life. been reunited with the volunteers george linnane broke his leg,
4:47 pm
jaw and ribs in a fall underground and was stuck there for sa hours before 300 caving volunteers from all over the uk worked together to rescue him. george is now training to join a rescue team, as hywel griffith reports. did you think that you might not survive? honestly? yes, at times. i sort of flipped between two states. there was the, "i'm going to fight this thing and i'm going to survive" state, which then became, "i really don't care, and i wish you'd stop talking to me." back in november, george found himself at the centre of britain's longest ever cave rescue. he'd been here in the brecon beacons dozens of times. but on that day, deep underground, his life changed in a split second. the first thing i knew about it was this... ..instantaneous feeling of legs whirling around in mid—air and arms grabbing for something and just this kind of feeling that, you know, one second i was caving, the next minute the world went mad.
4:48 pm
and then it all went black. and then two minutes later, i kind of woke up in a very different state to... to when i'd started. his friend went to raise the alarm. george had broken his leg, his jaw, several ribs and was bleeding. after three hours, the first rescuers arrived. i remember hearing the voices in the distance and realising that this time they weren't in my head. they were actually real people that were coming. i remember those first aiders turning up. i've basically lost somewhere between 12 and 18 hours, probably towards the 18 hour end. so there's bits of rescue that i don't remember. are you all right? how are you doing? nice to see you. i know who you are! to help george piece together what happened, we reunited him with some of the 300 volunteers from around britain who stopped what they were doing to answer the call. it's in human nature, isn't it? and, erm, we've all been in those remote situations,
4:49 pm
and we know that if something happened to us, our colleagues would come and get us. and part of that is to do the reverse and do whatever is necessary, and everybody brought their a—game. so we've got rope set up 30 metres. despite his injuries, george says he will return to caving. and to show his gratitude, he's training tojoin the team who rescued him. for 300 people to come to my aid from across the country, all come together to achieve one thing as a team, and the single bloody mindedness of it as well, you know? there's no way they were going to leave you? there's no way they were going to let anything other than a good outcome happen, you know? i take my hat off to them. we have the latest government covid—19 figures for the last 24—hour is. 94,326 new cases of
4:50 pm
covid—19 reported. there have been 439 deaths recorded in the latest 24—hour period, people dying within 28 days of a positive test. the police say they will be investigating multiple events that took place in downing street and whitehall in lockdown and we can go back to our correspondent in the central lobby. we back to our correspondent in the central lobby.— central lobby. we had the announcement _ central lobby. we had the announcement from - central lobby. we had the i announcement from cressida central lobby. we had the - announcement from cressida dick central lobby. we had the _ announcement from cressida dick the commission of the metropolitan police this morning, and she said the met police would be investigating some of the incidents that have taken place in downing street and whitehall although we didn't know which ones. it was initially thought that would delay the publication of the report being carried out by sue gray who is a senior civil servant, into these allegations of parties and gatherings in whitehall and downing street, but we have now been told there are conversations ongoing
4:51 pm
between the cabinet office and the metropolitan police about whether part or perhaps even all of the report could still be published in the next couple of days. the reason why that matters is because there are conservative mps who say they were waiting for the findings of that sue gray investigation before deciding what if any action they may take against the prime minister. we can talk this through with a conservative mp conor burns who has been a staunch defender of the prime minister. what do you make of the fact that the police have clearly deemed that there is enough evidence for them to at least investigate? they may have been a degree of inevitability that they would want to look _ inevitability that they would want to look at some of the things that have _ to look at some of the things that have been— to look at some of the things that have been said and look at the circumstances around the event so i actually _ circumstances around the event so i actually welcomed the decision by the met _ actually welcomed the decision by the met police to take a look at this _ the met police to take a look at this we — the met police to take a look at this. we have two independent processes running, the report sue gray is _ processes running, the report sue gray is conducting, a distinguished senior_ gray is conducting, a distinguished senior civil —
4:52 pm
gray is conducting, a distinguished senior civil servant, who is impartial— senior civil servant, who is impartial and objective and she was asked _ impartial and objective and she was asked by— impartial and objective and she was asked by the prime minister to report— asked by the prime minister to report on— asked by the prime minister to report on this and he is undertaken to come _ report on this and he is undertaken to come to — report on this and he is undertaken to come to parliament and to make a statement _ to come to parliament and to make a statement when the report arrives and now _ statement when the report arrives and now we have the met police investigating their own investigation and they will make their— investigation and they will make their own — investigation and they will make their own announcements. it is quite proper— their own announcements. it is quite proper that— their own announcements. it is quite proper that the cabinet office and sue gray— proper that the cabinet office and sue gray are in discussions with the met police — sue gray are in discussions with the met police as to how to proceed. would _ met police as to how to proceed. would you — met police as to how to proceed. would you like to see the sue gray report published sooner rather than later? , , ., ., later? these things at the moment are a huge. — later? these things at the moment are a huge. not— later? these things at the moment are a huge. not a _ later? these things at the moment are a huge, not a distraction, - later? these things at the moment are a huge, not a distraction, but l are a huge, not a distraction, but the prime — are a huge, not a distraction, but the prime minister came to the house of commons _ the prime minister came to the house of commons to make a statement on the largest— of commons to make a statement on the largest military build—up on mainland — the largest military build—up on mainland europe since the second world _ mainland europe since the second world war, and these other things we want to— world war, and these other things we want to he _ world war, and these other things we want to be focusing on as government, we would like the fax to be out there and the prime minister remains _ be out there and the prime minister remains clear that he believes when it has— remains clear that he believes when it has been— remains clear that he believes when it has been looked at and is all out
4:53 pm
there _ it has been looked at and is all out there that — it has been looked at and is all out there that he will be found to have acted _ there that he will be found to have acted appropriately. and then we can move _ acted appropriately. and then we can move on. _ acted appropriately. and then we can move on. so— acted appropriately. and then we can move on, so i would like it to come out sooner— move on, so i would like it to come out sooner or — move on, so i would like it to come out sooner or rather than later. some _ out sooner or rather than later. some of— out sooner or rather than later. some of your colleagues say the episode has been damaging and there is no coming back from it for the prime minister so there remains a question of when and not if there is a vote of no confidence in his leadership, what do you make of that, and can he win a vote? i don't believe we — that, and can he win a vote? i don't believe we are _ that, and can he win a vote? i don't believe we are in _ that, and can he win a vote? i don't believe we are in the _ that, and can he win a vote? i don't believe we are in the territory - that, and can he win a vote? i don't believe we are in the territory of. that, and can he win a vote? i don't believe we are in the territory of a l believe we are in the territory of a number— believe we are in the territory of a number of— believe we are in the territory of a number of letters going to trigger a vote of— number of letters going to trigger a vote of confidence, and he delivered the large _ vote of confidence, and he delivered the large majority only a couple of years _ the large majority only a couple of years ago. — the large majority only a couple of years ago, a generational majority, he has _ years ago, a generational majority, he has a _ years ago, a generational majority, he has a clear vision for britain and he — he has a clear vision for britain and he then had a pandemic dumped in his lap— and he then had a pandemic dumped in his lap which _ and he then had a pandemic dumped in his lap which he was not expecting. he has— his lap which he was not expecting. he has delivered the fastest vaccine rolled _ he has delivered the fastest vaccine rolled out _ he has delivered the fastest vaccine rolled out and he has taken all the because _ rolled out and he has taken all the because on— rolled out and he has taken all the because on the furlough scheme to support— because on the furlough scheme to support businesses and people and this is_ support businesses and people and this is a _ support businesses and people and this is a prime minister who will relish _ this is a prime minister who will relish getting back to the domestic agenda _ relish getting back to the domestic agenda and we are going to publish
4:54 pm
the levelling up a white paper which will show— the levelling up a white paper which will show how we are going to transform communities in every region— transform communities in every region and _ transform communities in every region and nation of the uk. this prime _ region and nation of the uk. this prime minister has got much more to deliver— prime minister has got much more to deliver for— prime minister has got much more to deliver for britain in the years ahead — deliver for britain in the years ahead. , ., ., deliver for britain in the years ahead. , . ., ., ahead. there is a real level of anuer ahead. there is a real level of anger and _ ahead. there is a real level of anger and frustration - ahead. there is a real level of| anger and frustration amongst ahead. there is a real level of- anger and frustration amongst some of your colleagues at what has happened and they argue that public trust has been dented, so do you think he will face a vote of no confidence?— think he will face a vote of no confidence? ., ._ ., confidence? today we saw a prime minister talking _ confidence? today we saw a prime minister talking about _ confidence? today we saw a prime minister talking about a _ confidence? today we saw a prime minister talking about a dangerous situation _ minister talking about a dangerous situation in eastern europe and we saw a _ situation in eastern europe and we saw a prime — situation in eastern europe and we saw a prime instead of getting on with the — saw a prime instead of getting on with the job of being prime minister of the _ with the job of being prime minister of the uk _ with the job of being prime minister of the uk and we saw a prime minister— of the uk and we saw a prime minister talking about how he's engaging with nato allies and others around _ engaging with nato allies and others around the world to make sure there is a coordinated response to any potential— is a coordinated response to any potential russian action, with us playing _ potential russian action, with us playing our four part, and i believe there _ playing our four part, and i believe there won't— playing our four part, and i believe there won't be a vote of confidence and i_ there won't be a vote of confidence and i believe borisjohnson will be prime _ and i believe borisjohnson will be prime minister for many years and i think— prime minister for many years and i think he _ prime minister for many years and i think he will— prime minister for many years and i think he will win the next general election — think he will win the next general election. ., ., �* , ., election. conor burns, conservative mp, thanks — election. conor burns, conservative mp, thanks for _ election. conor burns, conservative mp, thanks forjoining _ election. conor burns, conservative mp, thanks forjoining us. - election. conor burns, conservative
4:55 pm
mp, thanks forjoining us. things i mp, thanks forjoining us. things still feel fluid and events have been fast moving throughout this whole episode and we are told there are conversations happening between the cabinet office and the met police about the possible publication of all or part of the sue gray report and if that happens that would be a pivotal moment because a lot of conservative mps are waiting to see the result of that before making their own conclusions. there is a lot still hanging in the balance.- conclusions. there is a lot still hanging in the balance. alex, thanks for 'oinin: hanging in the balance. alex, thanks forjoining us- _ scientists say hippos can communicate with each other and tell the difference between the honking sounds of their friends, neighbours and strangers. until now, the function of the loudest and most common hippo calls, known as "wheeze honks", has been a mystery. french researchers recorded hippo sounds at a nature reserve in mozambique and broadcast the recordings through loud speakers over lakes. they found hippos responded differently to friends or rivals, suggesting they could tell each other apart. the lead scientist says the research could help
4:56 pm
in the conservation of hippos, whose numbers are falling fast. that is our mission to educate, right there. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. thank you for the kind linked to weather after that story and we have had a bit of sunshine in scotland today. hard to find but a bit here and there, but across much of the uk it has been gloomy and rather grey. i have been looking at the two bridges in buckinghamshire and some spots are barely above freezing. —— looking at the temperatures in buckinghamshire. this area of low pressure is approaching and it will start to freshen the breeze, already quite blustery in northern scotland and we saw some rain here today. it sinks further south tonight, not amounting to much, but as the breeze picks up more widely, some of the cloud starts to break tonight, and through parts of eastern scotland and also parts of wales in eastern england with a chance of a touch of frost in the morning. this looks
4:57 pm
different to morning the few —— in the morning because there are clearly some breaks around and that means the sunshine is coming through, not a huge amount, but northern ireland with rain moving in as we go on to the late afternoon, into the evening, but look how much wetter it is turning in northern and western isles and the wind is picking up with gales around with heavy and persistent rain. temperatures in double figures in scotland and northern ireland and they are higher elsewhere, some spots considerably higher elsewhere than they are today. tomorrow night the rain moves south and it will weaken and initially behind it in the northern isles some severe gales developing before the wind eases into thursday, thursday still blustery, you can see an area of cloud are not much rain clearing southwards to england and wales on thursday and bright skies elsewhere and a you shower around and temperatures are a bit low in scotland at this stage —— and a few
4:58 pm
showers. ahead of the weather front temperatures into double figures in wales and england. thursday night, high—pressure moves back in and we see the chance of some frost and fog and more rain pushing into western scotland on friday, still there as saturday begins and the weather front moves south across the uk on saturday with another weakening area of rain as it does so but it will be very blustery at the weekend. sunday to mark —— sunday is looking like a colder day and there may be some hill snow in some areas.
4:59 pm
5:00 pm
this is bbc news the headlines, i'm ben brown live in downing street where the police say they are investigating multiple events that took place in downing street during lockdown i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. i welcome the met's decision to conduct its own investigation because i believe this will help give the public the clarity it needs and help to draw a line under matters. and the bbc understands — with no objection from the met police — sue gray's report may be published sooner rather than later.

57 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on