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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 24, 2022 3:00am-3:31am GMT

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welcome to bbc news. our top stories: the us orders family members of its diplomats in kyiv to leave over the continued threat of russian military action in ukraine. reports of heavy gunfire in the capital of burkina faso, despite a curfew in place amid a mutiny by soldiers. tonga's government warns there's a long road the taliban are due to midwestern diplomats for a second day of talks on the afghan humanitarian crisis. —— meet western diplomats. tonga's government warns there's a long road to recovery, eight days since it was devastated by a volcanic eruption and tsunami. the people of tamar very resilient. they were immediately out there on the streets, helping to clean up their neighbourhoods, we are
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very fortunate that the global community has reacted and are sending supplies. and the armadillo twins facing a strict january diet after over doing it in the festive season. hello, and welcome. the us state department has told american citizens in ukraine they should consider getting out of the country, and has ordered family members of embassy staff in the capital, kyiv, to leave. its statement warned that moscow is planning for significant military action in ukraine. the state department also tweeted that it "continues to advise us citizens to not travel to russia due to ongoing tension along the border with ukraine," adding that it has "limited ability to assist us citizens in russia." the us secretary of state, antony blinken, has promised a significant response if moscow does invades its neighbour.
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here's our diplomatic correspondent, paul adams. in california, fresh supplies of american weapons destined for ukraine. hardly enough to defeat an invading russian army, but the message to moscow is clear — if you do this, it'll come at a price. but now the foreign office says it's seen signs of a russian plan to install a puppet government in kyiv after an invasion, pro—russian politicians, in contact with russian intelligence officers involved in planning the attack. it says this former ukrainian mp, yevhen murayev, is being considered as a future leader by the kremlin. he denies it. ukrainian officials seem unfazed. that's what i would expect as a logical next step in a russian invasion. they will invade and they will have to establish some sort of government, so i'm not actually surprised. we've been in war with them for seven years, and don't forget that our
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previous government actually fled to russia, nowhere else. it's highly unusual for intelligence of this kind to be put into the public domain in such a brief, abrupt manner. it's a reflection of the extreme anxiety across government about what vladimir putin might be planning. it's a way of saying to the kremlin, "we see what you're doing." but after friday's talks in geneva, there is more diplomacy to come, antony blinken, the us secretary of state, promising a written reply to his russian counterpart sergei lavrov, addressing russia's sweeping demands, some experts worried that russia is being allowed to set the agenda. it's asking for a demilitarised eastern europe and a denuclearised continent so that the only forces threatening europe are russian ones and the only nuclear missiles that can threaten european capitals are russian ones. that ought not to be a situation that is acceptable to anybody in the west of europe.
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russia's build—up along ukraine's northern and eastern borders continues, moscow still insisting it has no plans to invade, it's alljust drills. but it's now been ten months since russia started massing troops here, a gun held to ukraine's head for almost a year. what's really being planned behind the kremlin walls? as the troops assemble and the political plots swirl, the west is still left guessing. paul adams, bbc news. earlier i spoke to former us deputy assistant defense secretary, evelyn farkas, and i asked her if the state department's statement urging people to get out of ukraine should be taken at face value. well, actually that is quite serious, the fact that the state department is advising their personnel to leave, because usually, as you know or you might know, from following the crisis in the past, the state department does not want to alarm the country where the us personnel are stationed. so it would not want to give the ukrainian government any sense that it has lack of confidence that they might
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be able to manage that situation. so i think it does reflect, as you said earlier, the absolute sense of anxiety that the west has that vladimir putin is not deterred at the moment. nothing that we have done in the west thus far has made him de—escalate, indeed he has continued to escalate by placing troops in belarus, by conducting this political operation to try to remove the validly elected, democratically elected government in kyiv, and engineer some kind of coup. right, well, he still sees, i presume, some sense of weakness in the west's position, whether that's coming from some member states of the european union, compared to what the americans might have to put forward, and some nato states? well, i've always said that the sanctions alone were not sufficient and so i think we almost should not pay too much attention to the sanctions and look really more at the military
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balance of power and there, i am afraid, that vladimir putin thinks he can launch a lightning strike operation and achieve his objectives without much pain. and that somehow he is betting that the pain won't come another day if we support an insurgency or something like that. the problem is that he could be right. i mean, if he comes in with massive air power and that is why i think in the west we need to think more creatively, we need to up our game on deterrence, we need to provide maritime and air defences to the ukrainians and then i think we need to also look at other things we can do to distract vladimir putin. we should release information publicly about his finances, about his corruption and think about, certainly in the new york times there is an article indicating that the administration is looking at deploying forces in response to what is happening in belarus. whatever you might make of vladimir putin per se, as an individual perhaps,
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ijust wanted to draw on the remarks from the head of the german navy — we know they've been very contentious — but saying vladimir putin deserves respect, he is the leader of a very big country, russia, which has a sense that it should have its own sphere of influence and does feel under pressure from the west. does he not have a point? sniggers. i don't want to discuss all of the things that vladimir putin has authorised, including the killing ofjournalists, poisoning of people in your country, likely a killing in my country, even. he has of course invaded his neighbours, georgia and ukraine, he's annexed the territory of ukraine, changed borders by military force for the first time since world war ii — there's a long list of things that vladimir putin has done that i find are not deserving of any respect whatsoever. of course, he's the head of his state and as such i suppose we have to dealwith him, right? but the reality is that
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what he's doing right now deserves no respect and his pointing the finger at nato does not change the fact that he is the man that created this crisis, he and his cronies in the kremlin. our thanks to evelyn farkas there. if you want to follow developments on this story, just go to our website — where there is more analysis and answers to the main questions about what's going on in ukraine. shots continue to be heard in the capital of burkino faso despite a curfew being imposed by the government. a night—time curfew was imposed after protesters came out to support soldiers who were attempting a mutiny. they've burned down the headquarters of the ruling mpp party. the soldiers are demanding the replacement of military chiefs and more help in their campaign against an intensifying islamist insurgency. parts of the capital, ouagadougou, have been sealed off. president roch kabore is coming under growing pressure from those who say his government is incapable of dealing with the islamists. has been monitoring the situation from neigbouring ivory coast.
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with me is the bbc�*s gareth barlow. can you bring us up to date? as ou can you bring us up to date? sis you say, can you bring us up to date? is you say, dynamic and developing situation. it is sam you say, dynamic and developing situation. it is 3am in burkina faso but reports of gunfire in and around the presidential palace in the capital, longer do, and like you say, reports of presidents roch kabore being arrested and replaced with a member of the military. this all took place on sunday, a mutiny taking place in barracks across the country, soldiers unhappy with how the government has been handling the islamist militants plaguing the country for several years now. they had called the soldiers for heads of the government to be sacked, for more support, the more arms, to really take the fight to these militants. the government had said that it had contained this mutiny, but notably it was supported by civilians, people going out onto the streets of the
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capital, ouagadougou, setting up capital, ouagadougou, setting up roadblocks, which were eventually ta ken up roadblocks, which were eventually taken down by police. that triggered a nighttime curfew being put in place across the capital, but despite that, when darkness fell, reports of a helicopter hovering over the presidential palace, gunfire, at times very heavy, sometimes sporadic as well, and now this evening some of it continuing around these barix as well, and now we are seeing reports of roch kabore being arrested. find seeing reports of roch kabore being arrested.— being arrested. and that is precisely — being arrested. and that is precisely the _ being arrested. and that is precisely the point, - being arrested. and that is precisely the point, the - being arrested. and that is - precisely the point, the extent to which any of this is verified and confirmed, i mean, thatis verified and confirmed, i mean, that is the challenge for us. very hard to tell at the moment, it is dynamic, it is three in the morning, we don't really know who is in charge, and if all of these reports are true. we do know where this has come from, but is the important thing. this is not a flash in the pan, it has been boiling up for years. the pan, it has been boiling up foryears. burkina the pan, it has been boiling up for years. burkina faso, especially in the north, that is part of the sahel region that includes countries like mali, nisha and chad as well.
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—— niger. they have been long—standing islamist insurgencies in those countries, especially in mali, which spread across the region. in the current also in the last few years a million people have been displaced from their homes. —— in burkina faso. in one incident, 50 members of the military and four civilians were killed in a single incident. there has been an increasing rise of tension within the country and in the military as well. it is worth noting that in any african nation —— of any african nation, burkina faso has seen more military coups than any other. so this is not a first for the country. we will have to watch and see how it develops. the spread of the omicron variant may have moved the covid—i9 pandemic into a new phase and could bring it to an end in europe, according to experts at the world health organisation. they predict that 60% of the region could be infected by march. stephanie prentice reports. a return to normality in europe may not be here yet but it could be on the horizon, according to experts, as infections level in the region, due to omicron, are moving it into what has been called a pandemic endgame. but what does endgame
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actually mean? pandemic endgame is not an endgame of the covid—i9 the prediction, a respite from case numbers and subsequent deaths, though with the risk of the winter insurgency in the past two years. the who saying the priority now is to stabilise the situation in europe, where vaccination levels range from 25% to 95% across countries. but as many of those countries have seen, not everyone agrees to being vaccinated or to control measures. something the who has also been addressing. i think what is the challenge as we move into this next phase of this pandemic, is how do
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we get the balance right with the measures that are needed to reduce the spread? we are asking people to be very cautious, for the moment. this pandemic will end. we will not be in this cycle forever. the pandemic has killed an estimated 5.6 million people worldwide so far, 1.7 million of them in europe. the next stage of the cycle, covid—i9 becoming endemic, constantly present but manageable without large—scale threats to health systems. time goes by and more and more people are exposed to the virus or get vaccinated against the virus than the ability of the virus to cause that kind of problem on that kind of scale gradually goes down so that we see further waves but each wave tends to be less severe. what we can't be absolutely sure about is that we have got to the end of the pandemic until it ends. the who's advice, stay open—minded about the future but stay cautious.
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stephanie prentice, bbc news. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: i'll be introducing you to patsy and eddie, the armadillos who over indulged during the festive season. the shuttle challenger exploded soon after liftoff. there were seven astronauts on board, one of them a woman school teacher. all of them are believed to have been killed. by the evening, tahrir square, the heart of official cairo, was in the hands of the demonstrators. they were using the word 'revolution'.
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the earthquake singled out buildings and brought them down in seconds. tonight, the search for any survivors has an increasing desperation about it as the hours pass. the new government is firmly in control of the entirely republic of uganda. survivors of the auschwitz - concentration camp have been commemorating the 40th anniversary of their- liberation. they toured the huts, - gas chambers and crematoria and relived their- horrifying experiences. this is bbc news. the latest headlines: the united states has ordered the families of its diplomats in the ukrainian capital kyiv to leave the country. intense gunfire has been heard in the capital of burkina faso amid unconfirmed reports of a coup. representatives of the taliban are due to meet western diplomats in norway later on the second day of talks
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to discuss the humanitarian crisis in afghanistan. while aid agencies are warning that millions of afghans don't have enough to eat, the islamist group wants access to billions of dollars that are frozen in us banks. what do people expect from these talks? roya rahmani served as afghanistan's first female ambassador to the us, and she's in washington. thank you so much forjoining us. i guess the key really is the terms under which these talks are taking place and, you know, there are different interests here at the taliban are probably more needy than ever, aren't they?— ever, aren't they? certainly, they already _ ever, aren't they? certainly, they already does _ ever, aren't they? certainly, they already does make - ever, aren't they? certainly, they already does make one | ever, aren't they? certainly, i they already does make one of their needs is being met, which is the very trip by itself, it
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is the very trip by itself, it is the very trip by itself, it is the first trip to a european country and it is basically opening the doorfor country and it is basically opening the door for more to come. , ., ., , opening the door for more to come. , ., ., it come. does that worry you? it de-ends come. does that worry you? it depends what _ come. does that worry you? it depends what the _ come. does that worry you? it i depends what the consequences of these talks would be. afghanistan has seen way too many conferences and meetings over the past 20 years but what has been the consequence, the outcome of it, for the very people of afghanistan who are bearing the brunt of these tragedies now at this point so it would really depend on what would be the consequence, or is it going to be simply or merely a coverfor the west, in order to address their own concerns, including preventing a refugee influx towards the countries. good point you make there. there is also a degree of moral anxiety from the west about what is happening within afghanistan. and the need for the taleb and's from their perspective to bring money into
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do something about it. i have to find some compromise, haven't they? —— they. the very meaning of the negotiations and compromises, moving from the very rigid points. 50 compromises, moving from the very rigid points.— very rigid points. so taliban has not demonstrated - very rigid points. so taliban has not demonstrated so i very rigid points. so taliban| has not demonstrated so far that they have been willing to move from that point and somehow, they have held some of the very issues like girls in school or the volunteers of girls attending school which has always been a problem, holding that hostage so let's see how willing they would be moving in that direction to see how beneficial it could be to the people of afghanistan. i’m the people of afghanistan. i'm surmisin: the people of afghanistan. i'm surmising from what you've said there is that your fear is the west will give ground too easily to the taliban? for your liking? easily to the taliban? for your likin: ? ~ . . ,
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easily to the taliban? for your likinu? . . , ., liking? well, certainly taliban are used to — liking? well, certainly taliban are used to seeing _ liking? well, certainly taliban are used to seeing this - liking? well, certainly taliban are used to seeing this over l are used to seeing this over the past couple of years. yeah! so if ou the past couple of years. yeah! 50 if you were _ the past couple of years. yeah! so if you were to _ the past couple of years. yeah! so if you were to assess - the past couple of years. yeah! so if you were to assess what l so if you were to assess what you think will come from these talks, what would be your — the endpoint, from your point of view? ~ �* , endpoint, from your point of view? ~ �*, . ., endpoint, from your point of view? ., ., view? well, it's clear that we know what — view? well, it's clear that we know what are _ view? well, it's clear that we know what are the _ view? well, it's clear that we know what are the main - view? well, it's clear that we - know what are the main demands of the west, as well as the main demands of the taliban. taliban will want this as a stepping stone towards recognition, towards a relationship with the outside world and receiving aid and assistance, lifting sanctions and whatnot. the west wants to make sure to address the humanitarian crisis, including humanitarian crisis, including human rights, women's rights, and the bar has really been reduced low, like making girls going to school is a significant point. but they also probably want to seek
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assurances that afghanistan will never become again a breeding ground for terrorism threatening their countries, which i'm not sure taliban, evenif which i'm not sure taliban, even if they promised, can deliver that.— even if they promised, can deliver that.- and - deliver that. yeah. and certainly. _ deliver that. yeah. and certainly, they - deliver that. yeah. and certainly, they are - deliver that. yeah. and l certainly, they are asking deliver that. yeah. and - certainly, they are asking for an inclusive government, the meaning of which has been modelled over previous years and even previously when they were talking about a broad—based government, it was interpreted differently by different people.- interpreted differently by different people. interpreted differently by different eole. . . different people. yeah, so that fear of compromising - different people. yeah, so that fear of compromising you - different people. yeah, so that| fear of compromising you would perhaps not be too impressed by. roya rahmani, thank you indeed forjoining us from washington.— indeed forjoining us from washington. thank you for havin: washington. thank you for having me- _ the government of tonga says it's facing a long programme of rebuilding just a week after it was devastated by a volcanic eruption and a tsunami. entire villages were destroyed in the tsunami that hit the group of islands that make up tonga in the south pacific. some communities are still without basic necessities. foreign aid is arriving but strict coronavirus—prevention rules are hampering humanitarian efforts as the local authorities try to keep the virus out. a un official there says
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the nation will be heavily reliant on food aid for some time. lord fakafanua is tonga's speaker of parliament. he's currently separated from his family in auckland, new zealand, and is not sure when he can return home to help clean up. when i flew out, i came to see my mother, who was in auckland, and we didn't anticipate any of this would happen, so it came as a great surprise to everyone, the shock of the volcanic eruption and tsunami. absolutely. and i want to ask you if you've got updates for us but i know how difficult communication is there. but do you feel that you are building up a clear idea now of the communities that have been worst affected? yes, we — it's been a week now from last saturday and even though comms are intermittent at this stage,
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we're getting a clearer picture once the surveys have into the government. right... crosstalk. sorry to interrupt you. obviously, it's a hell of a job you've got on your hands now to rebuild. yes, rebuilding will be something that we will have to do after this. but the immediate relief right now is to get food and water to those who need it right now in tonga. how do you do that? i mean, we've all been made aware of this covid issue that you've had and you've got to try to keep a very tight lid on problems like that as well. i mean, it feels like you are being hit from two different sides. that's true. covid—i9 and the restrictions in tonga, being a covid—free country, are somewhat slowing down the humanitarian aid arriving, but we have protocols in place to ensure
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that the necessary food items and technology and gear gets on the ground without covid—i9. we often hear, lord fakafanua, of particularly with pacific islands, that you are very resilient. you have to deal with some pretty awful weather conditions, now you ve got — this is a volcanic eruption followed by a tsunami. i mean, you feel the heat of what is going on in the world and you are in this ring of fire. how is that being managed, not perhaps by the generation of — your generation who is in power now, but how do the youngsters deal with that sort of thing? do they get it? they do understand. climate change is very real and the effects are being seen. this volcanic eruption, i've been told, is a once in 1000 occasion. and, you know, the people of tonga are very resilient. they were immediately out there on the streets, helping to clean up their neighbourhoods, street — the roofs and to clear a lot of the ash fall that has
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clogged up a lot of machinery, including water collection for the homes, so i'm just hearing messages of people sticking together, tongans being united help each other, and we are very fortunate that the global community has reacted and are sending supplies. that's the tongan parliament lord fakafanua. a bit of a change of story now. if you're trying to lose some weight after eating too much over the holidays, then you're not alone. armadillo twins patsy and eddie have been put on a strict diet by the zookeepers at their home in south east england. the sisters, named after the characters from the british sitcom absolutely fabulous had an over—indulgent festive period and now need an improved diet and exercise regime.
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a new year's resolution forced upon patdy and eddie. —— patsy and eddie. hello there. high pressure has kept most parts of the uk dry through the weekend, if rather cloudy. and high pressure has meant a dry start to january 2022, only seeing around about 50% — half the rainfall we'd normally see by this stage, and there's not a great deal of rain in the offing this week — certainly not for england and wales. we might see a little bit more midweek across scotland in particular with a low pressure approaching but for the meantime, the high pressure is still hanging on towards the south. there's a weather front to the north and that has given a few millimetres of rain during the day on sunday. it's sinking a little further southwards on monday but coming into that high pressure, it's a weak affair. but there's still quite a bit of cloud around but where we had the cloud breaks through the night, there's patchy frost and some
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patchy fog as well to watch out for, some poor visibilities, but again, not widespread, but it will take its time to clear at this time of year. and then, there'll be some brightness and sunshine — notably, we think, eastern scotland, perhaps parts of north—east england, but some thinner cloud elsewhere. perhaps quite gloomy, though, in some areas and cold as we had on sunday — four or five degrees at best. our weather front towards the north as well weakens as it heads towards the moray firth, some sunshine then developing to the north of it, but it's a fairly weak affair for the most part. it then starts to push northwards again through monday night and into tuesday, so through the coming night as well, it's going to be pretty chilly where we get the cloud breaks but on the whole, there'll be a lot of cloud. some pockets of fog again on tuesday, slow to clear away but where they do, then we'll see some sunshine coming through but again, it's fairly limited — there will be a lot of cloud around and it will feel cold under that cloud, even without much breeze. that breeze still bringing in some cloudier skies and some patchy rain to the north and the west. the high pressure, as you can see, is still close
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by for tuesday, as i mentioned, but by mid week, we've got this area of low pressure rolling in and that's when we see some rainfall coming in to scotland, in particular, but parts of northern ireland as well as that weather front starts to trail southwards. but again, ahead of it, perhaps a little bit of brightness but it's the south—westerly wind, the atlantic breeze, that starts to pick the temperatures up and perhaps turn some of that cloud over and allow some sunshine to come through. so perhaps a little bit brighter midweek but then, the pressure builds towards the south once again. there's more online.
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this is bbc news,
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the headlines: the us state department has told american citizens in ukraine they should consider leaving, and has ordered family members of embassy staff in the capital, kyiv, to return home. it's warning that moscow is planning an invasion in ukraine, and americans have also been advised not to travel to russia. intense gunfire has been heard in the capital of burkino faso amid unconfirmed reports of a coup. a government curfew is in place, imposed after protesters came out to support soldiers who were attempting a mutiny. the soldiers are demanding the replacement of military chiefs. two senior members of boris johnson's cabinet say they want an investigation after a former minister claimed she'd been the victim of islamophobia. nus ghani says she was told her muslim faith was, in part, a reason why she lost her ministerial post in a government reshuffle. now on bbc news it's time for dateline london.

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