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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 24, 2022 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at eight o'clock. talk of another party at downing street during lockdown, this time for the parameter�*s birthday. this time for the parameter's birthda . ~ , ., , birthday. the prime minister has already used _ birthday. the prime minister has already used up _ birthday. the prime minister has already used up four _ birthday. the prime minister has already used up four different. already used up four different defences to these allegations. all of them point to a prime minister who is not being honest. does of them point to a prime minister who is not being honest.- who is not being honest. does he believe that _ who is not being honest. does he believe that by _ who is not being honest. does he believe that by holding _ who is not being honest. does he believe that by holding that - who is not being honest. does he l believe that by holding that office, the office — believe that by holding that office, the office of the prime minister, he is continuing to do what is in the best interest of the country. meanwhile the minister who claims she was fired for her muslimness.
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and the lord has resigned over the handling of the scandal. over the and a special report into the accusations made against the boss of brewdog. he denies all the allegations. hello and welcome to bbc news. we begin tonight with further allegations made against boris johnson about social events in downing street during the first covid lockdown back in 2020, this time an event to celebrate his
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birthday. itv news reported this evening that on the 19th ofjune in 2020, 30 people, including staff members at downing street, gathered together in the cabinet room at number 10 to mark the premise to's birthday in a surprise event organised by his wife, carrie. downing street issued a statement saying another of staff who had been working that day gathered briefly after a meeting and the prime minister stayed for less than ten minutes. there is also talk of a second gathering, this time with family and friends in the evening in the prime minister's flat. those allegations have been called completely untrue by number 10. the allegations of a gathering to mark the prime minister's birthday come just days before the expected release of sue gray's investigation into downing street parties during restrictions that prevented such events. and on the day that the prime
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minister has to investigate a member of parliament saying that she was dismissed because of being a muslim, and lord agnew resigning over the government's handling of covid fraud. chris mason is at westminster. i don't remember there being many evenings where there is such an accumulation of accusations against a government in a prime minister. perhaps the most serious for now at least as that allegation made by downing street of a gathering on the prime minister's birthday. find gathering on the prime minister's birthda . ~ . , birthday. and admirably comprehensive - birthday. and admirably - comprehensive introduction for birthday. and admirably _ comprehensive introduction for you there, and a good entry as a countdown contestant! as you say, there is so much happening at the moment. one revelation after another, all of which boil down to this overarching question facing conservative mps, the most powerful electorate in the country at the
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moment in deciding the prime minister's fate around the conduct of boris johnson's minister's fate around the conduct of borisjohnson�*s government. let's look at the revelations of the last 90 minutes, courtesy of itv news and as you mentioned there, a birthday do in downing street, the 19th of june 2020 when these social dos were banned, the prime minister went on a visit to a school and they sang happy birthday to him in the playground, and then on returning to downing street, at around about two o'clock in the afternoon, itv reports, there was a bit of a get—together in the building involving a birthday cake and involving a birthday cake and involving singing happy birthday, involving singing happy birthday, involving members of staff and the prime minister's wife and we understand the interior designer who has featured in the odd headline herself because she was involved in the renovation of the downing street flat. it was the subject of
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headlines in recent months over the funding of that renovation. so this is the latest trickle of the details that we are learning about these get—togethers that were going on at a time when people were on furlough or had been made redundant or couldn't meet their families or couldn't meet their families or couldn't see their relatives in care homes, and yet there was this gathering that was taking place in downing street. we understand that sue gray, the senior civil servant looking into all these shindigs in whitehall was aware of this do, so we were going to find out about it probably in a couple of days when we see this report, so she is not having to open up yet another lever arch file to do further investigation as we understand it, but nonetheless, it is shaping the political weather now, and prompting some responses that are well worth seeing and hearing. here is a sir keir starmer, the labour leader, with his response. this is yet more evidence that we
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have _ this is yet more evidence that we have got— this is yet more evidence that we have got a — this is yet more evidence that we have got a prime minister who believes— have got a prime minister who believes that the rules that he made don't apply to him. and so we have -ot don't apply to him. and so we have got a _ don't apply to him. and so we have got a prime — don't apply to him. and so we have got a prime minister and the government who spend their whole time mopping up sleaze and deceit. meanwhile, millions of people are struggling to pay their bills, and we can't — struggling to pay their bills, and we can't afford to go on with this chaotic, — we can't afford to go on with this chaotic, rudderless government. the prime _ chaotic, rudderless government. the prime minister is a national distraction, and he has got to go. it distraction, and he has got to go. it would _ distraction, and he has got to go. it would he — distraction, and he has got to go. it would be hard for the prime minisler— it would be hard for the prime minister to— it would be hard for the prime minister to use _ it would be hard for the prime minister to use the _ it would be hard for the prime minister to use the defence i it would be hard for the prime l minister to use the defence now it would be hard for the prime - minister to use the defence now that it was— minister to use the defence now that it was a _ minister to use the defence now that it was a work— minister to use the defence now that it was a work event _ minister to use the defence now that it was a work event in _ minister to use the defence now that it was a work event in this _ minister to use the defence now that it was a work event in this context. l it was a work event in this context. the prime — it was a work event in this context. the prime minister— it was a work event in this context. the prime minister has _ it was a work event in this context. the prime minister has already- it was a work event in this context. i the prime minister has already used up the prime minister has already used up four— the prime minister has already used up four different defences for these allegations, and all of them point to a prime — allegations, and all of them point to a prime minister who is not being honest. _ to a prime minister who is not being honest. and — to a prime minister who is not being honest, and weeks and weeks now of allegations, — honest, and weeks and weeks now of allegations, weeks of deceit from the prime — allegations, weeks of deceit from the prime minister. meanwhile, millions— the prime minister. meanwhile, millions of people struggling to pay their bills. this is chaotic. it is rudderless— their bills. this is chaotic. it is rudderless and it has got to go. the response they are from the labour leader sir keir starmer
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repeating his call that he's been making for some time that boris johnson should resign, and i get hoping that these latest revelations pile further pressure upon him to do exactly that. what about, then, the view within the conservative fold? here is baroness sayeeda warsi, former chair of the conservatives. the start of the political week, another— the start of the political week, another damaging day for government, and it is— another damaging day for government, and it is really worrying because this is— and it is really worrying because this is not— and it is really worrying because this is notjust now about boris johnson — this is notjust now about boris johnson or— this is notjust now about boris johnson or about number 10. it is about— johnson or about number 10. it is about the — johnson or about number 10. it is about the impression that is being given— about the impression that is being given out— about the impression that is being given out into the country, that those _ given out into the country, that those who _ given out into the country, that those who set the rules, those who made _ those who set the rules, those who made the _ those who set the rules, those who made the rules, those who talked to us all— made the rules, those who talked to us all about— made the rules, those who talked to us all about following the rules, may not — us all about following the rules, may not have been following those rules themselves, and this is damaging for us both in the united kingdom _ damaging for us both in the united kingdom but also more broadly when we look— kingdom but also more broadly when we look across the world and we see the crisis _ we look across the world and we see the crisis in — we look across the world and we see the crisis in afghanistan, the build-up— the crisis in afghanistan, the build—up of troops in ukraine, the response — build—up of troops in ukraine, the response to — build—up of troops in ukraine, the response to the fallout from brexit, the fact _ response to the fallout from brexit, the fact that our economy needs to -et the fact that our economy needs to get back— the fact that our economy needs to get back on— the fact that our economy needs to get back on its feet. we need the
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office _ get back on its feet. we need the office of— get back on its feet. we need the office of the prime minister and the prime _ office of the prime minister and the prime minister to be beyond reproach, and i think these are further— reproach, and i think these are further damaging allegations which once again means that the government is not _ once again means that the government is not focusing on the function of government and instead is focusing on survivat — government and instead is focusing on survival. do government and instead is focusing on survival-— on survival. do you think boris johnson can — on survival. do you think boris johnson can survive, _ on survival. do you think boris johnson can survive, should i on survival. do you think boris - johnson can survive, should survive? let's see how this week plays out. what _ let's see how this week plays out. what i _ let's see how this week plays out. what i sincerely hope is that at some _ what i sincerely hope is that at some point the pro—minister makes this decision himself. i think this kind of— this decision himself. i think this kind of death by a thousand cuts is becoming — kind of death by a thousand cuts is becoming painful to watch, and is also painful for the country and painful— also painful for the country and painful for the normal functioning of government. i keep going back to this. of government. i keep going back to this this— of government. i keep going back to this this is— of government. i keep going back to this. this is now not about an individual— this. this is now not about an individual or a department. this is about— individual or a department. this is about us— individual or a department. this is about us as — individual or a department. this is about us as a country, and that ultimately— about us as a country, and that ultimately what we need right now is a government firing on all cylinders dealing _ a government firing on all cylinders dealing with the domestic issues and international issues, and that simply— international issues, and that simply is _ international issues, and that simply is not happening whilst we are distracted by this. let�*s simply is not happening whilst we are distracted by this.— are distracted by this. let's talk about these _ are distracted by this. let's talk about these allegations - are distracted by this. let's talk about these allegations of - about these allegations of islamophobia involving a former minister who believes one of the
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reasons she is no longer in government is because she is muslim. is the conservative party doing enough to face up to these allegations of islamophobia? we have seen there is now going to be an inquiry into is it enough?- inquiry into is it enough? these allegations _ inquiry into is it enough? these allegations are _ inquiry into is it enough? these allegations are deeply - inquiry into is it enough? these l allegations are deeply disturbing, because _ allegations are deeply disturbing, because they go beyond the party. i have been— because they go beyond the party. i have been pointing out case after case: _ have been pointing out case after case, in _ have been pointing out case after case, in their hundreds, of islamophobia racism within the conservative party, but this is not about _ conservative party, but this is not about something that happened in the conservative party or at conservative party or at conservative hq to somebody who was employed _ conservative hq to somebody who was employed by the conservative party. this is— employed by the conservative party. this is something that happened to a government minister, somebody employed by government who is alleging — employed by government who is alleging that comments were made in number— alleging that comments were made in number 10 _ alleging that comments were made in number 10 downing street and repeated to her by the chief whip, so this— repeated to her by the chief whip, so this is— repeated to her by the chief whip, so this is at the heart of government, and therefore it makes it far more _ government, and therefore it makes it far more serious, because the conservative party in the end has to respond _ conservative party in the end has to respond to— conservative party in the end has to respond to its members, and there may be _ respond to its members, and there may be a _ respond to its members, and there may be a couple of hundred british muslim _ may be a couple of hundred british muslim members, but the government
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is accountable to its public, and in the public, — is accountable to its public, and in the public, there are 4 million british— the public, there are 4 million british muslims looking at the government right now and saying, what _ government right now and saying, what are _ government right now and saying, what are you going to do about this? final thought picking on what you said a moment ago about the pro—minister and his conduct. are you suggesting he should resign? i’m you suggesting he should resign? i'm suggesting that the pro—minister has to think— suggesting that the pro—minister has to think long and hard about what is in the _ to think long and hard about what is in the best— to think long and hard about what is in the best interest of this country _ in the best interest of this country. ultimately we all go into power. _ country. ultimately we all go into power. we — country. ultimately we all go into power, we go into politics to exercise _ power, we go into politics to exercise and have our hand on the levers _ exercise and have our hand on the levers of _ exercise and have our hand on the levers of power to make our country better, _ levers of power to make our country better, and — levers of power to make our country better, and the question he should better, and the question he should be asking — better, and the question he should be asking himself every morning is, is me _ be asking himself every morning is, is me staying in office allowing me to run— is me staying in office allowing me to run this — is me staying in office allowing me to run this office in a way which is making _ to run this office in a way which is making the — to run this office in a way which is making the country better, or am i a distraction? — making the country better, or am i a distraction? it making the country better, or am i a distraction?— distraction? it sounds like as a former chair _ distraction? it sounds like as a former chair of _ distraction? it sounds like as a former chair of the _ distraction? it sounds like as a. former chair of the conservative party, you are saying he should go. i genuinely think that the politics of ! genuinely think that the politics of this— i genuinely think that the politics of this goes well beyond the current crisis _ of this goes well beyond the current crisis this — of this goes well beyond the current crisis. this is how we are viewed as a government in the country and how
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we are _ a government in the country and how we are viewed in the world, and i think— we are viewed in the world, and i think those — we are viewed in the world, and i think those issues, and i instinctively believe that my colleagues love this country, they are patriots and they want to do the i’ili'it are patriots and they want to do the right thing _ are patriots and they want to do the right thing by this country, and the i’ili'it right thing by this country, and the right thing — right thing by this country, and the right thing by this country, and the right thing by us in the rest of the world, _ right thing by us in the rest of the world, and — right thing by us in the rest of the world, and that is a question the prime _ world, and that is a question the prime minister is going to ask himself — prime minister is going to ask himself. does he believe that holding — himself. does he believe that holding that office as office of the prime _ holding that office as office of the prime minister, he is continuing to do what _ prime minister, he is continuing to do what is — prime minister, he is continuing to do what is in — prime minister, he is continuing to do what is in the best interest of this country and the best that we can do? — this country and the best that we can do? do— this country and the best that we can do? ,., , ., this country and the best that we can do? ~' this country and the best that we can do? ,., ,., ~ , this country and the best that we can do? ~ | this country and the best that we i can do?_ i have can do? do you think he is? i have concerns. — can do? do you think he is? i have concerns. and _ can do? do you think he is? i have concerns, and i— can do? do you think he is? i have concerns, and i genuinely- can do? do you think he is? i have concerns, and i genuinely believe, j concerns, and i genuinely believe, as an _ concerns, and i genuinely believe, as an x _ concerns, and i genuinely believe, as an x chairman, i genuinely believe — as an x chairman, i genuinely believe and i have always said this, that people have to think, we are grown-ups. — that people have to think, we are grown—ups, we are mature people, we are individuals, and we have to be able to— are individuals, and we have to be able to think about these issues deeply— able to think about these issues deeply and take these decisions, and i deeply and take these decisions, and i genuinely— deeply and take these decisions, and i genuinely hope that we are not put in a ! genuinely hope that we are not put in a position— i genuinely hope that we are not put in a position where it looks like the prime _ in a position where it looks like the prime minister is being pushed, i the prime minister is being pushed, i hope _ the prime minister is being pushed, i hope this— the prime minister is being pushed, i hope this is a prime minister that can feel— i hope this is a prime minister that can feel that he can take these decisions — can feel that he can take these decisions himself in the best interests of the country.
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baroness sayeeda warsi, former conservative party chairman in your interview there, and i'm struck by the fact that you gave her plenty of opportunity to leap to the prime minister's defence and she chose not to do that. she spoke in her own way and let those words stand. let me take you to another example, which arguably is more disturbing because it is somebody who was until a matter of hours ago a government minister, lord agnew, standing up at the dispatch box in the house of lords and as far as i could see, basically saying the government department at which i work on the government of which i am part is, and i was going to quote the words, displays arrogance, indolence and ignorance on the question of £5 billion of fraud. coming at a time when the government wants to impose extra taxes, because it says it doesn't have any money because all the money it has spent on covid relief, his words are not ones that will be welcome, one would have thought, notjust in number 10 but
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in the treasury too. thought, notjust in number10 but in the treasury too.— thought, notjust in number10 but in the treasury too. kuyt. here is a treasury minister _ in the treasury too. kuyt. here is a treasury minister whose _ in the treasury too. kuyt. here is a treasury minister whose brief - treasury minister whose brief related to efficiency, pouring scorn on the very department he was representing as he resigned at the dispatch box in the house of lords, saying that the treasury had been nowhere near good enough in keeping an eye on its money, our money collectively, as taxpayers, during the worst elements of the covid pandemic. he said that he wasn't making a critique of the prime minister particularly in the current context of the swirl of awkwardness for borisjohnson, but nonetheless he contributed to that swirl of awkwardness because there are ways and means of resigning then there is going to the dispatch box and doing it publicly, which is exactly what he did, getting stealth a round of applause which is pretty rare in the rarefied echelons of the upper chamber as he departed, clearly not happy at how the treasury handled some of its approaches in the early stages of
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the pandemic. the response from the government, i was in the afternoon briefing for westminster journalist as this story broke, and downing street thanked him for his service in government and pointed to where they had been able to apply what they had been able to apply what they saw us some sort of rigour around the money that was handed out at the time of the pandemic, they met the broader argument, particularly during the establishment of the furlough scheme that this was about propping up as many households and businesses, as many households and businesses, as many parts of the economy as possible in an emergency that none of us had seen in our lifetimes, economically or in health terms. but yes, there is a real concern about the amount of money the treasury now acknowledges it has had to write off, north of £4 billion, particularly when there is this coming row happening increasingly in public within the conservative party at the moment about this impending rise in national insurance in april, with some senior figures, robert
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jenrick, a cabinet minister until recently, saying perhaps that shouldn't be happening right now. the government's argument as it helps pay for the nhs and in the long term it helps pay for social care in england, but there is huge concern from mps when you scratch beyond the current rows about the pro—minister, around the cost of living. in fact, tonight, pro—minister, around the cost of living. infact, tonight, a pro—minister, around the cost of living. in fact, tonight, a debate going on in the chamber led by the scottish national party on exactly that, the cost of living, with plenty of mps hugely conscious that away from the noise of the rows in this postcode about the prime minister, and of course beyond this postcode plenty of people are boiling with anger, there are real pressing concerns for people day to day paying the bills, and there is hope and plenty of sides including within the conservative party that the government might do something pretty quickly to try to help out in that regard. pretty quickly to try to help out in that regard-— that regard. chris mason at westminster, _ that regard. chris mason at westminster, i— that regard. chris mason at westminster, i have - that regard. chris mason at westminster, i have a - that regard. chris mason at i westminster, i have a feeling that regard. chris mason at - westminster, i have a feeling we are going to be talking again, thank you very much. we are saying just in passing that according to lord agnew, 1000 companies that weren't
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even trading at the time of the pandemic were still given grants to help them get back on their feet, they weren't actually trading at the time. so he is obviously very angry about that and we hope to get some more about that on the front pages of the newspapers at 10:30pm. susie is from covid—19 bereaved families forjustice, she lost her own father. thank you for speaking to us tonight. the government is saying that the marking of the pro—minister's birthday happened at the end of the working day, he didn't hang around longer than ten minutes, it was organised by his wife who arranged for m&s party food to be brought in. i wonder what you make of it. i to be brought in. i wonder what you make of it. ., to be brought in. i wonder what you make of it— make of it. i think one of the most shockin: make of it. i think one of the most shocking thing _ make of it. i think one of the most shocking thing is _ make of it. i think one of the most shocking thing is this _ make of it. i think one of the most shocking thing is this that - make of it. i think one of the most shocking thing is this that i - make of it. i think one of the most shocking thing is this that i am - shocking thing is this that i am really not surprised. there has been so much of this in recent months
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that it so much of this in recent months thatitis so much of this in recent months that it is not a surprise any more, but it doesn't fail to really, really hurt. dad died in the first lockdown, in a really very restricted period of time. i could have had five people there, but i chose to have two, because i didn't know who to invite out of the friends of who to put themselves at risk, so it was a really bleak affair. and i did it because we followed the rules because we wanted to keep people safe. i didn't want to keep people safe. i didn't want to expose anybody to the virus that killed my dad, so i followed the rules and follow them all the way through, and to know that yet again the so leader of this country has broken the rules and the law to celebrate his own birthday, the week after the day that my dad would have turned 82. i am angry. i'm insulted. ifeel yet again i have been punched in the stomach, and i don't know how
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much more bereaved families and the rest of the public are meant to take. this is insulting to those of us... y ., . take. this is insulting to those of us... do you... we know that sue gra , us... do you... we know that sue gray. the — us. .. do you... we know that sue gray, the senior— us... do you... we know that sue gray, the senior civil _ us... do you... we know that sue gray, the senior civil servant, - us... do you... we know that sue gray, the senior civil servant, is l gray, the senior civil servant, is carrying out an investigation, and would will presumably form part of her report. in an ideal world, what would you hope that report will say? i think we know what happened, and whatever sue gray's report says, i hope it will be honest and identify that these gatherings and parties did happen, and i honestly think that anyone with a shred of decency should be calling on the prime minister to resign. the man is a liability, he has lost all credibility, he has broken his own laws. he is a health hazard because he has undermined his own messaging, and should any restrictions have to be in place going forward, no one is
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going to pay attention. he has revealed himself to be dishonest, and in my opinion is not fit to leave this country, so i hope sue gray would echo that. whether she does remains to be seen, but i think anyone with any sense of integrity, honesty and fairness as well as decency should be asking the prime minister to resign. if decency should be asking the prime minister to resign.— minister to resign. if this report comes out _ minister to resign. if this report comes out as — minister to resign. if this report comes out as you _ minister to resign. if this report comes out as you say _ minister to resign. if this report comes out as you say and - minister to resign. if this report comes out as you say and he i minister to resign. if this report l comes out as you say and he puts himself in front of mps, journalists, the public and says, i really, genuinely am sorry, i badly misjudged this, i got the mood wrong, i got caught up in the business of government, life and were carrying on in the normal way inside this office space, and i didn't really understand where the lines were properly drawn, if you felt it was sincere, would you feel able to accept that? trio. felt it was sincere, would you feel able to accept that?— felt it was sincere, would you feel able to accept that? no, because i don't think— able to accept that? no, because i don't think it _ able to accept that? no, because i don't think it would _ able to accept that? no, because i don't think it would be _ able to accept that? no, because i don't think it would be sincere. - don't think it would be sincere. there is nothing there that could be
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sincere. he made the rules, he passed the laws that he then broke, is to call it a misjudgement or a mistake is downplaying the seriousness of it. mistake is the wrong homophone. it is not throwing a party, whether it is booze in a suitcase or a birthday party, that is deliberately ignoring the rules that he put in place himself. so i don't think anything he says apology wise is going to be sincere, and if it was, white repeated occasions? if you make a mistake the first time and you realise, you don't make the same mistake again, and we have got a catalogue of these events occurring, so no apology will be sincere. and he needs to understand the gravity of what he has done, and frankly as i say, he is a dishonest man breaking his own law, and he is not fit to rule this country. whatever happens as a result of this report and the stories, it won't bring your dad back and it won't
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change the memories you have of that period. change the memories you have of that eriod. ., change the memories you have of that period. trio. getting away from all period. no. getting away from all the period. hp. getting away from all the politics and being interviewed by people and stuff, can you try to put into words how you feel when you look back at that period of your life and what you are trying to do and because of what you are trying to do, what you didn't do and what that means to you and the family? dad and i were really close. before lockdown i saw him every day. he was my best friend. and when he went into hospital, he had gone in with pneumonia and i thought he would be out in a week because he was looking better, and then he caught covid and i saw what it did to him, how it diminished him from this vivacious
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life loving mischievous twinkly man into this rattling shall, and i was terrified and i was distraught, and i still have flashbacks to that moment. and when he eventually died, it was very important to me to have him cremated in the same place as my mum which is why it took so long, so i had a period of about three weeks where i couldn't even have any kind of ritual or process, and then when the day of his funeral came, it was myself and my husband, and that was it. ijust felt myself and my husband, and that was it. i just felt cheated, myself and my husband, and that was it. ijust felt cheated, because dad was one of those people who was universally loved, and so many people would have come to pay tribute to him, and to celebrate the life and celebrate who he was, because who he was wasn't who i saw in hospital, and i was deprived of all of that, and i couldn't have friends there, i couldn't hug anyone, i couldn't turn to anyone because i couldn't see anyone, none of those processes, none of those rituals were in place, and it was
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surreal, and it almost felt like it wasn't true, and even now, i'm only just beginning to have conversations about a memorial, and we're looking at two years since he died. and i'm hoping that it will be everything that couldn't have then, but at the same time it kind of feel slightly shallow because it is so far down the line. so i am really hoping it has the effect of a little bit of closure for me, and a little bit of being able to process and move forward. but there is a massive hole in my life where dad was, and a massive hole in my life where what should have been a celebration of his life wasn't, and for me, the narrative of that will never change. that is a fixed point. and to listen to the prime minister who changes the narrative to suit his own ends just reminds me of how empty and bleak and harrowing that time was, because that will never change for
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me and for hundreds of thousands of others up and down the country. susie flintham, thank you very much for talking to us and telling us about your dad, painful thing, for talking to us and telling us about your dad, painfulthing, i know, to talk about, but you have family at home with you this evenin: ? , family at home with you this evening?- good. - family at home with you this evening? yes. good. susie, thank you very much- — very much. let's talk now to labour's very much. — let's talk now to labour's pat mcfadden, shadow chief secretary to the treasury, number two on the labour treasury team. what do you make of the latest allegations at itv news? it make of the latest allegations at itv news? , ., ., ~ ., ., itv news? it is hard to know what else to say _ itv news? it is hard to know what else to say about _ itv news? it is hard to know what else to say about this. _ itv news? it is hard to know what else to say about this. what - itv news? it is hard to know what else to say about this. what i - itv news? it is hard to know what. else to say about this. what i make of it is, everybody is human, everybody can make a mistake, but what we have here isn't one mistake. it is clearly a culture of complete disregard for the rules that the rest of the country were being asked to abide by, and there have been so
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many examples now that that is no longer in doubt. the prime minister has made one excuse after another, none of them have held up to examination, and i think people will look at this now and almost not be surprised because the culture of what was happening there has been well established by the revelations over the past few weeks. and well established by the revelations over the past few weeks.— well established by the revelations over the past few weeks. and we will obviously see — over the past few weeks. and we will obviously see the _ over the past few weeks. and we will obviously see the sue _ over the past few weeks. and we will obviously see the sue gray report. i obviously see the sue gray report. what will labour be asking for at that point? what will labour be asking for at that oint? ,, what will labour be asking for at that point?— what will labour be asking for at that oint? ,, , ._ ._ , that point? sue gray, the way things are looking. — that point? sue gray, the way things are looking, would _ that point? sue gray, the way things are looking, would have _ that point? sue gray, the way things are looking, would have to _ that point? sue gray, the way things are looking, would have to write - that point? sue gray, the way things are looking, would have to write warj are looking, would have to write war and peace to cover everything that has happened. i have no doubt about her integrity as a civil servant, but she is a civil servant at the end of the day, and what i expect she will do is lay out the facts, and i'm not expecting her to say whether the prime minister should resign or not. she may not even
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pronounce exactly on breaches of the law, but i think we know all this now anyway. wait for sue gray has become this desperate mantra from ministers who must wonder how long this can continue. conservative mps who must wonder how they can justify this to their constituents. and who must wonder how they can 'ustify this to their constituentsfi this to their constituents. and let me ask you _ this to their constituents. and let me ask you about _ this to their constituents. and let me ask you about another - this to their constituents. and let me ask you about another event | this to their constituents. and let. me ask you about another event that perhaps would have more attention were it not for the parties, and this is the resignation of theodore lord agnew, the ministry of state, treasury minister who resigned at the dispatch box in the house of lords and effectively said, to quote him directly, arrogance, indolence and ignorance inside government meant that ministers had allowed and were making no effort to correct the situation where up to £5 billion was lost in fraud for covid recovery loans improperly claimed and or
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improperly distributed. that loans improperly claimed and or improperly distributed.- improperly distributed. that is ri . ht, improperly distributed. that is right. and _ improperly distributed. that is right. and you _ improperly distributed. that is right, and you might _ improperly distributed. that is right, and you might expect i improperly distributed. that is. right, and you might expect the opposition to attack the government over its stewardship of public finances, this was one of the government's own ministers attacking the government for its stewardship, and resigning on the spot. and the excuse that ministers will give is, we had to get money out of the door in the early days of the pandemic, and it is true there was pressure to do that, but that is not an excuse for not having any semblance of controls, for example giving money to companies that have never traded before, and now billions of pounds are in the hands of fraudsters with little or no hope of recovering it, and this matters because at the same time the government was about to impose tax increases on the public at the very time when prices are going up, so they are saying they need to increase taxes for the public to try to fill a hole in the public to try to fill a hole in the
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public finances, but this fraud and mismanagement and waste has made a big contribution to that hole in the public finances, and i don't think members of the public will take kindly to being asked to pay more taxes not for public services but to fill a hole created because billions of pounds is now in the hands of thieves and fraudsters. pat mcfadden. _ thieves and fraudsters. pat mcfadden, shadow chief secretary of the treasury, thank you very much for talking to us on bbc news. to ukraine now. the prime minister has warned russia that invading ukraine would be "disastrous" and a "painful, violent and bloody business". nato is sending more warships and fighterjets to member states in eastern europe and both the uk and us have announced that they are pulling some embassy staff out of ukraine. tension in the region has been building, in the past hour, the united states has placed 8500 troops on high alert. tension in the region has been building,
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with around 100,000 russian troops massed near ukraine's borders. and also in belarus which would allow them if they wanted to to be able to move into the northern border. president putin has publicly stated his belief that russia and ukraine are one people. he claims one of his key concerns is the expansion of nato, the military alliance of european and north american countries. many countries in eastern europe became members after the fall of the soviet union. they had been members of what was called the warsaw pact, a defence pact between members of the soviet union. the russian president's demand that ukraine will never be allowed tojoin nato has been rejected. although privately few western governments assume it will happen any time soon. here's our diplomatic correspondent james landale. across russia, military exercises are gathering pace as its troops continue to mass or ukraine's borders. on land, air and sea russian forces are training and preparing. but for what?
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some western powers now fear the worst. the intelligence is very clear that there are 60 russian battle groups on the borders of ukraine. the plan for a lightning war that could take out kyiv is one that everyone can see. invading ukraine from a russian perspective is going to be a painful, violent and bloody business, and it's very important that people in russia understand that this could be the new chechnya. that was a reference to the war russia fought in its southern republic of chechnya in the 1990s where thousands of troops died trying to defeat rebels seeking independence. the prime minister and the foreign secretary have been criticised for not focusing enough on ukraine. well, it seems they are trying to change that. the foreign office is releasing
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intelligence and they say russia is planning, and borisjohnson is engaging with counterparts about how best to deter invasion. today, liz truss was in brussels with talks with nato chiefs as they plan to beef up the presence of the alliance in eastern europe. extra ships and warplanes will be sent to the region and the us is reported to be ready to deploy thousands more troops. also in brussels, where eu foreign ministers who promised ukraine £1 billion in financial aid and warned russia there will be massive consequences and survey costs to any invasion. russia should know, president putin should know that the price of these provocations and military cheap force will be very high, he would be totally isolated and it would have a harsh reaction from all of us. in kyiv, the british embassy announced it would join the us in sending some diplomats and theirfamilies home because of the russian threat. a decision that did not impress ukraine's foreign ministry. such a step, the spokesman said,
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was premature, and a display of excessive caution. all the while, ukraine is doing what it can to get ready. with civilian reservists dusting off uniforms from the boots of their cars, preparing for the moment when they mightjust might have to bear arms again. james landale, bbc news. well, for more on this story, we can now speak to sir mark lyall grant, who was the uk ambassador to the united nations when crimea was annexed by the russians, and after that he served as the national security adviser. sir mark, thank you for being with us and also for your patience in waiting while we were dealing with the political developments. we are at a kind of odd phase, aren't we, in knowing how this is going to develop? what is your sense of where we are now? the ukrainian ambassador
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at the weekend said we have kind of lived with the situation for eight years, so it doesn't feel now specifically ordained, but the —— specifically ordained, but the —— specifically more dangerous, but the world thinks it is more dangerous? he is right to remind us this conflict has begun there were going on for eight years and is not something on for eight years and is not somethin— on for eight years and is not somethin: . ., , .., ., , something that has come in the last few weeks- — something that has come in the last few weeks. there _ something that has come in the last few weeks. there is _ something that has come in the last few weeks. there is no _ something that has come in the last few weeks. there is no doubt - something that has come in the last few weeks. there is no doubt the i few weeks. there is no doubt the developments and build up of russian troops on ukraine's borders in the last few weeks has intensified the tension in a very big way. i think my assessment is we're sort of on a knife edge, as it were. i would not say that a major conflict is inevitable, or escalation of existing comfort, but equally, it is not yet clear what sort of political off ramp can be devised which would enable president putin to withdraw the troops he has mobilised without getting any significant gains in return, so i think it's difficult to predict, because it is a decision
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that only president putin will take, whether to go for the military invasion or something militarily less than a full invasion, whether he will just try to continue less than a full invasion, whether he willjust try to continue to stabilise ukraine as he has done for the last eight years. can you recall what was being sent to you by the russians at the time of the annexation of crimea in terms of the annexation of crimea in terms of their broader ambitions? no, the focus at that point was largely on the crimea region. of course, they muddied the waters and pretended they were not involved and it was a sort of genuine uprising. but no, there was not any indication there that they wanted to reunite, as it were, ukraine within greater russia. what they did once and have always wanted is that ukraine should remain within the russian sphere of influence, and this has become something of a leitmotif, something of an emotional and personal commitment for president putin. that
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is what makes it very dangerous. we have been told the united states has placed a few thousand troops on potential warning of deployment. in truth, though, does moscow believe that the americans or the british, or indeed nato, since sinn fein is not a —— since ukraine is not a nato member, would act unilaterally if rush across the border? i member, would act unilaterally if rush across the border?— rush across the border? i don't think there's _ rush across the border? i don't think there's any _ rush across the border? i don't think there's any that - rush across the border? i don't think there's any that this - think there's any that this enhancement of troops would be gathering in ukraine. yes, there are military trainers there, already, both from the united kingdom and america in one or two other nato countries. yes, we are providing lethal defensive but none the less lethal defensive but none the less lethal equipment to ukraine which has been ramped up in terms of anti—tank missiles. and yes, we are putting ships into the black sea. we are also putting more troops into eastern europe. but no one is suggesting that we should actually
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put boots on the ground in ukraine in the event of a russian invasion. what i think would happen is that if russia, for instance, attacked a nato member like in the baltic states, then it is a completely different story, and clearly, there would be a commitment to defend that militarily. secondly, if russia worked to try and take over ukraine entirely, i would expect a very significant resistance movement to build up, rather as there was in afghanistan, and in those circumstances, rather like in afghanistan, the west would support that resistance movement by a whole range of different means, and that, i think, is what the prime minister was talking about when he says it could become a very bloody conflict for russia if they invaded. it could become a very bloody conflict for russia if they invaded.— for russia if they invaded. it could certainly become _ for russia if they invaded. it could certainly become a _ for russia if they invaded. it could certainly become a very _ for russia if they invaded. it could certainly become a very expensive one because of that threat of sanctions, may be keeping or pushing russia out of the banking system that allows money to be transferred around the world. but all of that comes with something of a risk for
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european countries as well, doesn't it? for no other reason, if for no other reason, than because of russia's control of natural gas supplies? russia's control of natural gas su lies? ., ., , , russia's control of natural gas sunlies? ., , ., supplies? no, absolutely, and the eu, supplies? no, absolutely, and the eu. because _ supplies? no, absolutely, and the eu. because it— supplies? no, absolutely, and the eu, because it is _ supplies? no, absolutely, and the eu, because it is more _ supplies? no, absolutely, and the eu, because it is more the - supplies? no, absolutely, and the eu, because it is more the eu - supplies? no, absolutely, and the| eu, because it is more the eu than nato when we're talking about economic sanctions, is certainly united in terms of russia being forced to pay a price. the exact nature of that is not fully agreed. certainly in the uk, it is felt that the nord stream gas pipeline should be suspended, and that would deal a blow to russia, but would also have an impact on germany and some european states. and also, that we should not take of the table excluding russia from the swift banking system. again, that would have some cost for europe, and a massive cost for russia. but i don't think any of those measures have been finally, finally agreed. they just haven't been taken off the
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table yet, so they are possible. sir mark lyall, thank you very much for your time this evening. let's return now to our top story this hour. the troubles that come in many forms for the prime minister at the moment. joining us this evening is anthony seldon, who has written a number of books analysing the operation in number ten on the success and of prime ministers, including margaret thatcher, tony blair and so on, so he has plenty of examples that he can draw on in terms of how this prime minister is measuring up. sir anthony, thank you for being with us. on paper, this is a prime minister with a massive commanding parliamentary majority, a prime minister who has been lucky, but also successful in the jobs he has held, and in his political he is the prime minister who can tell as he delivered brexit, delivered a massive majority for the tories, and
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there minister that surveys tell us is the prime minister who could reach the parts of the electorate that others could not reach. what, then,is that others could not reach. what, then, is really wrong with the situation he finds himself in at the moment, and why is it apparently so hard for him to get out of it? well, what's wrong is that it is very unusual for a prime minister whose policies have proved successful, or at least satisfactory, and who has won themselves a very significant general election victory, and he was sitting on a commanding majority in the house of commons, to find themselves in so much trouble. that is what is unique here, and i can't find precedent in british political history that is quite like this, that might be a guide to what is going to happen next. so this is a
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question far less about policies, though conservative mps are unhappy, some with this policy, some with that, but substantially, it's not about policy, it's about character, and they have an issue, difficulty, which is that they knew the character of the person they were voting for. borisjohnson suddenly hasn't become borisjohnson. boris johnson has spent his life playing his favourite character, boris johnson. so they have suddenly discovered, if you like, that he is borisjohnson, doing things that borisjohnson, doing things that borisjohnson, doing things that borisjohnson would be expected to do. so we are in a very difficult situation to read if history is a good guide. i think history is often a good guide, but not if previous examples are so dissimilar. i was struggling to think of— struggling to think of a... i came into reporting — struggling to think of a... i came into reporting politics _ struggling to think of a... i came into reporting politics at - struggling to think of a... i came into reporting politics at the - struggling to think of a... i came into reporting politics at the very end of margaret thatcher's time in
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office, so the first prime minister up office, so the first prime minister up close wasjohn major, and he had a pretty rough five years, but managed to hold on for the whole of parliament, having won an election very successfully, very successful election in 1992 against the odds, but was under pressure all that time, and yet somehow, he did keep going, and i suppose there is something to be said about the office of prime minister, at least allowing you, by virtue of occupying it, to keep going a lot of the time, despite external pressures? weill. despite external pressures? well, that's right. _ despite external pressures? well, that's right, and _ despite external pressures? well, that's right, and what _ despite external pressures? well, that's right, and what john - despite external pressures? -jj that's right, and whatjohn major didn't have in those five tough years, that went wrong almost immediately after the general election, which was black wednesday, britain coming out of the exchange rate mechanism, and the whole hit that that took to britain's prestige and economy, for five that that took to britain's prestige and economy, forfive years he that that took to britain's prestige and economy, for five years he was fighting, but he didn't have anything like the majority that borisjohnson has, and people wanting to take over from him knew
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that. they were going to be taking over at the stubborn end of a long period of conservative government and with a dwindling majority. now, for borisjohnson, that's very, very different, but you are right. the prime minister has extraordinarily, within that office, powers of endurance. the status quo rallies around him. the prime minister is a giant oak tree, and it does take several swings of the acts to cut down that oak tree. and you never quite know which swing of the axe it will be that will produce the final toppling of that tree. what we do know also is that the more the tree can bend, the more likely it is to sustain the gales blowing at it. and my goodness, the gales blowing at borisjohnson are just coming from notjust one borisjohnson are just coming from not just one westerly borisjohnson are just coming from notjust one westerly direction. they are coming from all 360 degrees
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at the same time. so beautifully put. as to how much of a storm this is. and he has been very resilient against a lot of these things, hasn't he? i wonder if there is... given that you have done so much work inside number ten under successive prime ministers, will he worry at all about what might be called collateral damage, that if you ignore the theatre of the man in charge and you look at what is happening to the machinery around him and the day to day operation and the ability tojust him and the day to day operation and the ability to just get on with the job of governing, whether that is, this ongoing political drama, tragedy, whatever you want to call it, saga, the worst problems may be being created around it? well. it, saga, the worst problems may be being created around it?— being created around it? well, i remember— being created around it? well, i remember one _ being created around it? well, i remember one of _ being created around it? well, i remember one ofjohn - being created around it? well, i remember one ofjohn major's l being created around it? well, i i remember one ofjohn major's key aides saying to me that daily life reminded him of being at roots drift in that film of zulu, if people
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remember that. in that film of zulu, if people rememberthat. —— in that film of zulu, if people remember that. —— rourke's drift. you are surrounded by enemies wanting to kill you, and there you are, and it feels very, very alone. and that is often what it feels like to be in that building. but looking from a national point of view, we had three years of theresa may, in which the long—standing tony blair referred to this in a speech last week, the long—standing issues that britain has over the greening of the economy, over social care, over the performance of the health service, to say nothing of the transport and infrastructure concerns, let alone foreign policy issues at the moment with russia and china. these three years of theresa may were put on the back burner due to the need to get back burner due to the need to get back brexit done, now they've been
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put on the back burner because of covid. so effectively, we've lost five years where the country and the prime minister could and probably should have been focusing more on the long—term issues that will affect britain in ten or 25 years as well as now, rather than just firefighting in the immediate. so thatis firefighting in the immediate. so that is a real concern, and it is partly the apparatus of number ten being not well—organised to look at the long term. long term for number ten is often next week, at the very long term is certainly the next general election. they cannot see beyond that. the country can. yes, absolutely, and at some point we will have to. sir anthony, thank you very much. always a pleasure to speak to you. sir anthony has written biographies, as i say, prime ministers in downing street, everyone since margaret thatcher. i guess you are not quite ready to write the last page of the boris johnson one just yet? plat write the last page of the boris johnson one just yet?- write the last page of the boris johnson one just yet? johnson one 'ust yet? not yet! not et. i johnson one 'ust yet? not yet! not yet. i have — johnson one just yet? not yet! not yet- i have no _ johnson one just yet? not yet! not yet. i have no idea _ johnson one just yet? not yet! not yet. i have no idea when _ johnson one just yet? not yet! not yet. i have no idea when i- johnson one just yet? not yet! not yet. i have no idea when i will. - johnson one just yet? not yet! not yet. i have no idea when i will. sir| yet. i have no idea when i will. sir anthony, thank you very much.
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travellers to the uk will no longer have to take covid tests after arrival if they've been fully vaccinated. the government says the changes will take effect from february 11, in time for school half—term holidays. travel firms have welcomed the announcement, but public health experts say testing remains important. stephanie boyle is spokesperson for skyscanner. shejoins me now. that group does a lot of work in terms of thanks forjoining us, stephanie. have we seen yet the impact this announcement is having? is there any evidence it is getting people back online, trying to make this bookings?— online, trying to make this bookinus? ~ , , bookings? well, it is very good news, absolutely, _ bookings? well, it is very good news, absolutely, regardless l bookings? well, it is very good| news, absolutely, regardless of whether or not we have seen the impact. we know it is incredibly good news for the travel sector, and we know that because throughout the pandemic, any time we have seen restrictions lift or testing requirements ease, we have seen a huge lift in booking, almost
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immediately. last october, when they drop the requirement for a pcr test and moved it to a lateralflow drop the requirement for a pcr test and moved it to a lateral flow test, we saw hundred and 33% increase in traffic from one day to the next, so we know that that appetite is there and the fact that this has just made it that much less complex is a really big thing. i suspect it will translate into very quick impact because of the timing was that they have done this injanuary, meaning thatis have done this injanuary, meaning that is already a really peak month for the industry, and to be honest, this january, more so than ever. in the last year, we have seen an increase of 230% in bookings on our site compared to last january. so we know that the moment these tests are gone and people feel free to do a lot more of their travel planning without having the factor of the additional cost in four tests, we know it will be a really big boost of confidence.
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in terms of its impact, has it been... is it possible to tell whether it has been a deterrent for people travel a short haul holidays as opposed to long haul? one would have thought that actually, if you are spending, i don't know, £1000, £2000, and going away for three weeks if you have a good fortune, you kind of can live with, you can probably afford to live with, no matter how much you might not like it, the extra cost. if you're going away for five days, there are six of you as a family, and it has to be squeezed into half term. presumably that not only cost you more but is a bigger proportion of the money you are spending on your holiday? well, i would say that it is a balance, because you may be spending quite a bit less if you are going along or... a short—haul trip than if you are spending a long walk, but we know it has returned. that is absolutely true. we also know that last year, is restrictions lifted and people were able to get back out there, they were really happy to do that. as well as seeing friends and
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family, being able to travel and take holiday is the biggest benefit we spoke to of people last year. that is because travel is really important. it's important to be able to see friends and family around the world. it is important to get away. your daily life in the news surrounding you. it is important to be able to take that break, to see cultures up close and personal and actually hear another language and smell different smells and that's why we see a lot of people coming to skyscanner to get to grips with what the actual testing requirements are and then to decide whether or not they can actually make that work for them. the other thing that has really made a difference is that we have seen the travel industry respond to all of those changes by putting on incredible prices, and actually, if you look at some of our biggest destinations like spain or greece or
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turkey, the prices we are seeing now are cheaper than they would have beenin are cheaper than they would have been in 2019, and we're even seeing that for some of more long—haul destinations like the maldives and mexico, which are trending in terms of traffic in bookings above 2019 levels for covid —— before covid hit, and with prices 45% less than they would have been in 2019. stephanie, in the context of what we're talking about at the moment, the cost of living crisis, you will have cheered up a lot of people, no doubt, by telling us that some things really are cheaper now than two or three years ago. thank you so much. . ., two or three years ago. thank you so much. . ,, ,., let's take a look at today's coronavirus figures. there were almost 88,500 new infections in the latest 24—hour period. if so there were just over 93,000 new cases on average per day in the last week. remember, monday figures are often a bit higher because staff did not get reported over the weekend. essen
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bit higher because staff did not get reported over the weekend. even so, sirnificant reported over the weekend. even so, significant numbers. _ more than 17,500 people are in hospital with covid. another 56 deaths were reported, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test. on average in the past week, there were 263 deaths per day. on vaccinations, nearly 37 million people have had a boosterjab. that's 64.2% percent of those aged 12 and over. scotland is easing most of its remaining covid restrictions, which means that nightclubs can now reopen and crowd limits on large indoor events have been scrapped. but people are still being asked to work from home where possible, and although table service is no longer necessary in most venues, face masks are still required in indoor public places, including secondary schools. joining me now is mike grieve,
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chair of night time industries association scotland & owner of glasgow's sub club. open for business when, mike? we are not hearing you. i think you might have muted yourself. oh, no, you are here, you are fine. ithink we might oh, no, you are here, you are fine. i think we might have neutered your! apologies. carry on. yes, in the sub club, we opened back up yes, in the sub club, we opened back up on friday evening. a lot of the more mainstream clubs will actually open tonight. they are located in high streets where they have significant passing trade. 50 significant passing trade. so obviously, monday night is not a great night for clubbing, but even so, for those who can and want to, it is nice to have the opportunity. i guess for a lot of colleagues in the industry, this will give you a chance to get back up, get into the flow and rhythm of things before the big weekend. how difficult period as this? particularly this last month
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orso this? particularly this last month or so with omicron, because it did look like you are moving in the right direction, and then suddenly you had to slam the on again. yes. you had to slam the on again. yes, it was very — you had to slam the on again. yes, it was very sudden, _ you had to slam the on again. yes, it was very sudden, and _ you had to slam the on again. yes, it was very sudden, and of - you had to slam the on again. jae: it was very sudden, and of course, we were close to 18 months in scotland, and only for three —— closed for 18 months. in the very busiest period of our calendar, we were shut down very suddenly, and the effect of that on the industry at large and businesses such as my own is absolutely dramatic. we rely very heavily on the festive period to supporters to the quieter months of the year, and it's been a very difficult time. the covid recovery measures came to an end, things like furlough and so on late last year. do you yet have a sense of what sort of proportion of night entertainment businesses are not going to survive this period? i
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think it would be how to put a number on it, but the proof will be in the pudding in the next couple of months, because as things stand at the moment, the scottish government brought forward a nightclub closure fund specifically for those nightclubs who were forced to close, but the money is not in from that yet, and we have been paying our staff wages for six weeks. with absolutely no income. so it's a tremendously difficult period of time and there is no certainty about the future, and i have no doubt that there will be businesses that go to there will be businesses that go to the war, sadly. i have no doubt that those businesses will accrue significant debt levels and, relative to the english market, our members are running at twice the debt level that there english counterparts are. that's quite striking and very disturbing for those of you hoping to get beyond this. mike grieve,
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chair of the night time industries association and owner of the sub club, thank you very much. i hope things pick up fast. staying in scotland... the boss of beer giant brewdog has been accused of inappropriate behaviour and abuse of power in the workplace. bbc disclosure has spoken to dozens of former us staff who say they were made to feel uncomfortable by the company's ceo, james watt. investigations correspondent mark daly has more. what do you do when that is your boss? light, the head of the company. you can't really tell them no or cut them off. this company. you can't really tell them no or cut them off.— no or cut them off. this woman is talkin: no or cut them off. this woman is talking about _ no or cut them off. this woman is talking about james _ no or cut them off. this woman is talking about james watt, - no or cut them off. this woman is talking about james watt, ceo i no or cut them off. this woman is talking about james watt, ceo of| talking about james watt, ceo of scottish be a giant brewdog. last year, he was accused by former staff of presiding over a toxic culture. rob mackay was one of them. there was absolutely _ rob mackay was one of them. there was absolutely a _ rob mackay was one of them. there was absolutely a culture _ rob mackay was one of them. there was absolutely a culture of- rob mackay was one of them. there was absolutely a culture of fear. - rob mackay was one of them. there was absolutely a culture of fear. i i was absolutely a culture of fear. i witnessed — was absolutely a culture of fear. i witnessed someone being called into a meeting _ witnessed someone being called into a meeting and coming out ten minutes later and _ a meeting and coming out ten minutes later and announcing that they had
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'ust later and announcing that they had just been— later and announcing that they had just been removed from the business, and that— just been removed from the business, and that was— just been removed from the business, and that was pretty shocking and horrible — horrible. that happened to scott horrible. — that happened to scott five. i asked, why does myjob no longer exist, and i was told that i did not need to concern myself with that, that i had ten, 15 minutes to pack away my desk and that i would be escorted from the building. i was in shock. i burst into tiers.— shock. i burst into tiers. brewdog exanded shock. i burst into tiers. brewdog expanded to _ shock. i burst into tiers. brewdog expanded to the _ shock. i burst into tiers. brewdog expanded to the us _ shock. i burst into tiers. brewdog expanded to the us in _ shock. i burst into tiers. brewdog expanded to the us in 2016 - shock. i burst into tiers. brewdog expanded to the us in 2016 an i shock. i burst into tiers. brewdog i expanded to the us in 2016 an opened eight bars across three states. staff there have raised fresh concerns about james watt. this woman to some female staff would dress down when the boss was in town. we would make a point to one nude girls and one the hosts. like, hey, just so you know —— worn new girls. just so you know, james watt is coming to town, don't hang around after your shift, coming to town, don't hang around afteryourshift, don't coming to town, don't hang around after your shift, don't do your air and make up that day, don't catch his attention. former manager dylan gray says he took extra steps to help female
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staff and one in particular. iie staff and one in particular. he would be _ staff and one in particular. he would be just staring, i staff and one in particular. he would bejust staring, i mean, staff and one in particular. he would be just staring, i mean, just, like, _ would be just staring, i mean, just, like. staring — would be just staring, i mean, just, like, staring. staring at an employee over and over again, every time you _ employee over and over again, every time you visit. asking if she is working — time you visit. asking if she is working if— time you visit. asking if she is working. if i knew she was coming in, working. if i knew she was coming in. i_ working. if i knew she was coming in. i made — working. if i knew she was coming in, i made sure another staffer, man or woman, _ in, i made sure another staffer, man or woman, would be with her, because i or woman, would be with her, because i knew— or woman, would be with her, because i knew she _ or woman, would be with her, because i knew she would feel comfortable. you didn't— i knew she would feel comfortable. you didn't feel you could speak up about it then? i you didn't feel you could speak up about it then?— about it then? i would have been canned long _ about it then? i would have been canned long ago. _ about it then? i would have been canned long ago. i _ about it then? i would have been canned long ago. i spoke - about it then? i would have been canned long ago. i spoke to i about it then? i would have been canned long ago. i spoke to this| canned long ago. i spoke to this woman— canned long ago. i spoke to this woman on— canned long ago. i spoke to this woman on the phone. she canned long ago. i spoke to this woman on the phone. she asked us not to use her name. _ woman on the phone. she asked us not to use her name. he _ woman on the phone. she asked us not to use her name. he was _ woman on the phone. she asked us not to use her name. he was a _ woman on the phone. she asked us not to use her name. he was a stair. i woman on the phone. she asked us not to use her name. he was a stair. he i to use her name. he was a stair. he liked the staring. _ to use her name. he was a stair. he liked the staring. how _ to use her name. he was a stair. he liked the staring. how did _ to use her name. he was a stair. he liked the staring. how did this i to use her name. he was a stair. he liked the staring. how did this make ou feel? liked the staring. how did this make you feel? just _ liked the staring. how did this make you feel? just uncomfortable. i liked the staring. how did this make you feel? just uncomfortable. what| you feel? just uncomfortable. what ou do you feel? just uncomfortable. what you do when _ you feel? just uncomfortable. what you do when that _ you feel? just uncomfortable. what you do when that is _ you feel? just uncomfortable. what you do when that is your— you feel? just uncomfortable. what you do when that is your boss? i you feel? just uncomfortable. what you do when that is your boss? he l you do when that is your boss? he is, like, the head of the company. you can't really tell them no or cut them off. you feel a little bit powerless. the programme also talk to staff so
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that the company. this woman has worked for brewdog for five years. i don't think that leaders should be able to— don't think that leaders should be able to intimidate their staff. those — able to intimidate their staff. those allegations have made many of us uncomfortable, myself included. mr watt's lawyer told the bbc that at no time had given attention to any female bartender. the lawyer said, following inquiries by brewdog, none of the managers interviewed had any knowledge of staff attempting to change shifts to avoid mr watt. james watt denies all allegations of inappropriate behaviour at work. that is mark daly. more details on the bbc website. we will be joining christian for context in just a few minutes. before that, time for the weather with darren. it has been a dry day for the vast majority today. cloud amounts have certainly varied. for some it has been very grey,
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others there's been some sunshine. patchy others there's been some sunshine. fog forming tc be patchy fog forming tonight, they may be frost forming as well. even though because of the parts of england, with that blanket of cloud, temperatures will slide away a few degrees. orwas temperatures will slide away a few degrees. or was that bit milder with a south—westerly breeze in and northern ireland. as the breeze picked up, that fog should lift. the best of the sunshine, northern ireland. ahead of someone heading into the highlands. temperatures tomorrow very similar to today, and if you are stuck under that great, low cloud across much of england and wales, again it will feel on the chilly side. looking further ahead in to thursday, a chilly start, a breeze picks up, stirs things up. hopefully we will see a bit more sunshine ahead of some more rain, and again, it's arriving in the north—west of the uk. the wind is picking up, touch and go here, but other day on wednesday, temperatures 8-10.
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all this hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching context on bbc news. more trouble for borisjohnson , the prime minister's office admits staff gathered inside downing street to celebrate his birthday during the first pandemic lockdown. he faces more calls to resign following the latest in a string of revelations about parties. the prime minister is a national destruction, and he has to go. the pentauon destruction, and he has to go. the pentagon says _ destruction, and he has to go. tue pentagon says thousands of destruction, and he has to go. tjj: pentagon says thousands of us troops are at a heightened readiness to deploy on the russia ukraine border. president biden is holding a video summit right now with european leaders to shore up support for the challenge to russia's
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invasion threat to ukraine

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