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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 25, 2022 1:30pm-2:01pm GMT

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but now, there's no sticky bits. we've been coming for 37 years, and we've never... we never realised what the pattern was on this floor. what's changed 7 now, you just glide even better. it's absolutely magic. yeah _ it's wonderful. and the newly—polished floor should have the chance to shine on strictly come dancing. blackpool, give us your best hello. for the last two years, covid meant blackpool week didn't happen. now an american smooth could be really smooth. the largest sprung dance floor in europe back to its bouncing best. colin paterson, bbc news, blackpool. time for a look at the weather — here's nick miller. judging by our recent winter weather, this is clearly not a picture from the uk and the clue is what this person is taking a photograph of. it is the acropolis in athens. yes, it is greece, with so much snow yesterday. the top
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temperature barely above freezing. whereas in the north of norway yesterday, the temperature reached 12 celsius. and it comes to something when some of our favourite greek holiday destinations are having a snowy winter than we are at the moment. this is mykonos, some severe winter weather across the eastern mediterranean. but right now, we seem to have the worst of all worlds here. yes, it is cold, but certainly no snow and just grey weather out there, low misty cloud trapped underneath an area of high pressure keeping most places dry, but cold again today. there is a weather front close to northern scotland. ready from that, we have seen a little rain in north west scotland. that is moving east and does replace the sunshine we have had so far in north—east scotland. it will brighten up a bit in northern ireland this afternoon, may be holes in the cloud in north—east wales and north—east england. overall, a lot of that cloud around and particularly in central and eastern parts of england, temperatures struggling around two
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celsius this afternoon. maybe a hint of drizzle in the air, too. overnight, a little patchy rain pushes further south through scotland, notice more clear spells developing more widely through the night across northern areas in the breeze picks up. lower temperatures will be across mainly eastern parts of the uk, so maybe a touch of frost. tomorrow is looking like a brighter day, with the exception perhaps of the far south and south east of england, some sunny spells coming through. initial patchy rain in north west scotland, look how much heavier that turns across the day in the northern and western isles and north west of the mainland, with the wind picking up. breezy across the uk with gales developing across northern scotland with that rain. and temperatures rebounding into double figures in scotland and northern ireland. and with the help of brighter spells wales and england, temperatures will also be higher than they have been of late. this rain starts to move south overnight wednesday into thursday. behind it, even stronger winds in northern scotland, some severe gales in orkney. blustery thursday, what is left of that cloud
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and rain, not much, clearing away from southern areas. a lot of sunshine following on behind on thursday. a few showers around, a cold day in scotland, mild in wales and england. frost and fog around first thing on friday, then more rain pushing towards western parts of scotland, another weather system moving south overnight and into saturday will lead to a windy, mild start to the weekend and the chance of rain on a cold sunday. thank you very much. a reminder of our top story... while we have been on air, the prime minister has responded into that police investigation into multiple events that took place in downing street during lockdown. i welcome the met's decision _ street during lockdown. i welcome the met's decision to _ street during lockdown. i welcome the met's decision to conduct - street during lockdown. i welcome the met's decision to conduct its . the met's decision to conduct its own investigation because i believe this will help to give the public with a clarity it needs and help to draw a line under matters. that's all from the bbc news at one,
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so it's goodbye from me. good afternoon, it'sjust after 1.30pm and this is your latest sports news. the former england manager roy hodgson looks set to return to management in the premier league, with his appointment expected at watford later today. hodgson left crystal palace at the end of last season, but kept them in the top tier of english football in the four seasons he was in charge. he was already the oldest manager in the premier league, and at 7a will be so again. his career has taken in 22 clubs and spans over a0 years. it comes after the departure of claudio ranieri who was sacked afterjust 14 games. manchester united's anthony martial willjoin sevilla on loan for the rest of the season, subject to a medical. there is no option to buy and no loan fee but the spanish club will cover the striker�*s wages. hejoined united from monaco in 2015 and told boss ralf rangnick he wanted a change of scenery. at the australian open, home favourite and world number one ashleigh barty made it look easy as she progressed to the semifinals. she dominated the american jessicca pegula
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in straight sets, 6—2, 6—love, in her bid to become the first australian to win the singles title in 44 years. in the men's draw, rafa nadal�*s hopes of a 21st grand slam are still alive. he was cruising two sets up, only to drop the next two against canada's denis shapovolov. he had the trainer out, and said afterwards he was feeling sick. but he was back out for a thrilling winner takes all in the fifth set, which he recovered to win. his first five—setter of the tournament so far. as we've been hearing, four county cricket bosses have been giving evidence at a dcms meeting into the governance of the sport. azeem rafiq, whose allegations of racial harassment and bullying during his two spells at yorkshire, has criticised comments made by middlesex chair mike o'farrell — saying his remarks about lack of diversity confirms an endemic problem in the sport. this is what o'farrell said in front of a committee of mps earlier. the other thing in the diversity bit
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is that the football and rugby world becomes much more attractive to the afro—caribbean community and in terms of the south asian community we are finding that they do not want necessarily to commit the same time thatis necessarily to commit the same time that is necessary to go to the same step because they sometimes prefer to go into other educational fields and then cricket becomes secondary and then cricket becomes secondary and part of that is it is a rather more time—consuming sport than others so we are finding that is difficult. that is changing with the 2020 sport in the one—day games but we are now finding we are coming for cycle because the game is getting more exposed, there is much more choice and variation in the games and therefore the south asian community, young men and women, are
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finding this a much more attractive sport. meanwhile, former england captain clare connor will lead an ecb review into dressing—room culture in the men and women's game — as part a bid to tackle racism and discrimination. connor is the ecb�*s managing director of women's cricket and the review will begin in february and run across the 2022 season. and just time to bring you the sad news that the former celtic manager wim jansen has died at the age of 75. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. the prime minister has been talking about the tension on the border with ukraine. a few weeks ago i commissioned an independent enquiry to a series of events and downing street and
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elsewhere in downing street and elsewhere in downing street and elsewhere that constituted a breach of the covid regulation. i welcome the decision by the metropolitan police to conduct its own investigation because i believe this will help give the public the cloud as it needs and help draw a line under matters. i want to is sure the house mr speaker that the government is focused 100% on dealing with the people's priorities including the uk is leading role in protecting freedom around the world and with permission i will make a statement about the united kingdom is sponsored to the situation —— might response to the situation in ukraine. a large and powerful country is massing troops and tanks on the border of a neighbour with the obvious threat of invading. russia has already attacked ukraine
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illegally annexing 10,000 square miles of her territory in 2014, igniting a war, and ukraine has scarcely known a day of peace ever since. no ukraine faces the danger of a renewed invasion and the force a on the ukraine frontier comprises 100,000 troops, far bigger than anything russia has deployed against anything russia has deployed against a before. if the worst happens and the destructive fire power of the russian army were to engulf ukraine's towns and cities i shudder to contemplate the tragedy that wooden shoe. ukraine citizens have every moral and legal right to defend our country and i believe their resistance would be dogged and a tenacious and the bloodshed comparable to the first war in chechnya or bosnia. or any other
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conflict that europe has ensured since 1945. no one would gain from such a catastrophe. russia would create a wasteland in a country which is she continuously reminds us is composed of fellow slavs and russia would never be able to call it peace. four months britain has worked with united states and our allies and sought to combine dialogue with deterrence, emphasising how a united western alliance would exact a forbidding price for any russian incursion into ukraine including by imposing heavy economic sanctions. and at the same time we stand ready as we always have to address any legitimate russian concerns through honest diplomacy. on the 13th of december i spoke to president vladimir putin and i stressed that nato had no
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thought of unsettling or otherwise threatening his country and that russia enjoys as much right as any other state to live in peace and security. but as i said to him, ukraine also enjoys an equal and symmetrical right to that of russia and i said that any attack on his neighbour would be followed by tougher sanctions against russia, further steps to help ukraine defend herself and by an increased nato presence to protect our allies on the eastern flank of nato. the truth is the goal of russia is to keep nato forces away from our borders, and if that is the goal of russia, then invading ukraine could scarcely be more counter—productive. my right honourable friend is the foreign and defence secretaries have both conveyed the same message to
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president vladimir putin and i'm prepared to speak to him again. meanwhile, the american deputy secretary of state met her russian counterpart in geneva on tenth january and the nato council gather two days later. the american secretary of state met the russian foreign minister last friday and the american administration has confirmed the willingness president joe biden to have a meeting with president vladimir putin continuing the dialogue they began last year. credible deterrence is the other side of the coin. last night i held a meeting with several presidents and prime ministers and the general secretary. we agreed we would respond in unison to any russian attack on ukraine in unison by
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imposing severe economic sanctions are heavier than anything we have done before against russia and agreed on the necessity of finalising these measures as swiftly as possible in order to maximise their deterrent effect. we in the uk will not hesitate to toughen our national sanctions against russia in response to whatever president vladimir putin may do and at the house will soon hear more on this for my right honourable friend, the foreign secretary. we have already declassified compelling intelligence exposing russian intent to install a puppet regime in ukraine and we will continue to disclose any russian use of cyber attacks, false flag operations or disinformation. amid all these pressures, ukraine asks for nothing except to be allowed to live in peace and to seek her own alliances as every sovereign country has a right to do. last week, the uk
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acted to strengthen the ability of ukraine to defend her soil by supplying anti—armour missiles and applying a small training team of british personnel in addition to the work of operation orbital which is trained 21,000 ukrainian troops since 2015. yesterday we took the precaution of temporarily withdrawing some stuff and dependence from the british embassy in kyiv though i emphasise the embassy open and will continue to provide consular assistance for british nationals in ukraine and i am particularly grateful for the dedication of our ambassador in kyiv. i commend our nato allies for the steps they have taken to protect the steps they have taken to protect the eastern flank of the alliance. denmark is sending a frigate to the baltic and applying for planes to lithuania. the applying —— deploying
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for planes. the united states has raised the alert level of 8500 combat troops preparing to deploy them in europe at short notice. the british army leads the nato battle group in astoria and if russia invades ukraine we would look to contribute to any new nato deployments to protect our allies in europe. and every contact with russia, the uk and our allies stressed our unity and adherence to vital points of principle. we cannot bargain away the vision of a europe whole and free that emerged in those amazing years from 1989 to 1991, healing the division of our continent by the iron curtain. we will not reopen that divide by
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agreeing to overturn the european security order because russia has placed a done to the head of ukraine. —— placed and done. —— a gun. nor can we accept that all states are sovereign but some more sovereign than others. the draft treatment by russia would divide again in ways russia would never accept for herself. more than half of europe including a dozen members of europe including a dozen members of nato and the european union would only be partially sovereign and would need to seek the approval of russia before inviting any personnel from nato onto the soil. the czech republic at the very heart of europe hundreds of miles from russia would have to ask the kremlin for the
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mission she wanted to invite russian infantrymen into the country and even help with flood defences. there is nothing new about large and powerful nations using the threat of brute force to terrify reasonable people into giving way to otherwise completely unacceptable if president vladimir putin were to choose the path of bloodshed and destruction he must realise it would be both destructive and futile. if he thinks he can take a smaller slice of ukraine, the resistance will be enormous. anyone who stood by the wall of remembrance is that of the portraits of nearly 4500 ukrainians who have died in defence of their country since 2014, the total death toll is in excess of 14,000, anyone who has seen it will know the
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ukrainians have become more determined to the fight and become more adept at gorilla warfare and the russians must know many brothers and husbands and sons would not come home. the response of the international community would be the same and the pain inflicted on the russian economy would be the same. when i spoke to president vladimir putin i also reminded him that at crucial moments in history britain and russia have stood together. the only reason why both our countries are permanent members of the united nations security council is because of the heroism of soviet soldiers in the struggle against fascism side by side with ourselves. i believe that all of russia's fears could yet be allayed and we could find a path to mutual security through patient and principled diplomacy provided that
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president vladimir hughton avoids the trap of starting a terrible war and a war that i believe would an undeserved the condemnation of history and i commend this statement to the house. we history and i commend this statement to the house-— to the house. we now come to the leader of the _ to the house. we now come to the leader of the opposition. - to the house. we now come to the leader of the opposition. can - to the house. we now come to the leader of the opposition. can i - leader of the opposition. can i thank the _ leader of the opposition. can i thank the prime _ leader of the opposition. can i thank the prime minister - leader of the opposition. can i thank the prime minister for l thank the prime minister for advanced sight of his statement. i am grateful to the defence secretary for keeping the opposition in of developments throughout the crisis. when _ developments throughout the crisis. when the _ developments throughout the crisis. when the soviet union collapsed in britain, _ when the soviet union collapsed in britain, russia and the united states— britain, russia and the united states made a solemn agreement with ukraine _ states made a solemn agreement with ukraine in_ states made a solemn agreement with ukraine in exchange for giving up nuclear— ukraine in exchange for giving up nuclear powers and weapons, ukraine's_ nuclear powers and weapons, ukraine's security was to be guaranteed and its independence would _ guaranteed and its independence would he — guaranteed and its independence would be respected. ukraine has kept its end _ would be respected. ukraine has kept its end of— would be respected. ukraine has kept its end of the deal. president vladimir— its end of the deal. president vladimir putin has not. his russia has annexed crimea, supported separatist— has annexed crimea, supported separatist conflict and now amassed
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over 100,000 troops on the borders of ukraine — over 100,000 troops on the borders of ukraine. these are repeated and unjustifiable acts of aggression so labour— unjustifiable acts of aggression so labour stands resolute in our sunport — labour stands resolute in our support of the sovereignty and independence and territorial integrity of ukraine. that was made clear when— integrity of ukraine. that was made clear when our shadow foreign secretary— clear when our shadow foreign secretary and shadow defence secretary and shadow defence secretary visited kyiv a fortnight a-o secretary visited kyiv a fortnight ago and — secretary visited kyiv a fortnight ago and i— secretary visited kyiv a fortnight ago and i made it clear to the ukrainian _ ago and i made it clear to the ukrainian ambassador when i met him last week _ ukrainian ambassador when i met him last week. this isn'tjust ukrainian ambassador when i met him last week. this isn't just a ukrainian ambassador when i met him last week. this isn'tjust a local dispute — last week. this isn'tjust a local dispute on _ last week. this isn'tjust a local dispute on the other side of the continent — dispute on the other side of the continent. this is an attempt by president — continent. this is an attempt by president vladimir putin to turn back— president vladimir putin to turn back the — president vladimir putin to turn back the clock, to re—establish russian — back the clock, to re—establish russian force as a means of dominance over parts of eastern europe, — dominance over parts of eastern europe, and it is a direct threat to the anti _ europe, and it is a direct threat to the anti imperialist principle that sovereign nations are free to choose their own _ sovereign nations are free to choose their own allies and choose their own way— their own allies and choose their own way of— their own allies and choose their own way of life. that is why it is crucial _ own way of life. that is why it is crucial that _ own way of life. that is why it is crucial that we in this house are
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united in— crucial that we in this house are united in opposing russian aggression. so let me be clear, the labour party supports _ so let me be clear, the labour party supports the steps that the government has taken to bolster ukraine's— government has taken to bolster ukraine's ability to defend itself. we support international efforts to deter— we support international efforts to deter russia from further aggression and the _ deter russia from further aggression and the vital diplomatic efforts to de—escalate the situation. can the prime _ de—escalate the situation. can the prime minister assure the during talks— prime minister assure the during talks the — prime minister assure the during talks the uk and our partners will be resolute in our defence of the ukraine — be resolute in our defence of the ukraine sovereignty and the security of our— ukraine sovereignty and the security of our nato — ukraine sovereignty and the security of our nato allies? too long the implicit — of our nato allies? too long the implicit message to moscow has been president— implicit message to moscow has been president vladimir putin can do what he likes— president vladimir putin can do what he likes and the west will do little to respond. we must now change course _ to respond. we must now change course and — to respond. we must now change course and sure russia any further aggression — course and sure russia any further aggression will result in severe real—world consequences. for britain
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and her_ real—world consequences. for britain and her allies that will mean taking tough _ and her allies that will mean taking tough decisions that won't be easy. widespread and hard—hitting sanctions must include cutting russia's— sanctions must include cutting russia's access to the international financial— russia's access to the international financial system. europe's over reliance — financial system. europe's over reliance on _ financial system. europe's over reliance on russian and energy supplies— reliance on russian and energy supplies is well documented and must be addressed. in britain we have failed _ be addressed. in britain we have failed to— be addressed. in britain we have failed to read our economic and political— failed to read our economic and political systems of the ill gotten money— political systems of the ill gotten money used to support the regime of vladimir— money used to support the regime of vladimir putin. if we take our obligations to global security seriously we cannot go on allowing ourselves — seriously we cannot go on allowing ourselves to be the worlds laundromat for illicit finance. labour — laundromat for illicit finance. labour has a four—point plan. first, reform _ labour has a four—point plan. first, reform companies house to track down on sheil— reform companies house to track down on shell companies. secondly, a register— on shell companies. secondly, a register of— on shell companies. secondly, a register of overseas entities to lift the — register of overseas entities to lift the veil on who owns property
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and assets — lift the veil on who owns property and assets in the uk. thirdly, tougher— and assets in the uk. thirdly, tougher regulation on political donations, and finally, implement the recommendations of the cross party— the recommendations of the cross party russia support to bolster national — party russia support to bolster national security. so i asked, will the prime — national security. so i asked, will the prime ministers support these measures— the prime ministers support these measures to rid the uk of the loot of the _ measures to rid the uk of the loot of the corrupt russian elite? we cannot— of the corrupt russian elite? we cannot stand up to russian oppression abroad whilst facilitating russian corruption at home _ facilitating russian corruption at home. after the chemical attacks in salisbury. _ home. after the chemical attacks in salisbury, after the annexation of crimea, _ salisbury, after the annexation of crimea, and know the threat of invasion— crimea, and know the threat of invasion in— crimea, and know the threat of invasion in ukraine, it is time to send _ invasion in ukraine, it is time to send a— invasion in ukraine, it is time to send a simple, clear and united message — send a simple, clear and united message. we support the sovereign i’ilht message. we support the sovereign right of— message. we support the sovereign right of ukraine to choose her own destiny, _ right of ukraine to choose her own destiny, we — right of ukraine to choose her own destiny, we will stand with the ukrainian _ destiny, we will stand with the ukrainian people in the face of threats— ukrainian people in the face of threats by vladimir putin and his aggression will come at a high price for himself— aggression will come at a high price for himself and his regime. thank you. _ for himself and his regime. thank you. mr_ for himself and his regime. thank you, mr speaker. |
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for himself and his regime. thank you. mr speaker-— for himself and his regime. thank you, mr speaker. i thank the right honourable — you, mr speaker. i thank the right honourable gentleman _ you, mr speaker. i thank the right honourable gentleman and - you, mr speaker. i thank the right honourable gentleman and i'm - you, mr speaker. i thank the right| honourable gentleman and i'm very glad he supports the sovereignty and territorial integrity of ukraine, and he is right to ask about the assurances that this country has given to ukraine and i must say that i have repeatedly told them that we stand foursquare behind the independence and sovereignty of ukraine and we always will. we have a hard—hitting package of sanctions ready to go and what i think is fair to say is we want to see our european friends ready to deploy that package as soon as this should be any incursion at all by russia into ukraine. he asked about what we are doing to track down russian money in this country and in the city. as we know —— like as he knows we are bringing forward measures of residential interest but i don't think there is any country in the
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world that has taken tougher action against the regime of vladimir putin. it was this government that brought in sanctions against all those involved in the poisoning and it was this government that got the world together, got 28 countries together to protest against the poisoning that took place in salisbury and the world responded to that british leader, mr speaker, by collectively expelling 153 diplomats around the world. what i can tell him, i am gratefulfor him to the general tenor of his intervention and the support he has given to nato, belated though it may be from the benches opposite. i am grateful for it now, mr speaker, and what i can tell him no is that same leadership in assembling a response to russian aggression is being shown
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by the uk now and it is absolutely vital that the world, the west is united now. it is our unity know that will be much more effective in deterring any russian aggression and thatis deterring any russian aggression and that is what this government will be pursuing in the days ahead. is the pursuing in the days ahead. is the prime minister _ pursuing in the days ahead. is the prime minister articulates - pursuing in the days ahead. is the prime minister articulates the - pursuing in the days ahead. is the prime minister articulates the west is now— prime minister articulates the west is now regrouping but the penny is also dropping, the threat of sanctions will not deter this russian _ sanctions will not deter this russian aggression and a total or even _ russian aggression and a total or even a _ russian aggression and a total or even a partial invasion will have severe — even a partial invasion will have severe economic and security consequences felt right across europe — consequences felt right across europe and beyond. ukraine grain exports _ europe and beyond. ukraine grain exports will be affected towards africa, — exports will be affected towards africa, global gas prices will be impacted — africa, global gas prices will be impacted and skyrocket and where might— impacted and skyrocket and where might and — impacted and skyrocket and where might and embolden russia turn to next? _ might and embolden russia turn to next? i_ might and embolden russia turn to next? i asked the government to release _ next? i asked the government to release with united states and now consider— release with united states and now consider a — release with united states and now consider a more simple and effective option— consider a more simple and effective option to _ consider a more simple and effective
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option to deter this invasion. by belatedly— option to deter this invasion. by belatedly answering ukraine's call for heip. — belatedly answering ukraine's call for help, it is not too late to mobilise _ for help, it is not too late to mobilise a _ for help, it is not too late to mobilise a sizeable nato presence in ukraine, _ mobilise a sizeable nato presence in ukraine, utilising the superior hard power— ukraine, utilising the superior hard power the — ukraine, utilising the superior hard power the alliance possesses to make putin think— power the alliance possesses to make putin think twice about invading another— putin think twice about invading another european democracy. what might— another european democracy. what might you _ another european democracy. what might you have there from the prime minister— might you have there from the prime minister and the leader of her majesties opposition keir starmer so, and _ majesties opposition keir starmer so, and tobias ellwood. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick. hello. our weather is about to turn more unsettled, which means underneath that cloud, especially weather, low cloud and the mist is hanging on throughout the day, as it will across parts of wales and england again. there has been some sunshine so far today in northeast scotland, though, clouding over and through the afternoon this weather frontjust moving through, taking a few outbreaks
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of rain across northern scotland, whereas elsewhere, despite all of the cloud, with the exception of perhaps a little drizzle, it is dry. you can see the extent of the cloud, though, it's western counties of northern ireland, perhaps northeast wales, a few spots in northeast england seeing some sunny spells breaking through, though nowhere near as bright as it was yesterday in northeast england. as it was yesterday and these temperatures, well, actually where you have the thickest low cloud and mistjust around two or three degrees celsius, that's why it's feeling so cold out there. but notice overnight tonight, some breaks around, some clear spells in scotland, northern ireland and also towards northern england. parts of wales and the midlands later in the night, as well as a breeze picks up across the northern half of the uk, and the lowest temperatures will be across eastern parts, with any of those clear spells allowing for a touch of frost. now, it may be the far south southeast of england staying mostly cloudy tomorrow, but elsewhere it is looking like a brighter day, that will be different, especially through wales and england, but notice the rain gathering and turning heavier towards northwest scotland as the day goes on. here and into the northern isles,
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too, a strengthening wind will see some gales developing, turning breezier elsewhere, just allowing that cloud to break up more. back into double figures, the temperatures in northern ireland and scotland, but higher too. may get some brighter spells in wales and england, this system working its way southwards overnight and into thursday behind it. severe gales developing for a time towards orkney in particular, the wind slowly easing on thursday. not much rain on this system as it moves through southern england on thursday. it takes a while for the cloud to clear away, whereas elsewhere it's a much brighter day. some sunshine, a scattering of showers, a colderfeel again in scotland, whereas much of wales and england see temperatures bounce back into double figures. frost and fog could be around on friday morning, turning wet again in scotland as friday goes on and a weather system moving south overnight and into saturday. a windy day on saturday. and then on sunday we could see another area of low pressure heading our way. the chance of some rain, perhaps even a little snow in places, too. we'll keep you updated.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown live in downing street, the headlines: the police say they will now investigate multiple events that took place in downing street during lockdown. i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years, in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. i welcome the met's decision to conduct its own investigation because i believe this will help to give the public the clarity it needs and help to draw a line under matters. sue gray's report will not be published while the met
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police investigate — so what do tory mps do next?

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