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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 25, 2022 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. happy the latest headlines. birthday to you! more revelations from downing street, as it admits to a gathering for borisjohnson�*s birthday during the first lockdown, a few hours after visiting a primary school. this was in a room that was constantly used all day long for a group people who needed to meet in pandemic response, and that somebody thought it was an idea to get a cake. how did you celebrate your birthday in lockdown? let me know — i'm @annitabbc on twitter or use the hashtag bbcyourquestions. the us puts more than 8,000 troops on high alert, as fears grow that russia will invade ukraine. eight people are killed and many more are injured
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in a stampede at the africa cup of nations in cameroon. no more covid tests for fully vaccinated people arriving in england and scotland — they'll be scrapped next month. and climate change is threatening to destroy treasures buried in the uk. archaeologists warn britain's history is at risk. good morning and welcome to bbc news. borisjohnson is facing renewed anger following another revelation about gatherings in downing street during lockdown. number 10 has admitted that, injune 2020, staff met in the cabinet room, where they were served cake to celebrate the prime minister's birthday.
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itv news reported that up to 30 people attended thejune 2020 event, sang happy birthday and were served cake. rules at the time —19june 2020 — banned most indoor gatherings involving more than two people. the bbc has learned that sue gray, the senior civil servant compiling a report into gatherings on government premises during covid restrictions, already knew about the 19 june event. her findings are expected to be published later this week. 0ur political correspondent chris mason reports. the prime minister has long said, "my policy on cake is pro—having it and pro—eating it." so much so he had two on his 56th birthday injune 2020 — the first courtesy of a school in hertfordshire he visited in the morning... # happy birthday to the prime minister! ..and another when he got back here to the cabinet room in downing street —
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the very spot where the covid rules were signed off. his now wife carrie brought another cake along to a gathering of up to 30 people at around two o'clock, which lasted around half an hour. there were sandwiches and picnic food and no discussion about social distancing. but his supporters say... i think most people would think a party as being an arranged event, rather than something on somebody's birthday in the office that they work in with the people they always work with — someone says, "it's your birthday, here's a cake." but that is for sue gray to get to the bottom of. it's yet another get—together to add to the list of dos around westminster we already knew about — and there were more than a few! those conservatives who want boris johnson out think this could persuade more to reach the same conclusion. no—one�*s ever misunderstood the job description of party leader any more than boris johnson. this, ithink, could well be the straw that breaks the camel's back.
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already this week, an allegation of islamophobia from a former minister, nusrat ghani — vehemently denied — the resignation of a sitting minister at the dispatch box in the lords... thank you and goodbye! ..and then another revelation about what went on here earlier in the pandemic. and it's only tuesday. chris mason, bbc news. let's show you a tweet from march 2020, relating to birthday parties. this is a letter from a seven—year—old girl called josephine, who wrote to the prime minister to say she would be staying at home for her birthday. she said her mummy and daddy had to cancel her party but that she didn't mind because she wanted everybody to be ok. that letter was put on twitter, and sent to downing street, and the prime minister replied and tweeted this...
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let's speak to our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. it is that issue of togetherness, where we all in it together or doing things differently? and all of this, whether it is a birthday party or a lost opportunity to see a loved one, it is hugely emotive. andrew bridgen said in a report that this was the straw that broke the camel's back as far as he was concerned for the pm but is it the final straw?— but is it the final straw? andrew brid . en but is it the final straw? andrew bridgen already _ but is it the final straw? andrew bridgen already had _ but is it the final straw? andrew bridgen already had the - but is it the final straw? andrew bridgen already had the final. but is it the final straw? andrew i bridgen already had the final straw some time ago and has been calling for the prime minister to go and has been highly critical of him for some time so it wasn'tjust him, but i suspect mps are still where they were in the last few days in that some have made up their mind and are calling for the prime minister to go but others are waiting for the sue gray report and have made up their minds but are waiting for the reported but before taking any action. i think this latest
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revelation packs more of an emotional punch with a public rather than having real influence on politics in this and do something about a birthday party, the fact is we all had birthdays during the pandemic so everyone can compare at what they were doing and their judgment with what they hear the prime minister did what they think hisjudgment was put prime minister did what they think his judgment was put at what is interesting this one is that the government is coming out fighting against this. we have gone from the fate of them denying the parties was happening, which wasn't true, to acknowledging public anger, to then stonewalling and saint wait for sue gray and we now have ministers on the airwaves and sending a tweet challenging the claims, interpreting for themselves what they think went on and this one it was transport secretary grant shapps. —— this morning. what we have seen in the story overnight, that number 10 is very clear, it wasn't the case, there weren't 30 people there. this was in a room that was constantly used all day long for a group people who needed to meet in pandemic response,
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and that somebody thought it was an idea to get a cake, i understand organised by his own office. and look, the prime minister has quite rightly already said mistakes were made, he takes full responsibility for everything that happens, regardless of whether it was his personal mistake or not. and he has asked for all of that to be concluded by sue gray, and i understand sue gray is already aware of this, this won't have been news to her. and speaking of sue gray, are you as sure as you can be that hurt report will be released this week? i’m sure as you can be that hurt report will be released this week? i'm not sa inc! will be released this week? i'm not saying! we — will be released this week? i'm not saying! we understood _ will be released this week? i'm not saying! we understood last - will be released this week? i'm not saying! we understood last week i will be released this week? i'm not saying! we understood last week itj saying! we understood last week it would be the end of this week and people close to her were sounding pretty competent about it. i have not checked with them today and i think it might be a bit of a full scheme trying to predict exactly when it will land. —— a bit of a full�*s game. what is good about the
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party claim overnight is that sue gray was already aware of it so it does not mean that process is going to get any longer. what we are not exactly clear on still is how far she will go in terms of calling out potential breaches of the rules or whether she will just potential breaches of the rules or whether she willjust be very factual. if it is the latter and she is very factual, what we have seen this morning with government ministers giving their own interpretation of the event will be continued on a massive scale after the report comes out. and that document might not be quite the cathartic moment people were thinking. cathartic moment people were thinkina. �* . cathartic moment people were thinkina. ~ . ., ~ cathartic moment people were thinkina. �* . . ~' ,, cathartic moment people were thinkina. ~ . ., ~ i. , thinking. 0k, adam, thank you very much, thinking. 0k, adam, thank you very much. adam _ thinking. 0k, adam, thank you very much, adam fleming. _ adam wagner is a human rights lawyer, and an expert on covid regulations. good morning, i note you have said that when you started keeping a table of the rules and regulations, you didn't realise you would be in your words, you didn't realise you would be in yourwords, keeping you didn't realise you would be in your words, keeping the country's at receipts on this but i suppose my first question is what this
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gathering on the 19th ofjune 2020 a party? gathering on the 19th ofjune 2020 a .a ? �* . ., , ., ., gathering on the 19th ofjune 2020 a party? actually, from a legal perspective. _ party? actually, from a legal perspective, whether - party? actually, from a legal perspective, whether it - party? actually, from a legal perspective, whether it is . party? actually, from a legal perspective, whether it is a i party? actually, from a legal- perspective, whether it is a party or not doesn't matter, the question is whether it was a gathering indoors over two or more people where there wasn't a listed reason at the time for having it. and i just can't see how there was any kind of reason that would have amounted to a defence in law. we know there was a cake that was served, grant shapps said johnson did not organise to be given a cake, he said the room was in constant use anyway with the implication that the group of people who were at this and served cake work together anyway. does any of that cut any sway in this? ,., , . does any of that cut any sway in this? , . ., , does any of that cut any sway in this? , . ., _.~ does any of that cut any sway in this? , . ., this? does it cut any cake! it has not to a this? does it cut any cake! it has got to a bit _ this? does it cut any cake! it has got to a bit of— this? does it cut any cake! it has got to a bit of a _ this? does it cut any cake! it has got to a bit of a ridiculous - this? does it cut any cake! it has got to a bit of a ridiculous phase | got to a bit of a ridiculous phase where the government are no longer denying the actualfacts
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where the government are no longer denying the actual facts and describing it in a way which doesn't actually fit with what is being reported predict what is being reported predict what is being reported is this was a prearranged gathering for about 30 people in a room that lasted for half an hour there was food brought from m&s, there was food brought from m&s, there was food brought from m&s, there was cake, the prime minister was a surprise but he stayed for ten minutes and in any possible understanding of the regulations at the time, anybody that would have been committing a criminal offence because it was a prearranged social gathering, exactly the kind of gathering, exactly the kind of gathering that was not permitted in law which, if you had asked the government at the time, if you could have a prearranged birthday party at work for 30 colleagues coming into a room with cake and all that, they would have said absolutely not put if the police had come across it, they would have given everyone a penalty notices. it is just getting a bit silly, to be honest, that the government are trying to defend it in those terms.— government are trying to defend it in those terms. could be police take retrospective _ in those terms. could be police take retrospective action? _ in those terms. could be police take retrospective action? would - in those terms. could be police take i retrospective action? would somebody need to make a complaint for that to happen? how would that work? the
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olice happen? how would that work? tue: police have happen? how would that work? tte: police have access to all the same information everybody else has, they could read the report, they could hear that downing street are not denying any of the basic facts and they should be making up their minds for themselves and deciding whether to look into this. you for themselves and deciding whether to look into this.— to look into this. you are talking about the law, _ to look into this. you are talking about the law, the _ to look into this. you are talking about the law, the rules, - to look into this. you are talking about the law, the rules, but. about the law, the rules, but actually as adam fleming was indicating it about the emotional punch that this packs with people who did not organise around this time and who missed moments with loved ones. i think it is that emotion, and that being expressed to their mps, that is going to be in many ways the thing that makes a difference in all of this, that drives mps to take whatever action they will decide to take when the report from sue gray comes out. fine report from sue gray comes out. one ofthe report from sue gray comes out. one of the things _ report from sue gray comes out. (me: of the things about birthdays is that everybody in the pandemic had one who lived through it, and i know i had to tell my children and explain to them, who understood it
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very well compared to apparently the government, that they could not have a birthday party, not multiple birthday parties and i guess it is important to separate out that emotional aspect to what is, to me, looks to me like a series or a pattern of criminal offences by officials in power, notjust in power but who themselves were creating the regulations that we all had to follow. this is at the heart of the cabinet office, and they were responsible for making the regulations. the idea that they look back and say, well, it was just people having cake in a room, firstly it makes a mockery of the rules now and don't forget, millions of people are still subject to self—isolation rules, travel rules and all that, and also it doesn't make any sense.— and all that, and also it doesn't make an sense. �* ., . ,, make any sense. and once sue gray's re ort is make any sense. and once sue gray's report is done. _ make any sense. and once sue gray's report is done, would _ make any sense. and once sue gray's report is done, would you _ make any sense. and once sue gray's report is done, would you expect - make any sense. and once sue gray's report is done, would you expect the | report is done, would you expect the police to look at that closely and talk to her about her investigation?
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absolutely. they have said that if anything comes out of that report, they will look into it and that is what they should be doing because thatis what they should be doing because that is what the police are meant to be. �* ., that is what the police are meant to be. �* . ~ . that is what the police are meant to be. ~ . ~ ., ., that is what the police are meant to be. ~ . ~ . ., , be. adam wagner, human rights la er, be. adam wagner, human rights lawyer. thank— be. adam wagner, human rights lawyer, thank you _ be. adam wagner, human rights lawyer, thank you very _ be. adam wagner, human rights lawyer, thank you very much. i let's speak to henry hill, news editor at conservativehome. henry, good morning as well put it last time we spoke i asked you if you thought borisjohnson could survive all this as prime minister and you said, if memory serves, no, but you've got the timing of his departure might depend on strategy, for example if you would be allowed to stay until the local elections, and then removed if the results were poon and then removed if the results were poor. have your calculations on any of that changed as a result of all the latest revelations? i think that getting more and more likely doesn't make it to may. there are obvious reasons on the one hand why the conservatives would want to wait that long, not least because the front runners, especially people
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like rishi sunak, i would rather not be focusing on something as self—indulgent as a leadership election at a time when not only is the government expecting to be sailing into the teeth of a cost of living crisis but there is the prospect of war in ukraine, this extended navel—gazing exercise electing a leader is something they might not want to ponder but as i keep saying every time i come on, this story keeps getting worse and worse. ., , , , ., , , worse. one of the biggest problems for tory mps — worse. one of the biggest problems for tory mps has — worse. one of the biggest problems for tory mps has always _ worse. one of the biggest problems for tory mps has always been i worse. one of the biggest problems for tory mps has always been they i for tory mps has always been they don't know what the next item on this story is going to be, they have never been able to draw a line under it, they hoped to do it over christmas and it didn't happen, they hoped they had it sorted by mid—january and that hasn't happened. in a week we will be in february and there is no way them to know if there are more parties to come out, what revelations and photographs and e—mails so i think the pressure to simply bite the bullet and push for a vote of no confidence sooner rather than later is growing on the conservative backbenchers. tt’s is growing on the conservative backbenchers.—
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backbenchers. it's quite a big roblem backbenchers. it's quite a big problem if — backbenchers. it's quite a big problem if you _ backbenchers. it's quite a big problem if you have - backbenchers. it's quite a big problem if you have letters . backbenchers. it's quite a big i problem if you have letters from a seven—year—old, and i don't know if you saw this, forgive me if you didn't, we run it earlier, a picture of a s ebony rod had sent to the prime minister, which he responded to, thank you for keeping to the rules, saying her mummy and daddy had cancelled her party —— a picture of a letter 87—year—old had sent to the prime minister. if she should be able to understand that, so should everybody else?— able to understand that, so should everybody else? absolutely and that is at the heart _ everybody else? absolutely and that is at the heart of _ everybody else? absolutely and that is at the heart of what _ everybody else? absolutely and that is at the heart of what makes - everybody else? absolutely and that is at the heart of what makes this i is at the heart of what makes this story so toxic. 0n is at the heart of what makes this story so toxic. on one level, you can understand how people who were all working in a building together thought that taking a ten minutes a side to have some cake might not be the end of the world but the problem is, these are the very people who said and indeed legislated to the effect that no, that wasn't allowed, and other people paid the price for breaking those rules. you had people who were brought up in court and some faced heavy fines for breaking covid rules and millions more make
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the sacrifices, missed out on special occasions, on seeing loved ones, because those were the laws that these people had set. they had eight moral responsibility, setting aside the legal which of course the police will properly investigate, they had a moral responsibility to set an example and it is that failure which i think i'd make this such a problematic story for the government and seen such a huge fall in the prime minister's personal ratings. in the prime minister's personal ratinus. ., , , in the prime minister's personal ratinus. . , , ., ., ., ratings. there has been a lot of talk about _ ratings. there has been a lot of talk about redwall _ ratings. there has been a lot of| talk about redwall conservative ratings. there has been a lot of- talk about redwall conservative mps and their constituents but do you the bielik is broadly the same in those constituencies and those which have been tory for many years? —— the feeling is broadly the same. t the feeling is broadly the same. i think there was public outrage wherever you go, obviously the prime minister has his constituency, but there was public anger everywhere. i think the different and what is making the red wall so sensitive that you might a pay expected in
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normal circumstances mps who owed their seat to the proneness to's amazing victory in 2019 to be more loyal but it is tory mps who are being the most blase about defending him, and the reason i was up in the red what a couple of weeks ago, tories in those areas, they know that those voters who only voted for them for the first time in 2019 lent them for the first time in 2019 lent them their vote, they are not committed conservative photos, they don't have a habit of backing the party and what they are finally on the doorsteps is their seat huge in support from people who betrayed and let down and that the party is not doing enough to demonstrate that it has changed and is delivering for them and that is being fed back to those read war and peace and that is why they are at the vanguard of the movement to unseat the prime minister. �* , , ., , minister. and briefly come as tory mps wait on _ minister. and briefly come as tory mps wait on the _ minister. and briefly come as tory mps wait on the sue _ minister. and briefly come as tory mps wait on the sue gray - minister. and briefly come as tory mps wait on the sue gray report i minister. and briefly come as tory l mps wait on the sue gray report and most say that is what they are doing, do you think they have nonetheless made up their minds already about what they want to see happen to be prime minister? t think happen to be prime minister? i think the have happen to be prime minister? i think they have certainly _ happen to be prime minister? i think they have certainly made _ happen to be prime minister? i think they have certainly made up - happen to be prime minister? i think
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they have certainly made up their. they have certainly made up their mind he will not fight the general election, it'sjust a question mind he will not fight the general election, it's just a question of timing. election, it's 'ust a question of timinu. , ., timing. henry hill from conservativehome, i timing. henry hill from i conservativehome, thank you timing. henry hill from _ conservativehome, thank you very much. you have been getting in touch about how you marked your birthday, dean says, i turned 40 in up there and spend it at home with my family, it would have been wonderful to celebrate with friends and extended family but we stuck to the rules, shame those in charge can't their own rules. poppy says, i'm disgusted at the total lack of respect by borisjohnson and number 10, we missed the birthdays of grandchildren or sat in the garden, what fools we were. who knew we could have a party and cake? darren says to my birth is at the end of march so you can imagine what it had been for the last couple of years, neither kate nor people involved. steve says, my wife's 70th birthday, no party, locate, no gathering, no friends, no nothing. please keep them coming in —— no take. neilsays, my six—year—old
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please keep them coming in —— no take. neil says, my six—year—old son was in school with his friends when they were open but outside of school, his friends parties were cancelled because it was against the rules. these friends met daily but unlike the pm, these children did not get there but the parties. keep your comments coming in on twitter and the bbc your questions hashtag. washington has placed more than 8,000 us—based troops on a heightened state of alert amid fears that russia will invade ukraine. moscow denies planning military action but it has amassed more than 100,000 troops close to the ukrainian border. 0ur correspondent gabriel gatehouse sent this report from kyiv. bell tolls. this is a country in limbo — waiting for an invasion that looks more likely with every passing day, but may yet never come. to the east, 100,000 russian troops amassed. but the kremlin says talk
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of an invasion is hysteria. facing them are ukrainian soldiers who hear western leaders sounding the alarm in ever starker tones. and stuck in between are the people of kyiv — who, frankly, don't know what to believe. i think something might happen. i think the probability is very high, but god knows. i think even putin doesn't know yet what kind of decision he's going to take, so... but, you know, the situation is horrible. at the weekend, britain warned that russia was planning a coup to install a little—known former mp as puppet ruler — suggestions that have been widely dismissed both in moscow and here in kyiv. the uk began pulling staff out of its embassy today, saying an invasion could come at any time. the americans are doing the same. a senior ukrainian politician told the bbc today, such
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actions are not helpful. translation: if people start - panicking, that leaves our country in a very dangerous position, and it will make it easier for russia to manipulate us. the reality is, of course, that this country is already at war — and has been since 2014, when russia annexed crimea and funded and provided weapons and sent in troops to support a separatist rebellion in the east. around 111,000 ukrainians have already died in that conflict — these are some of their faces. and so, for people here, the question is not "will there be war?", but "will this war escalate?" for months now, the ukrainians have been preparing a territorial defence force. volunteers like marta yuzkiv, a doctor in her 50s, is among those who are training
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for a possible defence of kyiv. of course, i am worried because i'm a peaceful woman, i don't want to have a war started, but in any case, in case it started, i should be ready to defend the country. meanwhile, a kind of normal life continues as the people of this country wait nervously to see what fate — and larger geopolitical forces — have in store. gabriel gatehouse, bbc news, kyiv. and in the next hour, we'll be speaking to ukraine's ambassador to the uk. we can get our ukrainian correspondent, james waterhouse, let me get some more reaction firstly from ukraine to the announcement by the us, 8500 troops on standby to travel to the region, not ukraine itself but the region?—
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itself but the region? that's exactly right _ itself but the region? that's exactly right and _ itself but the region? that's exactly right and i _ itself but the region? that's exactly right and i think i itself but the region? that's exactly right and i think you | itself but the region? that's i exactly right and i think you can see how seriously the west is taking this looming threat of a russian invasion. but the message in ukraine is to stay calm. president volodymyr zelensky has given a second such address in a week, urging citizens not to panic. his defence minister said he had seen no evidence in terms of russian troop movement to suggest they are about to launch any kind of offensive which directly goes against the uk concerns yesterday saying on the basis of intelligence that the russians could launch a lightning surprise attack on the capital. we are in independence square at where to make revolutions happen, the ukrainian symbol of political will and people power under paint you a picture, there was a demonstration earlier by a small business owners who were not happy with new regulations coming in. it gives you a sense of how people are continuing with their
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day—to—day lives, all while there is a continued troop build—up on the border we have thejoint a continued troop build—up on the border we have the joint exercises with belarus and russia to the north which is just a three with belarus and russia to the north which isjust a three hour with belarus and russia to the north which is just a three hour drive from here. but again, ukrainians will tell you they have been at war for eight years with the annexation of crimea and the fighting that continued since then in the eastern donbass region which has claimed 14,000 donbass region which has claimed 111,000 lives. donbass region which has claimed 14,000 lives-— 14,000 lives. thank you, james waterhouse, — 14,000 lives. thank you, james waterhouse, our— 14,000 lives. thank you, james waterhouse, our ukraine i waterhouse, our ukraine correspondent. travel restrictions are set to change for people arriving in england or scotland. from 4am on friday the 11th february, fully vaccinated travellers arriving in england or scotland won't have to take a covid test. instead, they will have to fill out a new passenger locator form. there will be no self—isolation requirement for those who are vaccinated. the unvaccinated will need to take a test on day two of their return but no longer on day eight. from the 3rd february, children aged between 12 and 15
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in england will be able to prove their vaccination status, or prior infection, through a digital nhs covid pass. let's get some reaction to this and speak to the travel editor at the independent simon calder who's at gatwick airport. it's worth going through those changes again and i know you have been explaining all the way through what the rules are and they have been terribly complicated at times so take us through what is changing and what people still need to do when travelling? tqm. and what people still need to do when travelling?— when travelling? ok, an lot of --eole when travelling? ok, an lot of people are _ when travelling? ok, an lot of people are travelling - when travelling? ok, an lot of people are travelling out i when travelling? ok, an lot of people are travelling out of. when travelling? ok, an lot of i people are travelling out of gatwick this morning looking forward to some winter sunshine of course but also slightly cheesed off because for the next 17 days, anybody coming back to the uk will still to have that travel test, which is if you have been fully vaccinated, you will need to take a lateral flow test either on the date you come back or one of the two following days, and you will
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need to have booked that test in advance, typically paying £20 or £30 in order to complete the passenger locator form. in order to complete the passenger locatorform. as in order to complete the passenger locator form. as you said, the requirement for the test will be dropped from the 11th of february at liam, the passenger locatorform, liam, the passenger locator form, which liam, the passenger locatorform, which for an awful lot of us, has been a vortex of despair at the end of the holiday, that will continue! and crucially, for unvaccinated travellers, this is perhaps the most surprising change, you will no longer need to self—isolate. i have been trying to find out, i have not yet managed to do so, what happens to people who are already in self—isolation at the witching hour of four i am on the 11th of february, i will try to find that out —— at 4am. but that will make life an awful lot easier. having said all of that, this isjust life an awful lot easier. having said all of that, this is just the rules coming into england and
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scotland, i expect an announcement from wales imminently and northern ireland will also fall into line but of course you are subject to the rules of the country you are going to and those will depend on your vaccination status and might well involve some kind of testing as well of course as self—isolation. and of course as self-isolation. and what difference _ of course as self-isolation. and what difference do _ of course as self—isolation. and what difference do you think these changes will make for the travel industry in terms of opening up the prospect of travel for people? tt is prospect of travel for people? it is most certainly _ prospect of travel for people? tt 3 most certainly triggering a boost in bookings, simply because it is going to mean that travellers can save a bit of cash. i have been typically spending about £25 on my post—arrival test, and it also reduces a bit of the complexity that makes such a misery, and while the passenger locator form continues to have an extra 2a hours in which to be completed, the travel firms are saying that yes, they are very much
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looking forward to people getting a bit more confidence and being happier to book but we still do not know for certain that we are not going to be suddenly plunged back into red lists, hotel quarantine, tests before departure and so on, and that is what the travel industry is desperate for but writing into des's daily telegraph, transport secretary grant shapps says he is very much hoping that things will get back to normal. he said we are going back to where we were at the start of 2020, which i can't quite make out because back then i most certainly did not need to fill in a passenger locator form! again, certainly did not need to fill in a passenger locatorform! again, i will find out a bit more on that. we have not forgotten all the lists and the tougher restrictions and absolutely not forgotten all those involved in the travel sector. at the moment, how are these restrictions, which apply to england and scotland, the changes, how does this compare to other parts of the
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world? ., , ., this compare to other parts of the world? . , ., ., , , world? that is a really interesting ruestion world? that is a really interesting question because _ world? that is a really interesting question because again, - world? that is a really interesting question because again, in - world? that is a really interesting question because again, in this i question because again, in this article, the transport secretary says we are now about the most open country in europe and that is the case if you have not been vaccinated but actually, travelling around europe, with the one exception of france who had this bizarre three week complete travel ban on the british, trying to keep 0micron at bay, which clearly wasn't working, and a brief ban by germany, it has been really quite straightforward going to a lot of countries if you are fully vaccinated, because most will let you in without a test. they will let you in without a test. they will generally require a passenger locator form. will generally require a passenger locatorform. the interesting development coming along from the start of february is that increasingly, european union countries will unify around a constant set of rules and that is
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likely to involve boosters. if you had your second jab more than 270 days ago, about nine months, you will be expected to have had a booster as well. that is not yet the case in the uk but going forward in the next weeks and months, you can expect there to be much more concentration on what does fully vaccinated mean, as well as what, in the long term, are we going to do about people who are chosen or who are unable to be vaccinated? what happens to them in terms of travel? a bit more certainty this morning but still so many unanswered quite —— unanswered questions. but still so many unanswered quite -- unanswered questions.- -- unanswered questions. simon, thank you — -- unanswered questions. simon, thank you very — -- unanswered questions. simon, thank you very much. _ now it's time for a look at the weather. yet again, lots of cloud is looming large over england and wales. ithai’ith large over england and wales. with barel a large over england and wales. with barely a breath _ large over england and wales. with barely a breath of breeze we will struggle to break it up and see much brightness today. for scotland,
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sunshine in the east, more cloud pushing into the west through the afternoon, rain for the northern and western isles and the breeze picking appear. northern ireland should seek decent sunny spells on and off. perhaps in brighter spells for the north—east of england, and the midlands. chilly in the cloud, highs of four orfive, northern midlands. chilly in the cloud, highs of four or five, northern scotland, highs of eight or nine. tomorrow looks brighter, looks like the cloud will start to break up overnight, allowing sunny spells for many to start wednesday, certainly brighter for england and wales, more cloud later, turning very wet and windy for the north—west of scotland, particularly later in the day. hello this is bbc news with me, annita mcveigh. the headlines... # happy birthday to you...# more revelations from downing street
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as it admits to a gathering for borisjohnson's birthday during the first lockdown, just a few hours after visiting a primary school. this was in a room that was constantly used all day long for a group people who needed to meet in pandemic response, and that somebody thought it was an idea to get a cake. i understand it was organised by his own office. the us puts more than 8000 troops on high alert, as fears grow that russia will invade ukraine. eight people are killed and many more are injured in a stampede at the africa cup of nations in cameroon. no more covid tests for fully vaccinated people arriving in england and scotland — they'll be scrapped next month. and climate change is threatening to destroy treasures buried in the uk — archaeologists warn britain's history is at risk. sport now, and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre.
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john watsonjoins us john watson joins us with all the drama from the australian open. yes, big wins for raff and ash barty. —— for rafael nadal. the former england manager roy hodgson looks set to return to management in the premier league, with his appointment expected at watford later today. he left crystal palace at the end of last season, but kept them in the top tier of english football in the four seasons he presided over. he was already the oldest manager in the premier league and, at 7a, will be so again. his career has taken in 22 clubs and spans over 40 years. his appointment follows the departure of claudio ranieri following his sacking afterjust14 games. the clock is ticking on derby county's future. the club's administrators are expected to hold talks with the english football league later today. they've a week to prove they can find funding for the rest of the season. placed in administration in september, they were deducted 21 points — wayne rooney battling hard to keep his side up.
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fellow championship side blackburn are looking at promotion rather than relegation after sam gallagher scored a second—half winner to send them second as they edged past middlesbrough 1—0. blackburn were relegated from the premier league ten years ago. rafa nadal ensured the headline on day nine of the australian 0pen wasn't his exit — his hopes of a 21st grand slam in melbourne still alive. he was cruising two sets up, only to drop the next two against canada's denis shapovolov. he had the trainer out, and said afterwards he was feeling sick. but he was back out for a thrilling winner—takes—all in the fifth which he recovered to win. his first five setter of the tournament so far. ruffin nadal marching on.
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i was completely destroyed. very warm. honestly, ididn't i was completely destroyed. very warm. honestly, i didn't practice for it, i am not 21 any more. it is great to have to days off. i thought i felt quite good physically in terms of movement but it is true the conditions here have not been that hard for the last week—and—a—half. it was a little bit of straightforward thorough ash barty. she beatjessicca pegula in straights sets in her bid to become the first australian to win the singles title in 44 years. and she will face madison keys, who's into is into her first grand slam semi—final for four years after beating french open champion barbora krejcikova. tournament organsiers had found themselves facing criticism for banning fans from wearing t—shirts in support of peng shuai — they have now reversed that decsion.
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lots of concern for the chinese tennis player ever since she disappeared from public view, having made allegations against a high—profile chinese official on social media — which she later withdrew. martina navratilova had accused tennis australia of being cowardly and capitulating to china. rafa nadal marches on, it was never in any doubt. ash barty making things look more comfortable in rob lever arena. things look more comfortable in rob leverarena. business things look more comfortable in rob lever arena. business as usual. studio: thank you. i thought my microphone was not up, but apparently it was. that was my hesitation, thank you tojohn watson. more pressure for the prime minister this morning after it was revealed that downing street staff met inside number ten to celebrate his birthday during the first lockdown. it's the latest headache in what has been another difficult
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week for boris johnson. ros atkins reports. in the last six days, the pressure on borisjohnson has continued to grow. this was on wednesday. you have sat there too long for all the good you have done. in the name of god, go. the former minister, david davis, wanted the prime minister to go. borisjohnson declined. i take full responsibility for everything done in this government and throughout the pandemic. also on wednesday, the conservative mp christian wakeford defected to the labour party. on thursday, a conservative mp who had called for mrjohnson's resignation alleged he'd been threatened by the government. the intimidation of a member of parliament is a serious matter. moreover, the reports of which i'm aware, would seem to constitute blackmail. william wragg says he's spoken to the police about this, and christian wakeford added this claim. i was threatened that i would not get the school for ratcliffe if i didn't vote one particular way. the government was being accused of threatening an mp with blocking school funding in his constituency.
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in response to both claims, this was borisjohnson's response. i've seen no evidence, heard no evidence to support any of those allegations. another allegation came in the sunday times. the conservative mp nusrat ghani said she was sacked as a minister in 2020, because of her religion. she says: in response, the conservative chief whip, mark spencer, tweeted: on monday, borisjohnson launched an inquiry and said this. we take these allegations extremely seriously. i took them very seriously when they were raised with me 18 months ago. very glad there's an investigation taking place now. that was on monday. so was this.
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thank you and goodbye. that's lord agnew, a conservative minister in the house of lords, resigning because of the government's handling of fraudulent covid business loans. the bbc�*s chris mason reported number ten's response. calls to resign, claims of blackmail. claims of islamophobia. a ministerial resignation. and the parties in number ten. not all connect directly to borisjohnson, but all connect to his government. and sam leith has seen enough. he's the literary editor of the spectator, a magazine mrjohnson once edited. his latest column has the headline: not that the prime minister's supporters see it that way. and on questions about that may 20th party and sue gray's investigation, the government's message is nothing, if not consistent. we all make mistakes and he made a mistake. he came and apologised to parliament.
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we've had the apology. now we need the actual detail, which is why sue gray's report is important and we'll get that. and the prime minister will make a statement to parliament, as he has said he will do. and then, just after 6pm on monday evening, this tweet from paul brand of itv news. and as this latest story ricochets through uk politics, the pressure builds, as does the anticipation of sue gray's report. ros atkins reporting. let's speak to laura 0akley. the 19th ofjune 2020 would have been her dad's 68th birthday. sadly, he died a month earlier,
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but laura and her family weren't able to visit him in hospital for much of the time beforehand. thank you forjoining us, i am sorry your family went through the loss of your dad, not being able to see him, i believe you could see him at the very end of his life. tell me more about your dad and those last few weeks. .. , about your dad and those last few weeks. ,,. , , about your dad and those last few weeks. , , , ., , about your dad and those last few weeks. , , , , about your dad and those last few weeks. , , , ., , , ., ., weeks. sadly this story is one of hundreds of— weeks. sadly this story is one of hundreds of thousands - weeks. sadly this story is one of. hundreds of thousands happening weeks. sadly this story is one of- hundreds of thousands happening at the time, he went into hospital mid april time with cellulitis, he was in icu for about two weeks apart, the whole time obviously we could not visit him, hospitals were not allowing anybody inside or any visitation, it must have been really, really tough for him just sitting in his own thoughts, not able to have family to comfort you will take your mind off things. it is also very difficult to get any
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information from the hospital because usually when you are in there you can track down the doctors and speak to them face—to—face, we were getting two quality day from whichever nurse was on duty to try to update is but they did not know any of the main details or anything. it was obviously extremely, extremely hard. he died five days before the 20th of may garden party, that brought up lots of trauma at the time when that came up and then, as you say, the 19th ofjune which have been his 68th birthday party, and to find out boris again is having fun with the rest of his pals in governmentjust brings everything back, we had not really been able to grieve at the time because we were only allowed ten people at the funeral, we could not have a wake, just when you think you're getting over of the wave, this comes up and brings back, really. —— getting over that crest of the wave. i know we
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are not alone but i am just fed up now, i am are not alone but i am just fed up now, iam really are not alone but i am just fed up now, i am really not surprised by the news coming out. i would love to be shocked but it is resignation now really that more and more things are coming out. why make the rules if you can't stick to them?— coming out. why make the rules if you can't stick to them? those two dates ou you can't stick to them? those two dates you have _ you can't stick to them? those two dates you have mentioned, - you can't stick to them? those two i dates you have mentioned, including during the 192020, in stark contrast to your experience as a family, and as a family where you very clear on what the rules were and what the expectations were? —— including the 19th ofjune 2020. expectations were? -- including the 19th of june 2020.— 19th ofjune 2020. yes, at my brother lived _ 19th ofjune 2020. yes, at my brother lived not _ 19th ofjune 2020. yes, at my brother lived not far _ 19th ofjune 2020. yes, at my brother lived not far from i 19th ofjune 2020. yes, at my brother lived not far from us, | 19th of june 2020. yes, at my - brother lived not far from us, when brother lived not farfrom us, when my dad was in hospital he and his wife could not come into my mum's house where i was staying with her because we were different households, they could not support that way, it would always be chatting on the doorstep so there was no way that we'd even held our loved ones when this was happening
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—— no way that we could even set our loved ones. we were only allowed ten at the funeral, it was a hard decision by my mum on who was coming. we were lucky that the hospital let the four others see my dad, at the time the rules were two people for 30 minutes, that would have been a hard decision for my mum and dad to decide who gets to say goodbye properly, face—to—face, between the and my brother, and who does not. we were very lucky compared to people who had to do it on zoom, my heart goes out to them. what would you say to the prime minister if he is listening? ga. what would you say to the prime minister if he is listening? go, we have had enough now. if- minister if he is listening? go, we have had enough now. if this i minister if he is listening? go, we have had enough now. if this had| have had enough now. if this had been any other business or company you have broken the rules to an extent, rules you have put forward yourself, i appreciate people are locking down, doubling down around you but it is getting ridiculous
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now, it is a bit of a circus really and i think now is the time to hold your hands up and say you messed up and it is time to let someone else come in, really.— and it is time to let someone else come in, really. when government ministers talk _ come in, really. when government ministers talk about _ come in, really. when government ministers talk about what - come in, really. when government ministers talk about what has i ministers talk about what has happened since the lockdowns and the roll—out of the vaccination programme and the booster programme and so one and the progress made and say, look at this, do you accept thatis say, look at this, do you accept that is in anyway making up for any transgressions that have happened prior to that during the lockdown is when families like yours worth following rules?— when families like yours worth following rules? when families like yours worth followin: rules? , ., , , , following rules? obviously they can talk until they _ following rules? obviously they can talk until they are _ following rules? obviously they can talk until they are blue _ following rules? obviously they can talk until they are blue in _ following rules? obviously they can talk until they are blue in the face l talk until they are blue in the face that we are one of the first countries to roll—out vaccines, that is fantastic, but as brits we will pretty much always stick to rules, thatis pretty much always stick to rules, that is what we do, and when it comes to emotive things with your
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family etc i think there is a certain stage where they need to realise that everyone is human and when it comes to the case that you can bring out the science as much as you want, there are people who would have risked covid to see their dying loved ones and i think that is the message, as humans we want to be treated as humans had to be able to say our goodbyes and see the people we want to when really if that is what they are giving themselves in the background. t what they are giving themselves in the background.— what they are giving themselves in the backuround. ~ ., ., the background. i don't know how you have voted in — the background. i don't know how you have voted in the _ the background. i don't know how you have voted in the past, _ the background. i don't know how you have voted in the past, you _ have voted in the past, you certainly don't have to tell us if you don't want to, but is this now about a loss of trust, is that fundamentally what it is about, loss of trust in the authority, the leadership and judgment of the prime minister? for leadership and 'udgment of the prime minister? ., , ., , , leadership and 'udgment of the prime minister? ., , , ., minister? for me personally i use to vote conservative, _
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minister? for me personally i use to vote conservative, i— minister? for me personally i use to vote conservative, i stop _ minister? for me personally i use to vote conservative, i stop voting i minister? for me personally i use to vote conservative, i stop voting for i vote conservative, i stop voting for them about ten years ago. ironically my dad was always a conservative voter and would probably still vote for them, that is the generation he came from. i think there is a massive loss of confidence, i think the government are extremely detached from the general public, the feeling of the public, the fact they can stand here when people try to chat to boris about it, it shows his lack of compassion, we need to government... 0bviously his lack of compassion, we need to government... obviously there are so many layers of what needs to go one when it comes to running a country but we need to running a country but we need somebody far more compassionate who will put the public�*s needs first at this time and boris and the current government as it stands is not those people, for me. ., ~ as it stands is not those people, for me. ., ,, i. . as it stands is not those people, for me. ., ,, . ., for me. thank you so much for talking to _ for me. thank you so much for talking to us. _ for me. thank you so much for talking to us, laura, _ for me. thank you so much for talking to us, laura, and i i for me. thank you so much for talking to us, laura, and i am| for me. thank you so much for. talking to us, laura, and i am so sorry for the loss of your dad
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during back lockdown at the factory were not able to spend as much time with him as you want your family would have wished. thank you. at least eight people are reported to have been killed and dozens injured in a stampede outside a stadium hosting an africa cup of nations football match in cameroon. the confederation of african football says it's investigating the incident, which happened outside the paul biya stadium in the capital yaounde. 0ur correspondent piers edwards has more. the incident occurred as fans tried to force their way in roughly half—an—hour before kick—off. the incident took place at a perimeter gate where spectators were pushed against the fences by the sheer number of those trying to get in. shoes and clothing were amongst the debris that littered the site. some 50 wounded have been taken to a nearby hospital where there were harrowing scenes of those mourning their loved ones. a nurse there has told reporters that some of the wounded will need to be taken to more specialised hospitals. cameroon, which is hosting africa's greatest sporting event
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for the first time in half a century, has been beset by organisational problems in its staging of these finals. they should have first been played in 2019, only for late preparations to cause the delay. african football's ruling body, caf, has sent a delegation to visit victims in hospital. now, games here should have a limit and a maximum capacity of 80% for matches involving the host nation, cameroon, but there appeared to be more than that number inside the 0lembe stadium during a victory which was ultimately overshadowed by tragedy. piers edwards, bbc news, 0lembe stadium, yaounde. eric djemba—djemba is a former cameroon international who spent some of his playing career with manchester united. he is working at the tournament for bbc africa sport and was only told about the incident after the game. he gave his reaction to our reporterjohn bennett. people, they come into the stadium, they come to watch the football and after that, we can see people, theyjust die. it's...
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it's a shock. you know, they did everything, they build the big stadium ever in africa central and you see what happens in the end. some family they will cry, they will cry, there are kids. and some people, they will go to the stadium to support cameroon, to support their team play... that, for me, it is the worst thing to happen to cameroon. eric djemba—djemba. throughout this year, events are being held to mark 1,900 years since the building of hadrian's wall. the roman ruins stretch coast—to—coast along the border between england and scotland. but there are concerns that climate change could now be threatening the ancient site. 0ur climate editorjustin rowlatt is there for us. hello, it looks wonderful behind you, i have been watching your report with interest all morning, tell us more about this? tt is
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report with interest all morning, tell us more about this? it is great to be here. _ tell us more about this? it is great to be here. it— tell us more about this? it is great to be here, it is— tell us more about this? it is great to be here, it is a _ tell us more about this? it is great to be here, it is a bracing - tell us more about this? it is great to be here, it is a bracing winter. to be here, it is a bracing winter day here at hadrian's wall, but what a fabulous structure it is. birthday celebrations in order, it is 1900 years since construction began. this section of the wall where i am was built in a.d1 thousand and 2a, just imagine for a moment you infantry soldierfrom north imagine for a moment you infantry soldier from north africa, imagine for a moment you infantry soldierfrom north africa, the middle east, said he had to guard the last outpost of empire, the boundary between the civilised world and the barbarous picts beyond —— this section here was built in ad 1024. you stand alongside this wall, what a formidable place it would be. there is an incredible archaeological resource in the body people and soils all around the wall. —— in the boggy peatland
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soils. at climate change and trying it out, threatening the wonderful artefacts within. —— but climate change is drying it out. for the romans, this was the end of civilization. at 73 miles long, hadrian's wall is, without question, the greatest roman structure in britain. it's reckoned it took 15,000 men six years to build, and the sites around the wall have been the source of some of the most incredible roman artifacts everfound in britain. the waterlogged peat soils here mean organic materials, like this child's shoe, don't rot. they've found boxing gloves, some of the oldest handwritten messages in the world, even a roman toilet seat. but now climate change is threatening the ancient objects preserved along the wall. so what we've got here is a field where it should be very, very wet. but what's happening is it's drying out throughout the year, and the land is dropping. this is magna, one of the biggest roman forts. alongside the wall.
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the site has never been dug, and now archaeologists are worried because the treasures buried here could begin to rot away. pretty much everything that they used on this site for 300 or 400 years has the potential to be preserved in more or less the same state it was thrown away in, under the ground where we're standing, which is an incredible opportunity. just think of the range of stuff that we could be standing on right now, and what kind of story that can tell us about life here almost 2,000 years ago. they've dug boreholes to monitor what's happening, and at teesside university, they're analysing soil samples. specifically, we're looking at moisture levels, total carbon, total nitrogen, the chemistry and microbiology changes that go on with the drying out of that peat area. and what if it is continuing to dry out? what does that mean for the archaeological remains? they will disappear. we will lose our heritage. and it isn'tjust roman remains at risk. there are reckoned to be more than 22,000 archaeological
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sites in uk peatlands. peatland represents such a small l part of the ecology of britain, l but the stories that they can tell is massive, and it has such- a big implication for not. just our personal history, but also our climatic history. and our environmental history, and we need to protect them. who knows what else will be lost unless these sites are preserved? justin rowlatt, bbc news, hadrian's wall. what if anything can be done to save the incredible range of artefacts stored in the people and soils all around hadrian's wall and other sites in the uk? —— in the peatland soil. doctorandrew sites in the uk? —— in the peatland soil. doctor andrew burley, sites in the uk? —— in the peatland soil. doctorandrew burley, can sites in the uk? —— in the peatland soil. doctor andrew burley, can we do anything to protect the
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peatlands? taste do anything to protect the peatlands?— do anything to protect the peatlands? do anything to protect the eatlands? ~ ., ., ., do anything to protect the eatlands? ., ., ., , peatlands? we can monitor what is auoin on peatlands? we can monitor what is going on in — peatlands? we can monitor what is going on in the _ peatlands? we can monitor what is going on in the ground, _ peatlands? we can monitor what is going on in the ground, see - peatlands? we can monitor what is going on in the ground, see where| going on in the ground, see where things are changing most rapidly and intervene if we can to rescue that material by excavation or other means that we have a sample of what is surviving on the ground, we have key artefacts which would otherwise vanish for future generations to study. vanish for future generations to stud . ., vanish for future generations to stud . . , . , ., study. intervene and rescue, you mean to begin — study. intervene and rescue, you mean to begin digging _ study. intervene and rescue, you mean to begin digging on - study. intervene and rescue, you mean to begin digging on a i study. intervene and rescue, you mean to begin digging on a site i study. intervene and rescue, you i mean to begin digging on a site like magna, which we saw in the report? we can't excavate the whole site but weakened excavate sections to get a sample of what is going on and rescue the sample of the artefacts, the boots, shoes, writing tablets, things made of cloth which would simply vanish if the ground dries out. ~ , ., simply vanish if the ground dries out. ~ , . , simply vanish if the ground dries out. , ., , out. why are these artefacts so secial? out. why are these artefacts so special? there _ out. why are these artefacts so special? there are _ out. why are these artefacts so special? there are sites - out. why are these artefacts so special? there are sites around out. why are these artefacts so i special? there are sites around the world where we recover bronze and stone works, what is so special about these organic artefacts like leather, wood and fabric? the irony is the british _ leather, wood and fabric? the irony is the british climate _ leather, wood and fabric? the irony is the british climate has _
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leather, wood and fabric? the irony is the british climate has created i is the british climate has created the conditions for this stuff to survive in the uk, but as we try out, this will disappear and what is so special, this materialjust nursed —— just does not survive in places like pompeii or the egyptian desert, britain is incredible because we have this jackie o desert, britain is incredible because we have this jackie 0 where other parts of the empire in the roman sense or other periods of history do not get such good preservation, so it gives estate, material bijker is not —— does not come from anywhere else. material bijker is not -- does not come from anywhere else.- material bijker is not -- does not come from anywhere else. there are these incredible _ come from anywhere else. there are these incredible writing _ come from anywhere else. there are these incredible writing tablets, i these incredible writing tablets, day to day messages, one of the earliest bits of handwritten text from a woman anywhere in the world? it is quite extraordinary and they communicate something really visceral across the millennia? you can't beat visceral across the millennia? gm, can't beat somebody actually telling you what is going on, these are little windows into peoples souls, they are tiny bits of wood like postcards from the past, covered in meat handwriting, less than a
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millimetre thick. if they try out, they crack, they disappear. those things can give us a reflection of what has happened in the past that we cannot get from any other source. you have done a huge amount of the exact vindolanda just along the wall from here, have you ever discovered any of those writing tablets —— you had to make huge amount of digs at vindolanda. what is it like? you had to make huge amount of digs at vindolanda. what is it like?- vindolanda. what is it like? you are makin: a vindolanda. what is it like? you are making a direct _ vindolanda. what is it like? you are making a direct connection - vindolanda. what is it like? you are making a direct connection over i vindolanda. what is it like? you are l making a direct connection over 2000 years, there has on the back of your neck stand up. you can't always read what it says immediately but you know it will be sensational because there is literally no other way of getting that information, it is the real primary source, an incredible feeling. real primary source, an incredible feelina. ., ~ real primary source, an incredible feelina. ., ,, , real primary source, an incredible feelina. ., ~ , . feeling. thank you very much indeed, communicating _ feeling. thank you very much indeed, communicating so _ feeling. thank you very much indeed, communicating so powerfully - feeling. thank you very much indeed, communicating so powerfullyjust i feeling. thank you very much indeed, | communicating so powerfullyjust how much could be lost as these peatlands, these amazing boggy landscapes tryouts, there are 22,500
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archaeological sites across britain. the entire stretch of human history in britain from the paleolithic to the present day under threat. an incredible resource that climate change is threatening, threatening to undermine our understanding of our past as well as jeopardising our future. studio: thank you to our climate editor, justin rowlatt. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan. yet again, lots of cloud is looming large over england and wales. with barely a breath of breeze we will struggle to break it up and see much brightness today. for scotland, sunshine in the east, more cloud pushing into the west through the afternoon, rain for the northern and western isles and the breeze picking appear. isles and the breeze picking up here. northern ireland should seek decent sunny spells on and off. perhaps in brighter spells for the north—east of england, and the midlands. and north wales from time to time. chilly in the cloud,
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highs of four orfive, northern scotland, highs of eight or nine. tomorrow looks brighter, looks like the cloud will start to break up overnight, allowing sunny spells for many to start wednesday, certainly brighter for england and wales, more cloud later, turning very wet and windy for the north—west of scotland, particularly later in the day. some rain for northern ireland come the afternoon.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. # happy birthday to you!# uk prime minister borisjohnson's under renewed pressure as downing street admits to a gathering for the prime minister's birthday during the first lockdown, a few hours after visiting a primary school. this was in a room that was constantly used all day long for a group people who needed to meet in pandemic response, and that somebody thought it was an idea to get a cake, i understand organised by his own office. how did you celebrate your birthday in lockdown? let me know. i'm @annitabbc on twitter or use the hashtag bbcyourquestions. more than 8,000 us troops
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are on standby to deploy to europe,

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