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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 25, 2022 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. # happy birthday to you!# uk prime minister borisjohnson�*s under renewed pressure as downing street admits to a gathering for the prime minister's birthday during the first lockdown, a few hours after visiting a primary school. this was in a room that was constantly used all day long for a group people who needed to meet in pandemic response, and that somebody thought it was an idea to get a cake, i understand organised by his own office. how did you celebrate your birthday in lockdown? let me know. i'm @annitabbc on twitter or use the hashtag bbcyourquestions. more than 8,000 us troops
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are on standby to deploy to europe, as fears grow that russia will invade ukraine. eight people are killed and many more are injured in a stampede at the africa cup of nations in cameroon. no more covid tests for fully vaccinated people arriving in england and scotland — they'll be scrapped next month. and a warning that britain's history is at risk — archaeologists say climate change is threatening to destroy treasures buried in the uk. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. borisjohnson is facing renewed anger following another revelation about gatherings in downing street during lockdown.
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number 10 has admitted that, injune 2020, staff met in the cabinet room, where they were served cake to celebrate the prime minister's birthday. itv news reported that up to 30 people attended thejune 2020 event, sang happy birthday and were served cake. rules at the time —19june 2020 — banned most indoor gatherings involving more than two people. the bbc has learned that sue gray, the senior civil servant compiling a report into gatherings on government premises during covid restrictions, already knew about the 19 june event. her findings are expected to be published later this week. 0ur political correspondent chris mason reports. the prime minister has long said, "my policy on cake is pro—having it and pro—eating it." so much so he had two on his 56th birthday injune 2020 — the first courtesy of a school in hertfordshire he visited in the morning...
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# happy birthday to the prime minister! ..and another when he got back here to the cabinet room in downing street — the very spot where the covid rules were signed off. his now wife carrie brought another cake along to a gathering of up to 30 people at around two o'clock, which lasted around half an hour. there were sandwiches and picnic food and no discussion about social distancing. but his supporters say... i think most people would think a party as being an arranged event, rather than something on somebody's birthday in the office that they work in with the people they always work with — someone says, "it's your birthday, here's a cake." but that is for sue gray to get to the bottom of. we are pulling away from this because the commission of the metropolitan police cressida dick, is speaking to the police and crime committee of the london assembly about potential investigations into parties at downing street.-
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parties at downing street. feeling it is one set _ parties at downing street. feeling it is one set of _ parties at downing street. feeling it is one set of rules _ parties at downing street. feeling it is one set of rules for— parties at downing street. feeling it is one set of rules for the - it is one set of rules for the government and another for everyone else. government and another for everyone else many— government and another for everyone else. many constituents have rightly been angry about the perceived inaction— been angry about the perceived inaction of the police, perceived breaches— inaction of the police, perceived breaches of covid rules and the proximity— breaches of covid rules and the proximity of your officers, the rule breaking _ proximity of your officers, the rule breaking taking place at number 10 downing _ breaking taking place at number 10 downing st. the perception you are covering _ downing st. the perception you are covering for — downing st. the perception you are covering for those in power has been building _ covering for those in power has been building for— covering for those in power has been building for some time. you will recall— building for some time. you will recall that — building for some time. you will recall that i asked questions of the assistant _ recall that i asked questions of the assistant commissioner about downing streei— assistant commissioner about downing street officers marching sonia khan, a street officers marching sonia khan, 6 junior— street officers marching sonia khan, a junior special adviser come off the premises when asked to do so by the premises when asked to do so by the government bond that treasury had the government bond that treasury bad to— the government bond that treasury bad to pay— the government bond that treasury had to pay her off at a tribunal put other— had to pay her off at a tribunal put other instances include not investigating former housing secretary robert jenrick with what seemed _ secretary robert jenrick with what seemed like a blatant evidence of corruption — seemed like a blatant evidence of corruption on the table and dominic curnrnings— corruption on the table and dominic cummings alleged covid breaches when working _ cummings alleged covid breaches when working for— cummings alleged covid breaches when working for the government. commissioner, as you are aware, officiat— commissioner, as you are aware, official data — commissioner, as you are aware, official data shows public trust in your force —
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official data shows public trust in your force has severely waned in recent— your force has severely waned in recent years and so do you accept this separate incident has impacted on the _ this separate incident has impacted on the distrust and if so, do you accept _ on the distrust and if so, do you accept you — on the distrust and if so, do you accept you may need to review the way in _ accept you may need to review the way in which you and your officers act in _ way in which you and your officers act in relation to policing the government themselves? thank you very much indeed for that question. we have known each other for a long time. police without fear or favour, for a long time. police without fear orfavour, we police impartially and we police in an operationally independent manner. i myself have, as you know, investigated more politically charged investigations and investigations involving members of the government, of the civil service, and other elected officials, many more than any other senior police officer, i would suggest, and i have always done that and i will always do that, as i say,
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impartially. i absolutely understand that there is deep public concern about the allegations that have been in the media over the last several weeks. i completely understand that. the vast majority of people have acted responsibly during the pandemic, many, many people, including many londoners and my colleagues have made huge sacrifices and suffered considerable loss during the pandemic. and as you know, throughout the pandemic, my officers and staff have kept going, they put themselves in harm's way to tackle crime and violence and to do their bit to help our city in the health crisis. if i may, i would like to quickly explain our general approach before turning very specifically to the matters relating to downing street. we have
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throughout the pandemic adopted, as you know, the approach of the four vadym prystaiko, engaging with people at the time —— the four es. encouraging people to adhere to the structures, and only as a last resort, moving to enforcement. in general, we have not normally investigated breaches of the regulations when they have been reported long after they are said to have taken place. and if i may, i will quickly explain why. it was never a blanket rule, but it was our guideline is that in general, we would not come and we have said that publicly on many occasions. throughout the pandemic, ourfocus has been on what we could do to benefit public health project we policed by consent and people need to see that what we are doing has a
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purpose. hence the four es approach. and of course we did issue tickets and we did enforce with some really flagrant breaches, but most people, as you all well though, responded very well to our engagement and changed their behaviour. we do have finite resources and even more so during the worst periods of the pandemic, when our officers fell ill as well as other people. and our view was and is that it would not normally be a proportionate, normally be a proportionate, normally be a proportionate, normally be a proportionate use of officers' time to spend their time, bearing in mind the nature of the offences, after the fact investigating what could have been thousands of complaints. these are summary only offences. at the people who commit them to get a fixed
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penalty notice. i think in general, the public would understand that we need to focus on violent crime and terrorism and other priorities, as well of course as doing our bit during the pandemic. but recognising that there might be some occasions where we would investigate retrospectively, we generated some guidelines, only guidelines, but guidelines, only guidelines, but guidelines that we have stuck to. and you will be aware that we have, on occasion, investigated retrospectively. some of my own officers, a few, have received penalty notices when we heard after the fact that they had breached the guidelines. 0ne the fact that they had breached the guidelines. one or two high—profile people also, when it was plain they had admitted and there was good evidence, they also come after a few
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weeks after the fact, received penalty notices. and the occasions on which we have done that had been where we were looking at something which appeared to be the most serious and flagrant type of breach. and where three factors came into play. firstly, there had to be, and a fourth, there has to be some kind of evidence, notjust somebody saying something has to be some start point and evidence. but my three factors were and are there was evidence of those involved knew or ought to have known that what they were doing was an offence. where not investigating would significantly undermine the legitimacy of the law. and where there was little ambiguity around the absence of any reasonable
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defence. in those cases, where those criteria were met, guidelines suggested we should potentially investigate further and end up giving people tickets. we have a long established and effective working relationship with the cabinet office, who have an investigative capability. and, as you well know, they have been carrying out an investigation over the last few weeks. what i can tell you this morning is that, as a result, firstly of the information provided by the cabinet office enquiry team and secondly, my officers' own assessment, i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years
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in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. my officers have assessed several other events that appear to have taken place at downing street and whitehall, on the available information these other events are assessed as not reaching the threshold for criminal investigation. throughout the pandemic, the met has sought to take, as i have said, a proportionate approach. i should stress that the fact we are now investigating does not of course mean that fixed penalty notices will necessarily be issued in every instance and to every person involved. we will not be giving a running commentary on our current investigations, but i can assure you
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that we will give updates at significant points as we would generally do. and finally, i would just say, you mentioned a number of other matters that you are clearly frustrated about and no doubt some other people as well. i know what you are talking about in each instance, i suspect it is not worth discussing them here and not appropriate. 0r discussing them here and not appropriate. or i would say is i beg to differ. i am fully aware of the decisions made in each of the cases you mentioned, and i believe we did the right thing and we will always seek to do the right thing.- seek to do the right thing. thank ou, seek to do the right thing. thank you, commissioner. _ seek to do the right thing. thank you, commissioner. if— seek to do the right thing. thank you, commissioner. if you - seek to do the right thing. thank you, commissioner. if you have. you, commissioner. if you have an hinu you, commissioner. if you have anything different, _ you, commissioner. if you have anything different, question, i you, commissioner. if you have. anything different, question, not you, commissioner. if you have i anything different, question, not a statement, — anything different, question, not a statement, please. _ anything different, question, not a statement, please. i— anything different, question, not a statement, please.— anything different, question, not a statement, please. i have very clear auestions statement, please. i have very clear questions that _ statement, please. i have very clear questions that relate... _ statement, please. i have very clear questions that relate... don't - questions that relate... don't foruet, questions that relate... don't forget. we — questions that relate... don't forget, we are _ questions that relate... don't forget, we are only _ questions that relate... don't forget, we are only allowing i questions that relate... don't| forget, we are only allowing 15 minutes — forget, we are only allowing 15 minutes i— forget, we are only allowing 15 minutes. ., ., ., forget, we are only allowing 15 minutes. . . ., ., forget, we are only allowing 15 minutes. . . . . . ~ minutes. i am aware i have the clock runninu. minutes. i am aware i have the clock running. commissioner, _ minutes. i am aware i have the clock running. commissioner, you - minutes. i am aware i have the clock
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running. commissioner, you have . minutes. i am aware i have the clockl running. commissioner, you havejust set out _ running. commissioner, you havejust set out part— running. commissioner, you havejust set out part of what was said in the 13th of— set out part of what was said in the 13th ofjanuary statement by the met, _ 13th ofjanuary statement by the met, that you do not routinely investigate retrospective breaches of covid _ investigate retrospective breaches of covid laws, and that you used a four es_ of covid laws, and that you used a four es approach, which is to ehgage, _ four es approach, which is to engage, explain, encourage, enforce at the _ engage, explain, encourage, enforce at the time _ engage, explain, encourage, enforce at the time of breaches, and you might— at the time of breaches, and you might review and consider significant evidence if becomes available. was there any attempt rnade _ available. was there any attempt rnade to— available. was there any attempt made to use the four es approach, ehgage, _ made to use the four es approach, engage, explain, encourage, enforce, with attendees at any of the downing street— with attendees at any of the downing street lockdown parties while they were happening? i street lockdown parties while they were happening?— were happening? i think you will understand _ were happening? i think you will understand that _ were happening? i think you will understand that it _ were happening? i think you will understand that it is _ were happening? i think you will. understand that it is inappropriate for me to comment on that point we are in the middle of an investigation and when we have investigated, then i am sure the facts will become apparent. you should not read anything into that apart from the fact that i am not prepared to comment.— apart from the fact that i am not
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prepared to comment. thank you. it sounds like — prepared to comment. thank you. it sounds like there _ prepared to comment. thank you. it sounds like there was _ prepared to comment. thank you. it sounds like there was a _ prepared to comment. thank you. it sounds like there was a culture - prepared to comment. thank you. it sounds like there was a culture of i sounds like there was a culture of lawbreaking parties rather than a single _ lawbreaking parties rather than a single one—off event. we have heard reports _ single one—off event. we have heard reports of— single one—off event. we have heard reports of suitcases of drink coming through— reports of suitcases of drink coming through security. surely some officers — through security. surely some officers were concerned about what they were _ officers were concerned about what they were seeing at the time? was any concern — they were seeing at the time? was any concern raised with you or any member— any concern raised with you or any member of— any concern raised with you or any member of yourteam about any concern raised with you or any member of your team about what was going _ member of your team about what was going on— member of your team about what was going on in_ member of your team about what was going on in downing street while the coronavirus — going on in downing street while the coronavirus lockdown rules were in place? _ coronavirus lockdown rules were in lace? ., , ., ., ., ., place? you will be aware there are a number of officers _ place? you will be aware there are a number of officers posted _ place? you will be aware there are a number of officers posted in - place? you will be aware there are a number of officers posted in the - number of officers posted in the surrounds of downing street and indeed what we call more generally the government security zone they have a very clear role and that is protective security. you will be aware that the ones you see are all armed and they have a job to do. in relation to anything they may have seen or heard or done or not done again, i'm afraid i'm not prepared to comment but i can assure you that
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we are carrying out our investigations and if that is a relevant matter, we will find out about it. . ~ relevant matter, we will find out about it. ., ,, , ., relevant matter, we will find out about it. ., ,, i. , .,, , about it. thank you. the problem is that if people _ about it. thank you. the problem is that if people begin _ about it. thank you. the problem is that if people begin to _ about it. thank you. the problem is that if people begin to think- that if people begin to think the laws apply to everyone except the people _ laws apply to everyone except the people who set those laws, the police _ people who set those laws, the police may struggle to retain that public _ police may struggle to retain that public consent that enables them to do their— public consent that enables them to do theirjobs. are you worried that the apparent lack of investigation of the _ the apparent lack of investigation of the met in downing street might be further damaging trust and confidence in the police? i fully recounise confidence in the police? i fully recognise people _ confidence in the police? i fully recognise people have - confidence in the police? i fully recognise people have been - confidence in the police? i fully. recognise people have been very concerned about this. i think you will recognise also that in the explanation, i hope in the explanation, i hope in the explanation i have given, you can see that we have acted carefully, thoughtfully, and in concert with the cabinet office enquiry. i do need to say, we work very regularly
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with the cabinet office team, even sometimes in the most serious cases, they will carry out an initial investigation and then hand us material. and they have access to all sorts of things because they know the systems, the way things work. and i am confident in the enquiry they have done. i don't like anything that can potentially damage public confidence, of course i don't... ,, , ., don't... studio: 0k, we have lost the image — don't... studio: ok, we have lost the image of— don't... studio: ok, we have lost the image of cressida _ don't... studio: ok, we have lost the image of cressida dick - don't... studio: ok, we have lost the image of cressida dick talking | the image of cressida dick talking but we have heard i think the key line from her, confirming that her officers are now investigating a number of events at downing street and whitehall for potential breaches of coronavirus restrictions. let's speak to our chief political correspondent adam fleming.
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this adds to the mix as well as the sue gray, the senior civil servant investigation, now a police investigation, now a police investigation as well but what you think this means for the prime minister and his future? the first thin to minister and his future? the first thing to say _ minister and his future? the first thing to say is — minister and his future? the first thing to say is to _ minister and his future? the first thing to say is to have _ minister and his future? the first thing to say is to have a - minister and his future? the first thing to say is to have a sense i minister and his future? the first thing to say is to have a sense ofj thing to say is to have a sense of proportion because when you hear the words met police investigation, criminal law breaking, downing street, it sounds incredibly dramatic and of course this is a big development in this story. but we are talking about the issuing of fixed penalty notices here. tickets as cressida dick called them, fines for breaking the rules. we're not talking about big criminal trials or people going to prison or anything and it is important to keep that sense of perspective in terms of what the law is first of all. but all the now about what this means for the process and the politics. 0n the process, there has been talked previously from ministers that if the police wanted to investigate, maybe sue gray, the senior civil servant who is investigating these
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claims, would pause her investigation while the police conducted there's. we are expecting a statement from sue gray's team in the next couple of minutes which should make that clear and if she does pause, that means we are in this limbo for a lot longer with that sort of damocles hanging over downing street for a lot longer as well. —— it sort of damocles. cressida dick said there was a number up claims are parties in downing street and elsewhere in whitehall. we don't know how many, we don't know how many of those high—profile ones that have been splashed across the papers in the last few weeks are being investigated by the police and crucially, we don't know if they involve ones that were attended by the prime minister so we don't know if the prime minister is in the frame for being interviewed by the police or ultimately getting one of those fixed penalty notices. a lot of unanswered questions but it means this will rumble on even longer. i
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was about to say we were going to go back to the london assembly but i believe that has wrapped up so we can continue our thought process with you. you say we are expecting to hear from with you. you say we are expecting to hearfrom sue gray's with you. you say we are expecting to hear from sue gray's team imminently. it seems she was on the point of finishing her report passing it to the prime minister and others of course, is that really the possibility that might be shelved or at least put on hold while the police investigate? brute at least put on hold while the police investigate?— police investigate? we are speculating _ police investigate? we are speculating it _ police investigate? we are speculating it now - police investigate? we are speculating it now and - police investigate? we are l speculating it now and filling police investigate? we are - speculating it now and filling the minutes until we get a word from her office but i suppose it is a possibility because ministers have said at the dispatch box and it says in the terms of reference for the investigation by sue gray, in black and white, issued by the government at the start of this, that there is the potential for her investigation to be paused if the police decide to intervene in this so it is a very real possibility and we will find out in a couple of minutes. for the moment, thank— out in a couple of minutes. for the
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moment, thank you. _ our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford is here. going back to what was being said before cressida dick made the announcement, an assembly member talking about confidence in the met police over all of this being severely waning and the met has been under a lot of pressure but not having already started an investigation given that a civil servant has been investigating events in downing street and whitehall so why now? events in downing street and whitehall so wh now? ., , , whitehall so why now? there has been a lot of fire aimed _ whitehall so why now? there has been a lot of fire aimed at _ whitehall so why now? there has been a lot of fire aimed at those _ whitehall so why now? there has been a lot of fire aimed at those who - a lot of fire aimed at those who attended the parties but some of the fire has also been aimed at the police. white did they not stop them at the time and did they not investigate them or leave it to the cabinet office? cressida dick dealt with both of those, saying that the officers in downing street have a clear role which is protecting the government and those in government, and she left unsaid that perhaps it might undermine that role if they were seen to be poking through the curtains and seeing if people were
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having a drink after work. that is still a little bit open put up the next thing was why have you not been investigating these things after the fact and she talked a lot about the fact and she talked a lot about the fact that generally you don't, that has not been their approach with coronavirus but in some cases, they have done it. she talked about the reasons why you might go into and out of the case investigation and has to be some evidence and evidence the people who were doing it knew they were in breach of the rules but it might somehow undermine the law and there should be little ambiguity about whether this was a breach. and some of these instances we have heard about are a bit more ambiguous, if it was just somebody having a glass of wine at their desk and others are less so, people coming together but what seems to have been a long session of drinking and eating. there might be a clue as to which of these events might be in
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the police's domain. at the other question, why have they left it to the cabinet office, she tried to explain that it was actually that the cabinet office are good at investigating and getting the evidence you need for this, e—mails, messages, talking to staff, better at getting that kind of evidence than a police officer might be who would have to go through a lot of hoops in order to get that kind of evidence because getting the e—mails of people doing sensitive jobs is quite a big dealfor the police but easy for the cabinet office. quite a big deal for the police but easy for the cabinet office. because of course sue _ easy for the cabinet office. because of course sue gray _ easy for the cabinet office. because of course sue gray is _ easy for the cabinet office. because of course sue gray is a _ easy for the cabinet office. because of course sue gray is a civil - of course sue gray is a civil servant, not a police detective, but it sounds as though the commission thought she was in the best position to get the required information but that said, now the police are going to investigate, what do you think might be the scope and scale and how long might this take? it is potentially _ long might this take? it is potentially not _ long might this take? it is potentially not huge, - long might this take? it 3 potentially not huge, slightly depending on how much people want to
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fight it but it will not end up at a iury fight it but it will not end up at a jury trial, it's not a complex thing, it's a question of did this person or didn't they breach, will they accept a fine or demand it be taken to magistrates' court? potentially depending on the approach of those accused, it might be quite a simple process. but of course the fact that the police are involved slightly changes the dynamics of what people are prepared to say in interview, they might be worried that anything they say to sue gray could be used against them in the criminal process. it's worth remembering that in the early days of the pandemic particular, the fines were quite low and the bigger fines were quite low and the bigger fines were quite low and the bigger fines were eitherfor fines were quite low and the bigger fines were either for repeat offences, or organising events, those didn't come in until later in the pandemic. the events of april and may, it was essentially a small fine for people who attended. it is not massive but of course politically, hugely damaging because anybody who has been issued with one
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of those fixed penalty notices, their political career would be severely damaged so people might want to challenge them if the police want to challenge them if the police want to challenge them if the police want to find them. and do you think it is the sue gray investigation and something she has turned up in her investigation that has prompted the police to step in and say they are also investigating? we don't know for sure but i think if you look at what people have been saying and the sequence of events, the police have said they have constantly been in touch with sue gray over her investigation and i think there has been a constant exchange and the question, if we have reached the point where the police need to come in, but it looks to me like it is the sue gray investigation that has led to the police investigation. band investigation that has led to the police investigation.— investigation that has led to the police investigation. and 'ust as i ask ou police investigation. and 'ust as i ask you that. h police investigation. and 'ust as i ask you that, some _ police investigation. and 'ust as i ask you that, some copy _ police investigation. and just as i ask you that, some copy come i police investigation. and just as i i ask you that, some copy come into be, and the met saying they are now investigating after being passed information from the sue gray enquiry so it seems to be the case
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that one has led to the other. thea;r that one has led to the other. they have a set — that one has led to the other. they have a set of _ that one has led to the other. they have a set of e-mails _ that one has led to the other. they have a set of e-mails and - that one has led to the other. tue: have a set of e—mails and possible messages and things have been said in interview, there is now a bundle of evidence that in some cases, it might be a matter for the police and they might need to issue fixed penalty notices for the behaviour of people at these events in downing street. for people at these events in downing street. ., ., street. for the moment, daniel, thank you _ street. for the moment, daniel, thank you very — street. for the moment, daniel, thank you very much _ street. for the moment, daniel, thank you very much for - street. for the moment, daniel, thank you very much for that. i with me now is sir peter fahy, he's a former chief constable of greater manchester police and he was listening to the met�*s chief commissioner. thank you forjoining us. i suppose that answers the question of why now the met are launching their investigation having been passed information from the sue gray enquiry but you think they you have started investigations soon or do you accept that they think she was in the best position initially to gather information? t in the best position initially to gather information?— in the best position initially to gather information? i think the olice gather information? i think the police feel _ gather information? i think the police feel they _ gather information? i think the police feel they are _ gather information? i think the police feel they are in - gather information? i think the police feel they are in a - gather information? i think the police feel they are in a really. police feel they are in a really difficult position with this one,
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trying to follow the logic that cressida dick explained that normally they would not go back and investigate a crime of this relatively, not that serious, two years after the event, they try to stick to that line. and really come on the other hand, there is this huge level of public concern and the police feel that is about a failure of political accountability and they are put in a position where people are put in a position where people are trying to get them to use the criminal law almost to fill that hole, as your correspondence have said point of these are relatively minor offences, a fine of £100, the worst that could happen is that could be challenged at my district court but on the other hand, there is no question there's a huge level of public concern about this —— magistrates' court point and it still looks like one law for one and one law for another. band still looks like one law for one and one law for another.— still looks like one law for one and one law for another. and given the auestions one law for another. and given the questions over _ one law for another. and given the
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questions over trust _ one law for another. and given the questions over trust in _ one law for another. and given the questions over trust in the - questions over trust in the government and in the prime minister personally, we saw cressida dick trying to explain the process and the threshold for the police are launching an investigation into downing street events and in whitehall, and the fact that until now police have had finite resources, other priorities perhaps, but how important is it more broadly that the met does this in order to underline public trust in the met itself? , ., , underline public trust in the met itself? , . , ., itself? they are but to some extent the are itself? they are but to some extent they are making — itself? they are but to some extent they are making an _ itself? they are but to some extent they are making an exception - itself? they are but to some extent i they are making an exception because they, and events of this seriousness from take the police it quite unprecedented territory, a difficult situation. i think the investigators will come up again about the confusion over legislation, the word party does not appear in the legislation, it was pretty poorly drafted actually i think that has been the consent of the metropolitan police. i think some people will say
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we don't normally allow an organisation to investigate itself, as happened with the cabinet investigating another part of government, so it shows this is really complex and almost whatever the met do, they can't win. some people will say, why didn't you start earlier, they have given this clear logic. i think the big issue will be, when there is a work event, where they might happen to be some form of food and drink, pass over to then become a social occasion and no longer a work event? it is really whether sue gray has found enough evidence to clarify that position but no doubt lawyers will still argue about this and we are still in the position where the easiest thing to do would be that those who were involved in this, and they must know they have broken the law, put themselves forward so this can be resolved as quickly as possible without the metropolitan police having to do too much work. where
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'ust having to do too much work. where just showing _ having to do too much work. where just showing our — having to do too much work. where just showing our view _ having to do too much work. where just showing our view pictures - having to do too much work. where just showing our view pictures of. just showing our view pictures of downing street, we think the cabinet that has been going on is ending, but a final thought, what can you tell us about the scope of the investigation or the difference in approach if i can put way of the investigation by the met compared to the work that sue gray has been doing? the work that sue gray has been doin: ? , ., , , the work that sue gray has been doin:? , ., .y , the work that sue gray has been doin:? , ., _ ,., the work that sue gray has been doin:? , ., _ ., doing? obviously it is a criminal investigation _ doing? obviously it is a criminal investigation and _ doing? obviously it is a criminal investigation and whatever - investigation and whatever interviews people may have given to sue gray will probably not be admissible in terms of criminal investigations. they might have to be taken again so the person is under caution. but that will also depend on whether there is other evidence being gathered by a sue gray, e—mails, otherforms of communication or evidence even possibly from some of the officers who were on duty, which might mean that those interviews they still need to be carried out, more perfunctory. i think part of the issue will be the issue of
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clarifying the legal definition and whether sue gray has been able to get the evidence which puts this really on one side of that line very clearly. 5ir really on one side of that line very clearl . ,, ., , ., clearly. sir peter fahy, former chief constable _ clearly. sir peter fahy, former chief constable of _ clearly. sir peter fahy, former chief constable of greater - chief constable of greater manchester police, thank you very much. will are just hearing from sebastien payne in the financial times, he is reporting that the sue gray investigational report will not be delayed as a result of the metropolitan police nelson they are also investigating a number of events in downing street and whitehall for potential breaches of covid regulations. there was a thought that if police got involved with an investigation then the sue gray report, or the release of age, might be paused, but according to sebastien payne that will not be the case, we have not heard that directly from sue gray's team
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directly. literally as i say that, we have confirmation from sue gray's team, all literally breaking in front of you, that the investigation will continue despite cressida dick's confirmation that the metropolitan police are investigating a number of events in downing street and whitehall, that is from a spokesperson for the cabinet office just is from a spokesperson for the cabinet officejust in is from a spokesperson for the cabinet office just in the last couple of seconds, the investigation carried out by sue gray is continuing, there is ongoing contact with the metropolitan police service, that is the quote from a spokesperson for the cabinet office, the investigation carried out by sue gray is continuing, there is ongoing contact with the metropolitan police service and as you are probably well aware, although not absolutely confirmed, the expectation has been that sue gray's report would be released at some point this week.
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you may know that report goes directly to the prime minister in the first instance which has raised questions about checks and balances, but now the metropolitan police is also investigating a number of events. let's continue our coverage of this. let's speak now to ramsay jones, former special advisor to david cameron. you join us on a morning with lots of developments, you previously said it was a matter of when not if boris johnson is removed from number ten, when do you think that could happen? just as we were told to wait for the sue gray report, do you think we could be told to wait for the metropolitan police report? very, very probably- _ metropolitan police report? very, very probably- l — metropolitan police report? very, very probably. i am _ metropolitan police report? very, very probably. i am just _ metropolitan police report? very, very probably. i am just reflecting on an extraordinary last 30 minutes in news once again in this whole saga and reflecting on the role of the police in number ten was not so
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much to deter and detect but to deter and protect the people in there. i am deter and protect the people in there. iam interested deter and protect the people in there. i am interested that the sue gray inquiry continues although we do not have confirmation when that report might come, because just as her report has clearly informed the metropolitan police's decision to investigate, they might cut the evidence which influences her report. i think the other aspects going around in my mind now is there is perhaps the possibility that we might have different outcomes from the two reports, and perhaps a parliamentary inquiry. there could be opinions happening here but the one that will always matter most will be the court of public opinion and i have come to the conclusion that that court is not prepared to give the benefit of the doubt to anything of the allegations that come out from number ten, there will be damage to the ratings of the
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authority of number ten which has waned a permanent basis, so i still think it is a question of when. precisely one, i wish i could tell you, but if i knew i would be off to ladbrokes. you, but ifi knew i would be off to ladbrokes— you, but ifi knew i would be off to ladbrokes. , . ., ladbrokes. looking up the culture of the time when _ ladbrokes. looking up the culture of the time when you _ ladbrokes. looking up the culture of the time when you worked _ ladbrokes. looking up the culture of the time when you worked with - ladbrokes. looking up the culture of| the time when you worked with david cameron and, for a time, with theresa may, which events like we have heard about have happened if the context had been the same, if i had been a pandemic? == the context had been the same, if i had been a pandemic?— had been a pandemic? -- would events? you _ had been a pandemic? -- would events? you can _ had been a pandemic? -- would events? you can never- had been a pandemic? -- would events? you can never say - had been a pandemic? -- would i events? you can never say nothing would have happened but i think a couple of things which have been different. if anything had happened i think it would have been quashed much more quickly, there would have been a much tighter grip on the control of the culture of number ten. secondly, as i have said before and i saw that my old colleague so craig barlow the tweeted this morning, the rule is that it these situations you have to get everything out, you cannot allow
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this dripping of allegations and insinuations to appear, because they turn into a torrent and you lose control of the whole situation —— as my former colleague sir craig oliver tweeted. that would have been the difference between many previous prime ministers in what seems to be happening in number ten right now. robert burns, behan burns day, previous administrations and certainly my life and politics, i try to look outside of the westminster political bubble, and as burns said, what a gift to give us, to see ourselves as others see us. that is happening now, others are seeing number ten in a different way to how some insiders have been seeing it. taste to how some insiders have been seeinu it. ~ . . to how some insiders have been seeinu it. ~ . , seeing it. we are seeing cabinet members leaving _ seeing it. we are seeing cabinet members leaving number- seeing it. we are seeing cabinet members leaving number ten i seeing it. we are seeing cabinet| members leaving number ten as seeing it. we are seeing cabinet - members leaving number ten as these events have been breaking. i wonder if those were discussed at all or if the news had filtered through to them while they were meeting but that cabinet meeting over. let’s that cabinet meeting over. let's
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listen to jacob _ that cabinet meeting over. let's listen to jacob rees—mogg. that cabinet meeting over. let's listen to jacob rees-mogg. the | listen to jacob rees-mogg. the economy has — listen to jacob rees—mogg. the economy has bounced back to pre-pandemic_ economy has bounced back to pre—pandemic levels. - economy has bounced back to pre—pandemic levels. under. economy has bounced back to - pre—pandemic levels. under boris johnson _ pre—pandemic levels. under boris johnson this — pre—pandemic levels. under boris johnson this country— pre—pandemic levels. under boris johnson this country has - pre—pandemic levels. under boris johnson this country has been - johnson this country has been (inaudible) _ (inaudible) . he - (inaudible) , he has - (inaudible) i , he has gotten (inaudible) _ , he has gotten through an incredibly— , he has gotten through an incredibly difficult- , he has gotten through an incredibly difficult period. i incredibly difficult period. (inaudible) _ incredibly difficult period. (inaudible). _ (inaudible). a little difficult to hear what jacob rees—mogg, the leader of the commons, was saying, that he was talking about borisjohnson with regard to the aspect of leading a country, the economy, for example, that cabinet meeting breaking up in the last few minutes. a final thought with ramsayjones, former special adviser to david cameron. you know sue gray well, tell us a bit about and this question many people have had about whether or not there are significant checks and balances in this process she has been working through given that her
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report goes to borisjohnson. the report goes to boris johnson. the s stem is report goes to boris johnson. the system is the _ report goes to borisjohnson. t'te: system is the system report goes to borisjohnson. tte: system is the system and report goes to borisjohnson. t'te: system is the system and it report goes to borisjohnson. tte: system is the system and it is the one we pretty much have to deal with, but if anyone can make sure that impartiality and fairness and rigour are brought to an investigation, then it is sue gray. i have known her over a decade from the very thursday i set foot in whitehall, and all the things that we are hearing your colleagues in the political team say about sue gray, and politicians too, are true, the integrity etc which she has. she will produce her report without fear or favour but people need to remember that whilst this goes to the prime minister it is not to hold politicians to account and act as judge and jury, that is a political process both within the houses of parliament, the house of commons and through conservative mps and the influence that the electorate bring to bear on them. she has cabinet
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office responsibility and that under police investigation and everything of that will happen. if i can briefly reflect on what i think jacob rees—mogg the same, watch for the next 2a hours, both sides in the debate using the same argument. the government saying there is ukraine, china, the cost of living crisis, the pandemic, we have to be a light to get on to deal with these things. the other side is saying that because of all the same big ticket issues hitting the country and the world, we have to clear the decks, so both sides will use everything happening in the world to their side, both sides need this cleared up side, both sides need this cleared up and sue gray hopefully we'll have her report out soon on the country can move on. her report out soon on the country can move on-_ her report out soon on the country can move on. . g ., , ., ~ can move on. ramsay jones, thank you ve much can move on. ramsay jones, thank you very much for— can move on. ramsay jones, thank you very much for your _ can move on. ramsay jones, thank you very much for your thoughts _ can move on. ramsay jones, thank you very much for your thoughts on - can move on. ramsay jones, thank you very much for your thoughts on this - very much for your thoughts on this today. and let's talk about ukraine now.
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president biden has said there is total agreement with european leaders over how to deal with russia's troop build—up on the border with ukraine. during crisis talks on monday, western powers agreed to impose "unprecedented" sanctions against russia if it were to invade. the us has also put 8,500 troops on alert. russia denies plans for an incursion, despite deploying some 100,000 soldiers on ukraine's border. with me now is ukraine's ambassador to the uk, vadym prystaiko. ambassador, thank you very much for waiting to talk to me today as events unfold here in domestic politics. i want to get your reaction firstly to the news that the us has put those 8500 troops, made them ready to be deployed to countries around ukraine, not ukraine itself but neighbouring countries. for ukraine itself but neighbouring countries. ., . ukraine itself but neighbouring countries. ., , ., , countries. for us it means the united states _ countries. for us it means the united states at _ countries. for us it means the united states at least - countries. for us it means the united states at least is - countries. for us it means the | united states at least is taking countries. for us it means the i united states at least is taking it very seriously, all the demands and threats from the russian federation. some nations are not taking it seriously and telling us nothing
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will happen, we don't need to do anything, like germany. last will happen, we don't need to do anything, like germany. last week at those talks between _ anything, like germany. last week at those talks between the _ anything, like germany. last week at those talks between the us - anything, like germany. last week atj those talks between the us secretary of state antony blinken and his russian counterpart, sergei lavrov, mr blinken said there was no trade space on the rights of ukraine to determine its own future. how we should argue by those words? these should argue by those words? these are aood should argue by those words? these are good words. _ should argue by those words? these are good words, something - should argue by those words? ttfs are good words, something we have been waiting for notjust in these seven years but the 30 years of our independence, we have been growing, developing and building up this state. unfortunately we came to the point when russians understand how dangerous it is that ukraine is becoming somebody different and that is when this moment of truth is coming. t is when this moment of truth is cominu. . is when this moment of truth is cominu. , ., , coming. i believe now is the time. but there coming. i believe now is the time. ibut there is _ coming. i believe now is the time. but there is no _ coming. i believe now is the time. but there is no de-escalation - coming. i believe now is the time. but there is no de-escalation yet, | but there is no de—escalation yet, do you think more work can be done in increasing transparency, on
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reducing risk, increasing arms control? is there room to find a breakthrough that will lead to de—escalation? taste breakthrough that will lead to de-escalation?_ breakthrough that will lead to de-escalation? ~ , ., , de-escalation? we see how trust can be raised in — de-escalation? we see how trust can be raised in europe, _ de-escalation? we see how trust can be raised in europe, but— de-escalation? we see how trust can be raised in europe, but the - de-escalation? we see how trust can be raised in europe, but the problemj be raised in europe, but the problem here would be everybody�*s talking about this 100,000 troops and people tend to forget about seven and half years of war which is still ongoing, there is not a political or diplomatic process, unfortunately it is not about them being in our territory and killing our people, it is being distracted by this build—up of putin right away. is being distracted by this build-up of putin right away.— is being distracted by this build-up of putin right away. alexei navalny, the russian — of putin right away. alexei navalny, the russian opposition _ of putin right away. alexei navalny, the russian opposition leader, - of putin right away. alexei navalny, the russian opposition leader, in i the russian opposition leader, in prison, of course, and others, they had talked about really hard—hitting sanctions, do you think that is the route to lead to de—escalation, hitting wealthy russians, supporters of vladimir putin, where it hurts? t
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of vladimir putin, where it hurts? i believe there is always room of vladimir putin, where it hurts? t believe there is always room here, they are wealthy not just believe there is always room here, they are wealthy notjust because they are wealthy notjust because they are wealthy notjust because they are good businessmen that they are stealing from their own people. blinded from the greatness coming from his aggressive moves, this is the problem of this moment in his turn this situation, but the russians understand how this has been created and why they are loyal, because of this enormous wealth from his nation. they understand somebody is causing this bother families, their loved ones somewhere in london or somewhere else, this might change the game. the or somewhere else, this might change the name. ,, ., ., or somewhere else, this might change the name. ,, . ., ., or somewhere else, this might change the name. ,, . . ., ., , the game. the ukrainian leader has asked people _ the game. the ukrainian leader has asked people tuesday _ the game. the ukrainian leader has asked people tuesday calm, - the game. the ukrainian leader has asked people tuesday calm, i - the game. the ukrainian leader has l asked people tuesday calm, i wonder if i can ask you to reflect on a personal level for a moment about yourfamily in ukraine, how they are, what they are telling you about the situation, what they feel? frankly some people are just
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preparing their camping gear and hunting rifles, some of the mud by nonperishable foods and looking for the next bombshell to. —— some of them are by nonperishable foods. my mother is in kyiv alone, these people need to be helped. i had started getting messages from students all over london, for example ucla, they are reaching out to ukrainian students, trying to calm them down and ask what they need to. . .. . calm them down and ask what they need to. , .. , ., , need to. these acts are very touching _ need to. these acts are very touching to _ need to. these acts are very touching to us. _ need to. these acts are very touching to us. ambassador| need to. these acts are very - touching to us. ambassador vadym prystaiko, thank you very much for your time today. back to that breaking news. the metropolitan police commissioner, dame cressida dick, has announced scotland yard has launched an investigation into a "number of events" in downing street and whitehall in relation to potential beaches of coronavirus laws. she's also defended her force's approach and has been setting out the criteria for retrospective investigations. my three factors were, and are, there was evidence that those involved knew or ought to have known that what they were
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doing was an offence. where not investigating would significantly undermine the legitimacy of the law. and where there was little ambiguity around the absence of any reasonable defence. in those cases, where those criteria were met, guidelines suggested that we should potentially investigate further and end up giving people tickets. we have a long established and effective working relationship with the cabinet office, who have an investigative capability. and, as you well know, they have been carrying out an investigation over the last few weeks.
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and what i can tell you this morning is that, as a result firstly of the information provided by the cabinet office enquiry team and secondly, my officers' assessment, i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. that was cressida dick talking to the london assembly a short while ago. we have been asking how you market your birthday is in lockdown. let me read some of your tweets, lots of you had sent messages so apologies if i do not read them all out but i read them all. this is from isabel aldrich who says my birthday in 2021 was my 50th, i spent it alone, no cake or friends,
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definitely no party, i obeyed the rules like the majority of people, i am not sheriff you are talking about 2020 or 2021, the 19th ofjune 2020 is the date in question. sue chadwick says my husband and i, in inverted, is, celebrated our70th birthday is that same week, just the two others, nobody could sing happy birthday to us. make it says i lost a brother, a sister and a marriage while partners were in full swing, he says borisjohnson has to be held accountable. —— mick says. there are many more in a very similar vein of people following rules, let me read one more from jez harris, my dad puts my birthday is the 21st of april, minus the 29th, his 76th in 2020 was his last, we could me to my
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parents' front drive, his birthday in the sunshine, mine in the rain, i couldn't even hug him. sebastian payne is the whitehall editor at the financial times. hello, just bring us up to date with your understanding about sue gray's report, when that might be released, vis—a—vis the investigation the metropolitan police are now carrying out? ,, , ._ , . , out? the sue gray inquiry which is not 'ust out? the sue gray inquiry which is notjust looking _ out? the sue gray inquiry which is notjust looking at _ out? the sue gray inquiry which is notjust looking at downing - out? the sue gray inquiry which is notjust looking at downing streetj notjust looking at downing street party is but a whole stream of gatherings across whitehall was coming to its conclusion, it was thought it would be released either tomorrow or thursday but following this announcement from the met it has now been delayed, it will not be published this week and sue gray does not want to prejudice anything the met may or may not want to pursue in terms of criminal liability for these gatherings. this is not a great outcome for boris johnson because it means this will
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continue, the drip drip of allegations may also continuing to these parties and i also understand that sue gray is investigating these overnight reports of a gathering on june the 19th in 2020 where a birthday party was held for boris johnson inside the cabinet room with party food and an appearance by his interior designer. that is another want to add to the list, another series of interviews and this row will drag on and on and the reaction from mps is one of total exasperation.— from mps is one of total exasperation. from mps is one of total exaseration. , . ., exasperation. let me be clear, we had a cabinet _ exasperation. let me be clear, we had a cabinet office _ exasperation. let me be clear, we had a cabinet office spokespersonj had a cabinet office spokesperson little while ago saying the investigation being carried out by sue gray is continuing, at the same time the publication of her findings will be delayed until the investigation by the police is
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completed? mr; investigation by the police is comleted? g , ., , ,, completed? my understanding is sue gra does completed? my understanding is sue gray does not — completed? my understanding is sue gray does not want _ completed? my understanding is sue gray does not want to _ completed? my understanding is sue gray does not want to conflict - completed? my understanding is sue gray does not want to conflict with i gray does not want to conflict with anything the met police are doing here, whether it will wait until the met has concluded it is uncertain but i understand it will not be published this week, as was originally hoped for and as downing street was hoping for, people close to borisjohnson hoped it might come out tonight so he could tackle it at prime minister's questions on wednesday, that it's very unlikely. this has a big impact on the whole of government because any time a minister goes anywhere, all they are asked about is the sue gray inquiry about will continue until it eventually wraps up and we do not know at this stage when that will be. that is a really important consideration, is this all basically impeding the government 0t consideration, is this all basically impeding the government of getting on with the business _ impeding the government of getting on with the business of— impeding the government of getting on with the business of government | on with the business of government in normal times? we have the sue gray investigation and now the
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metropolitan police investigation, to what extent does that add to the pressure conservative mps face a difficult calculation because many who have not to difficult calculation because many who have no— difficult calculation because many who have not to to a no confidence letters were _ who have not to to a no confidence letters were going _ who have not to to a no confidence letters were going to _ who have not to to a no confidence letters were going to wait - who have not to to a no confidence letters were going to wait for - who have not to to a no confidence letters were going to wait for the l letters were going to wait for the sue gray report to make up their minds on what they were going to do, but if that report will now be delayed by some time they have to decide whether they want to wait for that again, dragging this whole thing out, or have a essentially made up their minds and decided to try to go for a no—confidence vote now, it should be said that the image of any government or any involvement with the police that the prime minister has is not good. tony blair was interviewed twice by police under caution due to the cash for peerages scandal, i think that is the first time a sitting prime minister was interviewed by the police. that image is not good, conservative mps will not like it,
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in the court of parliamentary and public opinion it does not play well so mps will be thinking about whether they put in letters now, whether they put in letters now, whether they put in letters now, whether they wait for sue gray and the drip drip drip of allegations about this birthday party will probably continue. taste about this birthday party will probably continue.— about this birthday party will probably continue. we are 'ust heafina probably continue. we are 'ust hearing mi probably continue. we are 'ust hearing from labour�* probably continue. we are just hearing from labour website i probably continue. we are just i hearing from labour website that probably continue. we are just - hearing from labour website that the deputy leader of labour, angela rayner, will be asking an urgent question in the light of the latest revelations. angela rayner to ask the minister for the cabinet city will make a statement on the status of the investigation into downing street parties following the statement from the commission of the met police. so the opposition parties, labourand met police. so the opposition parties, labour and others, will be adding to pressure on the prime minister. so now there is a police investigation alongside the investigation alongside the investigation by senior civil servant sue gray. there is talk of
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basically if any offences were committed by would—be penalty notices, but perhaps that undermines the seriousness potentially if anyone is found guilty of a criminal offence —— if any offences were committed there would be penalty notices. . . notices. the first thing is the fixed penalty _ notices. the first thing is the fixed penalty notices, - notices. the first thing is the fixed penalty notices, in - notices. the first thing is the i fixed penalty notices, in normal situations the met gave a £100 fine if this happens, double on every occasion for repeat offenders, but there were very different penalties for organisers of gatherings. without prejudice then what the met might be looking at, i do not know details about, but there is very different things from those who might have attended a covid breaking gathering to those that organised it, which is where i think the met will get involved because i can get more serious than people who turned up more serious than people who turned up to a party which was not meant to
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happen. up to a party which was not meant to ha en. ., , ., up to a party which was not meant to ha en, ,, , . up to a party which was not meant to hauen. ,, ., . happen. sebastian payne, white editor for the _ happen. sebastian payne, white editor for the financial - happen. sebastian payne, white editor for the financial times, i editor for the financial times, thank you very much for all of your opinions on these developments —— whitehall editor. let's listen to the statement from cressida dick again. ma; the statement from cressida dick aaain. ~ , the statement from cressida dick aaain. y .,, the statement from cressida dick aaain. y ., , ., again. my three factors were that there was evidence _ again. my three factors were that there was evidence that - again. my three factors were that there was evidence that those i there was evidence that those involved knew and ought to have known that what they were doing was an offence. were not investigating would have significantly undermined the legitimacy of the law. and where there was little ambiguity around there was little ambiguity around the absence of any reasonable defence. in those cases, where those criteria were met, the guidelines suggested we should potentially investigate further and and giving people tickets. we have a long
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established and effective working relationship with the cabinet office who have an investigative capability, and as you well know they have been carrying out an investigation over the last few weeks. what i can tell you this morning is as a result firstly of the information provided by the cabinet office inquiry team and secondly my office is' own assessment, i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. that was the commissioner of the metropolitan police, cressida dick, making that statement just a short while ago to the london assembly, confirming the metropolitan police
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is now investigating a number of events at downing street and whitehall in relation to potential breaches of covid regulations. that sits alongside the investigation by senior civil servant sue gray. you are watching bbc news. joanna is here next to continue looking at the breaking developments, but now the weather with susan. tt is developments, but now the weather with susan. . . developments, but now the weather with susan. , ., ., , with susan. it is all looking a bit uloom with susan. it is all looking a bit gloomy out _ with susan. it is all looking a bit gloomy out there _ with susan. it is all looking a bit gloomy out there yet _ with susan. it is all looking a bit gloomy out there yet again - with susan. it is all looking a bit| gloomy out there yet again today with susan. it is all looking a bit - gloomy out there yet again today to the south of the uk, strubben cloud suppressing the sunshine. it should be a little brighterfurther suppressing the sunshine. it should be a little brighter further north, partly thanks to a weather front pushing its way in. that'll mean slightly stronger winds, helping to break up the college for northern ireland, eastern sunshine should do fairly well in terms of sunshine. we might see brighter spells for the north—east of england, north wales and the midlands but for much of
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england and it is again a story of little or no breeze, stubborn cloud that thinks feeling chilly. it becomes much windier to the north—west of the uk, but a mild breeze, eight or nine, making northern scotland the warmest place to be. overnight this weather front weakens to pretty much nothing and as it sinks south it is helping to clear the skies, we should have clearance belts across many parts of the uk by the end of the night. —— clearer spells. temperatures hovering around freezing, a frosted one or two sheltered hollows. wednesday starts with clearing skies, setting us up for more sunshine, and it will be more more mobile ads below try to approach northern scotland. we anticipate quite strong winds to the north and west of scotland by the time we get through the afternoon and into the
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evening they will peak at gusts of “p evening they will peak at gusts of up to 55 mph, so heavy and persistent rain for the northern and western isles, rain come the afternoon for northern ireland, try for england and wales, milder and much brighter than today. for england and wales, very little rain forecast, this is the best chance of seeing any but it weakens a while, just subsides that it might not get away from the south coast to thursday so we could have more cloud through the day. elsewhere it is brighter, northerly or north—westerly breeze, milder than it would have been to start the week, daytime highs finally back into double figures. we stay in the relatively milder air for friday, it looks like the cloud will to return. —— will start to return.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11... the metropolitan police says it is investigating the gatherings which took place at downing street during lockdown. i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. it comes after downing street admits to a gathering for the prime minister's birthday during the first lockdown — a few hours after visiting a primary school. more than 8000 us troops are on standby to deploy to europe, as fears grow that russia will invade ukraine.
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eight people are killed and many more are injured in a stampede at the africa cup of nations in cameroon. good afternoon. scotland yard has launched an investigation into gatherings in downing street in connection with potential breaches of coronavirus laws. the metropolitan police commissioner, dame cressida dick, said officers had begun their investigation after the inquiry led by the senior civil servant sue gray passed them new information. sue gray's inquiry is continuing while the police investigate. the commissioner said potential breaches of covid restrictions in the past were investigated when there was evidence that those involved knew or "ought to have
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known" that what they were doing was an offence, and where there could be "little "ambiguity around the absence of any reasonable defence". cressida dick was speaking to members of the london assembly. my three factors were and are, there was evidence that those involved knew or ought to have known that what they were doing was an offence, where not investigating would significantly undermine the legitimacy of the law and where there was little ambiguity around the absence of any reasonable defence. so, in those cases where those criteria were met, the guidelines suggested that we should potentially investigate further and end up giving people tickets. we have a long established and effective working relationship with the cabinet office,
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who have an investigative capability, and as you well know, they have been carrying out an investigation over the last few weeks, and what i can tell you this morning is that, as a result, firstly, of the information provided by the cabinet office enquiry team and, secondly, my officers' own assessment, i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. we arejust hearing... the bbc understands that the cabinet office will not publish sue gray's report while the metroplitan police is investigating events in government during lockdown. it is not clear how long this
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investingation will take. it had been anticipated that sue gray's report will be published this week. it was initially thought it would be published at the start of the week and then we thought the end, but now this investigation by the police changes everything. while sue gray will continue with her investigations internally, and she will be liaising with the metropolitan police, her report will not be published until the police complete their investigation. it is not clear at this point how long that will take. the former chief constable of greater manchester police sir peter fahy has been giving us his reaction to this morning's announcement. well, i think the police feel that they are in a really difficult position with this one. you know, they have tried to follow the logic that cressida dick explained, that normally they wouldn't go back and investigate a crime of this relatively, you know, not that serious — two years after the event.
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they have tried to stick to that line and, really, but on the other hand, there is this huge level of public concern, and i think the police feel that that is really about a failure of political accountability and they are now in a position where people are trying to make them use criminal law almost to fill that hole. as your correspondents have said, these are relatively minor offences, £100 fine. the worst that could happen is that could be challenged at a magistrates' court, but on the other hand, there is no question, there is a huge level of public concern about this and no matter what the met have said, it looks like one law for one and one law for another. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, has more on the developments and why this police investigation has been announced now. there has been a lot of fire obviously aimed at those who have been attending the alleged parties, but some of the fire has also been aimed at the police.
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why were they not stopping them at the time and why are they not investigating and leaving it to the cabinet office? cressida dick dealt with both of those. she said the officers in downing street have a clear role, that is protecting the government and those in government and she left unsaid that perhaps it might undermine that role if they were seen to be poking through the curtains and seeing if people were having a drink after work. so that is still a little bit open. the next thing was, why have you not been investigating these parties after the fact? you talk a lot about the fact that you generally don't, that is generally not the approach with coronavirus, but in some cases, they have done it, and she spoke about the reasons why you might go into an after—the—case investigation. there has to be at least some evidence and there needs to be evidence that the people doing it knew they were in breach of the rules. they might somehow be undermining the law,
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and there should be little ambiguity about whether this was a breach. and, of course, some of these instances we have heard about are a bit more ambiguous. well, was thatjust somebody having a glass of wine at their desk? and others seem to be less ambiguous. people coming together for what seems to be a long session of drinking and eating. i think there might be a clue in there as to which ones of these events might now be in the police's domain. the other question, well, why have you not been investigating, why have left it to the cabinet office? she tried to explain that, which was that the cabinet office are good at investigating and good at getting the evidence you need for this. e—mails, messages, talking to the staff. actually better at getting that kind of evidence than a police officer, who would have to go through a lot of hoops in order to get that kind of evidence, because obviously getting through e—mails of people doing sensitivejobs is quite a big deal
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for the police, quite easy for the cabinet office. well, while dame cressida made her announcement at the london assemby, at downing street cabinet ministers were leaving a meeting, and the leader of the house of commons, jacob rees—mogg, spoke to reporters — in defence of the prime minister. he's just done an amazing job. the vaccine roll—out, the furlough programme, the economy having bounced back to pre—pandemic levels. the leadership of boris johnson this country has had has been so brilliant that he has got us through this incredibly difficult period and he's got all the big decisions right. we have opened up faster than any other european country thanks to the prime minister, and i'm honoured to be under his leadership. mr rees—mogg, don't you think that's embarrassing? jacob rees—mogg leaving a cabinet. let me bring you a statement from sadiq khan, the mayor of london. he says, i welcome confirmation that the met police are investigating a number of events that took place in downing street and whitehall in the last two years in relation to potential breaches of the law. the
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public rightly expect the police to a poll below without fear or favour no matter who that involved and i have been clear that members of the public must be able to expect the highest standards of everyone, including the prime minister and those are around him. they cannot be one rule for the government and another everyone else. —— there cannot be. —— there cannot be. let's speak to our political correspondent alex forsyth. alex, what is the potential impact of this police investigation into events in downing street? t do of this police investigation into events in downing street? i do not underestimate _ events in downing street? i do not underestimate the _ events in downing street? i do not underestimate the decision - events in downing street? i do not underestimate the decision by - underestimate the decision by cressida dick and the metropolitan police, because the immediate impact is that it is going to delay the publication of that report that is being written by sue gray, the senior civil servant. remember that a lot of conservative mps will waiting for that sue gray report before deciding what to do next, crucially before deciding on the prime minister's fete, whether he should raise a vote of no confidence
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and we were expecting that report in the next couple of days. we are now hearing that will be delayed while the metropolitan police complete their investigation. the big question is, what does that do to the mood amongst conservative mps? some of them, let's wait for the outcome of the police investigation and then the sue gray report before deciding where to go next. the other train of thought is that this could, for some conservative mps, something that could drag on this drip of what had been damaging stories and reports in the press and therefore, will it crystallise some sort of action around the prime minister? the point is, mps are digesting this information from cressida dick and the cabinet office and i think they are trying to work out the consequences. tt are trying to work out the consequences.— are trying to work out the consequences. are trying to work out the conseuuences. . , ., ., consequences. if it drags on and the timin: is consequences. if it drags on and the timing is now— consequences. if it drags on and the timing is now completely _ consequences. if it drags on and the timing is now completely out - consequences. if it drags on and the timing is now completely out of - consequences. if it drags on and the timing is now completely out of the | timing is now completely out of the hands of downing street, who knows how long it drags on, and there are elections coming up in may, it could end up reporting not far ahead of
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those. . . . end up reporting not far ahead of those. ,, ., , .~' end up reporting not far ahead of those. ,, ., , , end up reporting not far ahead of those. ,, . , , ., those. cressida dick this morning was asked about _ those. cressida dick this morning was asked about the _ those. cressida dick this morning was asked about the potential- was asked about the potential timeline and she said she could not put a timeline on it. she said they are investigating a number of events that took place in downing street and whitehall, though not all of them. she said she would provide updates but not a blow by blow account. we do know not —— but we do not know the time frame. although there was a timeframe to the political pressure on the prime minister, it was likely to come to a head around the publication of us sue gray report and now we do not know when that will happen. there is still real anger and frustration at the way party leadership has managed all of this. the question is how this plays out and whether mps decide, now is the time to move against the prime minister and force against the prime minister and force a vote of confidence or whether they decide that they should wait for these enquiries and investigations. it is a very significant development and we will find out from mps what it means for the pm a's future. lloathed
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it means for the pm a's future. what are the potential _ it means for the pm a's future. what are the potential pass _ it means for the pm a's future. what are the potential pass ahead in the immediate future? you have outlined the possibility of a vote of no confidence. i conservative party's and mps. could it be possible that another party might take some sort of step ins terms of a vote of no—confidence? and obviously the prime minister will be considering how he is going to act going forward. what are your thoughts on those different aspects? thea;r forward. what are your thoughts on those different aspects?— those different aspects? they are all factors at _ those different aspects? they are all factors at play, _ those different aspects? they are all factors at play, and _ those different aspects? they are all factors at play, and as - those different aspects? they are all factors at play, and as we - those different aspects? they are l all factors at play, and as we know, the labour, liberal democrat party, and the snp say he should be considering his position and the labour leader sir keir starmer reiterated that position last night when the latest allegation around the prime minister's birthday emerged. sir keir starmer repeated the call for him to resign, but we must remember borisjohnson has an
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80 seat majority in the house of commons so it will likely come down to his own mps, and it will take 5a mps to submit a letter calling for a vote of no—confidence in the prime minister, and that would take place and then it would be 50% of mps would have to say they had no confidence in the prime minister, to force him to resign. still quite a lot of process to get through before that point, and it takes tory mps to decide they want to go down that path first. i up until now, what you have been hearing from conservative mps is that while there is real anger at leadership and they are conscious of the damage these reports have done to the party, but there has not been is a clear route to what to do next and different groups within the party had had different views on that. what will be fascinating and crucial to watching the next few hours is what those different elements of the conservative party, how they respond to what we have heard from dame cressida dick and the metropolitan police this morning and the
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consequences for the prime minister. worth saying that since prime minister is questions last week, we have heard a more robust town from downing street, even when they pushed back against those latest allegations that itv news reported last night about the prime minister's birthday, downing street was quite strong in its defence of prime minister's role in what happened. that is interesting, because up until this point, boris johnson has been keen to fight on for his position and premiership, so if that remains the same, the focus will be on conservative mps particularly and what they choose to do it now. . ~ particularly and what they choose to do it now. ., ,, , ., , particularly and what they choose to do it now. ., ,, i. , . do it now. thank you very much, alex. well, metropolitan police commissioner, cressida dick is still at the london assembly's police and crime committee to make the announcement that her police force would investigate the downing street parties — she's still talking actually at that assembly hearing — but about less poltiically explosive matters. the impact of that investigation is
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the sue gray enquiry about what happened at number ten, which are expected to report this week, will now not report until the police finalise their investigation and we do not know how long it will take. we also do not know specifically what the police are looking into. they have said they are looking into some of the events at downing street. dal babu is former chief superintendent in the metropolitan police. welcome and thank you forjoining us. it has been quite an extraordinary turn of events, hasn't it? and the way this has evolved in that initially the police said they did not do retrospective investigations of something like this, then there was sue gray's enquiry, and now they are investigating because of something she has turned up. she has been in close contact with the police. what are your thoughts on that?- are your thoughts on that? purely from a policing — are your thoughts on that? purely from a policing point _ are your thoughts on that? purely from a policing point of _ are your thoughts on that? purely from a policing point of view, - are your thoughts on that? purely from a policing point of view, i i from a policing point of view, i think the police have heard the mood
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music and it is a relatively straightforward, simple investigation, a probationary pc investigation, a probationary pc investigation, a probationary pc investigation, a fixed penalty notice, a very basic thing. essentially you have got people who are not in a work situation at a social gathering, and the delay by the police investigating this has caused issues around trust in the police and now police are investigating this, but this should have been done months ago and the matter could have been avoided. it is a simple investigation, you give somebody a fixed penalty notice for breaching conditions and that is the end of the matter unless they decide to appeal. 50 end of the matter unless they decide to a. eal. ., end of the matter unless they decide to a- eal. . i. end of the matter unless they decide to aeal, . end of the matter unless they decide to aeal. . . to appeal. so are you saying that if the are to appeal. so are you saying that if they are now _ to appeal. so are you saying that if they are now being _ to appeal. so are you saying that if they are now being given _ to appeal. so are you saying that if they are now being given whateverj they are now being given whatever sue gray has turned up and that can include e—mails, potentially even closed—circuit footage from inside downing street, the logs of who was coming and going and the times of
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that, with that evidence having already been amassed by sue gray, are you saying it will be a quick process for the police to go through that and decide whether to issue fixed penalty notices or not? absolutely, it is fairly simple. we know who the individuals are, cctv is quite extensive and they will be able to get this information fairly quickly. it should be relatively straightforward. t quickly. it should be relatively straightforward.— quickly. it should be relatively straightforward. i know you have said there that _ straightforward. i know you have said there that you _ straightforward. i know you have said there that you wish - straightforward. i know you have said there that you wish the - straightforward. i know you have i said there that you wish the police would have done the investigation first, but now that we are where we are, do you except cressida dick's defence of why it has happened this way around? because there was some criticism as well of the fact that there are obviously police officers based at downing street and it has been pointed out by some people that they knew what was going on but she says it was a different role. absolutely. i carry out investigations and the police always have priority, so if i am carrying out an investigation, police
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investigations always have priority, so i was quite surprised at the police stood back and allowed a process that had no legal standing to go through. so i'm very surprised, i'm pleased it's happening and hopefully this can be resolved with fixed penalty notices and people can move on. it is frustrating that the police had been dragged into this when it should have been straightforward. cressida dick said the _ have been straightforward. cressida dick said the cabinet _ have been straightforward. cressida dick said the cabinet office - have been straightforward. cressida dick said the cabinet office has - dick said the cabinet office has investigatory powers and that is what we have seen with sue gray, but it seems like an unusual situation for the police to be working hand in glove with civil servants, who are carrying out their own investigation. can you think of any precedent for this? trio. investigation. can you think of any precedent for this?— investigation. can you think of any precedent for this? no, when you do investigations _ precedent for this? no, when you do investigations and _ precedent for this? no, when you do investigations and there _ precedent for this? no, when you do investigations and there are - precedent for this? no, when you do investigations and there are issues i investigations and there are issues around essentially criminal matters, as this was the case, you immediately go to a situation where you deal with criminal matters. i was quite surprised that decision
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was quite surprised that decision was made to not investigate. lloathed was quite surprised that decision was made to not investigate. what do ou think was made to not investigate. what do you think has — was made to not investigate. what do you think has been _ was made to not investigate. what do you think has been the _ was made to not investigate. what do you think has been the impact - was made to not investigate. what do you think has been the impact on - was made to not investigate. what do you think has been the impact on the | you think has been the impact on the police, if anything it? trust you think has been the impact on the police, if anything it?— police, if anything it? trust has been affected, _ police, if anything it? trust has been affected, because - police, if anything it? trust has been affected, because people| police, if anything it? trust has - been affected, because people see one rule for those with significant power and another rule for others, so has had a significant impact. so it has had a significant impact. the fact it has been investigated will hopefully rectify that issue around trust.— will hopefully rectify that issue around trust. ., ,, , ., , . around trust. thank you very much for “oininu around trust. thank you very much forjoining us- _ around trust. thank you very much forjoining us. we _ around trust. thank you very much forjoining us. we will _ around trust. thank you very much forjoining us. we will talk - around trust. thank you very much forjoining us. we will talk in - around trust. thank you very much forjoining us. we will talk in a - forjoining us. we will talk in a few moments to somebody about how the whole process works inside the cabinet office, but first, labour want a response from the government about it this morning's significant announcement and angela rayner will be addressing the house of commons
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with an urgent question and we will bring it to you when it happens. we are expecting at around 12:30pm or later. the prime minister will also give a statement on ukraine in the commons, so we will have full coverage of those events. i'm joined now by dr catherine haddon, a senior fellow at the institute for government think tank. welcome and thank you forjoining us. in terms of the process of how this is working, just discussing their about the interaction between sue gray and the cabinet office and the police, what are your thoughts on how it has all been going on and where we are now? he on how it has all been going on and where we are now?— on how it has all been going on and where we are now? he is absolutely riaht, this where we are now? he is absolutely right. this is — where we are now? he is absolutely right, this is highly _ where we are now? he is absolutely right, this is highly unusual - right, this is highly unusual situation where you would have thought that the met police might have got involved earlier, but the point is, as he was making clear, it was never sue gray's position to be able to rule on criminality. it was
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always a case that if she found evidence that she thought and lawyers advising her thought could point to criminality, they had to pass that onto the police to either conduct a investigation or say they did not think that the threshold had been met for an investigation. they now say that it has, so of course that has to take precedence, but she could never have said, yes, this definitely broke the law, she is not the court and does not have a legal standing to make that position. what she can speak to more broadly is questions about government guidance at the time, which was different sometimes from the laws that were in place and was often more sweeping. so for some of the investigation, some of the gatherings she was looking at, it will notjust be a question of criminality, but also about whether or not it breached guidance on whether or not itjust had the appearance, it went contrary to the public expected at the time. there are lots of other issues
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because she still will be able to speak to them, but because of the central question about whether or not it broke the covid laws at the time taking precedent, she has to put it on ice so to speak for a bit of time. �* . put it on ice so to speak for a bit of time. . , . ., ., ., of time. and it is unclear how long that will be. _ of time. and it is unclear how long that will be, leaving _ of time. and it is unclear how long that will be, leaving lots _ of time. and it is unclear how long that will be, leaving lots of - of time. and it is unclear how long that will be, leaving lots of people j that will be, leaving lots of people in limbo. the mps saying they would wait to hear about the impact of sue gray's report before deciding what they would do next.— gray's report before deciding what they would do next. absolutely. to some extent. _ they would do next. absolutely. to some extent, this _ they would do next. absolutely. to some extent, this will _ they would do next. absolutely. to some extent, this will be _ they would do next. absolutely. to some extent, this will be a - they would do next. absolutely. to some extent, this will be a shock l they would do next. absolutely. to | some extent, this will be a shock to the system anyway, the fact that sue gray has found sufficient evidence that she thinks the question needs to be asked and she referred to the police, that suggests that this report will not look good for the prime minister. that may affect some mps' judgment already. i think the most important question is just the timetable now, as you get are saying, this can be looked at swiftly because these are by and large fixed penalty notices unless they brought a big penalties against
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they brought a big penalties against the organisers, though again, there were different laws in place throughout the pandemic. but if that can be wrapped up quickly, we could be looking back at the sue gray report will be in a matter of weeks. it is not in anyone's favour for this to drag on.— it is not in anyone's favour for this to drag on. no, because the olitical this to drag on. no, because the political agenda _ this to drag on. no, because the political agenda goes _ this to drag on. no, because the political agenda goes on - this to drag on. no, because the political agenda goes on from i political agenda goes on from elections in may, and also of course, really important, events overseas with what is happening in ukraine. the business of government is to go on and mps have to, well, not mps, in the local elections, councils, but mps and councillors all have to be hearing about those in their constituencies about how they feel about all of this. this is one of the _ they feel about all of this. this is one of the big — they feel about all of this. this is one of the big questions - they feel about all of this. this is one of the big questions for - they feel about all of this. this is one of the big questions for the i one of the big questions for the conservative party at the moment. this is undermining business of government, it is a huge distraction, it is undoubtedly taking up a lot of time for people at the centre of government, and
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destabilising. it is also a question of how long they will have to keep going on and whether there is a mood that actually, we have to resolve this soon out one way or another. it is not how you want government to be operating when it is under such a cloud for such a long period of time. you need proper process to investigate properly and mps want evidence, but ultimately will have to come to a judgment themselves stop it will not be sue gray who decides the future of the prime minister, it will be mps.- decides the future of the prime minister, it will be mps. where does this sit for you _ minister, it will be mps. where does this sit for you in _ minister, it will be mps. where does this sit for you in terms _ minister, it will be mps. where does this sit for you in terms of _ minister, it will be mps. where does this sit for you in terms of when - this sit for you in terms of when you look back and see issues that have caused difficulty the prime minister is in the past and the nature of those issues and how that compares with what has happened here? tt compares with what has happened here? . . , compares with what has happened here? , , here? it is a very destabilising one. here? it is a very destabilising one- people — here? it is a very destabilising one. people have _ here? it is a very destabilising one. people have been - here? it is a very destabilising i one. people have been pointing here? it is a very destabilising - one. people have been pointing back to the cash for peerages row in 2007 and the police enquiry and the then
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prime minister was interviewed, but as a witness, because that in itself they thought would be very damaging. his own role in the enquiry and his status within it. so, yes, looking back at the ministers, it is highly unusual to find one where there is a police investigation going on into them but then the entire situation where you have these repeated leaks coming from inside the centre of government, which suggest that number 10 is not operating effectively, though is a lot of blood —— there is a lot of bad blood, that is hugely damaging in itself for the prime minister and government. it is a situation which we rarely see because often times, when a crisis hits, it gets resolved one way or another, but the way in which this has dragged on now for several weeks is quite a unique situation and i think one which is
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going to be a big bookmark in boris johnson's career, whichever way it goes. johnson's career, whichever way it noes. . ~' johnson's career, whichever way it noes. . ~ ,, y johnson's career, whichever way it toes. ., ~' , . johnson's career, whichever way it noes. . ~' , . ., goes. thank you very much for “oininu goes. thank you very much for joining us- _ thank you very much forjoining us. let's turn our attention now to ukraine. let's turn our attention now to ukraine. washington has placed more than 8,000 us—based troops on a heightened state of alert amid fears that russia will invade ukraine. moscow denies planning military action but it has amassed more than 100,000 troops close to the ukrainian border. our correspondent gabriel gatehouse sent this report from kyiv. bell tolls. this is a country in limbo — waiting for an invasion that looks more likely with every passing day, but may yet never come. to the east, 100,000 russian troops amassed. but the kremlin says talk of an invasion is hysteria. facing them are ukrainian soldiers
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who hear western leaders sounding the alarm in ever starker tones. and stuck in between are the people of kyiv — who, frankly, don't know what to believe. i think something might happen. i think the probability is very high, but god knows. i think even putin doesn't know yet what kind of decision he's going to take, so... but, you know, the situation is horrible. at the weekend, britain warned that russia was planning a coup to install a little—known former mp as puppet ruler — suggestions that have been widely dismissed both in moscow and here in kyiv. the uk began pulling staff out of its embassy today, saying an invasion could come at any time. the americans are doing the same. a senior ukrainian politician told the bbc today, such actions are not helpful. translation: if people start -
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panicking, that leaves our country in a very dangerous position, and it will make it easier for russia to manipulate us. the reality is, of course, that this country is already at war — and has been since 2014, when russia annexed crimea and funded and provided weapons and sent in troops to support a separatist rebellion in the east. around 1a,000 ukrainians have already died in that conflict — these are some of their faces. and so, for people here, the question is not "will there be war?", but "will this war escalate?" for months now, the ukrainians have been preparing a territorial defence force. volunteers like marta yuzkiv, a doctor in her 50s, is among those who are training for a possible defence of kyiv. of course, i am worried
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because i'm a peaceful woman, i don't want to have a war started, but in any case, in case it started, i should be ready to defend the country. meanwhile, a kind of normal life continues as the people of this country wait nervously to see what fate — and larger geopolitical forces — have in store. gabriel gatehouse, bbc news, kyiv. with me now is richard ensor from the economist who is in kyiv. what is the feeling on the ground? is it waiting nervously for things to happen?— is it waiting nervously for things to hauen? . , ., ., to happen? that is right, a waiting came to happen? that is right, a waiting name is a to happen? that is right, a waiting game is a good — to happen? that is right, a waiting game is a good way _ to happen? that is right, a waiting game is a good way to _ to happen? that is right, a waiting game is a good way to describe i to happen? that is right, a waiting game is a good way to describe a i game is a good way to describe a pretty grim situation here in kyiv, tens of thousands of russian troops poised on the other side of ukraine's border. we have a growing level of readiness. the diplomatic track to avert a war through talking looks to be running out of road and
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it looks unlikely to succeed anyway. even joe it looks unlikely to succeed anyway. evenjoe biden seems to be giving up the idea of preventing a war, saying he expects vladimir putin to move in to ukraine, so this is not something that inspires confidence, and for everyone and anyone across europe who cares about the relative peace that this continent has enjoyed almost uninterrupted since 1945, you should be worried. what is life like on a daily basis as the clock ticks? many ukrainians are not as sure another russian vision is coming. the last eight years ukrainians have lived with constant reports russia is up to no good. sometimes these are true reports and sometimes don't amount to anything that changes or effects of their lives so they
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simply get on with their lives and live normally that is what you seeing a lot on the of kyiv. if you are a ukrainian was a war on the horizon does not excuse you from going to yourjob and provide for yourfamily and feed going to yourjob and provide for your family and feed yourself when your family and feed yourself when you get hungry. that being said, you are seeing a shift in the mood and people are starting to plan for eventualities and people are asking should i stay, should i go, should i fight? young people on social media and group chats are asking each other, i have a grandmother who lives on the border with russia, what should i do? how close to my hosting russian troops need to come before they respond? these are the kind of questions are grandparents might have had to ask a long time ago but in ukraine they are here. thank you very much indeed for
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joining us. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. yet again, lots of cloud is looming large over england and wales. with barely a breath of breeze we will struggle to break it up and see much brightness today. for scotland, sunshine in the east, more cloud pushing into the west through the afternoon, rain for the northern and western isles and the breeze picking up here. perhaps some brighter spells for the north—east of england, the midlands and north wales from time to time. chilly in the cloud, highs of four orfive, northern scotland, highs of eight or nine. tomorrow looks brighter, looks like the cloud will start to break up overnight,
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allowing sunny spells and wales, more cloud later, rain for northern ireland, turning very wet and windy for the north—west of scotland, particularly later in the day. some rain for northern ireland come the afternoon. hello, this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines: the metropolitan police say they are investigating the gatherings which took place at downing street during lockdown. i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. it comes after downing street admits to a gathering for the prime minister's birthday during the first lockdown — a few hours after visiting a primary school. more than 8,000 us troops
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are on standby to deploy to europe, as fears grow that russia will invade ukraine. eight people are killed and many more are injured in a stampede at the africa cup of nations in cameroon. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. the former england manager roy hodgson looks set to return to management in the premier league, with his appointment expected at watford later today. hodgson left crystal palace at the end of last season, but kept them in the top tier of english football in the four seasons he was in charge. he was already the oldest manager in the premier league and at 74 will be so again. his career has taken in 22 clubs and spans over 40 years. it comes after the departure of claudio ranieri who was sacjed afterjust 14 games. —— who was sacked afterjust 14 games. the clock is ticking on derby county's future. the club's administrators are expected to hold talks
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with the english football league later today. they have a week to prove they can find funding for the rest of the season. placed in administration in september, they were deducted 21 points, with wayne rooney battling hard to keep his side up. england midfielderjill scott has joined aston villa on loan from manchester city for the rest of the season. scott has been at manchester city for eight years, but will be looking for more game time to boost her hopes of being picked for this summer's european championship. at the australian open, home favourite and world number one ashleigh barty made it look easy as she progressed to the semifinals. she dominated the americanjessicca pegula in straight sets, 6—2, 6—love, in her bid to become the first australian to win the singles title in 44 years. and she will face madison keys who's into her first grand slam semi—final for four years after beating french open champion barbora krejcikova. in the men's draw, rafa nadal�*s hopes of a 21st grand slam are still alive. he was cruising two sets up,
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only to drop the next two against canada's denis shapovolov. he had the trainer out, and said afterwards he was feeling sick. but he was back out for a thrilling winner—takes—all in the fifth set which he recovered to win. his first five—setter of the tournament so far. so how did he find the going? i was completely destroyed after that. yeah, very tough day, very warm. honestly, i didn't practise for it. i'm not 21 any more, so... after this, these matches, it's great to have two days off. i think i felt quite good physically, in terms of movement, but it's true that the conditions here haven't been that hard for the last week and a half. and england bowler kate cross has said the side need to force a positive result after weather frustration during the t20 series as they prepare to take on australia in a women's ashes test that starts
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on wednesday evening in canberra. it doesn't happen often, winning test matches doesn't happen often in the women's game so i think being able to get that win would be able to boost us so much as a group and the confidence and the momentum you can then take into the last three games going into that one day series would be absolutely enormous. we know it is going to be hard work and i think everyone is up for that fight and we have worked so hard on our fitness and the demands of being able to cope with four—day cricket so i think we are all chomping at the bit to get out there now. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. let's return to our top story — the metropolitan police commissioner, dame cressida dick, has announced scotland yard has launched an investigation into a "number of events" in downing street and whitehall in relation to potential beaches of coronavirus laws. she's also defended her force's
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approach and has been setting out the criteria for retrospective investigations. i think ithink in i think in general the public would understand we need to focus on violent crime and terrorism as well of course is doing a bit during the pandemic. recognising there might be some occasions where we would investigate retrospectively we generated some guidelines, only guidelines, but guidelines that we have stock too. and she will be aware that we have on occasion investigated retrospectively. some of my officers, a few, have received penalty notices when we heard after the fact that they had breached the guidelines. one or two high—profile people also when it was plain that they had admitted and there was good evidence, they also after the a few
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weeks after the fact received penalty notices. on the occasions on which we have done that have been when we were looking at something which appeared to be the most serious flagrant type of breach. and we are three factors came into play. firstly there had to be of course some kind of evidence, notjust somebody saying something, some sort of evidence. there was evidence those involved knew or ought to have known that what they were doing was an offence. we are not investigating —— were not investigating would significantly undermine the integrity of the law and where there
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was little ambiguity around any reasonable defence. in those cases where those criteria were met, the guidelines suggested we should potentially investigate further and end up giving people tickets. we have a long established and effective working relationship with the cabinet office, who have an investigative capability, and as you well know they have been carrying out an investigation over the last few weeks. and what i can tell you this morning is that as a result, firstly of the information provided by the cabinet office enquiry team and secondly my officers own assessment, i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing
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street and whitehall in the last two years in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. bina patel died in october last year after an ambulance took nearly an hour to arrive. she had been struggling to breathe. ambulances are supposed to come within 18 minutes, but when her son akshay called 999, he was told the service that night was �*incredibly busy�*, and people were being asked to wait for up to an hour and a half. akshay has been speaking to graham satchell, viewers may to graham satchell. viewers may find his report distressing. life is about positivity. surrounding yourself with people like me. she was a giving person, she was never a taker and ijust loved my mum. ijust think, you know, a lot of people say that we look alike. she was very loving and ijust couldn't live without her, in a sense.
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it's just a shame she's gone and, i mean, she was really young, and it's quite upsetting, to be honest. ambulance service, is the patient breathing? hi, can i get an ambulance, please? is the patient breathing? erm, struggling. 0k. october the 11th last year, 2:31 in the morning, and akshay calls 999 for his mum, bina. she woke me up and she, you know, screamed my name — "akshay, akshay, get up, i can't breathe." and i thought, 0k, something's gone wrong here. so we will get an ambulance out to you as soon as possible, or as soon as we have an ambulance available _ i was just in a state of shock. i didn't know what to do myself because i've never been in a position like that, and i was waiting for the people that knew what to do to come as soon as possible. akshay waited for 15 minutes, and then called back. 0k, we're very busy and we aim to be with you as soon as possible, or as soon as we have an ambulance available. 0k. currently it's likely to be over an hour and a half. but that's from your first call. right... 0k? 0k.
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it'sjust incredibly busy this evening. i can't believe she's told me it's going to be an hour and a half from my first call. so, potentially, you know, that's four o'clock in the morning. ijust looked at my mum and ijust thought, i don't know what to do. bina, relax. is the patient breathing? no. i don't know. she's lost a lot of breath. tell me exactly what's happening. bina screaming. we logged a call half an hour ago. she can't breathe. akshay made six calls in total — each one more distressing. to hear my mother screaming, you know, saying that she's going to die... you know, even to the point, "where are they, where are they?" you know, screaming for help. she was screaming for that ambulance to come. sorry, graham. yeah, she was screaming for help. he sobs.
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and it didn't come! he sobs. it took 56 minutes for an ambulance to arrive. by then, akshay�*s mum was dead. akshay�*s experience is not unique. patients who may have had a heart attack — so—called category 2 — waited an average of 53 minutes for an ambulance in england last month. the target is 18 minutes. where akshay lives in the northwest of england, category 2 patients waited an hour and seven minutes on average in december. if they came within their recommended time — which is 18 minutes — if they came within that time, i believe she would have been saved. the north west ambulance service has now completed an investigation seen by the bbc.
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in a statement, the service told us... these pictures show ambulances queuing up outside a hospital in devon at the beginning ofjanuary — there are similar pictures across the country. ambulances waiting hours to off—load their patients because hospitals are full. the college of paramedics says it has had an impact on patient safety. in a statement, nhs england said... but i just want to know the truth and why. none of that is enough for akshay. something needs to be done about it, you know, because we all rely on the nhs,
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you know, and we only call them in emergency — we don't call them every day — we call them when we actually need them. and when they're not there, it kind of... you lose your trust. so... there's no way i can put trust in a service like that, you know? in the days after she died, akshay found a video on his mum's phone. he replays it again and again to give him comfort. i want the whole nation to know that life is about positivity. surrounding yourself with people like me, my friend, mina, my workplace, asda, good friends around you, good family around you. positivity, brother. positivity. you can hear more about ambulances delays in file on four on bbc radio 4 at eight o'clock tonight, orafter that on bbc sounds.
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travel restrictions are set to change for people arriving in england or scotland. from 4am on friday the 11th february, fully vaccinated travellers arriving in england or scotland won't have to take a covid test. instead, they will have to fill out a new, simpler passenger locator form. there will be no self—isolation requirement for those who are vaccinated. the unvaccinated will need to take a test on day two of their return but no longer on day eight. from the third february, children aged between 12 and 15 in england will be able to prove their vaccination status, or prior infection, through a digital nhs covid pass. earlier we spoke to the independent�*s travel editor, who's at gatwick airport an awful lot of people are travelling out of gatwick airport this morning looking forward to some winter sun, of course, but also slightly cheesed off because for the next 17 days,
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anybody coming back to the uk will still have to have that travel test, which is if you have been fully vaccinated, you will need to take a lateral flow test either on the day you come back or one of the two following days, and you will need to have booked that test in advance, typically paying £20 or £30, in order to complete your passenger locator form. as you say, the requirement for the test will be dropped from the 11th of february at 4am. the passenger locatorform, though, which for an awful lot of us, has been a vortex of despair at the end of a holiday, that will continue. and crucially, for unvaccinated travellers, this is perhaps the most surprising change, you will no longer need to self—isolate. i have been trying to find out, i have not yet managed to do so, what happens to people who are already in self—isolation at the witching hour of 4am on the 11th of february, i will try to find that out. but that will make life an awful lot easier. having said all of that,
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this is just the rules coming into england and scotland, i expect an announcement from wales imminently and northern ireland will also fall into line, but of course you are subject to the rules of the country you are going to and those will depend on your vaccination status and might well involve some kind of testing as well, nicola sturgeon will make her weekly statement on coronavirus later as omicron restrictions in scotland are finally scrapped. social distancing rules in pubs and restaurants were lifted on monday while nightclubs can now reopen for the first time in a month. the first minister will update msps this afternoon on the latest steps in scotland's fight against coronavirus. the headlines on bbc news:
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the metropolitan police say they are investigating the gatherings which took place at downing street during lockdown. more than 8,000 us troops are on standby to deploy to europe, as fears grow that russia will invade ukraine. eight people are killed and many more are injured in a stampede at the africa cup of nations in cameroon. taylor swift has criticised the lead singer of blur and gorillaz after he said she doesn't write her own music. damon albarn made the comments in an interview with the la times. she's now responded, saying she writes all of her songs and has called his words �*damaging'. with me to discuss this is music journalist nicola davies. to be clear, she does write them or doesn't _ to be clear, she does write them or doesn't she? — to be clear, she does write them or doesn't she? she to be clear, she does write them or doesn't she?— doesn't she? she is known for writin: doesn't she? she is known for writing about _ doesn't she? she is known for writing about her _ doesn't she? she is known for writing about her past - writing about her past relationships, no one else could write that stuff.— relationships, no one else could write that stuff. exactly right, she is very open _ write that stuff. exactly right, she is very open about _ write that stuff. exactly right, she is very open about her _ write that stuff. exactly right, she| is very open about her songwriting and about her life, as you say. she has also been in the press a lot about her ownership of her tracks,
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of her albums and she even just rereleased because she recorded one of her first albums, red, rereleased because she recorded one of herfirst albums, red, so rereleased because she recorded one of her first albums, red, so she could own the rights and royalties on that because she is notjust a performer but also the writer stop what did damon albarn say? tie performer but also the writer stop what did damon albarn say? he said categorically — what did damon albarn say? he said categorically taylor _ what did damon albarn say? he said categorically taylor swift _ what did damon albarn say? he said categorically taylor swift does - what did damon albarn say? he said categorically taylor swift does not i categorically taylor swift does not write songs and how billie eilish call right so songs with a brother and he enjoys that music. taylor swift after put this on twitter he said it was taken out of context and edited to make it click bait. the sentence he said was taylor swift does not write her own songs which is obviously categorically false. has he acknowledged she does write her own songs?— has he acknowledged she does write her own songs? yes, he did apologise and said he very _
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her own songs? yes, he did apologise and said he very much _ her own songs? yes, he did apologise and said he very much understands i and said he very much understands how it looks and he does acknowledge that she does write her own songs. i think what the wider issue really is around this kind of prevailing myth and society that women can't be song writers can play the guitar, typically male gendered roles. there are only about 13% of songwriters that are female, which is obviously a very small minority so i think taylor swift has said this is damaging in her own words. i don't think she meant as much to her personally but to the wider industry and to those young people who i am sure look up to her as someone who not only sings about rights and plays instruments. tt not only sings about rights and plays instruments.— not only sings about rights and plays instruments. it makes you wonder how _ plays instruments. it makes you wonder how much _ plays instruments. it makes you wonder how much he _ plays instruments. it makes you wonder how much he knows - plays instruments. it makes you i wonder how much he knows about taylor swift because she does not hold back and that is part of why people love her, she stands up and
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says what she thinks.— says what she thinks. absolutely. just says what she thinks. absolutely. just because _ says what she thinks. absolutely. just because he _ says what she thinks. absolutely. just because he has _ says what she thinks. absolutely. just because he has a _ says what she thinks. absolutely. just because he has a huge - says what she thinks. absolutely. just because he has a huge music star does not mean he knows about all the other big music stars in the world. taylor swift has really gone above and beyond in the music industry and is often grouped with lots of male artists and records and charts and those sorts of things so she is not some and e would want to go she is not some and e would want to 9° up she is not some and e would want to go up against, i don't think. going back to what _ go up against, i don't think. going back to what you _ go up against, i don't think. going back to what you are _ go up against, i don't think. going back to what you are saying - go up against, i don't think. going back to what you are saying about the lack of female representation in the lack of female representation in the music industry, it seems really surprising it is still like that. absolutely. there is progress and things are moving in the right direction and obviously if you look at statistics for different countries and will differ but there was a global numbers. it is surprisingly still like that. there is a lot that can be done when people are young in terms of education and what young girls might
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want to go into. this is also very true of production. only about 3% of producers are female which again is this gender stereotype that males are more into the technical side of music and that then plays out into song writing to a slightly lesser extent. so there is some progress but it is a little bit slow. t am but it is a little bit slow. i am guessing _ but it is a little bit slow. i am guessing her _ but it is a little bit slow. i am guessing her next _ but it is a little bit slow. i am guessing her next song - but it is a little bit slow. i am guessing her next song might be about damon albarn. t am guessing her next song might be about damon albarn.— guessing her next song might be about damon albarn. i am not sure she should — about damon albarn. i am not sure she should waste _ about damon albarn. i am not sure she should waste her— about damon albarn. i am not sure she should waste her time, - about damon albarn. i am not sure she should waste her time, to - about damon albarn. i am not sure she should waste her time, to be i she should waste her time, to be honest. at least eight people are reported to have been killed and dozens injured in a stampede outside a stadium hosting an africa cup of nations football match in cameroon. the confederation of african football says it's investigating the incident, which happened outside the paul biya stadium in the capital yaounde. our correspondent
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piers edwards has more. the incident took place as fans try to force their way in about half an hour before kick off at a perimeter gate and shoes and debris were amongst the letter at the site. at the hospital nurses told us some of the hospital nurses told us some of the wounded will need to be taken to more specialised hospitals. cameroon is hosting the greatest sporting eventin is hosting the greatest sporting event in africa for more than half a century and is facing problems and they should have been first played in 2019 only for problems to delay them. they have sent a delegation to visit victims in hospital. games here should have maximum capacity of
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80% for games involving the host nation cameroon but the seem to be more inside the stadium for a victory which was ultimately overshadowed by tragedy. the world's most powerful telescope has reached its final destination — a million miles from earth. the james webb telescope took 30 days to get there — and will now spend five months studying the universe's earliest stars. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. hello, it's all looking a bit gloomy out there yet again today to the south of the uk, stubborn cloud suppressing the sunshine. it should be a little brighter further north, partly thanks to a weather front pushing its way in. that'll mean slightly stronger winds, helping to break teh cloud for northern ireland, eastern scotland should do fairly well in terms of sunshine.
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we might see brighter spells for the north—east of england, north wales and the midlands but for much of england and it is again a story of little or no breeze, stubborn cloud but things feeling chilly. it becomes much windier to the north—west of the uk through the afternoon, but a mild breeze, eight or nine, making northern scotland the warmest place to be. overnight this weather front weakens to pretty much nothing and as it sinks south it is helping to clear the skies, we should see clearer spells across many parts of the uk by the end of the night. temperatures quite similar to the nightjust gone — hovering around freezing, and i think we'll catch a frost in one or two sheltered hollows. wednesday starts with clearing skies, setting us up for more sunshine, and it will be a more mobile days as this low tries to approach northern scotland.
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we anticipate quite strong winds to the north and west of scotland by the time we get to the afternoon and into the evening they will peak at gusts of up to 55 mph. so quite heavy and persistent rain for the northern and western isles, rain come the afternoon for northern ireland. dry for england and wales, milder and much brighter than today. for england and wales, very little rain forecast, this is the best chance of seeing any but it weakens all the while, just some signs that it might not get away from the south coast through thursday so we could have more cloud through the day. elsewhere it is brighter, northerly or north—westerly breeze, milder than it would have been to start the week, our daytime highs finally back into double figures in the south of the uk. we stay in the relatively milder air for friday, but it looks like the cloud will start to return.
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almost uninterrupted since 1945, you should be worried.
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good afternoon. this is bbc news. the headlines... i'm ben brown live in downing street, where the metropolitan police say they are investigating the gatherings which took place at downing street during lockdown. i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. the cabinet has been meeting today — one minister spoke to the media to defend the prime minister. the leadership of borisjohnson this country has had has been so brilliant,
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he has got us through this incredibly difficult period and he has got all the big decisions right. meanwhile, labour have demanded an urgent question — we'll bring you that live atjust after 12:30. i'm joanna gosling. the other main news... more than 8000 us troops are on standby to deploy to europe, as fears grow that russia will invade ukraine. eight people are killed and many more are injured in a stampede at the africa cup of nations in cameroon. i'm ben brown live in downing street. another day of intense political drama here. another day of intense political drama here.
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scotland yard has launched an investigation into gatherings in downing street in connection with potential breaches of coronavirus laws. the metropolitan police commissioner, dame cressida dick, said officers had begun their investigation after the inquiry, led by the senior civil servant, sue gray, passed them new information. sue gray's work will continue while the police investigate, but won't be published until the police conclude their inquiries. the commissioner said potential breaches of covid restrictions in the past were investigated when there was evidence that those involved knew or "ought to have known" that what they were doing was an offence, and where there could be "little "ambiguity around the absence of any reasonable defence". cressida dick was speaking to members of the london assembly. my three factors were and are, there was evidence that those involved knew or ought to have known that what they were doing was an offence, where not
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investigating would significantly undermine the legitimacy of the law and where there was little ambiguity around the absence of any reasonable defence. so, in those cases where those criteria were met, the guidelines suggested that we should potentially investigate further and end up giving people tickets. we have a long established and effective working relationship with the cabinet office, who have an investigative capability, and, as you well know, they have been carrying out an investigation over the last few weeks, and what i can tell you this morning is that, as a result, firstly, of the information provided by the cabinet office enquiry team
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and, secondly, my officers' own assessment, i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. cressida dick are there. we do not know how long that police investigation will take an cressida dick said they would not be providing a running commentary on their investigation. sir peter fahy is the former chief constable of greater manchester police. he explained how the investigations by the met and sue gray will differ. well, obviously it is a criminal investigation and the issue will be that whatever interviews that people may have given to sue gray, would probably not be admissible in terms of a criminal investigation, so they may have to be taken again so that the person is under caution.
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but that would also depend on whether there is other evidence being gathered by sue gray — e—mails, otherforms of communication, otherforms of evidence, even possibly from some of the police officers that were on duty, that means that those interviews, while they still need to be carried out, are more perfunctory. as i say, i think part of the issue will be the issue about clarifying the legal definition and whether sue gray has been able to get the evidence which puts this, really, a very clear side of this line. the news that the police are investigating the various gatherings, alleged parties in downing street and whitehall will pile more political pressure on prime minister, borisjohnson. very shortly after the revelation there was a birthday celebration for him in number 10 was a birthday celebration for him in number10 injune was a birthday celebration for him in number 10 injune of 2020.
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well, while dame cressida made her announcement at the london assembly, downing street cabinet ministers were leaving a meeting, and the leader of the house of commons, jacob rees—mogg, spoke to reporters in defence of the prime minister. the government has done an amazing job. the vaccine roll—out, the furlough programme, the economy having bounced back to pre—pandemic levels. the leadership of borisjohnson this country has had has been so brilliant, that he has got us through this incredibly difficult period and he's got all the big decisions right. we have opened up faster than any other european country thanks to the prime minister, and i'm honoured to be under his leadership. let's speak to our political correspondent chris mason. chris, immediately what we have got coming up in the next few minutes is an urgent question from the labour party about all of this, but i want you to try and assess how damaging this investigation is for the prime
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minister and government. goad minister and government. good afternoon. _ minister and government. good afternoon, all— minister and government. good afternoon, all of _ minister and government. good afternoon, all of this _ minister and government. good afternoon, all of this means - minister and government. (limp. afternoon, all of this means this whole row continues and will continue for some time. parliament and was as reporters have got ourselves into a position where we were counting down to this imminent publication of sue gray's report into all of these parties and gatherings taking place around westminster when these things were banned. the expectation was that that would come in the next couple of days, we now know that is not going to happen because we await the investigation by the police. so those questions will continue. they will hover over the government put so much longer. they pose massive questions for conservative mps, the most important electorate in the country as far as the prime minister is concerned, and lean little bandwidth or conversations about anything else. let's talk to the leader of the liberal democrats —— liberal democrats. what do you make
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of this latest revelation that the police are going to investigate? this government is in meltdown. we have had _ this government is in meltdown. we have had countless parties breaking covid _ have had countless parties breaking covid rules — have had countless parties breaking covid rules that you and i kept to an your— covid rules that you and i kept to an your view is kept to, then we have _ an your view is kept to, then we have had — an your view is kept to, then we have had black male with government whips— have had black male with government whips telling their own party mps they have funding taking away from their constituency, and now we have -- we _ their constituency, and now we have -- we have — their constituency, and now we have -- we have an — their constituency, and now we have —— we have an investigation into the prime _ —— we have an investigation into the prime minister and his staff. we got here because the premise that cannot tell the _ here because the premise that cannot tell the truth, he has lied continuously, he has been dishonest to parliament and the british people. _ to parliament and the british people, and can rightly, he has to lo. people, and can rightly, he has to go. he _ people, and can rightly, he has to go. he must resign and that is the only solution. if go. he must resign and that is the only solution-— only solution. if not, then what? conservative _ only solution. if not, then what? conservative mps _ only solution. if not, then what? conservative mps need - only solution. if not, then what? conservative mps need to - only solution. if not, then what? conservative mps need to look. only solution. if not, then what? | conservative mps need to look in only solution. if not, then what? - conservative mps need to look in the mirror. _ conservative mps need to look in the mirror. they— conservative mps need to look in the mirror. they have had the power to act against — mirror. they have had the power to act against the dishonesty of the prime _ act against the dishonesty of the prime minister. they know he is dishonest. — prime minister. they know he is dishonest, this is a prime minister sacked _ dishonest, this is a prime minister sacked twice before flying in
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previous _ sacked twice before flying in previousjobs sacked twice before flying in previous jobs and so the conservative mps know him well and know he _ conservative mps know him well and know he is _ conservative mps know him well and know he is dishonest. if they do not act and _ know he is dishonest. if they do not act and use — know he is dishonest. if they do not act and use their power, they are guilty— act and use their power, they are guilty by— act and use their power, they are guilty by association in this most dishonest — guilty by association in this most dishonest of prime ministers. yet here is a dishonest of prime ministers. get here is a prime minister dishonest of prime ministers. yet here is a prime minister perhaps more widely known to the electorate, his character, his strengths and weaknesses, going into the next general election, then any other prime minister in our lifetimes, and given that he won a stonking majority just a given that he won a stonking majorityjust a couple of given that he won a stonking majority just a couple of years given that he won a stonking majorityjust a couple of years ago. does that not give him the right to carry on until he seeks an appointment with the electorate rather than conservative mps or others trying to bring him down? t others trying to bring him down? i think the events of the last few months — think the events of the last few months are the answer to that, the continual— months are the answer to that, the continual dishonesty and lies. he may have — continual dishonesty and lies. he may have won the last election, he wasn't _ may have won the last election, he wasn't popular, but less unpopular thanjeremy corbyn. i do not think the british— thanjeremy corbyn. i do not think the british public... an than jeremy corbyn. i do not think the british public. . .— the british public... an 80 seat ma'ori . the british public... an 80 seat majority- he — the british public... an 80 seat majority. he was _ the british public... an 80 seat majority. he was not _ the british public... an 80 seat majority. he was not quite - the british public... an 80 seat
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majority. he was not quite as l majority. he was not quite as unpopular — majority. he was not quite as unpopular as _ majority. he was not quite as unpopular as his _ majority. he was not quite as unpopular as his opponent. l majority. he was not quite as i unpopular as his opponent. now majority. he was not quite as - unpopular as his opponent. now the question— unpopular as his opponent. now the question is. — unpopular as his opponent. now the question is, what happens now? we have a _ question is, what happens now? we have a huge — question is, what happens now? we have a huge crisis in our country. we have — have a huge crisis in our country. we have a — have a huge crisis in our country. we have a cost of living crisis, the pandemic. — we have a cost of living crisis, the pandemic, the possibility of a war in ukraine. — pandemic, the possibility of a war in ukraine. these are serious moments _ in ukraine. these are serious moments and yet we have a government in total— moments and yet we have a government in total meltdown and it is a meltdown because the prime minister's dishonesty and continual lies, minister's dishonesty and continual lies. and _ minister's dishonesty and continual lies, and the only way in the national— lies, and the only way in the national interest our country can face up — national interest our country can face up to— national interest our country can face up to these huge challenges is for the _ face up to these huge challenges is for the prime minister to go. we know for the prime minister to go. know what for the prime minister to go. - know what you hope to happen, what think will happen, what is your estimate, your guess, really, given how febrile things are over how things will pan out over the coming days and weeks? t things will pan out over the coming days and weeks?— days and weeks? i find it's difficult to _ days and weeks? i find it's difficult to make _ days and weeks? i find it's i difficult to make predictions days and weeks? i find it's - difficult to make predictions and i said two— difficult to make predictions and i said two weeks ago the prime minister— said two weeks ago the prime minister would go because if he had any decency left, he would have gone. _ any decency left, he would have gone. i— any decency left, he would have gone. i underestimated his appalling character— gone. i underestimated his appalling character and his appalling
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behaviour, and i think that is what people _ behaviour, and i think that is what people need to remember. we have a prime _ people need to remember. we have a prime minister who is taking our parliament and the office of prime minister— parliament and the office of prime minister into the gutter, sol parliament and the office of prime minister into the gutter, so i do not know— minister into the gutter, so i do not know how much further he can take our— not know how much further he can take our democracy, but if he really persists _ take our democracy, but if he really persists in — take our democracy, but if he really persists in clinging on despite all the evidence, his own lies and lawbreaking, i think that is very damaging. sol lawbreaking, i think that is very damaging. so i would call on all conservative mps to act before it is too late. _ conservative mps to act before it is too late. ~ ., ., , too late. who would be your preference _ too late. who would be your preference as _ too late. who would be your preference as new— too late. who would be your i preference as new conservative leader? imagining borisjohnson was no longer leading the conservative party, you would say, the sunlit uplands would be led by a liberal democrat government would clearly we conservatives have won a mandate to see at this parliament, so who would you prefer as prime minister given you prefer as prime minister given you do not want borisjohnson, amongst the conservatives to choose from? t amongst the conservatives to choose from? ., �* ., ., ., , from? i don't have a in vote this came from? i don't have a in vote this game and _ from? i don't have a in vote this game and l _ from? i don't have a in vote this game and i would _ from? i don't have a in vote this game and i would say _ from? i don't have a in vote this game and i would say this - from? i don't have a in vote this game and i would say this to i game and i would say this to viewers. _ game and i would say this to viewers, it is notjust boris johnson. _ viewers, it is notjust boris johnson, but the whole conservative
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government. the way they have managed — government. the way they have managed this pandemic is not as good as their— managed this pandemic is not as good as their spin _ managed this pandemic is not as good as their spin doctors say, we have an appalling death rate compared to many— an appalling death rate compared to many countries, the way they are managing — many countries, the way they are managing the economy is dreadful, we are seeing _ managing the economy is dreadful, we are seeing inflation rising, businesses in trouble, huge delays at the _ businesses in trouble, huge delays at the border, so whether it is on people's— at the border, so whether it is on people's health or people'sjobs, the conservative government is failing. — the conservative government is failina. . ~' the conservative government is failina. . ,, ., the conservative government is failina. . ., ., ,, ., failing. thank you for talking to us, we appreciated. _ failing. thank you for talking to us, we appreciated. said - failing. thank you for talking to | us, we appreciated. said davey, leader of the liberal democrats, and plenty of conversations going on publicly and privately as well at the moment around here, people trying to weigh up the significance of what has happened this morning, undoubtedly, there is huge importance attached to it, and trying to answer the impossible question, really, now, which is how on earth does this all end up? lese's throw that question back to you, chris, because i wanted to ask you, chris, because i wanted to ask you, we do not know how long the police investigation will go on for and we don't know when we will hear from sue gray either, so where does
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that leave conservative mps either who have put in letters of no confidence to the 1922 committee, trying to get rid of borisjohnson, or who are still thinking about it? we know that there are a view that had gone in but we do not know how many, but will this make a difference to those tory mps thinking of sending in letters? that is the bi thinking of sending in letters? “tngt is the big question and the honest answer is i do not know. we will have to weigh up if the police investigation takes some of the energy and sting out of things in the short—term to knock this off the boil a little bit, but mps are still waiting for sue gray's report, or does this force them to act now? i don't have a definitive answer, but that will shape the politics of the coming days without question. chris mason, coming days without question. chris mason. thank _ coming days without question. chris mason, thank you, _ coming days without question. chris mason, thank you, our _ coming days without question. chris mason, thank you, our political correspondent. we will have an urgent question from labour on all of this at around 12:30pm from the
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labour deputy angela rayner, who has said already, how on earth can boris johnson think he can stay on as prime minister? we will say goodbye now to viewers on bbc and i will hand you back to the studio and joanna. —— on bbc two. thank you, ben. we will have coverage of that urgent question in the commons at 12:30pm. liz truss has been speaking to mps and has said that she will be visiting ukraine next week, she said that she met the prime minister last night to discuss the situation in ukraine. met the prime minister last night to discuss the situation in ukraine. washington has placed more than 8,000 us—based troops on a heightened state of alert, amid fears that russia will invade ukraine. moscow denies planning military action but it has amassed more than 100,000 troops close to the ukrainian border. with me now is leigh turner, writer and fomer ambassador to the ukraine for the uk.
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you have written a book — the hitchhiker�*s guide to diplomacy. if this trust goes next week, what can she possibly say? tt is if this trust goes next week, what can she possibly say?— can she possibly say? it is a great decision by _ can she possibly say? it is a great decision by her— can she possibly say? it is a great decision by her to _ can she possibly say? it is a great decision by her to go _ can she possibly say? it is a great decision by her to go to _ can she possibly say? it is a great decision by her to go to ukraine l can she possibly say? it is a great| decision by her to go to ukraine to show solidarity with ukraine at this time when the situation is so dangerous. there is a real risk now to decision makers in moscow, they will plunge russia and ukraine into a completely avoidable war, over essentially domestic reasons. it is vital we show solidarity with ukraine in terms of making it is prickly and operation of any possible invading force as we can, and at the same time, we keep the diplomatic track going to try and meet whatever legitimate security concerns russia may have. so when
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ou sa it concerns russia may have. so when you say it is — concerns russia may have. so when you say it is completely _ concerns russia may have. so when you say it is completely avoidable, i you say it is completely avoidable, how do you see that? because it has been described as a pretty intractable dilemma with the west, they are concerned about doing anything that might then trigger the russian invasion, which it continues to insist it is not actually planning even though it has got its troops lined up. planning even though it has got its troops lined op— troops lined up. unfortunately russia has _ troops lined up. unfortunately russia has a _ troops lined up. unfortunately russia has a track— troops lined up. unfortunately russia has a track record - troops lined up. unfortunately russia has a track record of i troops lined up. unfortunately i russia has a track record of what they call a legitimate tactic of war to try to mislead the enemy about what you are doing, which happened in crimea in 2014, when russia went on denying any of its troops were involved months after the event. i say completely avoidable because there is no threat to russia from ukraine, so there is absolutely no need for russia to invade ukraine, there is no figleaf at all, yet at there is no figleaf at all, yet at the same time, as i say, the situation is extremely dangerous
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because russia has amassed more than 100,000 troops around the borders of ukraine and it only takes a tiny miscalculation for a full—blown war to break out, which would be extraordinarily damaging to russia and ukraine. you may debate whether or not the russian leadership actually wants a war, we just don't know that or whether they are just negotiating to try and get the best possible security deal they can, but it makes very good sense for liz truss and other western leaders to keep up a strong diplomatic campaign to try and make sure risk of a war breaking out is as low as possible. we are just looking at a map, breaking out is as low as possible. we arejust looking at a map, and this is what russia's concern is, that eastern expansion of nato and we can see the eastern european countries to the west of ukraine who have alljoined up with nato since 1996, and of course, ukraine on that
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promise, but who knows how long the window extends in terms of when ukraine might potentiallyjoin nato? but north of ukraine, belarus, not in a nato, and crimea to the south, which is annexed. when you talk about there being no threat to russia from ukraine, obviously you have worked in ukraine, to get under the sort of rushing psyche, how much does that vulnerability of that eastern expansion of ukraine pray on mind and matter and eastern expansion of ukraine pray on mind and matterand in eastern expansion of ukraine pray on mind and matter and in terms of vladimir putin stoking a nationalist sentiment? tt vladimir putin stoking a nationalist sentiment? . ., , , vladimir putin stoking a nationalist sentiment? . . , , ., sentiment? it certainly is true that russia has deep-seated _ sentiment? it certainly is true that russia has deep-seated historic. russia has deep—seated historic concerns about its security and you only have to look back to 1815 or 1941, when napoleon and then hitler invaded what was then, in the second
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case, the soviet union, to see why they are concerned about the possibility they could be invaded. at the same time, the idea that somehow ukraine might invade russia, it is absolutely laughable. this is why i say that we should keep up the diplomatic track. in the discussions which are already taking place between russia and the united states, there are a whole range of what we call confidence and security building measures on the table, on the agenda, for example, to where exactly military forces may be stationed how you alert each other to your many exercises you may be going to do to make sure that neither side gets too alarmed. and so on. so i think nobody would expect that russia should have a veto on independent sector and states —— on what independent sovereign states can do on their
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borders, yet they do have legitimate security concerns which we should talk to them about in order to diminish the risk of war, whether intended or unintended.- diminish the risk of war, whether intended or unintended. thank you for “oinint intended or unintended. thank you forjoining us- _ intended or unintended. thank you forjoining us. now— intended or unintended. thank you forjoining us. now time _ intended or unintended. thank you forjoining us. now time to - intended or unintended. thank you forjoining us. now time to catch i intended or unintended. thank you | forjoining us. now time to catch up with the sport, we can get the latest from gavin. the former england manager roy hodgson looks set to return to management in the premier league, with his appointment expected at watford later today. hodgson left crystal palace at the end of last season, but kept them in the top tier of english football in the four seasons he was in charge. he was already the oldest manager in the premier league, and, at 74, will be so again. his career has taken in 22 clubs and spans over 40 years. it comes after the departure of claudio ranieri, who was sacked afterjust 14 games. england midfielderjill scott has joined aston villa on loan from manchester city for the rest of the season. scott has been at city for eight years, and spent the second half of last season on loan at everton. she'll be looking for more game time to boost her hopes of being picked for this summer's european
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championship. at the australian open, home favourite and world number one ashleigh barty made it look easy as she progressed to the semifinals. she dominated the americanjessicca pegula in straight sets, 6—2, 6—0, in her bid to become the first australian to win the singles title in 44 years. in the men's draw, rafa nadal�*s hopes of a 21st grand slam are still alive. he was cruising two sets up, only to drop the next two against canada's denis shapovolov. he had the trainer out, and said afterwards he was feeling sick. but he was back out for a thrilling winner takes all in the fifth set, which he recovered to win. his first five—setter of the tournament so far. so how did he find the going? i was completely destroyed after that. yeah, very tough day, very warm. honestly, i didn't practise for it. i'm not 21 any more, so... after this, these matches,
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it's great to have two days off. i think i felt quite good physically, in terms of movement, but it's true that the conditions here haven't been that hard for the last week and a half. one thing about rafael nadal, he is a battler. one thing about rafael nadal, he is a battler. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that includes the latest from the australian open. let's go back to the continuing fallout from what happened at downing street during the lockdown. the latest news that has been spoken about is the birthday party for boris johnson has been spoken about is the birthday party for borisjohnson in june of the first lockdown. and the latest development in terms of the investigations are that the metropolitan police are now investigating what happened at downing street and the impact of
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thatis downing street and the impact of that is that the enquiry by sue gray is now going to be delayed, she has been looking into what has been going on at downing street. now around 19 events, it is understood, are being looked into by sue gray and there had been an expectation she would be reporting on her findings this week, but she has passed some of what she has uncovered in downing street to the police and they are now investigating, meaning the enquiry will not report until they have for around the country, there are people who are drawing parallels between what they were doing, how they were observing the rules, the impact on what might have been very important celebrations, and also, of course, there is very difficult times, losing people, not being able to visit people. joining me now is elena ciesco. she lost her father to coronavirus in december 2020. shejoins us now. you have a picture of your father. thank you for
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joining us. tell us about him, tell us about what happened. mr; joining us. tell us about him, tell us about what happened. my father was admitted _ us about what happened. my father was admitted into _ us about what happened. my father was admitted into hospital - us about what happened. my father was admitted into hospital in - was admitted into hospital in november of 2020 with an unrelated issue to covid, and he spent ten daysin issue to covid, and he spent ten days in hospital and on two occasions, he was submitted, sorry, exposed to two covid positive patients, and then he was discharged. he came home two days later, and then developed a raging temperature, one of our family members was looking after him at the time, and then she became extremely unwell. sadly, my fatherwas time, and then she became extremely unwell. sadly, my father was then readmitted into hospital a week after being discharged and four days
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later, he passed away. t am after being discharged and four days later, he passed away.— later, he passed away. i am so sor . later, he passed away. i am so sorry- it _ later, he passed away. i am so sorry- it is _ later, he passed away. i am so sorry. it is difficult _ later, he passed away. i am so sorry. it is difficult to - later, he passed away. i am so sorry. it is difficult to lose - sorry. it is difficult to lose someone in any circumstances, but in circumstances when you could not visit, could not hold hands, what was your experience on that front? when were you able to see him? where you are able to properly say goodbye? t you are able to properly say goodbye?— you are able to properly say toodb e? .,, you are able to properly say toodb e? ., , ., goodbye? i was able to see him for the ten days _ goodbye? i was able to see him for the ten days he _ goodbye? i was able to see him for the ten days he was _ goodbye? i was able to see him for the ten days he was in _ goodbye? i was able to see him for the ten days he was in hospital - goodbye? i was able to see him for the ten days he was in hospital and when he came back home, i took over and looked after him, but when he was readmitted into hospital, we were not able to see him at all and just a few telephone calls and i will never, everforget just a few telephone calls and i will never, ever forget what my father said on the phone to me. it
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isjust father said on the phone to me. it is just devastating to think that he couldn't be with his family when he needed his family the most and we were only able to be with him on the day that he died, when he was given palliative care. and that was done through full ppe, no skin to skin contact at all.— through full ppe, no skin to skin contact at all. so, when you hear about the — contact at all. so, when you hear about the parties _ contact at all. so, when you hear about the parties in _ contact at all. so, when you hear about the parties in downing - contact at all. so, when you hear i about the parties in downing street, the police investigation now, do you drop parallels between your experiences and what was going on in downing street? —— draw parallels. it is absolutely heart—wrenching. i cannot even put it into words. it is just heart—wrenching, ijust feel as though our loved ones are being completely disregarded, disrespected, and mocked. it is like
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their lives just do not matter. and they do matter. bhd their livesjust do not matter. and they do matter-— their livesjust do not matter. and they do matter. and what is it that makes you — they do matter. and what is it that makes you feel — they do matter. and what is it that makes you feel like _ they do matter. and what is it that makes you feel like they _ they do matter. and what is it that makes you feel like they are - they do matter. and what is it that makes you feel like they are being | makes you feel like they are being mocked? �* .., . makes you feel like they are being mocked? , . ., , ., mocked? because, clearly, i have lost count— mocked? because, clearly, i have lost count of _ mocked? because, clearly, i have lost count of the _ mocked? because, clearly, i have lost count of the events _ mocked? because, clearly, i have lost count of the events that - mocked? because, clearly, i have lost count of the events that have j lost count of the events that have come to light in recent times, but i think there is about 19 different events now that happened during lockdown, when borisjohnson and the conservative party were meant to be setting an example for the rest of us stop and keeping the spread of the virus down to a bare minimum, but all of those events took place and with no regard for anybody, the british public, and all of our loved ones. ., ., i. ., ones. how do you feel about, when ou look ones. how do you feel about, when you look back. _ ones. how do you feel about, when you look back, it _ ones. how do you feel about, when you look back, it was _ ones. how do you feel about, when you look back, it was very - ones. how do you feel about, when you look back, it was very difficult i you look back, it was very difficult to observe the rules as they were,
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and that you lost things that you cannot get back, contact you cannot get back because observing those rules. so do you feel... what are your thoughts around the fact that your thoughts around the fact that you did observe it for the right reasons at the time? t you did observe it for the right reasons at the time?— you did observe it for the right reasons at the time? i am 'ust. .. i am beyond — reasons at the time? i am 'ust. .. i am beyond angry. h reasons at the time? i am 'ust. .. i am beyond angry. it reasons at the time? i am just. .. i am beyond angry. i couldn't- reasons at the time? i am just. .. i am beyond angry. i couldn't have i am beyond angry. i couldn't have contact with my mother or my father for a good eight months. you know, we had to speak to each other over a skype call or deliver shopping through a window in the conservatory. so we didn't have proper contact for all that time. i'm never going to be able to guess that time back. —— get that time
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back. it is heart—wrenching. do that time back. -- get that time back. it is heart-wrenching. do you talk to your — back. it is heart-wrenching. do you talk to your wider _ back. it is heart-wrenching. do you talk to your wider circle _ back. it is heart-wrenching. do you talk to your wider circle about - back. it is heart-wrenching. do you talk to your wider circle about this i talk to your wider circle about this and how it feels now, seeing what is happening and your view of politicians, perhaps? t happening and your view of politicians, perhaps?- happening and your view of politicians, perhaps? italk about it all at the _ politicians, perhaps? italk about it all at the time _ politicians, perhaps? italk about it all at the time because - politicians, perhaps? italk about it all at the time because there i it all at the time because there needs to be public awareness, people do know, but we as bereaved families have first—hand experience about the trauma and the tragedy associated around a covid death. it isjust trauma and the tragedy associated around a covid death. it is just the most awful thing. around a covid death. it is 'ust the most awful thingfi most awful thing. thank you for 'oinin: most awful thing. thank you for joining us- _ most awful thing. thank you for joining us- l— most awful thing. thank you for joining us. i know— most awful thing. thank you for joining us. i know it _ most awful thing. thank you for joining us. i know it is - most awful thing. thank you for. joining us. i know it is something very difficult to talk about and we appreciate you taking the time. it
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is 12:29pm, some breaking news to bring you. we are hearing from cumbria police that a 16—year—old boy has been arrested on suspicion of grievous bodily harm after an incident at school this morning. cumbria police, there is a tweet from cumbria police, they have said that they were called at around ten past ten by the ambulance service who were reporting a pupil having suffered stab injuries following an incident inside walney school. the victim, a 15—year—old boy, has suffered multiple stab wounds to the body and has been taken to alder hey hospital via air ambulance having suffered serious injuries. a 16—year—old boy was detained at around 10:40am close to barrow train station and has been arrested on suspicion of grievous bodily harm with intent. police are in attendance at the school and can reassure the public and parents that
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there is no perceived wider threat. we have got comment from the school also on twitter, this is walney school, where the stabbing happened inside the building. i cannot, i'm afraid, actually read that. it is too small to read. but this is an incident that we are just getting the details of, an incident at walney school this morning. a pupil suffered stab injuries and that 15—year—old boy taken to alder hey hospital, a 16—year—old boy detained at around hospital, a 16—year—old boy detained ataround10:40am, hospital, a 16—year—old boy detained at around 10:40am, and that a letter from the school confirms those details that we are bringing you of what happened there inside the school. we will keep you updated with any more that we get. now time for the weather with nick miller.
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the weather is about to turn more unsettled. this is probably the last of the gloomy cloudy days. it is misty outside. just brightening up over northern ireland. some sunshine in northern scotland and some outbreaks of rain, particularly when you have the thickest cloud and the misty conditions, temperatures just two or three degrees on a cold afternoon. more cold spell is developing more widely through the afternoon. patchy rain in south—west scotland till the morning. coldest in the eastern side of the uk. a touch of frost possible into the morning and tomorrow looks like a brighter day with the exception of the far south and south—east of england. rain turns heavier and north—west scotland with the stronger when and into the evening that rim will push into northern ireland. temperatures back into double figures in scotland and northern ireland and are higher elsewhere as well.
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let's go to the house of commons now where there's an urgent question from the labour deputy leader, angela rayner. following on from the news the metropolitan police are investigating parties at number 10 downing street. they have said this morning, dame cressida dick, the commissioner of the metropolitan police has spoken this morning to see the police investigation has been triggered by information passed to the police by sue gray, the civil servant tasked with investigating parties inside number 10 downing street. she has been carrying out a report and been speaking to people inside downing street, and we also
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heard yesterday that dominic cummings boo was expected to speak to her said that he wouldn't speak to her said that he wouldn't speak to her said that he wouldn't speak to her directly, he would provide written evidence to her and he said there had been a written dialogue. she has been amassing information from people still in at number ten and others who have since left. she has also been looking at e—mail trails and potentially had access to cctv footage inside number 10 downing street and also electronic logs of the cummings and goings. something was passed from her, we do not know exactly what. —— comings and goings. one of the practical
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implications is the report of sue gray will not be published this week but will wait until the investigation is published. we will wait for angela rayner to ask urgent question. liz truss is currently speaking and was telling members she is going to the ukraine next week. this issue is bogging down the focus. scotland yard has said the metropolitan police lead officer on covid, deputy assistant officerjane connors will lead the investigation. the statement from the commissioner
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of the metropolitan police. days the statement from the commissioner of the metropolitan police.— of the metropolitan police. as the host will be _ of the metropolitan police. as the host will be aware _ of the metropolitan police. as the host will be aware the _ of the metropolitan police. as the i host will be aware the commissioner of the _ host will be aware the commissioner of the metropolitan police confirmed that the _ of the metropolitan police confirmed that the metropolitan police service will be _ that the metropolitan police service will be investigating alleged breaches of covid regulations within government. this is a matter for the police _ government. this is a matter for the police and _ government. this is a matter for the police and the host will understand i am police and the host will understand i am not _ police and the host will understand i am not in — police and the host will understand i am not in a position to comment on the nature _ i am not in a position to comment on the nature or— i am not in a position to comment on the nature or content of the police investigation. mr speaker, i have previously— investigation. mr speaker, i have previously made clear from this dispatch— previously made clear from this dispatch box that the government recognises and i recognise the public— recognises and i recognise the public anxiety and indignation that it appears— public anxiety and indignation that it appears as though the people who have been— it appears as though the people who have been setting the rules may not have been setting the rules may not have been— have been setting the rules may not have been following the rules. and i would _ have been following the rules. and i would like _ have been following the rules. and i would like to repeat that sentiment today. _ would like to repeat that sentiment today. this is why the prime minister— today. this is why the prime minister asked for a cabinet office investigation to take place. the
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terms _ investigation to take place. the terms of— investigation to take place. the terms of reference for this investigation led by the second permanent secretary at the cabinet office. _ permanent secretary at the cabinet office, sue gray, have been published and laid in the library of this house. — published and laid in the library of this house. they made clear that as with all— this house. they made clear that as with all internal investigations, if during _ with all internal investigations, if during the — with all internal investigations, if during the course of the work any evidence — during the course of the work any evidence emerges of behaviour potentially a criminal offence, the matter— potentially a criminal offence, the matter will be referred to the police — matter will be referred to the police and the cabinet office work may be _ police and the cabinet office work may be paused. as the host would expect. _ may be paused. as the host would expect, there is ongoing contact between — expect, there is ongoing contact between the cabinet office investigation and the metropolitan police _ investigation and the metropolitan police service. however, the cabinet office _ police service. however, the cabinet office investigation will continue its work. — office investigation will continue its work. i— office investigation will continue its work. i would urge the house to wait for— its work. i would urge the house to wait for the — its work. i would urge the house to wait for the findings of that investigation and for the police to conclude — investigation and for the police to conclude their work. it is important for the _ conclude their work. it is important for the work— conclude their work. it is important for the work to be unimpeded and respect _ for the work to be unimpeded and respect the rights of all involved. matters _ respect the rights of all involved. matters relating to adherents of the
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law are _ matters relating to adherents of the law are properly a matter for the police _ law are properly a matter for the police to — law are properly a matter for the police to investigate and the cabinet _ police to investigate and the cabinet office will liaise with them as appropriate. i can confirm the findings — as appropriate. i can confirm the findings of— as appropriate. i can confirm the findings of the investigation will be provided this honourable house and made — be provided this honourable house and made public. mr speaker, the host will— and made public. mr speaker, the host will understand that is a limit to what _ host will understand that is a limit to what i_ host will understand that is a limit to what i can see given this is an ongoing — to what i can see given this is an ongoing investigation. ialso to what i can see given this is an ongoing investigation. i also cannot comment— ongoing investigation. i also cannot comment on what is now an ongoing police _ comment on what is now an ongoing police investigation and therefore i ask members of the house let the investigation run its course and do not pre—empt its conclusions. investigation run its course and do not pre-empt its conclusions. angela ra ner. all not pre-empt its conclusions. angela rayner- all too _ not pre-empt its conclusions. angela rayner. all too soon _ not pre-empt its conclusions. angela rayner. all too soon minister- not pre-empt its conclusions. angela rayner. all too soon minister i - not pre-empt its conclusions. angela rayner. all too soon minister i find i rayner. all too soon minister i find ourselves here _ rayner. all too soon minister i find ourselves here once _ rayner. all too soon minister i find ourselves here once again, - rayner. all too soon minister i find ourselves here once again, ratheri ourselves here once again, rather than dealing with the cost of living crisis impacting on families, we are talking about scandals in downing street again and the members
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opposite can shunt out from their positions but they are allowing this to happen. —— chunter. for two months cabinet ministers have been working hard to make sue gray the most famous woman in britain in response to every question. in response to every question. in response to every question. in response to every question about rule breaking that this government has seen, they have constantly referenced sue gray. now there is a police investigation and the term set for sue gray by the prime minister are clear. if any evidence emerges of behaviour that is a criminal offence the matter will be referred to the police. so it seems potential criminality has been found in downing street. what a truly
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damning reflection on our nations very highest office. so i ask the minister, given this mornings announcement when will the sue gray report finally be published? can he assure the house that the sue gray report will be published in full, notjust report will be published in full, not just the summary, report will be published in full, notjust the summary, and will the evidence provided? can he clarify for the house what sue gray and her team will do while the police conduct their investigation? can the minister confirm whether the decision to delay publication of the sue gray report was made by the metropolitan police or the government? given the record of this government, on lost phones and missing messages and minutes, can he assure the house all evidence from
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the sue gray enquiry will be properly held by the cabinet office? can he clarify if the chancellor as a resident of downing street is cooperating fully with the sue gray enquiry and if the police investigation and has he been interviewed? just weeks ago the prime minister told this house there was no party. how does the paymaster general explain that? i know across the country people know enough, they have made up their minds about the prime minister so when will his party catch up? mr prime minister so when will his party catch op?— prime minister so when will his party catch up? mr speaker, i will aoree party catch up? mr speaker, i will agree with — party catch up? mr speaker, i will agree with her — party catch up? mr speaker, i will agree with her first _ party catch up? mr speaker, i will agree with her first point, - party catch up? mr speaker, i will agree with her first point, why - agree with her first point, why aren't— agree with her first point, why aren't we _ agree with her first point, why aren't we talking about the cost of living? _ aren't we talking about the cost of living? the — aren't we talking about the cost of living? the prime minister is working _ living? the prime minister is working on the cost of living, he is working on— working on the cost of living, he is working on russia, ukraine, he is doing those jobs. he working on russia, ukraine, he is
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doing thosejobs. he is working on russia, ukraine, he is doing those jobs. he is focused on those _ doing those jobs. he is focused on those areas. mr speaker, i think she also in _ those areas. mr speaker, i think she also in her— those areas. mr speaker, i think she also in her second point forgets that the — also in her second point forgets that the world potentially —— word potentially was used. the fact that the police — potentially was used. the fact that the police are investigating the matter— the police are investigating the matter does not draw any conclusions. she looks at the statement issued by the metropolitan police _ statement issued by the metropolitan police commissioner, cressida dick she has— police commissioner, cressida dick she has stressed the fact that the met investigating does not mean it will necessarily result in fixed penalty — will necessarily result in fixed penalty notices in every instance to every _ penalty notices in every instance to every person involved. potentially as a key— every person involved. potentially as a key operative word and if she wants— as a key operative word and if she wants to — as a key operative word and if she wants tojump to as a key operative word and if she wants to jump to conclusions, she asked _ wants to jump to conclusions, she asked about details of the investigation and those are of course — investigation and those are of course are matters for the cabinet office _ course are matters for the cabinet office and — course are matters for the cabinet office and matters for the police. they— office and matters for the police. they are — office and matters for the police. they are not details of which i would — they are not details of which i would be _ they are not details of which i would be informed and i would not ekpect— would be informed and i would not expect to — would be informed and i would not expect to be informed because the police _ expect to be informed because the police have independent operational assessment of matters before them
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and they— assessment of matters before them and they will conduct the matter as they see _ and they will conduct the matter as they see fit. and they will conduct the matter as they see fit-— and they will conduct the matter as the see fit. ~ , ., , ., they see fit. when europe stands on they see fit. when europe stands on the brink of — they see fit. when europe stands on the brink of war _ they see fit. when europe stands on the brink of war and _ they see fit. when europe stands on the brink of war and there _ they see fit. when europe stands on the brink of war and there is - they see fit. when europe stands on the brink of war and there is a - they see fit. when europe stands on the brink of war and there is a cost i the brink of war and there is a cost of living crisis, can we please have a sense of proportion over the prime minister being given a piece of cake in his own office by his own staff? i completely agree. on burns day it is appropriate to start off with a line from him one from sir walter scott, what a tangled web we weave. now the police are finally involved, how much more degradation and indignity of the
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prime minister be prepared to endure? how much more of this embarrassing circus are his colleagues prepared to tolerate before they remove this man from office? this wound will not heal miraculously by itself and i'm sure we all know there is an awful lot more still to come out. can i ask the minister, at any time has anyone from that sue gray enquiry contacted the metropolitan police. when the cabinet office first learned of this investigation. when does he now expect the sue gray report to be delivered and cannae assure the house when it is delivered it will be delivered in full and be open completely transparent for every member of this house to access? he asked questions about the police investigation and i have no knowledge about that and nor should i knowledge about that and nor should i ekpect— knowledge about that and nor should i expect i_ knowledge about that and nor should i expect i should have knowledge of that. he _
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i expect i should have knowledge of that. he asked about the publication and i that. he asked about the publication and i have _ that. he asked about the publication and i have already indicated the findings — and i have already indicated the findings of the investigation will be published. can findings of the investigation will be published-— be published. can i ask the paymaster— be published. can i ask the paymaster general, - be published. can i ask the paymaster general, i - be published. can i ask the l paymaster general, i accept be published. can i ask the - paymaster general, i accept he may not be able to answer part of this question now but can he assure the house he or other ministers will keep the house posted about whether the prime minister is going to be interviewed by the metropolitan police either as a witness or as a potential suspect in this criminal investigation? t potential suspect in this criminal investigation?— potential suspect in this criminal investigation? i thank him for his duestion investigation? i thank him for his question but _ investigation? i thank him for his question but of— investigation? i thank him for his question but of course _ investigation? i thank him for his question but of course the - investigation? i thank him for his question but of course the police | question but of course the police will conduct their investigation as they do— will conduct their investigation as they do in— will conduct their investigation as they do in any case at their own discretion— they do in any case at their own discretion and i would not expect to be informed of that and not with the house _ be informed of that and not with the house expect me to be.— house expect me to be. there are newspaper— house expect me to be. there are newspaper reports _ house expect me to be. there are newspaper reports of _ house expect me to be. there are newspaper reports of downing - house expect me to be. there are i newspaper reports of downing street staff told to delete evidence of
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parties from their phones and staff feeling to give evidence to the sue gray enquiry for fear of the prime minister will see it and that will lead to recrimination, so now there is a police investigation will the paymaster general make it clear throughout whitehall that all evidence must be given to the police and will he undertake to publish a report and evidence so we can all see at the end of this affair it has been done? t see at the end of this affair it has been done?— see at the end of this affair it has been done? i think one can draw a conclusion — been done? i think one can draw a conclusion from _ been done? i think one can draw a conclusion from the _ been done? i think one can draw a conclusion from the fact _ been done? i think one can draw a conclusion from the fact that - been done? i think one can draw a conclusion from the fact that the l conclusion from the fact that the cabinet — conclusion from the fact that the cabinet office in their liaison with the metropolitan police have according to the metropolitan police commissioner satisfied that an investigation should take place, and that should give comfort to those who might otherwise doubt investigation but it is a proper and due process investigation and as in all cases— due process investigation and as in all cases were due process should be followed _ all cases were due process should be followed in _ all cases were due process should be followed in the interests of fairness, no result of police are
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cabinet — fairness, no result of police are cabinet investigation should be free maiz? _ cabinet investigation should be free maiz? ~ ., , cabinet investigation should be free maiz? . ., , ., ., maiz? would my right honourable friend agree _ maiz? would my right honourable friend agree it _ maiz? would my right honourable friend agree it is _ maiz? would my right honourable friend agree it is a _ maiz? would my right honourable friend agree it is a long-standingl friend agree it is a long—standing convention in this house that when there are independent inquiries and investigations they are allowed to run their course and three judgments pre—judgments should be refrain from in this house. would you agree that we need to focus on day—to—day matters such as cost of living and the energy crisis and 100,000 troops on the ukrainian border which threatens global stability? he makes owerful threatens global stability? he makes powerful point _ threatens global stability? he makes powerful point about _ threatens global stability? he makes powerful point about the _ threatens global stability? he makes powerful point about the pressing i powerful point about the pressing international situation,
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particularly as regards ukraine and russia _ particularly as regards ukraine and russia and — particularly as regards ukraine and russia and i know the prime minister is focused _ russia and i know the prime minister is focused on that matter. i also understand the anxiety and indignation of many who are frustrated by the reports that have been emanating over the course of many— been emanating over the course of many weeks about alleged gatherings in the downing street area. the reality— in the downing street area. the reality of— in the downing street area. the reality of the matter is the prime minister. — reality of the matter is the prime minister, as he has been focused, and delivering for this country as he has _ and delivering for this country as he has succeeded in delivering vaccines. _ he has succeeded in delivering vaccines, as he has succeeded delivering _ vaccines, as he has succeeded delivering the manifesto commitments and he _ delivering the manifesto commitments and he will— delivering the manifesto commitments and he will continue that laser focus. — and he will continue that laser focus. lt— and he will continue that laser focus. . . . and he will continue that laser focus. , . ., ., and he will continue that laser focus. , . . ., , focus. it is clear that this government _ focus. it is clear that this government is _ focus. it is clear that this government is now - focus. it is clear that this government is now in i focus. it is clear that this i government is now in total focus. it is clear that this _ government is now in total meltdown. story after story about covid negligence been broken a number ten and now a negligence been broken a number ten and nowa prime
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negligence been broken a number ten and now a prime minister and his staff under police investigation. in the midst of a pandemic and a cost of living crisis and europe on the brink of war in ukraine we cannot go on with this chaotic government. does the prime minister accept the authority of the prime minister is in tatters? —— mike does the minister accept? will he urge the prime minister to do the right thing and resign? t prime minister to do the right thing and resin? ., ~ prime minister to do the right thing and resin? . ~' ., , and resign? i thank him for his advice on _ and resign? i thank him for his advice on propriety _ and resign? i thank him for his advice on propriety but - and resign? i thank him for his advice on propriety but he - and resign? i thank him for his advice on propriety but he will| advice on propriety but he will forgive — advice on propriety but he will forgive me ifi advice on propriety but he will forgive me if i decline to follow. mr speaker will the minister agree that anyone taking a view on the pie minister must take into account the fact he has presided over the most successful vaccination programme during this pandemic and the envy of most other countries in the world?
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that is absolutely right. let's speak to our political correspondent chris mason. we have just had a conclusion of the downihg _ we have just had a conclusion of the downing street briefing for reporters and they are saying at the pie minister does not believe he has broken _ pie minister does not believe he has broken the _ pie minister does not believe he has broken the law after the metropolitan police has launched this enquiry into allegations of parties — this enquiry into allegations of parties in _ this enquiry into allegations of parties in downing street and beyond. — parties in downing street and be ond. ' . . parties in downing street and be ond. , , ., ., beyond. official spokesman for the ie beyond. official spokesman for the pie minister— beyond. official spokesman for the pie minister saying _ beyond. official spokesman for the pie minister saying anyone - beyond. official spokesman for the | pie minister saying anyone required to cooperate will be expected to do just that with the investigation and interestingly the spokesman saying that the parts of the sue gray enquiry would not be published until the police have completed their investigation, in other words parts that relate specifically to what the police is looking into, but the spokesman saying the parts of the investigation not being investigated
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by the police can still be published. the spokesman for the pie minister saying we want what is able to be concluded to be made public as soon as possible and adding she can publish those elements not subject to further work by the police. the spokesman saying that borisjohnson was informed before the meeting this morning of the cabinet the metropolitan police were due to launch this investigation before we heard from cressida dick but did not tell the cabinet during the weekly meeting. the spokesman said the pie minister did not want to pre—empt the metropolitan police making their announcement. the two key lines from the briefing for westminster reporters was we were listening to the activities and discussions, the pie minister does not believe he broke the law during those lockdown gatherings and downing street saying there are elements of the sue gray
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report that may be able to be published whilst the metropolitan police investigation is ongoing. we may get bits this week but we don't know when. scotland yard says the met�*s lead officer on covid, deputy assistant comissionerjane connors, will lead the whitehall and downing street investigation. it will be carried out by the met�*s special inquiries team.
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at least eight people are reported to have been killed and dozens injured in a stampede outside a stadium hosting an africa cup of nations football match in cameroon. the confederation of african football says it's investigating the incident, which happened outside the paul biya stadium in the capital yaounde. our correspondent piers edwards has more. the incident occurred as fans tried to force their way in roughly half—an—hour before kick—off. the incident took place at a perimeter gate where spectators were pushed against the fences by the sheer number of those trying to get in. shoes and clothing were amongst the debris that littered the site. some 50 wounded have been taken to a nearby hospital where there were harrowing scenes of those mourning their loved ones. a nurse there has told reporters that some of the wounded will need to be taken to more specialised hospitals. cameroon, which is hosting africa's greatest sporting event
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for the first time in half a century, has been beset by organisational problems in its staging of these finals. they should have first been played in 2019, only for late preparations to cause the delay. african football's ruling body, caf, has sent a delegation to visit victims in hospital. now, games here should have a limit and a maximum capacity of 80% for matches involving the host nation, cameroon, but there appeared to be more than that number inside the olembe stadium during a victory which was ultimately overshadowed by tragedy. piers edwards, bbc news, olembe stadium, yaounde. eric djemba—djemba is a former cameroon international who spent some of his playing career with manchester united. he is working at the tournament for bbc africa sport and was only told about the incident after the game. he gave his reaction to our reporterjohn bennett. people, they are coming to the stadium, they come to watch the football and after that, we can see people, theyjust died. it is a shock. you know, they did everything, they built the biggest stadium ever, and you see what happens in the end. some families, they will cry, they are kids, and some people, they will go to the stadium to support cameroon, to support their team play, but, for me, it's the worst thing that can happen to cameroon.
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the world's most powerful telescope has reached its final destination — a million miles from earth. the james webb telescope took 30 days to get there — and will now spend five months studying the universe's earliest stars. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. our weather is about to turn more unsettled, which means it's the last day of the widespread cloud and cold underneath that cloud, especially weather, low cloud and the mist is hanging on throughout the day, as it will across parts of wales and england again. there has been some sunshine so far today in northeast scotland, though, clouding over and through the afternoon this weather frontjust moving through, taking a few outbreaks of rain across northern scotland. whereas elsewhere, despite all of the cloud, with the exception of perhaps a little drizzle, it is dry. you can see the extent of the cloud, though, it's western counties
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of northern ireland, perhaps northeast wales, a few spots in northeast england seeing some sunny spells breaking through, though nowhere near as bright as it was yesterday in northeast england. and these temperatures, well, actually where you have the thickest low cloud and mistjust around two or three degrees celsius, that's why it's feeling so cold out there. but notice overnight tonight, some breaks around, some clear spells in scotland, northern ireland and also towards northern england. parts of wales and the midlands later in the night, as well as a breeze, picks up across the northern half of the uk, and the lowest temperatures will be across eastern parts, with any of those clear spells allowing for a touch of frost. now it may be the far south southeast of england staying mostly cloudy tomorrow, but elsewhere it is looking like a brighter days that will be different, especially through wales and england, but notice the rain gathering and turning heavier towards northwest scotland as the day goes on. here and into the northern isles to a strengthening wind will see some gales developing, turning breezy elsewhere, just allowing that cloud to break up more.
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back into double figures, the temperatures in northern ireland and scotland, but higher too. we get some brighter spells in wales and england, this system working its way southwards overnight and into thursday behind it. severe gales developing for a time towards orkney in particular, the wind slowly easing on thursday. not much rain on this system as it moves through southern england on thursday. it takes a while for the cloud to clear away, whereas elsewhere it's a much brighter day. some sunshine, a scattering of showers, a colderfeel again in scotland. again in scotland, whereas much of wales and england see temperatures bounce back into double figures. frost and fog could be around on friday morning, turning wet again in scotland as friday goes on and weather system moving south overnight and into saturday. a windy day on saturday. and then on sunday we could see another area of low pressure heading our way. the chance of some rain, perhaps even a little snow in places too. we'll keep you updated.
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the police say they will now investigate multiple events that took place in downing street during lockdown. britain's top police officer, the head of the met, had been criticised for taking no action. i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years, in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. we'll bring you the latest on what this might mean for the prime minister's future. also this lunchtime... russia says it's greatly concerned by president biden's decision to put thousands of us troops on alert in response to the russian troops stationed on the border with ukraine. after a three year investigation, we're still no closer to finding out what caused the inferno that ripped through the glasgow school of art.

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