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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 23, 2022 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and nina warhurst. our headlines today: the uk accuses vladimir putin of planning to install a pro—russia leader in ukraine, as fears of an invasion grow. former conservative minister nusrat ghani tells the sunday times she was sacked from herjob, because of her muslim faith. the government chief whip mark spencer says her claim is completely false. two years to the day since the city of wuhan first went into lockdown, we take a look at the country's zero covid policy. that does appear to be widespread
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support for the government programme on covid because it looks quite normal but no—one knows the answer to the big question, how long will it go on for? a moment of british skiing history. from the dry slopes of lancashire to the mountains of austria, dave ryding wins britain's first ever alpine skiing world cup gold medal. good morning. a quiet one out there. high pressure still with us and that means a lot of dry weather. a lot of cloud making it feeljust a little bit colder with the winds strengthening into the far north—west of scotland later on. all the details coming up shortly. it's sunday the 23rd of january. our main story: the foreign office says it's uncovered a plot by moscow to install a pro—russian leader in ukraine, amid increasing tension over a possible invasion. the kremlin has sent tens of thousands of troops
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to the ukrainian border in recent months. moscow has accused the uk of spreading "disinformation". our diplomatic correspondent paul adams reports. american weapons arriving in ukraine, 90 tons of what washington calls lethal aid. 0thers ukraine, 90 tons of what washington calls lethal aid. others including britain also sending supplies. hardly enough to defeat an invading russian army but the message is clear, if you do this, it will come at a price. now london and washington say they see signs of a russian plan to install a puppet government in ukraine. the foreign office says this man, a former mp, office says this man, a former mp, is being considered as a future leader by the kremlin but four others named are thought to be in moscow and it is not clear what, if any role, they could realistically
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play. but russia's goes on but says it has no plans to invade. fighter jets now flying two locations in belarus, north of ukraine. moscow says they will be carrying outjoint drills. the policy also continues. friday's meeting settled nothing but antony blinken has promised a written reply within days to russia's expensive demand. further talks could follow. british ministers are expected to travel to european capitals in the coming day. the defence secretary ben wallace likely to visit moscow. downing street set to put more pressure on russia, which could pierce the heart of the russian economy. paul adams, bbc news. a former conservative minister says she was sacked from her ministerial post because her muslim faith was "making colleagues uncomfortable".
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nusrat ghani lost herjob as a transport minister in a mini—reshuffle in february 2020. in an interview with the sunday times, she says that in a briefing afterwards with the whips, she was told that her "muslimness" had been raised as an issue. the chief whip mark spencer has denied the claims — calling them defamatory. the education secretary, nadhim zahawi, said her allegations had to be investigated properly. police in the us city of atlanta say they're following up on a number of leads after the killing of british scientist, matthew willson. mr willson had only arrived two days earlier to visit his girlfriend when he was hit by a stray bullet while lying in bed, after a number of shots were fired in an adjacent apartment. his family have described the astrophysicist as a "beautiful soul". lorries queued for almost two miles on the main road heading into dover yesterday, prompting anger among many drivers preparing to cross the channel. port officials have acknowledged that new customs controls for goods heading to the eu have been causing hold—ups,
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but say there are other factors at play too. ramzan karmali reports. use of lorries on the day 20, yesterday at lunchtime, trying to get into dover. a start menu got used to at the start of 2022. on social media many drivers are blaming brexit. the eu is subject to full customs control but there are a number of factors causing the delays. number of factors causing the dela s. ,, . , ., delays. since the beginning of the ear, delays. since the beginning of the year. there _ delays. since the beginning of the year. there has— delays. since the beginning of the year, there has been _ delays. since the beginning of the year, there has been increased i year, there has been increased transaction time at the border due to carriers have two check paperwork but equally, for this time of year, we have vessels they go out for normal maintenance activity. we are also doing maintenance in the port which means the office has got slightly reduced capacity as well. but there are growing concerns over driver welfare. but there are growing concerns over driver welfare-— driver welfare. professional drivers are et
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driver welfare. professional drivers are yet again _ driver welfare. professional drivers are yet again being _ driver welfare. professional drivers are yet again being held _ driver welfare. professional drivers are yet again being held up - driver welfare. professional drivers are yet again being held up at - are yet again being held up at dover, queueing up, into this weather, it is pretty cold, not all drugs are as well equipped with regards to heating. and just the frustration and the unknown length of time the driver is going to be delayed. drivers deserve better. the increase in traffic means protocols, a temporary traffic management system, has been called on ten times already the port of dover is more concerned about new checks coming into force in september. irate concerned about new checks coming into force in september.— into force in september. we are t in: to into force in september. we are trying to make _ into force in september. we are trying to make is _ into force in september. we are trying to make is that _ into force in september. we are trying to make is that the - trying to make is that the government is certain of the implications if we do not get an agreement between the uk government and a french government for a set of protocols that will work. unless you get that agreement, it is going to be very difficult to see how it will not impact travel through the port of dover. ., ,, , , , ., . of dover. from september, biometric checks are due _
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of dover. from september, biometric checks are due to _ of dover. from september, biometric checks are due to be _ of dover. from september, biometric checks are due to be implemented i checks are due to be implemented which meant drivers been stopped at the port for ten minutes each with around 10,000 trucks passing through the pod each day, the warning is clear that a solution needs to be found. the government says it is working with its european counterpart to ensure border arrangement run as smoothly as possible. ramzan karmali, bbc news. it's exactly two years ago today since china locked down the city of wuhan and its 10 million residents, to try to stop the spread of covid. since then strict lockdowns across the country have kept the death toll from the virus to below 6,000. as beijing prepares to host the winter olympic games next month, it's determined to maintain its strict zero covid policy. 0ur china correspondent robin brant reports. 27 days into lockdown, confined to her apartment. hello... senlin is one of millions in china still subject to the ultimate covid control.
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translation: when covid hit wuhan, the country didn't - have much experience dealing with the outbreak. but now it's different. it's better. she's in xian, a city famous for its motionless army of terracotta warriors, but normal life for 13 million people there has come to a halt. there's fresh evidence, too, that some people have just had enough. crowd clashes with police at a compound in xian, where they've been in lockdown for 35 days. a couple of men are taken away. assessing the overall impact on people's lives, economic and psychological, is almost impossible. all of this is part of a massive effort to stop a few thousand new covid cases from spreading. and in terms of the official reported case numbers, it seems to be working. china's leader xi jinping hailed the economy's
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resilience earlier this week, saying he is fully confident about its development. so is zero covid in china the new normal? other small and frequent disruption, but not like a massive shutdown. so for china, it seems to be working. china is still manufacturing construction equipment. all these activities can be isolated, so that's why zero covid so far makes sense. but this country has deeper problems to deal with — a huge debt, a faltering property market, as well as the hyper—vigilance against more covid spikes. it's difficult to take a scientific survey, but there does appear to be widespread support for the government's policy on covid. because you get this, it looks quite normal. but no—one knows the answer to the big question. how long will it go on for? translation:
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i think the epidemic control in shanghai is very good. the government uses big data to quickly trace and control people who are close contacts. translation: the negative impacts of lockdowns are quite bad, people are worried. two years on, the borders here remain all but closed. international flights are at a bare minimum. china's communist party leaders are sticking with their zero—covid promise. in the run—up to hosting the olympics, china has shown how far it's willing to go. international mail is the new enemy. authorities in beijing this week claimed a package from canada brought omicron in. we were in contact with someone in another city who was ordered to stay behind her sealed front door simply after receiving a delivery from abroad. she didn't want us to name her, but she's deeply frustrated. she sent us a text message saying it's good for epidemic control, but it's not a good thing from the human rights perspective.
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robin brant, bbc news, shanghai. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. look at this beautiful picture. the aurora was out yesterday in aberdeenshire where we had clear skies. for most of us a lot of cloud around and once again the emphasis is going to be with that cloudy story but it will state largely dry. still have high pressure with us but it is lifting, you can set underneath that cloud, over towards france and germany. the arrival of this weather front by the end of the day in scotland. for most of us are cloudy affair with some brightness here and there. i am not going to be too clever about favoured spots but perhaps out to
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the west. by the end of the afternoon went strengthening into the far north—west of scotland. it is going to be a rather grey, drab afternoon and if you are underneath that cloud, maybe a degree or so low. through the night tonight, the weather front taking its time. a band of cloud and light patchy rain moving into the far north of scotland. that is as exciting as our weather gets. quite a lot of cloud through the night acting like a blanket for many of us and keeping temperatures above freezing but if we get one or two holes breaking up, we get one or two holes breaking up, we could see some patchy mist and fog. on monday, the height continues to drift off but still influencing england and wales. —— the high.
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eastern, southern scotland, northern ireland and northern england should see some of the brightest guys. thicker cloudy just lingering see some of the brightest guys. thicker cloudyjust lingering across central and southern england through the day on monday. potentially, we could see more significant rain through the middle part of the week. this weather front irving in bringing heavy rain for a time and stronger winds across scotland. we might see some rain overnight wednesday into thursday over central and southern england the risk of some rain on wednesday by cloudier and slightly mother conditions look likely to return by the end of this week. it likely to return by the end of this week. , ., ., ' likely to return by the end of this week. , ., .,' ., , week. it is the trade-off. to get my cloud but it — week. it is the trade-off. to get my cloud but it is _ week. it is the trade-off. to get my cloud but it is slightly _ week. it is the trade-off. to get my cloud but it is slightly warmer. -
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cloud but it is slightly warmer. thank you, louise. three brothers from nepal, who are among the country's most renowned sherpa guides, have become the first nepali team to reach the south pole. it's part of a broader quest known as the explorer's grand slam. tanya dendrinos explains exactly what the ambitious pursuit entails. battling the elements. there is so much wind — battling the elements. there is so much wind here. _ battling the elements. there is so much wind here. three _ battling the elements. there is so much wind here. three brothers i much wind here. three brothers approaching _ much wind here. three brothers approaching the _ much wind here. three brothers approaching the summit - much wind here. three brothers approaching the summit of - much wind here. three brothers i approaching the summit of mount vincent, the highest peak in antarctica. vincent, the highest peak in antarctica-— vincent, the highest peak in antarctica. hey, we are three brothers. _ antarctica. hey, we are three brothers, first _ antarctica. hey, we are three brothers, first time _ antarctica. hey, we are three brothers, first time here - antarctica. hey, we are three brothers, first time here to l antarctica. hey, we are three i brothers, first time here to the summit. we are the first brothers who did the south pole and vincent together. the who did the south pole and vincent touether. ., ., , together. the trio marks the first ne alese together. the trio marks the first nepalese team — together. the trio marks the first nepalese team to _ together. the trio marks the first nepalese team to reach - together. the trio marks the first nepalese team to reach the - together. the trio marks the first | nepalese team to reach the south pole. it is part of the quest to
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conquer the explorers grand slam, challenge that involves reaching the south and north pole, along with the highest mountain peaks in each of the seven continents. they hope to complete it within a year. translation:— complete it within a year. translation: . ., , translation: once we do this, there is nothin: translation: once we do this, there is nothing more _ translation: once we do this, there is nothing more adventurous - translation: once we do this, there is nothing more adventurous left - translation: once we do this, there is nothing more adventurous left to i is nothing more adventurous left to do. it is like getting a masters degree. it do. it is like getting a masters decree. , ., do. it is like getting a masters decree. ., , ., , degree. it is an ambitious task but these mountaineers _ degree. it is an ambitious task but these mountaineers are _ degree. it is an ambitious task but these mountaineers are no - degree. it is an ambitious task but i these mountaineers are no strangers to a tall order. they held the world record for being the first siblings to climb all 1a mountains above 18,000 metres. while the youngest person to climb everest without the use of supplementary oxygen for the younger brother. hand—in—hand with the records is recognition the siblings are part of an elite group
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ensuring the police mountaineers escape from the shadows of foreign plumbers, covering a place in history in their own right. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. so impressive. it looks cold. impressive, but cold. let's take a look at today's papers. the mail on sunday says the civil service is planning to keep a large number of staff working from home permanently. covid restrictions are set to be eased next week, meaning that employees would be required to return to the office. the sunday telegraph reports the uk has accused russia of planning to install a puppet leader in ukraine following an invasion. the paper says borisjohnson has warned eu leaders against "naivety" over vladimir putin's demands. the times has a picture of dave ryding on its front page who has won britain's first alpine skiing world cup gold medal with victory in the kitzbuhel slalom. we'll be speaking to him a little later in the programme. the sunday mirror reports that katie price has been released under
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investigation by police after being arrested for allegedly breaching the terms of a restraining order. we have been looking inside the newspapers, you may have heard the expression cold nft, a non—fungible token, people selling digital art and things like that online, things selling thousands and thousands of pounds for something which in theory does not exist in the real world, just a digital version. wayne rooney is getting in on the act. he is selling non—fungible tokens, little pictures of himself, these digital pictures. but unlike some of those record figures that they have been fetching for some bits of art, these are going tojust fetching for some bits of art, these are going to just a0 fetching for some bits of art, these are going tojust a0 quid. and it makes the point that when he was at manchester united he was earning £300,000 per week, manchester united he was earning £300,000 perweek, but manchester united he was earning £300,000 per week, but he is flogging these for a0 quid a pop. i am not sure what you would want these are what you do with them, but nonetheless... these are what you do with them, but nonetheless. . ._
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nonetheless... each to their own. quite right- _ nonetheless... each to their own. quite right. did _ nonetheless... each to their own. quite right. did you _ nonetheless... each to their own. quite right. did you watch - nonetheless... each to their own. quite right. did you watch line - nonetheless... each to their own. quite right. did you watch line of| quite right. did you watch line of du ? quite right. did you watch line of duty? yes- _ quite right. did you watch line of duty? yes. remember— quite right. did you watch line of duty? yes. remember one - quite right. did you watch line of duty? yes. remember one of. quite right. did you watch line of- duty? yes. remember one of standout lines of last season, sleet baby maryjesus? that is my northern irish accent. this isjesus, mary, joseph and the new wee baby. i am a suckerfor a picture of joseph and the new wee baby. i am a sucker for a picture of a joseph and the new wee baby. i am a suckerfor a picture of a newborn. this is adrian dunbar, ted hastings of course clutching his baby granddaughter. i of course clutching his baby granddaughter.— of course clutching his baby ruranddauhter. ., ., ., i] granddaughter. i love that outfit. i know! a little _ granddaughter. i love that outfit. i know! a little ac _ granddaughter. i love that outfit. i know! a little ac 12 _ granddaughter. i love that outfit. i know! a little ac 12 baby, - granddaughter. i love that outfit. i know! a little ac 12 baby, super i know! a little ac 12 baby, super cute. wrapping the ground pop, very sweet. ,, ., , cute. wrapping the ground pop, very sweet. ,, , ., sweet. staying with this sort of theme, sweet. staying with this sort of theme. well. — sweet. staying with this sort of theme, well, it _ sweet. staying with this sort of theme, well, it is _ sweet. staying with this sort of theme, well, it is similar, - sweet. staying with this sort of theme, well, it is similar, do i sweet. staying with this sort of l theme, well, it is similar, do you have lucky pants? apparently a lot of us admit to owning a pet of lucky pants we might wear on a first date or to a meeting or to a sporting event. what colour do you deem to be the luckiest? i’m event. what colour do you deem to be the luckiest?— the luckiest? i'm going to say what? blue, the luckiest? i'm going to say what? blue. apparently- — the luckiest? i'm going to say what? blue, apparently. and _ the luckiest? i'm going to say what? blue, apparently. and the _ blue, apparently. and the
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unluckiest? i mean, iwould worry blue, apparently. and the unluckiest? i mean, i would worry if anybody had pants this colour. orange. orange pants. the unluckiest, apparently. i don't know i am showing your picture, it is a picture of pounds. nonetheless, if you want to see, there you go. so, a third of us admitting only that. i was discussing earlier, it has to be black or white.— black or white. have you got lucky ants? black or white. have you got lucky pants? what _ black or white. have you got lucky pants? what if— black or white. have you got lucky pants? what if you _ black or white. have you got lucky pants? what if you get _ black or white. have you got lucky pants? what if you get too - black or white. have you got lucky i pants? what if you get too attached and it is time for them to move on, but you want to keep them? i and it is time for them to move on, but you want to keep them?- but you want to keep them? i think if ou but you want to keep them? i think if you have — but you want to keep them? i think if you have them _ but you want to keep them? i think if you have them it _ but you want to keep them? i think if you have them it probably - but you want to keep them? i think if you have them it probably worksl if you have them it probably works in reverse, if you don't have them on the day you really need them, maybe it is psychologically a disadvantage.— maybe it is psychologically a disadvantage. maybe it is psychologically a disadvantaue. ., ., ., disadvantage. important not to get too attached _ disadvantage. important not to get too attached to _ disadvantage. important not to get too attached to your— disadvantage. important not to get too attached to your pants, - disadvantage. important not to get too attached to your pants, your. too attached to your pants, your pyjamas. popping to supermarket wearing your pyjamas could be perceived as a lazy life choice on a hectic day, but bed whereas outerwear experiencing a resurgence in legitimate fashion due to the pandemic. party pyjamas, sutton pyjamas are now going to hundreds of
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pounds, because ijust invested in posh pyjamas to enter parties, so there you go. posh pyjamas to enter parties, so there you go-_ posh pyjamas to enter parties, so there you go. during the pandemic, totally allowed. _ there you go. during the pandemic, totally allowed. but _ there you go. during the pandemic, totally allowed. but i _ there you go. during the pandemic, totally allowed. but i think - there you go. during the pandemic, totally allowed. but i think a - totally allowed. but i think a number of supermarkets have been advising customers not to turn up and sort of dressing gowns and slippers. i and sort of dressing gowns and sli ers. �* and sort of dressing gowns and sliuers. �* , . slippers. i didn't pay this much, thou~h. slippers. i didn't pay this much, though. £115. _ slippers. i didn't pay this much, though. £115. just— slippers. i didn't pay this much, though. £115. just for _ slippers. i didn't pay this much, though. £115. just for the - slippers. i didn't pay this much, though. £115. just for the top? | slippers. i didn't pay this much, i though. £115. just for the top? no. you could spend it on your pants. unlucky orange. imagine selling your home and all your worldly possessions to travel the world — that's exactly what the lingards did. heartbroken by several close bereavements, they decided life was simply too short. take a look at this. we've literally lost my dad and my stepmum within 2a hours of each other, and then six weeks later my mom away, all the cancer. so we realised that life is too short and
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you've got to take these chances when you've got them. we've got three beautiful kids and we just decided we were going to sell everything we own, and go live every day like it is our last. i am nat. i day like it is our last. lam nat. i am then. day like it is our last. i am nat. i am then- m _ day like it is our last. i am nat. i am then. i'm henry. _ day like it is our last. i am nat. i am then. i'm henry. i'm - day like it is our last. i am nat. i am then. i'm henry. i'm millie. l day like it is our last. i am nat. i. am then. i'm henry. i'm millie. and who are you? _ am then. i'm henry. i'm millie. and who are you? this _ am then. i'm henry. i'm millie. and who are you? this is _ am then. i'm henry. i'm millie. and who are you? this is brief. - am then. i'm henry. i'm millie. and who are you? this is brief. i'm - am then. i'm henry. i'm millie. and who are you? this is brief. i'm ben. she's not ben. _ who are you? this is brief. i'm ben. she's not ben, she's _ who are you? this is brief. i'm ben. she's not ben, she's brief. - who are you? this is brief. i'm ben. she's not ben, she's brief. so - who are you? this is brief. i'm ben. she's not ben, she's brief. so in - she's not ben, she's brief. so in the last eight — she's not ben, she's brief. so in the last eight months, - she's not ben, she's brief. so in the last eight months, we've - she's not ben, she's brief. so in the last eight months, we've done 13 countries _ the last eight months, we've done 13 countries around europe. | the last eight months, we've done 13 countries around europe. itell the last eight months, we've done 13 countries around europe.— countries around europe. i tell you what, switzerland, _ countries around europe. i tell you what, switzerland, stunning. -
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countries around europe. i tell you what, switzerland, stunning. it - countries around europe. i tell you| what, switzerland, stunning. it has definitely given _ what, switzerland, stunning. it has definitely given us _ what, switzerland, stunning. it has definitely given us the _ what, switzerland, stunning. it has definitely given us the opportunity to all— definitely given us the opportunity to all spend that time together, every day, and watching the kids grow— every day, and watching the kids grow on— every day, and watching the kids grow on a — every day, and watching the kids grow on a daily basis, rather than 'ust grow on a daily basis, rather than just snapshots. grow on a daily basis, rather than just snapshots-— grow on a daily basis, rather than just snapshots. really, what is your favourite place _ just snapshots. really, what is your favourite place you _ just snapshots. really, what is your favourite place you have _ just snapshots. really, what is your favourite place you have been - just snapshots. really, what is your favourite place you have been to . just snapshots. really, what is your favourite place you have been to so| favourite place you have been to so far? ., . wh favourite place you have been to so far?- why france? - favourite place you have been to so far?- why france? because | favourite place you have been to so . far?- why france? because you far? france. why france? because you liked eatin: far? france. why france? because you liked eating frogs _ far? france. why france? because you liked eating frogs legs? _ far? france. why france? because you liked eating frogs legs? no! _ far? france. why france? because you liked eating frogs legs? no! henry, . liked eating frogs legs? no! henry, what is your favourite place we have been to so far?— what is your favourite place we have | been to so far?_ wales, been to so far? wales, easy. wales, eas !of been to so far? wales, easy. wales, easy! of all — been to so far? wales, easy. wales, easy! of all the _ been to so far? wales, easy. wales, easy! of all the places _ been to so far? wales, easy. wales, easy! of all the places we _ been to so far? wales, easy. wales, easy! of all the places we have - been to so far? wales, easy. wales, easy! of all the places we have been to, wales. why is that? yes, we did climb mount snowden. it was quite an achievement as a family. you climb mount snowden. it was quite an achievement as a family.— achievement as a family. you know, to no achievement as a family. you know, to go from — achievement as a family. you know, to go from the _ achievement as a family. you know, to go from the stability _ achievement as a family. you know, to go from the stability of _ achievement as a family. you know, to go from the stability of a - to go from the stability of a regular income, a house, kids being in school, or that kind of thing, to than selling everything we own, the house, the lot, homeschooling... that was pretty scary. as exciting
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as it was, it was also terrifying. it is experiences, it is living a life to the fullest, the best way about we can for our family. it is what we feel is the right thing to do. what an adventure! that looks great. ben and natalie and their childrenjoin us now. good morning to you all. nice to see you, hope you are doing all right. very good, thank you. say hello, guys! very good, thank you. say hello, au s! ~ , very good, thank you. say hello, tu s! . , very good, thank you. say hello, tu s!. , ., very good, thank you. say hello, guys! we were 'ust looking at some of our guys! we were 'ust looking at some of yourjourney— guys! we were just looking at some of yourjourney and _ guys! we were just looking at some of yourjourney and hearing - guys! we were just looking at some of yourjourney and hearing from i guys! we were just looking at some | of yourjourney and hearing from the kids, and we will come onto some of their learnings about croissant sound climbing mount snowden in a minute, butjust talk sound climbing mount snowden in a minute, but just talk to sound climbing mount snowden in a minute, butjust talk to us, mom and dad, about why you wanted to do this with the kids. i dad, about why you wanted to do this with the kids-— with the kids. i think travelling is somethin: with the kids. i think travelling is something that _ with the kids. i think travelling is something that we _ with the kids. i think travelling is something that we have - with the kids. i think travelling is something that we have always i with the kids. i think travelling is - something that we have always wanted to do, really. we both had careers,
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we bought a house, we had kids, just took a back seat. and then when we did lose, me dad and me stepmum, we thought, what are we waiting for? why not do it now and do it with our kids? , , ., ., , ., kids? life is definitely too short and we thought, _ kids? life is definitely too short and we thought, right, - kids? life is definitely too short and we thought, right, why - kids? life is definitely too short | and we thought, right, why not? let's _ and we thought, right, why not? lel'sjusl— and we thought, right, why not? let'sjust take a and we thought, right, why not? let's just take a chance. and we thought, right, why not? let'sjust take a chance. and off we went _ let'sjust take a chance. and off we went. , ~ ., , ., went. henry, millie, what did you think when _ went. henry, millie, what did you think when your _ went. henry, millie, what did you think when your mum _ went. henry, millie, what did you think when your mum and - went. henry, millie, what did you think when your mum and dad - went. henry, millie, what did you i think when your mum and dad said, that's it, we are going on a big adventure? i that's it, we are going on a big adventure?— that's it, we are going on a big adventure? i was really excited. what did you — adventure? i was really excited. what did you think— adventure? i was really excited. what did you think i'm - adventure? i was really excited. what did you think i'm henry? i adventure? i was really excited. - what did you think i'm henry? what has been the _ what did you think i'm henry? what has been the best _ what did you think i'm henry? what has been the best bit? _ what did you think i'm henry? what has been the best bit? disneyland? disneyland in paris. tell has been the best bit? disneyland? disneyland in paris.— disneyland in paris. tell us about disneyland! _ laughter. well, we surprised them
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with disneyland, _ laughter. well, we surprised them with disneyland, we _ laughter. well, we surprised them with disneyland, we turned - laughter. well, we surprised them with disneyland, we turned up - laughter. well, we surprised them with disneyland, we turned up on . laughter. well, we surprised them| with disneyland, we turned up on the day, just— with disneyland, we turned up on the day, just off—the—cuff, they had no idea it _ day, just off—the—cuff, they had no idea it was — day, just off—the—cuff, they had no idea it was going to go for the two days _ idea it was going to go for the two days it— idea it was going to go for the two da s. ., , idea it was going to go for the two da 5. . , . . idea it was going to go for the two da 5. ., , ., ., ., idea it was going to go for the two da 5. .,, ., ., ., . �* days. it was amazing for them. we're lookin: at days. it was amazing for them. we're looking at pictures _ days. it was amazing for them. we're looking at pictures of _ days. it was amazing for them. we're looking at pictures of you _ days. it was amazing for them. we're looking at pictures of you arriving - looking at pictures of you arriving at disneyland and the excitement on everybody because 's basis. monitor you too included. talk to me about, you too included. talk to me about, you know, it is a difficult thing for anybody to do, just to sell up, pack up and leave, and you have done it with three young kids. talk to us about some of the logistics involved. because obviously you are thinking about things like schooling as well, aren't you? yes. thinking about things like schooling as well, aren't you? yes, schooling. it has as well, aren't you? yes, schooling. it has been — as well, aren't you? yes, schooling. it has been able _ as well, aren't you? yes, schooling. it has been able to _ as well, aren't you? yes, schooling. it has been able to take _ as well, aren't you? yes, schooling. it has been able to take in, - as well, aren't you? yes, schooling. it has been able to take in, a - as well, aren't you? yes, schooling. it has been able to take in, a lot - it has been able to take in, a lot of changes. homeschooling has been quite good. got of changes. homeschooling has been uuite aood. ., of changes. homeschooling has been uuite aood. . , ., of changes. homeschooling has been tuite tood. ., , ., ., ., quite good. got a bit of a head start on that _ quite good. got a bit of a head start on that through - quite good. got a bit of a head | start on that through lockdown, quite good. got a bit of a head - start on that through lockdown, like everybody _ start on that through lockdown, like everybody else did. so we had an idea of— everybody else did. so we had an idea of what homeschooling going to be like _ idea of what homeschooling going to be like stop and think kids have adapted — be like stop and think kids have adapted quite well, especially with
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the lockdown, they have cracked on with the _ the lockdown, they have cracked on with the work. a the lockdown, they have cracked on with the work.— with the work. a lot of people will want know — with the work. a lot of people will want know how _ with the work. a lot of people will want know how you _ with the work. a lot of people will want know how you do _ with the work. a lot of people will want know how you do it. - with the work. a lot of people will want know how you do it. you - with the work. a lot of people will| want know how you do it. you sold your house, you sold most things to fund this trip. how are you supporting yourself along the way? again, covid has shown we can do a lot of remote working. myself and my wife, we can do remote working, we do a lot of freelance stuff online, and basically we just keep our funds going as we do. iben and basically we 'ust keep our funds going as we do.— and basically we 'ust keep our funds going as we do. ben works in health and safety. — going as we do. ben works in health and safety. so _ going as we do. ben works in health and safety, so we _ going as we do. ben works in health and safety, so we can _ going as we do. ben works in health and safety, so we can do _ going as we do. ben works in health and safety, so we can do that - and safety, so we can do that online — and safety, so we can do that online i_ and safety, so we can do that online. i have an english degree already— online. i have an english degree already so— online. i have an english degree already so ijust trained to teach english — already so ijust trained to teach english online. so that is what i do. ~ ., english online. so that is what i do. . . . ., ~ ., english online. so that is what i do. ~ . ., ., ~ ., , do. what i want to know is, sometimes _ do. what i want to know is, sometimes parents - do. what i want to know is, sometimes parents will - do. what i want to know is,
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sometimes parents will say j do. what i want to know is, i sometimes parents will say to do. what i want to know is, - sometimes parents will say to you, they go to work, to the office, but you are working and living in the campervan with three little ones. how old is your youngest? she campervan with three little ones. how old is your youngest?- how old is your youngest? she is four years _ how old is your youngest? she is four years old. _ how old is your youngest? she is four years old. there _ how old is your youngest? she is four years old. there must - how old is your youngest? she is four years old. there must be . how old is your youngest? she is . four years old. there must be points where it is incredibly _ four years old. there must be points where it is incredibly stressful? - where it is incredibly stressful? yeah, definitely. igtgte where it is incredibly stressful? yeah, definitely.— where it is incredibly stressful? yeah, definitely. we have incredible hi . hs, yeah, definitely. we have incredible hiuhs, and yeah, definitely. we have incredible highs. and then _ yeah, definitely. we have incredible highs, and then sometimes - yeah, definitely. we have incredible highs, and then sometimes on - yeah, definitely. we have incredible highs, and then sometimes on the i yeah, definitely. we have incredible i highs, and then sometimes on the bad days when_ highs, and then sometimes on the bad days when everything is going wrong it is a _ days when everything is going wrong it is a stressful day, i think we just— it is a stressful day, i think we just have _ it is a stressful day, i think we just have to check ourselves, we take _ just have to check ourselves, we take ten — just have to check ourselves, we take ten or— just have to check ourselves, we take ten or 15 minutes to ourselves and we _ take ten or 15 minutes to ourselves and we go — take ten or 15 minutes to ourselves and we go off and have a walk, a long _ and we go off and have a walk, a long walk, — and we go off and have a walk, a long walk, to get away from it all, to be _ long walk, to get away from it all, to be fair~ — long walk, to get away from it all, to be fair. and have our own time. | to be fair. and have our own time. i think to be fair. and have our own time. think what is to be fair. and have our own time. i think what is important is that you do fancy yourself as well. so whether that is going for a run, or like ben says, going for a walk, just taking yourself outside in the morning, and just enjoying scenery, enjoying the moment. it isjust those moments.
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enjoying the moment. it is 'ust those momentsi enjoying the moment. it is 'ust those moments. , , , . ., , ., those moments. yes, especially in a campervan. — those moments. yes, especially in a campervan. we _ those moments. yes, especially in a campervan. we can _ those moments. yes, especially in a campervan, we can be _ those moments. yes, especially in a campervan, we can be where - those moments. yes, especially in a campervan, we can be where we - those moments. yes, especially in a. campervan, we can be where we want we can— campervan, we can be where we want we can set— campervan, we can be where we want we can set up— campervan, we can be where we want we can set up next to mountains and lakes, _ we can set up next to mountains and lakes, that— we can set up next to mountains and lakes, that sets up that makes up for the _ lakes, that sets up that makes up for the stressful days. we lakes, that sets up that makes up for the stressful days.— lakes, that sets up that makes up for the stressful days. we heard in that video some _ for the stressful days. we heard in that video some of _ for the stressful days. we heard in that video some of the _ for the stressful days. we heard in that video some of the highlights i for the stressful days. we heard in l that video some of the highlights of some of the things you have enjoyed most. i wonder what surprised you most. i wonder what surprised you most. as that anything you discovered, either about yourselves we have travelling, that she had no idea you discover on a trip like this? i idea you discover on a trip like this? ., idea you discover on a trip like this? . ,. ., ., idea you discover on a trip like this? . ,.., ., .,, , this? i have discovered how easily stressed i was, _ this? i have discovered how easily stressed i was, you _ this? i have discovered how easily stressed i was, you know, - this? i have discovered how easily stressed i was, you know, in - stressed i was, you know, in day—to—day things, which i'm sure a lot of people can relate to. just getting out of the house in the morning, getting dressed, you know, i would be frantic, come on, get your codes, get your shoes on, let's go. and, yeah, because now we don't live for the clock anymore, i am definitely a lot more relaxed, i didn't realise how stressed i was before that, really. igtgte
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didn't realise how stressed i was before that, really.— before that, really. we can all learn from _ before that, really. we can all learn from that, _ before that, really. we can all learn from that, natalie. - before that, really. we can all - learn from that, natalie. something for us to all learn from. thank you so much, best of luck with the rest of your travels, and i am sure your dad and your stepmum and your mum will find this a fitting tribute to them. ., , . will find this a fitting tribute to them. . , . ., , will find this a fitting tribute to them. . , . .,, . them. really nice to see you all. i will let you _ them. really nice to see you all. i will let you get — them. really nice to see you all. i will let you get some _ them. really nice to see you all. i will let you get some sleep, - them. really nice to see you all. i will let you get some sleep, i - them. really nice to see you all. i l will let you get some sleep, i know especially for henry and millie, you are up very late, so we will let you get to bed. are up very late, so we will let you get to bed-— get to bed. yes, it has been a bit of a wake-up _ get to bed. yes, it has been a bit of a wake-up for— get to bed. yes, it has been a bit of a wake-up for them _ get to bed. yes, it has been a bit of a wake-up for them this - get to bed. yes, it has been a bit. of a wake-up for them this morning. of a wake—up for them this morning. get mum and dad to give you an extra treat. ., , , get mum and dad to give you an extra treat. . , , , treat. thanks, guys. en'oy the rest of our treat. thanks, guys. en'oy the rest of yourtraveis. h treat. thanks, guys. en'oy the rest of your travels, see _ treat. thanks, guys. enjoy the rest of your travels, see you _ treat. thanks, guys. enjoy the rest of your travels, see you soon. - that is rights cheered me up this morning. it that is rights cheered me up this morninu. , , ., , �* morning. it is brilliant, isn't it? you aet morning. it is brilliant, isn't it? you get away — morning. it is brilliant, isn't it? you get away from _ morning. it is brilliant, isn't it? you get away from the - morning. it is brilliant, isn't it? you get away from the daily - morning. it is brilliant, isn't it?| you get away from the daily life morning. it is brilliant, isn't it? i you get away from the daily life of getting the kids ready for school, everything is rushed, things are actually a lot easier when you take that structure away. bind actually a lot easier when you take that structure away.— that structure away. and that messa . e that structure away. and that message at _ that structure away. and that message at the _ that structure away. and that message at the end - that structure away. and that message at the end of i that structure away. and that message at the end of the i that structure away. and that i message at the end of the video, living life to the fullest. a lesson for all of us. living life to the fullest. a lesson for all of us-_ for all of us. absolutely. it is cominu for all of us. absolutely. it is coming up — for all of us. absolutely. it is coming up to _ for all of us. absolutely. it is coming up to 7:30am. i for all of us. absolutely. it is coming up to 7:30am. you i for all of us. absolutely. it is i coming up to 7:30am. you are watching breakfast. lots more to
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come. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and nina warhurst. we're talking skiing in the sport. good morning. slalom skier dave ryding says he never stopped believing after he became the first briton
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to win an alpine world cup event. he started at the age of six. he has risen to the top of the spot. it is 35 uuite risen to the top of the spot. it is 35 quite old _ risen to the top of the spot. it is 35 quite old for— risen to the top of the spot. it is 35 quite old for the _ risen to the top of the spot. it 3 35 quite old for the spot? risen to the top of the spot. it is 35 quite old for the spot? yes, i 35 quite old for the spot? yes, cominu 35 quite old for the spot? yes, coming towards _ 35 quite old for the spot? yes, coming towards the _ 35 quite old for the spot? yes, coming towards the end i 35 quite old for the spot? yes, coming towards the end of- 35 quite old for the spot? yes, coming towards the end of his career. —— sport. it is a great story and let's not forget the winter olympics is around the corner. slalom skier dave ryding says he never stopped believing after he became the first briton to win an alpine world cup event. the 35 year—old, who learnt to ski on a dry slope in lancashire, winning on one of the most prestigiouis ski runs in the world in kitzbuel, austria. and you wonder what else might lie ahead, with the winter olympics round the corner. adam wild reports.
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british alpine ski has never before reached such heights. in more than half a century of world cup competition, there is not a breed that has done more than dave ryding. by that has done more than dave ryding. by the time he reached the bottom of his second, dave ryding was on top. in the lead, only one other skier could stop him.— in the lead, only one other skier could stop him. dave ryding, great britain has one! _ could stop him. dave ryding, great britain has one! it _ could stop him. dave ryding, great britain has one! it has _ could stop him. dave ryding, great britain has one! it has been i could stop him. dave ryding, great britain has one! it has been a i could stop him. dave ryding, great britain has one! it has been a longl britain has one! it has been a long road. it britain has one! it has been a long road- it was _ britain has one! it has been a long road. it was more _ britain has one! it has been a long road. it was more disbelief- britain has one! it has been a long road. it was more disbelief when i realised _ road. it was more disbelief when i realised i— road. it was more disbelief when i realised i had done it. i did not know— realised i had done it. i did not know what— realised i had done it. i did not know what to say, just that it was crazy _ know what to say, 'ust that it was cra . ~ . ., , know what to say, 'ust that it was cra . ~ ~ ., , ., know what to say, 'ust that it was cra . ~ . ., , ., , , crazy. winning world cup gold seems of all the way — crazy. winning world cup gold seems of all the way from _ crazy. winning world cup gold seems of all the way from britain. _ crazy. winning world cup gold seems of all the way from britain. he i of all the way from britain. he often had to dodge sheep learning to
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ski. now at 35, he is the oldest ever world cup winner. the winter olympics are less than a fortnight away and in the alpine snow, british skiing hopes will be up nicely. looking forward to speaking to him. rafa nadal is safely through to the quarter—finals. he had a titanic struggle in the first set but eventually he won the tie—break. after that, eventually he won the tie—break. afterthat, it eventually he won the tie—break. after that, it was plain sailing, winning the next two sets. he has only ever won the australian open once. could you do it again 13 years on? there's been more frustration for england's women cricketers overnight. their third t20 ashes match against australia in adelaide was abandoned without a ball being bowled.
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that's after the second match yesterday was abandoned afterjust over four overs. the points are shared, so australia lead the multi—format series a points to two i feel like this should be headline news. premier league leaders manchester city drop points, their 12—match winning run ended by southampton. who took the lead at home through kyle walker—peters — what a goal. the champions though equalised through aymeric laporte. what a run they've been on, it's the first time they haven't won in the league in almost thee months. not that pep thinks the league is already won. it is not over injanuary. i would like to have a stent like liverpool and chelsea. we had in the last year, liverpooland and chelsea. we had in the last year, liverpool and the european champion butjanuary is impossible. it was like the old days for manchester united,
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known for their winning goals deep in injury time. they scored here with virtually the last kick of the game against west ham as they move into the top four. marcus rashford with it, tweeted afterwards 'fergie time'. he was one of four strikers on the pitch at the end as united pushed for the winner. for me, it wasn't clear, we had enough quality on the bench and in the end it was taking this risk. --it the end it was taking this risk. ——it was clear. some people might say it was too much of a risk but we needed those three points and therefore for me it was clear that it was important to take that risk. and could big spending newcastle, after that huge takeover, beat the drop. they earned a massive win agaisnt leeds winning 1—0 thanks to jonjo shelvey�*s free kick sealing only their second premier league win of the season. there was some unsavoury scenes at goodison park yesterday. as villa celebrated their winner against everton, matty cash and lucas digne were struck by objects thrown from the crowd. it looked pretty unconfortable,
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one everton supporter was arrested after the match. there was a protest after the match from everton fans, unhappy with owner farhad moshiri and chairman bill kenwright — chants of "sack the board", with a planeflown above the ground before the match demanding his removal. now have you ever seen a match delayed because of this? a drone flown above the stadium at brentford, it meant the game against wolves was halted for more than 25 minutes in the first half as it hovered above the ground. wolves ended up 2—1winners. how about this for a cup upset? fourth tier kelty hearts knocked the scottish cup holders stjohnstone out in the fourth round. after a goalless 90 minutes, veteran forward kallum higginbotham broke clear to score an extra—time winner for the runaway league 2 leaders. after this dream win the team from kelty in fife will face another
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top—tier opponent, this time travelling to face st mirren next month. i love a good upset. kelty will be joined in the next round by celtic — they won 2—1 at league one side alloa. israeli winger liel abada scoring a wonderful second goal. up next they've got championship side raith rovers at celtic park. elfyn evans' chances of a podium finish at the monte carlo rally are over after a crash yesterday. the welshman was setting a fast pace during the first half of the stage but he clipped a bank and was left stuck on the hillside. in fact you can see him here in the top of your screen on fellow driver sebastian ogier�*s on—board camera. the dangerous situation led to a red—flag from the marshals. ogier leads the rally overall, going into the final day today. it gives you the appreciation of the species and the tight courses they
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are racing on and if you get it wrong, anything can happen and you can see how far he could have fallen. the skill level is just unbelievable. the slightest error and that is what happens.- unbelievable. the slightest error and that is what happens. thank you, john. time now for the travel show. this week on the travel show, tiny spaces in tokyo. vast wide open ones in finnish lapland. freedom, the silence around you, and generallyjust live a happier life. and the trips to look forward to in 2022. international restrictions will start to ease, restoring the benefits travel brings to the world.
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it's a city of dazzling neon, where robots can fix your drink, and you order your food from a machine. and even way back in 1972, architects were coming up with visions of the future that still leave us spellbound. this is the nakagin capsule tower. it's astonishing to sit here and look at this building, and even though it was built about 50 years ago, it still looks really futuristic. but the netting on the outside is a sign that time is beginning to catch up with the nakagin. it's made up of 1a0 pods,
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each of which can be detached and replaced. the tower was the first finished example of metabolism — an architectural movement inspired by the natural world — but this year it is scheduled for demolition. wow. this is it? it's tiny! hai! where's the kitchen? doko — kitchen wa doko desu ka? mr maeda owns several capsules. look at this tiny bathroom. i'm not going to even attempt to go inside. wow. that is small. it still works? yes. there's hot water? no hot water. oh, tough. wow, and there's a bit of rust on the taps there. yeah. why is the building being demolished?
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how does it make you feel when you know that this building will be demolished? the current plan is for some of the pods to be shipped off to museums around the world, but i'm off to see another resident here, who's still very much using hers. ok, shoes off? hai. i love your place. look, it's brilliant, it's mad — i've never seen anything like it! why do you rent a capsule here?
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koe is a dj. she live—streams from her pod on one of the upper floors of the tower. upbeat music plays.
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when nakagin is torn down later this year, there'll be empty space in tokyo's skyline. but it's not quite the end for metabolism. deep in the woods in nagano prefecture, about a three—hour drive from tokyo, is one building that is built better than the nakagin capsule tower.
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—— drive from tokyo, is one building that has faired better than the nakagin capsule tower. this is capsule house k. it's owned by mikio kurokawa, whose father was the architect of this and the nakagin itself. he intends to list it on airbnb. hajimemashite. arigatou gozaimasu. it's nice and warm in here. i love these 70s features — they're great. it's got a real retro feel about it. arigatou gozaimasu. 0k. show me around. hai. it's in much better condition. oh, so this must be the kitchen capsule? a real arigatou gozaimasu. old 70s interior.
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the building was designed for use as kisho kurokawa's own private villa. there is one central shaft with four capsules attached, each with a different function. and what you about the nakagin capsule tower in tokyo being set for demolition?
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i love the idea of a metabolically designed building — that parts or pods can be removed and recycled — but sadly, that's more difficult than it sounds, and while the nakagin capsule tower is destined for demolition, at least the original design concept is living on here in nagano. hello and happy new year to you. well, for me, and probably for you, it's been another hello and happy new year to you. well, for me, and probably for you, it's been another challenging year for travel, and 2022 begins with a tangle of international rules that can make anyjourney a gruelling battle. but my hope is that as vaccination makes progress around the world, international
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restrictions will start to ease and borders will open, restoring the benefits that travel brings to the world. so what am i most excited about this year? the resurgence of rail in europe. during the coronavirus pandemic, many of us have reassessed our relationship with travel, wanting to limit the impact on the environment and improve the quality of the journey. and in europe, that means international rail, with new opportunities, such as italian railway�*s frecciarossa service, between paris and milan, enjoying complimentary food and prosecco as you speed through the alps. also, there's expanded overnight services, including new sleeper trains between paris and vienna and from amsterdam to zurich. the us finally opened to visitors from europe, brazil, and some other countries only in november. iflew into orlando, florida, on opening day — inconveniently a few weeks late for the big anniversary of walt disney world — 50 years since it opened on october 1, 1971.
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but never wants to miss a party, the four disney parks will be having celebrations for 18 months, all the way through this year and into 2023. after two summers of disappointment, will this be the year when festival—lovers can return to worthy farm in the english county of somerset? glastonbury, arguably the most famous music festival but never ones to miss a party, the four disney parks will be having celebrations for 18 months, all the way through this year and into 2023. after two summers of disappointment, will this be the year when festival—lovers can return to worthy farm in the english county of somerset? glastonbury, arguably the most famous music festival in the world, was due to celebrate its 50th anniversary in 2020,
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until covid—19 forced its cancellation. now, emily evers, co—organiser of glastonbury, says it will go ahead injune, and two headliners are already confirmed — diana ross and billie eilish. the uk is hosting the women's euros for the first time with the final being played at wembley stadium on the last day ofjuly. later in the year, it's the turn of qatar to host the men's world cup. tickets for the tournament are not yet on sale but you can check out accommodation options, whether that's in a special desert camp, on board a cruise ship moored in qatar or staying with a local family. to answer a question we've been asked many times here at the travel show, fans will be able to drink alcohol in qatar in
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specially allocated zones. find out more in a couple of weeks when we will host an entire travel show special from qatar. wherever you are heading in 2022, i hope your travel dreams come true. joined me again soon for another global guide. still to come on the travel show: one of the best social distances around. the woman who gave it all up for a new life in the arctic wilderness. i wanted to have more spare time, not work so much. and enjoy more. so don't go away. this week we are exploring the japanese capital tokyo. this is yoyogi park, right in the heart of the city
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and known for its cherry blossom in the springtime. i wanted to show you one pretty cool addition to the landscape, and here it is. this is yoyogi's new transparent loo, part of the tokyo toilet project, an attempt by some of the country's best known architects to give us somewhere more beautiful to go about our business. these ones, for example, took mushrooms as inspiration as they sit in front of woodland. while this has hygiene at its heart with everything operating on voice command. from my mind though, these at yoyogi are the most outrageous. this is how it works. now you see me, now you don't. well, sort of. it takes a while to become opaque so i hope you're not in a rush. i've never seen anything like this. i felt a bit strange at first.
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were you worried people might see you? yes, i was a bit worried at first but then it gets darker towards when the time has passed so i felt safe. let's face it, japanese toilets have always been ahead of the game. with their hygiene sprays and their seat warmers, but this might take a bit of getting used to. anyway, now, if you don't mind, i have business to get down to. sometimes, don't we all want to just get away from it all? really far away. sometimes, don't we all want to just get away from it all? really far away. well, that is exactly what ava did, leaving her home in helsinki for a new life in the remote, freezing arctic. we met with her to see how her new life in a winter wonderland is panning out. this is my london life.
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bike rides through the park. you can see why this is one of my favourite parts of the cycle. leaves, light, the cute dogs. having coffee with friends, and of course, not forgetting the tube at rush—hour. but i'm leaving the big smoke for a while to visit kuusamo, which is just 60km south of the arctic circle, on the border of finnish lapland. the temperature and the db have dropped dramatically compared to london.
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i'm heading deeper and deeper into the wilderness. this is wild. to meet photographer ava. three years ago she turned her back on city life in helsinki to move to the wilds of northern finland and build her dream house by the side of a lake. believe it or not, it's actually a good place for snorkelling. definitely more of a summer activity, i think. i'm meeting ava on the lakejust over there. don't get me wrong, i love being in the countryside, but it's minus 15 degrees here where in london it is plus ten. i've got two pairs of gloves on, three pairs of socks and i've lost count of how many jumpers and i still feel cold. i don't feel like selling up and moving here anytime soon but that could all change. ava.
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hi! so good to meet you. same to you. what an incredible spot, i can't believe you actually live here. welcome to our home. thank you. obviously it is beautiful. and so, so cold. why would you move to a place like this? freedom is one of the biggest ones. just the silence around you, and generallyjust live happier life. what was it about the city that you didn't like? just the pace of life. everybody is so busy and you kind of let yourself go into the mode of that you have to just work and be super oriented with all that stuff. i wanted to have more spare time, not work so much and enjoy more. i feel like when i'm in the city there's always so much to do, so many places to be but i feel like here you have a lot of time. what do you fill that time with? i take my camera a lot of times. i'd take it with me
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to the woods and during winter we go skiing because there is so much snow. show me the way. yes! as well as working as a photographer, ava is also a wilderness guide and takes tourists like me into her own winter wonderland. first downhill. i'm a skier now! when you look at ava's photography, her love for nature is evident. she uses her online presence and her tools to show the best the natural world has to offer, and what's at stake of being lost to climate change. i love taking photos of everything that is valuable. for example, old forests. i love taking photos there.
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i can show it to people, that this is what we should protect. should we head back and get warm? yeah, i think so. ok, let's go. as night falls, shortly after lunchtime, it becomes apparent to me that life here during winter is extreme. very extreme. as we head indoors to a restaurant to get warm, there is one question on my mind. does ava ever feel tempted to head back into the city for an easier life? nope, i don't think so. and why? we are building a house, a log house in the forest. why did you choose to do it there? we found this beautiful place that is on a lakeshore and we actually wanted a house
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that is facing north, that we could sit on our couch, have a fire going and watch the northern lights when they appear. so what advice would you give to somebody who wants to give up everything and move to the wilderness to live in their dream house? when we left the city, we hadn't been consuming less. that's pretty natural here. but to be honest, it's not that expensive to have your dream life, at least here. a trip to finland wouldn't be complete without going to a sauna and it's here where it becomes apparent why ava chooses to live somewhere quite so rural. she's figured out the conundrum that us citydwellers have been mulling overfor years. how to stop time. when we're sitting in a 100 years old sauna, it is going to be a memory that we are going to remember like all of our lives. i remember every time that i have been into this sauna and i remember every adventure that i've had in these fields around us.
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i even remember the walks that we have with our dog and sometimes of course i might have a little memory of that with my camera. i remember all the things that i saw, all the things that i felt and heard. when i was in the city, there was like, 365 days in a year and you might have months and months just running by and you don't remember any details of a day because everything is just so similar. when you are here, every year feels kind of longer because you are going to have so many more memories. before i head back to london, there is one more memory i want to make here in finland. i'm definitely the town mouse to ava's country mouse, but like in the old story, what i've learned from my trip is to slow down and to find peace in a busy world. i've been wanting to do
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a snow angel all day. and i'm told that this is the traditional finnish way. oh my god! ok, that's a memory i definitely won't forget! oh my god, it actually feels really nice. coming up next week: we are with one woman emerging from a hard lockdown as she battles her own anxiety on the road. this is it, i've made it to the mediterranean sea. i've been waiting for this feeling for so long, it feels like forever. unbelievable. and find out the tips, tricks and long—term solutions to make your travels a lot calmer. don't forget, you can catch up with more of our recent trips on the bbc iplayer. and we're on social media too. just search bbc travel show
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on facebook and instagram. but for now, from all of us here in tokyo, it's goodbye. good morning, welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and nina warhurst. our headlines today: former conservative minister, nusrat ghani, tells the sunday times she was sacked from herjob, because of her muslim faith. the government chief whip, mark spencer, says her claim is completely false. the uk accuses vladimir putin of planning to install a pro—russia leader in ukraine, as fears of an invasion grow.
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a stray bullet killed british scientist matthew willson in the us city of atlanta — we'll speak to a witness who lives in the flat where the incident happened. two years to the day since the city of wuhan first went into lockdown, we take a look at china's zero—covid policy. there does appear to be widespread support for the government policy on covid because you get this — it looks quite normal but no—one knows the answer to the big question. how long will it go on for? a moment of british skiing history. from the dry slopes of lancashire to the mountains of austria, dave ryding wins britain's first ever alpine skiing world cup gold medal. good morning. a quiet one out there. high pressure still with us and that means a lot of dry weather. a lot of cloud around making it feel just a little
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bit colder with the winds strengthening into the far north—west of scotland later on. all the details coming up shortly. it's sunday the 23rd of january. our main story: the conservative mp, nusrat ghani, has said her muslim faith was given as one of the reasons behind the decision to sack her as a minister two years ago. the education secretary, nadhim zahawi, has called for her claims to be properly investigated. the chief whip, mark spencer, has revealed he was the person who spoke to ms ghani, and insists her accusations are false. let's get more on this with our political correspondent, helen catt. how did this news come about? this is an interview into the sunday time and nusrat ghani was the first muslim woman to get a ministry. she says that when she asked for an
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explanation as to why, the thinking behind that a government with told that her "muslimness" was raised as an issue during discussion of the reshuffle and that it was making colleagues uncomfortable. she told the paper she dropped the matter because if she persisted in asking about it, she would be ostracised and her career would be destroyed. the chief whip identified himself as the person the claim was made about. he denied ever using the words nusrat ghani said he had used and the claims were not true. nadhim zahawi is calling for full investigation. and its expected that sue gray's report into downing street lockdown parties will come in the next day or two, now it's being reported that she's looking into event in the prime minister's private flat too? the flat above number 11 where the
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premise and leaves with his wife and children, they had been rumours of gatherings, certainly about one on the evening dominic cummings left downing street. sue grey has widened her enquiry to include allegations around the flat. henry newman and josh brimstone, both friends of mr johnson's wife, had visited the flat on a number of locations during lockdown. initially sue grey had accepted it was for work but investigators question why they went so often given they work for the cabinet office. the foreign office says it's uncovered a plot by moscow to install a pro—russian leader in ukraine, amid increasing tension over a possible invasion. the kremlin has sent tens of thousands of troops to the ukrainian border in recent months. moscow has accused the uk of spreading "disinformation". our diplomatic correspondent paul adams reports. american weapons arriving
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in ukraine, 90 tons of what washington calls lethal aid. others including britain also sending supplies. hardly enough to defeat an invading russian army but the message to moscow is clear, "if you do this, it will come at a price." but now london and washington say they see signs of a russian plan to install a puppet government in kyiv after an invasion. pro—russian politicians, they say, in contact with russian intelligence officers involved in planning the attack. the foreign office says this man, former mp, yevheniy murayev, is being considered as a future leader by the kremlin. but four others named are thought to be in moscow. it is not clear what, if any role, they could realistically play. but russia's build—up goes on. it says repeatedly, it has no plans to invade. fighter jets now flying to locations in belarus, north of ukraine. moscow says they will be carrying outjoint drills.
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but diplomacy also continues. friday's meeting in geneva settled nothing but the us secretary of state antony blinken has promised a written reply within days to russia's expensive demand. a written reply within days to russia's expensive demands. further talks could follow. british ministers are expected to travel to european capitals in the coming days. the defence secretary ben wallace likely to visit moscow. downing street says it plans to ramp up pressure on russia. sanctions being discussed among allies, the government says, would pierce the heart of the russian economy. paul adams, bbc news. the first talks in europe involving senior taliban officials begin today in norway. the afghan delegation will meet envoys from the united states and european countries. taliban leaders are still subject to us and un sanctions. the talks will focus on ways of getting help to the millions of afghans short of food.
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lorries queued for almost two miles on the main road heading into dover yesterday, prompting anger among many drivers preparing to cross the channel. port officials have acknowledged that new customs controls for goods heading to the eu have been causing hold—ups, but say there are other factors at play too. ramzan karmali reports. queues of lorries on the a20, yesterday lunchtime, trying to get into dover. a sight many have got used to at the start of 2022. on social media many drivers have blamed brexit. from january first, exports to the eu are subject to full customs controls but the boss of the port believes there are a number of factors causing the current delays. since the beginning of the year, there has been increased transaction times at the border due to the carriers having to check customs paperwork at the check—in process, but equally, normally for this time of year, we have vessels that go out in refits, sort of normal maintenance activity.
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we are also doing a bit of maintenance in the port which means that our buffer zone space has got slightly reduced capacity as well. but there are growing concerns over driver welfare. professional drivers are yet again being held up at dover, for miles and miles, queueing up without any facilities, in this weather, injanuary in the uk, it is pretty cold, not all trucks are as well equipped as others with regards to heating. and just the frustration and the unknown length of time the driver is going to be delayed. it is totally unacceptable and drivers deserve better. the increase in freight traffic has meant that the operation travel access protocol, or tap, a temporary traffic management system, has been called on ten times already this year but the port of dover is more concerned about new checks which will come into force in september. what we are trying to do is make certain the government fully appreciates what the implications are if we do not get an agreement between the uk government and the french government for a set
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of protocols that will work. unless we get that agreement, it is going to be very difficult to see how it won't impact travel through the port of dover. from september, airport—style biometric checks are due to be implemented which would mean that drivers being stopped at the port for around ten minutes each. with around 10,000 trucks passing through the port each day, the warning is clear that a solution needs to be found. the government says it is working with its european counterparts to ensure border arrangement run as smoothly as possible. ramzan karmali, bbc news. the family of a british astrophysicist killed by a stray bullet in the us state of georgia has called him a "beautiful soul". we told you on breakfast yesterday about 31—year—old mathew willson from surrey, who was in the us city of atlanta visiting his girlfriend, katherine shepherd. he was shot while lying in bed as gunfire came from an adjacent building. police say they are continuing to investigate
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the circumstances of mr willson's death. aman kar shares the flat with matthew's girlfriend and was there on the night of the shooting. he joins us now from atlanta. it is good to talk to you and i know you have had a difficult week and we are grateful for you to be with us this morning. can you tell us a little bit more about what happened that night? this little bit more about what happened that niuht? , .,, little bit more about what happened that niuht? , ., , , that night? this was exactly seven da s aao, that night? this was exactly seven days ago. around _ that night? this was exactly seven days ago, around this _ that night? this was exactly seven days ago, around this time i that night? this was exactly seven days ago, around this time so i days ago, around this time so exactly this time 2am when this happened. wejust exactly this time 2am when this happened. we just heard exactly this time 2am when this happened. wejust heard multiple rounds of gunshot starting from 1:30am local time and it was unusual — this has happened beforejust not for so long. when i got to the living room for the third or fourth round i remember catherine shepherd screaming that matt had been shot and when i scrambled to the room i
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saw he was laying on the bed with the wound on his head and week—old 9/11 instantly ——we called. it happened so quick that it is hard to believe it has been seven days already. believe it has been seven days alread . g , ., believe it has been seven days alread ., , ., , ., ., , already. just to explain to viewers, matthew was _ already. just to explain to viewers, matthew was visiting _ already. just to explain to viewers, matthew was visiting his _ already. just to explain to viewers, matthew was visiting his girlfriend, catherine, who you live with. they had a long—distance relationship. you did not matthew personally but you knew catherine? i am you did not matthew personally but you knew catherine?— you knew catherine? i am also a student at _ you knew catherine? i am also a student at the _ you knew catherine? i am also a student at the university i you knew catherine? i am also a student at the university where l student at the university where matthew previously worked and catherine is a student, a postgrad student. we are supposed to go to a football game on sunday. but i
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figured they had not seen each other and i would give them some time. i was in my room most of saturday and i could hear them but i wanted to wait and give them time and approach him later. the first time i met him was when he was shot so i never got to meet him and i wish i had gone and talk to him because i never thought this was going to happen on saturday night. igirgthat thought this was going to happen on saturday night-— saturday night. what an awful set of circumstances. _ saturday night. what an awful set of circumstances. tell _ saturday night. what an awful set of circumstances. tell us _ saturday night. what an awful set of circumstances. tell us a _ saturday night. what an awful set of circumstances. tell us a little i saturday night. what an awful set of circumstances. tell us a little bit i circumstances. tell us a little bit about the area in which you are living. you have heard shots fired before but it is generally considered to be a safe neighbourhood? considered to be a safe neiuhbourhood? ., . . ., neighbourhood? correct. we are . raduate neighbourhood? correct. we are graduate students. _ neighbourhood? correct. we are graduate students. we - neighbourhood? correct. we are graduate students. we do i neighbourhood? correct. we are graduate students. we do not i neighbourhood? correct. we are i graduate students. we do not have a ton of money. we are on a budget but we try and stay into the safest neighbourhood and brookhaven is considered a safe area. me and catherine moved in in august last year and i had catherine moved in in august last yearand i had heard catherine moved in in august last year and i had heard shots back in
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october and we had called the cops but, again, they werejust october and we had called the cops but, again, they were just a few shots and it passed in a couple of minutes. another time in november and then we had this time but the unusual part this time is it wasn't just a few shots for a few minutes, it kept going on for 20 — 30 minutes until a straight bullet hit matthew. police say they are continuing their investigation into the events. have they told you anything else about how something like this could have happened? mi how something like this could have ha ened? �* ~' ., how something like this could have ha ened? �* ~ ., , .,, happened? all we know is there was an individual— happened? all we know is there was an individual firing _ happened? all we know is there was an individual firing at _ happened? all we know is there was an individual firing at an _ happened? all we know is there was an individual firing at an opposite i an individual firing at an opposite complex, about 200 feet away, is what i understand. there was no information to be found about anybody and we just hope that somebody can come out with information and help us find a lead and help with the investigation but so far we have not been informed
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about any leads. people were firing out that at this time at night, 2am, and one bullet, the only bullet that came on this site was that one. it is absolutely tragic. it has been seven days, how is catherine and how are you? i seven days, how is catherine and how are ou? ., ., are you? i am hanging in there. catherine _ are you? i am hanging in there. catherine has _ are you? i am hanging in there. catherine has left _ are you? i am hanging in there. catherine has left town - are you? i am hanging in there. catherine has left town and i i are you? i am hanging in there. | catherine has left town and i am trying to figure out another place to live but i have temporary accommodation but i am trying to hang in there and see the process over, get some help, doctor people and most importantly wait for the investigation to conclude so we can have at least something than the bizarre idea that it was something so random. as much as it is an accident, it is also not. because the sheer of shots fired and it is hard to see how something so random
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happened. it is reckless, reckless people with guns and one of those multiple rounds of shot happened to hit this way and it happened at that time went matthew was trying to get up time went matthew was trying to get up out of bed. time went matthew was trying to get up out of bed-— up out of bed. thank you for talking to us this morning. _ up out of bed. thank you for talking to us this morning. i _ up out of bed. thank you for talking to us this morning. i know- up out of bed. thank you for talking to us this morning. i know it i up out of bed. thank you for talking to us this morning. i know it is i to us this morning. i know it is difficult and we are really grateful for you to be with us this morning. we wish you and catherine all the best. ., ~ we wish you and catherine all the best. . ,, , ., ., ., ~ best. thank you for having me, ben. appreciated- — just an awful thing to go through. it is 7:16am. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, everybody. the story continues, in fact the weather we've got at the moment is what we are going to going to see to close out the month of january. going to going to see to close out the month ofjanuary. quite going to going to see to close out the month of january. quite a going to going to see to close out the month ofjanuary. quite a lot going to going to see to close out the month of january. quite a lot of around, i suspect, the month of january. quite a lot of around, isuspect, but the month of january. quite a lot of around, i suspect, but it will be largely dry. haven't seen any
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significant rainfall over a week or so now, and pressure is still with us. it is drifting into the near continent, and we have got more of a breeze coming in from the south—west. that's driving more cloud across the country, but it means it will be relatively quiet for many of us with that high pressure. the winds will strengthen as we go through the afternoon and a far north—west of scotland and we could see gale force gusts by the end of the day. if we do see some glimpses of sunshine that it will be fleeting, i suspect, glimpses of sunshine that it will be fleeting, isuspect, and maybe glimpses of sunshine that it will be fleeting, i suspect, and maybe some sheltered western areas could see breaks and sunshine from time to time. these are the winds, as you can see, strengthening into the far west of scotland. once again it is the western fringes that are likely to see the highest values around eight or nine degrees, but when we got back cloud, and it is very —— fairly stubborn to break up, those temperatures might be down on yesterday, it may feel cold in that drab afternoon. through this evening, we continue to see a fair amount of cloud, so on the whole,
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temperatures will hold up above freezing, but where we get a few breaks in the cloud we will see some patching mist and fog forming, just like the last few mornings, and temperatures close to freezing in one or two spots. mild in the far north—west, but here we could see rain. nothing particularly significant, unfortunately. we could see wetter weather gradually drifting into the far north of scotland, and even then it tends to weaken to the odd spot or two, as it pushes steadily south. some breaks in the cloud across eastern scotland, northern england and northern ireland, but to the south of that, again, some stubborn, grey, low cloud sitting there, but will have an impact with five or six the high, the mildest of the weather further north and west, with top temperatures of nine celsius. as we move out of monday towards the middle part of the week we could start to see a weather front arriving by wednesday, potentially, somewhat wetter and windier when arriving into scotland. this front will sink south, so there is a
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chance for england and wales to see rain overnight and into wednesday and thursday. not that much, it has to be said. it isn't going to give a good offering to the gardens. but as you can see, there is the potential for rain around, and as it gets drier and brighter, for rain around, and as it gets drierand brighter, it for rain around, and as it gets drier and brighter, it will bejust that little bit milder as we approach the end of the week. do you two. we're all familiar with the saying "this deserves to go to a better home," and now it seems it could. a charity in fife is now working with online retail giant amazon to distribute surplus household goods to families struggling with the rising cost of living. catriona renton reports. it looks like the distribution centre of a supermarket or online store. in fact, these are surplus goods from amazon due to be distributed to people struggling with the cost of living. in distributed to people struggling with the cost of living.— with the cost of living. in this warehouse — with the cost of living. in this warehouse there _ with the cost of living. in this warehouse there are - with the cost of living. in this i warehouse there are thousands of items, including essential things like bedding, nappies, and children's clothes, like warm winter jackets. it is thought around 13,000
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families and five will be helped through this project this year. the through this pro'ect this year. the former prime — through this project this year. the former prime minister gordon brown is patron of a charity that works with vulnerable families. he asked amazon if surplus goods that are unsold or returned could be donated to local people. igtgte unsold or returned could be donated to local people-— to local people. we could make a dent on some _ to local people. we could make a dent on some of _ to local people. we could make a dent on some of the _ to local people. we could make a dent on some of the poverty i to local people. we could make a dent on some of the poverty that| dent on some of the poverty that exists, we can't undo the damage thatis exists, we can't undo the damage that is done by so many families being on low pay also many families being on low pay also many families being in poverty, but this can make a difference. being in poverty, but this can make a difference-— being in poverty, but this can make a difference. amazon was previously under fire over _ a difference. amazon was previously under fire over reports _ a difference. amazon was previously under fire over reports of _ a difference. amazon was previously under fire over reports of how- under fire over reports of how adulthood surplus goods. the challen . e adulthood surplus goods. the challenge of— adulthood surplus goods. iia: challenge of managing adulthood surplus goods. tia: challenge of managing unsold or returned products are something faced by all retailers, notjust amazon, but it is a challenge that we are absolutely committed to addressing. we want to resell, donate or recycle items, and this initiative here is a great example of how we are putting products to good use in the community. igtgte of how we are putting products to good use in the community. we met leshe good use in the community. we met leslie last year _ good use in the community. we met leslie last year when _ good use in the community. we met leslie last year when her _ good use in the community. we met leslie last year when her baby i leslie last year when her baby leslie last year when her baby leslie was just six months old. he is nine months now and his big sister holly is three. the family
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benefited from the new project at christmas. it benefited from the new pro'ect at christmas. , ., benefited from the new pro'ect at christmas. , . , , ., christmas. it is hard, because i am a sinile christmas. it is hard, because i am a single mom- _ christmas. it is hard, because i am a single mom- i— christmas. it is hard, because i am a single mom. i get— christmas. it is hard, because i am a single mom. i get my _ christmas. it is hard, because i am a single mom. i get my universali a single mom. i get my universal credit, i've got my bills to pay and food to buy. and keep my house cosy and warm. you know, it is not easy. it is good they are doing this because it will help a lot of people. because it will help a lot of --eole. �* ., , people. bowling will be co-ordinating _ people. bowling will be co-ordinating with i people. bowling will be i co-ordinating with apparels people. bowling will be _ co-ordinating with apparels which co—ordinating with apparels which are now being sought from around a0 charities and five. are now being sought from around 40 charities and five.— charities and five. things like editini , charities and five. things like editing. tails. _ charities and five. things like editing, tails, crockery, i charities and five. things like i editing, tails, crockery, cutlery, electrical goods, clothing, shoes, all that kind of stuff. these stuff that there is no money for. curtains, blinds, all those kinds of things. things that make you wake up in the morning and you think, right, maybe i've not got a lot of money, but at least my house feels like a home. and right now, that is not
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what is out there.— what is out there. other companies, scotmed and — what is out there. other companies, scotmed and the _ what is out there. other companies, scotmed and the co-op, _ what is out there. other companies, scotmed and the co-op, are i what is out there. other companies, | scotmed and the co-op, are involved scotmed and the co—op, are involved is welcome and gordon brown is urging other companies to get involved. if successful, it is hoped this project could be rolled out across the uk. a great idea. long queues on the main road heading to dover have been a regular sight in recent times. and as our report earlier showed, there's anger among many drivers who are facing long delays to cross the channel. we are joined now by richard ballantyne, chief executive, of the british ports association and adrianjones, national officer for road transport at unite the union. good morning to you both. richard, i will start with you. explain a little bit if you can hear, what is going on, why are we seeing these cues once again?— going on, why are we seeing these cues once again? good morning, and thanks for having _ cues once again? good morning, and thanks for having me _ cues once again? good morning, and thanks for having me on. _ cues once again? good morning, and thanks for having me on. i _ cues once again? good morning, and thanks for having me on. ithink- cues once again? good morning, and thanks for having me on. i think it i thanks for having me on. i think it sounds like a bit of a perfect storm of things that are happening. we
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have a bit of spike in traffic numbers and volumes after a lot of operators were holding off to see how the first couple of the weeks of the new year went in terms of the new brexit process, the new controls. we saw quite a lot of activity this week, and there was a bit of a lag in some of the traffic going back, hence why it has occurred towards and over a weekend. also one or two things like certain drivers, not all, being subject to covid rules and checks, so there is digital paperwork, et cetera, and now we are outside the eu, there are one or two extra hoops that people have to jump through, in terms of proving or downloading a digital eu covid passport... proving or downloading a digital eu covid passport. . ._ covid passport... richard, you say there is one _ covid passport... richard, you say there is one or— covid passport... richard, you say there is one or two _ covid passport... richard, you say there is one or two extra - covid passport... richard, you say there is one or two extra hurdles, | there is one or two extra hurdles, tojump through. but, you know, when we are seeing scenes like this, most
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viewers will look at this and say, thatis viewers will look at this and say, that is more than one or two with a q that long. there is a lot going on, isn't there?— q that long. there is a lot going on, isn't there? yes, and of course the local resilience _ on, isn't there? yes, and of course the local resilience forum - on, isn't there? yes, and of course the local resilience forum for i on, isn't there? yes, and of course the local resilience forum for the i the local resilience forum for the police, the council and the government have these traffic measures which they in store, which are designed to prevent major disruption for other people in east kent, you know, businesses and residents. so they come in and of course it effectively doubles up the cues on the port approaches and elsewhere. cues on the port approaches and elsewhere-— cues on the port approaches and elsewhere. adrian, richard there describini elsewhere. adrian, richard there describing the _ elsewhere. adrian, richard there describing the perfect _ elsewhere. adrian, richard there describing the perfect storm. i elsewhere. adrian, richard there describing the perfect storm. we j describing the perfect storm. we have seen pictures of the 17 mile tail backs, what is the impact on the drivers?— tail backs, what is the impact on the drivers? these are people at work who are — the drivers? these are people at work who are then _ the drivers? these are people at work who are then made i the drivers? these are people at work who are then made to - the drivers? these are people at work who are then made to park| the drivers? these are people at i work who are then made to park on the drivers? these are people at - work who are then made to park on a motorway— work who are then made to park on a motorway with no facilities, no food, — motorway with no facilities, no food, no — motorway with no facilities, no food, no drinks, at motorway with no facilities, no food, no drinks, et cetera. you know, _ food, no drinks, et cetera. you know. it — food, no drinks, et cetera. you know. it is _ food, no drinks, et cetera. you know, it is preposterous to say it is a perfect — know, it is preposterous to say it is a perfect storm. 12 months ago it
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was a _ is a perfect storm. 12 months ago it was a storm. — is a perfect storm. 12 months ago it was a storm, next year they will be another_ was a storm, next year they will be another storm, the consequence of this is— another storm, the consequence of this is that — another storm, the consequence of this is that drivers are stranded. our drivers— this is that drivers are stranded. our drivers are feeding back that it is a complete catastrophe. it is chaos, — is a complete catastrophe. it is chaos, down at dover. this should have _ chaos, down at dover. this should have been— chaos, down at dover. this should have been planned for, we should have _ have been planned for, we should have been— have been planned for, we should have been able to co—ordinate an appropriate response, to make sure that drivers — appropriate response, to make sure that drivers are not parked up on a motorway. — that drivers are not parked up on a motorway, but they do have access to proper _ motorway, but they do have access to proper facilities and i kept as comfortable as possible in very difficult — comfortable as possible in very difficult circumstances. is comfortable as possible in very difficult circumstances.- comfortable as possible in very difficult circumstances. is it? you are saying _ difficult circumstances. is it? you are saying that — difficult circumstances. is it? you are saying that all— difficult circumstances. is it? you are saying that all your _ difficult circumstances. is it? you are saying that all your members| are saying that all your members have the right paperwork, they've got the forms they need, and that it is a processing issue, not a driver issue? ~ , ., is a processing issue, not a driver issue? ~ i. ,, ., , issue? well, you know, they will alwa s issue? well, you know, they will always be _ issue? well, you know, they will always be errors. _ issue? well, you know, they will always be errors. we _ issue? well, you know, they will always be errors. we all- issue? well, you know, they will always be errors. we all make i issue? well, you know, they will. always be errors. we all make the odd mistake. but fundamentally, there needs to be better planning, a better rollout on the process, so
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that when drivers have a new system in place there has actually been a proper rollout of understanding what that process is. and proper rollout of understanding what that process is.— that process is. and is it clear? do they know — that process is. and is it clear? do they know what — that process is. and is it clear? do they know what they _ that process is. and is it clear? do they know what they need? - they know what they need? absolutely. drivers have exactly the correct _ absolutely. drivers have exactly the correct documentation and paperwork that they— correct documentation and paperwork that they believe is correct, the probtem — that they believe is correct, the problem that we have seen in the last few— problem that we have seen in the last few days and previously is that actually. _ last few days and previously is that actually, the communication to the hauliers. _ actually, the communication to the hauliers, the employers, has not been _ hauliers, the employers, has not been as— hauliers, the employers, has not been as comprehensive as we would hope. _ been as comprehensive as we would hope. and _ been as comprehensive as we would hope, and therefore the driver turns up hope, and therefore the driver turns up believing they have all the correct — up believing they have all the correct paperwork to get through the port as— correct paperwork to get through the port as quickly as possible, only to be held _ port as quickly as possible, only to be held up — port as quickly as possible, only to be held up. and when there is little fat on— be held up. and when there is little fat on the _ be held up. and when there is little fat on the bone in the process, the small— fat on the bone in the process, the small delayed quickly builds into a bil small delayed quickly builds into a big delay — small delayed quickly builds into a big delay. we small delayed quickly builds into a bi dela . ~ . , small delayed quickly builds into a biudela. . , , ., big delay. we have been here before, we had about — big delay. we have been here before, we had about the _ big delay. we have been here before, we had about the perfect _ big delay. we have been here before, we had about the perfect dust - big delay. we have been here before, we had about the perfect dust my - we had about the perfect dust my perfect storm two years ago, do we have to just get used to this and the knock—on impact being empty
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shops? i the knock-on impact being empty shos? ., �* ~' the knock-on impact being empty shos? ., �* ,, . ., shops? i don't think we have to get used to this. _ shops? i don't think we have to get used to this, but _ shops? i don't think we have to get used to this, but i _ shops? i don't think we have to get used to this, but i think— shops? i don't think we have to get used to this, but i think it - shops? i don't think we have to get used to this, but i think it is - shops? i don't think we have to get used to this, but i think it is the - used to this, but i think it is the new norm indisposed pandemic and a new norm indisposed pandemic and a new arrangement with exit, and we talked earlier in the report about the new visa controls that come in from the eu, which will certainly be an extra hurdle where drivers have to get out of vehicles to show evidence, whichjust to get out of vehicles to show evidence, which just won't work in the maritime and port environment. and we have new sps, animal and plant controls coming in injuly for brexit checks, and that is where you goods taken off get at any port when they are coming in, and exceptions of the consignments they are carrying, animal and plant —based products, food and grains uncut plans, et cetera. that comes up quite a cost which will be passed on to british importers and consumers.
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richard, adrian there saying that the drivers you work would have the right paperwork, they know what they need, they are turning up to the port and that is the problem. do you have enough resources to protest that process the drivers turning up at your ports? i that process the drivers turning up at your ports?— at your ports? i think it is fundamental _ at your ports? i think it is fundamental to _ at your ports? i think it is fundamental to highlight | at your ports? i think it is - fundamental to highlight that a lot of these processes required by government agency, we have french agencies, we havejuxtaposed agencies, we have juxtaposed controls agencies, we havejuxtaposed controls in dover, in particular, where the french police and immigration service are here checking prior to loading onto ferries, unlike most other methods of international travel, i think it is a resourcing issue across the port for government agencies. full sympathy to the drivers, ports do not want to see queues, they do not want to see freight being processed quickly and efficiently, to get them through to the other side.- through to the other side. richard
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and adrian. _ through to the other side. richard and adrian, many _ through to the other side. richard and adrian, many thanks - through to the other side. richard and adrian, many thanks for- through to the other side. richard and adrian, many thanks for your| and adrian, many thanks for your time this morning. i am sure we will be back talking about this in the not too distant future. sophie raworth presents sunday morning on bbc one at nine o'clock this morning. sophie, what do you have on today's show? we have an awful lot this morning. big changes coming up to the way that we deal with covid across the uk this week. we will be talking to the world health organization, who are urging caution, scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, joining me as scotland eases most of its restrictions this week, and deputy prime minister dominic raab will be here in what is yet another difficult week for the conservative party. and we've got david morrisey, the actor, who will be joining me to go through all the papers, because there is plenty to talk about. see you then. there is plenty to talk about. see ou then. , . ,, i. there is plenty to talk about. see | you then-_ see there is plenty to talk about. see - you thtatt-_ see you you then. sophie, thank you. see you
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later. you then. sophie, thank you. see you later- certainly _ you then. sophie, thank you. see you later. certainly has _ you then. sophie, thank you. see you later. certainly has lots _ you then. sophie, thank you. see you later. certainly has lots to _ you then. sophie, thank you. see you later. certainly has lots to talk- later. certainly has lots to talk about this morning. international aid efforts have been stepped up in response to last weekends volcanic eruption and tsunami off the coast of tonga. the island nation has been left largely cut—off from the outside world. our australian correspondent shaimaa khalil is in fiji. shaimaa what is the situation there like? maybe just bring us up to date on the latest situation, as we said, the latest situation, as we said, the island is largely cut off, that is such a big problem for getting aid to people who need it? good morninu. aid to people who need it? good morning. communication - aid to people who need it? good morning. communication is- aid to people who need it? (13cm morning. communication is one of the biggest challenges in this disaster, because when the volcanic eruption happened, it destroyed the deep sea internet cable, essentially connecting tonga to the rest of the world, and while the pacific island nation has started to reconnect with other countries, it is still very, very limited, and it will take a long time to fix that cable. aid has
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been arriving to tonga from australia, britain, japan and new zealand, and supplies are in, everything from generators to shelter kits and of course the desperately needed clean water. the problem is that facing the country, it is how slow it is being distributed, because suppliers are on the ground and the government is adamant that nobody is allowed in tonga. aid workers are not allowed on the ground. this is because they just do not want a covid case to come in. obviously, distributing aid to a country that has been devastated, as tonga has, is tricky on occasion, but out of fear of a covid—19 outbreak to that equation, you realise how complex it is. one of the bigger concern aid comes in, a lot of it has been co—ordinated here in fiji, it is how far it can go and how fast it can get to those who needed to be most.—
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go and how fast it can get to those who needed to be most. when the past when something _ who needed to be most. when the past when something like _ who needed to be most. when the past when something like this _ who needed to be most. when the past when something like this has _ when something like this has happened they have been able to add drop that aid, which might help circumnavigate some of those issues around quarantine sound problems and fears about covid spreading on the island, but still we know the infrastructure is proving difficult just to get around the island? absolutely, and we have heard from un officials who have said that this is a country that will be dependent on food aid for a long time, because the crops have been destroyed, farmers, for example, they have lost their livelihoods, they have lost their livelihoods, they have lost their homes and the extent of the damage we have seen so far. remember, we're still not getting a full and complete picture, we are relying on images coming in from people inside tonga, from the tonga government, but nobody has been inside, and there are places that are still too far to reach. all of these places, we haven't even seen how badly damaged they are. so we
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are talking about the main island, we are talking about the capital, and i think as time goes by, the challenges will be greater because the aid has to go further, into places that we still haven't heard of yet. places that we still haven't heard of et. . ~ places that we still haven't heard of et. . ,, ., . , . places that we still haven't heard of et. . ,, ., . , of yet. talk to me a bit about some of yet. talk to me a bit about some of those logistics. _ of yet. talk to me a bit about some of those logistics. i _ of yet. talk to me a bit about some of those logistics. i know _ of yet. talk to me a bit about some of those logistics. i know that - of yet. talk to me a bit about some of those logistics. i know that you i of those logistics. i know that you are hoping that when all the rules, all the quarantine that you face to get in there, talk to me a bit about the first—hand accounts you are hearing already, where you are, about what people are experiencing in tonga and on those islands? i in tonga and on those islands? i think two things have stayed with me from reports from inside tonga. one is that description of the colour of the tongan capital in the main capital, the fact that after this eruption, tonga turned grey, this ash has just been suspended eruption, tonga turned grey, this ash hasjust been suspended in eruption, tonga turned grey, this ash has just been suspended in the air, turning everything grave. also, people saying that we pray for water, a localjournalist, marion cole, was speaking to the bbc and
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saying, we are praying for water, this remains a top priority, trying to get aid workers in, and we are also trying to get in, but so far that desperate need for aid continues, as the supplies are coming into tonga.— continues, as the supplies are coming into tonga. shaimaa khalil, thank ou. it's exactly two years ago today since china locked down the city of wuhan and its 10 million residents, to try to stop the spread of covid. since then strict lockdowns across the country have kept the death toll from the virus to below 6,000. as beijing prepares to host the winter olympic games next month, it's determined to maintain its strict "zero covid" policy. our china correspondent robin brant reports. this 27 days into lockdown confined to her apartment. xen lin is one of
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millions in china still subject to the ultimate covid control. translation:— the ultimate covid control. translation: ~ ., translation: when covid hit with time, the country didn't _ translation: when covid hit with time, the country didn't have - translation: when covid hit with time, the country didn't have much experience dealing with the outbreak. now it is different, it is better. ,, ., , . . , better. showers in xian, the city famous for _ better. showers in xian, the city famous for its _ better. showers in xian, the city famous for its motionless - better. showers in xian, the city famous for its motionless army l better. showers in xian, the city. famous for its motionless army of terracotta warriors. but normal life of 13 million people that has come to a halt. there is evidence to that some people have just to a halt. there is evidence to that some people havejust had enough. a crowd clashes with police at a compound in xian where they have been put in lockdown for 35 days. a couple of men are taken away. assessing the overall impact on people's lives, economic and psychological, is almost impossible. all of this is part of a massive effort to stop a few thousand covid cases from spreading, and in terms of this official report in case numbers, it seems to be working.
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chinese leader xi jinping numbers, it seems to be working. chinese leader xijinping hailed the economy's resilience earlier this week, saying he is fully confident about its development. so is zero covid in china the new normal? email covid in china the new normal? small infreuuent covid in china the new normal? small infrequent disruption, _ covid in china the new normal? small infrequent disruption, but _ covid in china the new normal? ’sn—ii infrequent disruption, but not covid in china the new normal? 5n—ii infrequent disruption, but not a massive shutdown. so for china seems to be working. china is still, you know, manufacturing and construction driven. all these activities can be isolated. so that is why zero covid so far make sense. but isolated. so that is why zero covid so far make sense.— isolated. so that is why zero covid so far make sense. but this country has deeper— so far make sense. but this country has deeper problems _ so far make sense. but this country has deeper problems to _ so far make sense. but this country has deeper problems to deal- so far make sense. but this country has deeper problems to deal with. l so far make sense. but this country| has deeper problems to deal with. a huge debt, a faltering property market, as well as the hypervigilance against more covid spikes. it hypervigilance against more covid sikes. . hypervigilance against more covid sikes. , , . ., .~ hypervigilance against more covid sikes. , '. ., . spikes. it is difficult to take a scientific survey, _ spikes. it is difficult to take a scientific survey, but - spikes. it is difficult to take a scientific survey, but there i spikes. it is difficult to take a i scientific survey, but there does appear to be widespread support for the government's policy on covid, because you get this. it the government's policy on covid, because you get this.— the government's policy on covid, because you get this. it looks quite normal. because you get this. it looks quite normal- but _ because you get this. it looks quite normal. but nobody _ because you get this. it looks quite normal. but nobody knows - because you get this. it looks quite normal. but nobody knows the - because you get this. it looks quite i normal. but nobody knows the answer to the big question. how long will it go on for? translation: i to the big question. how long will it go on for? translation: i think the epidemic _
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it go on for? translation: i think the epidemic control— it go on for? translation: i think the epidemic control in _ it go on for? translation: i think the epidemic control in shanghai i it go on for? translation: i think the epidemic control in shanghai isj the epidemic control in shanghai is very good. the government uses big data to quickly trace and control people who are close contacts. the neaative people who are close contacts. the negative impacts of lockdowns are quite _ negative impacts of lockdowns are quite bad~ — negative impacts of lockdowns are quite bad. people are worried. two ears on quite bad. people are worried. “ii-mp years on comedy borders here remain all but closed, international flights are at a bare minimum, and china's communist party leaders are sticking with their zero covid promise. in the run—up to hosting the olympics, china has shown how far it is willing to go. international mail is the new enemy. authorities in beijing this week claimed that a package from canada brought omicron in. we were in contact with someone in another city who was ordered to stay behind her sealed front door simply after receiving a delivery from abroad. she didn't want us to name her, but deeply frustrated, she sent us a text message saying, it's good for epidemic control, but it's not a
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good thing from the human rights perspective. coming up, we will be speaking to dave ryding after he became the first—ever alpine skiing world cup champion. we are now saying bye to be there was a bbc one. if you are still with us, you made the right decision. we if you are still with us, you made the right decision.— if you are still with us, you made the right decision. we are going to be talkin: the right decision. we are going to be talking to _ the right decision. we are going to be talking to bruno _ the right decision. we are going to be talking to bruno and _ the right decision. we are going to be talking to bruno and if - the right decision. we are going to be talking to bruno and if you i the right decision. we are going to i be talking to bruno and if you know, you know. be talking to bruno and if you know, ou know. ., , _, , be talking to bruno and if you know, you know— i i you know. louise looks confused. i don't know— you know. louise looks confused. i don't know what _ you know. louise looks confused. i don't know what you're _ you know. louise looks confused. i don't know what you're talking i don't know what you're talking about — don't know what you're talking about. it — don't know what you're talking about. . don't know what you're talking about. , ., , , about. it is of the first time this son: about. it is of the first time this song gone _ about. it is of the first time this song gone to — about. it is of the first time this song gone to the _ about. it is of the first time this song gone to the top _ about. it is of the first time this song gone to the top spot. i about. it is of the first time this song gone to the top spot. you | about. it is of the first time this i song gone to the top spot. you see, m kids song gone to the top spot. you see, my kids are _ song gone to the top spot. you see, my kids are 21 —
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song gone to the top spot. you see, my kids are 21 and _ song gone to the top spot. you see, my kids are 21 and 23,. _ song gone to the top spot. you see, my kids are 21 and 23,. not - song gone to the top spot. you see, my kids are 21 and 23,. not quite i my kids are 21 and 23,. not quite there. well. _ my kids are 21 and 23,. not quite there. well. i— my kids are 21 and 23,. not quite there. well, i am _ my kids are 21 and 23,. not quite there. well, i am 41— my kids are 21 and 23,. not quite there. well, i am 41 and - my kids are 21 and 23,. not quite there. well, i am 41 and i- my kids are 21 and 23,. not quite there. well, i am 41 and i love i my kids are 21 and 23,. not quite| there. well, i am 41 and i love it. i don't think you would be able to idon't think you would be able to sin- i don't think you would be able to sing the — i don't think you would be able to sing the songs they would. too many expletives _ sing the songs they would. too many expletives. shall we talk about the weather? — this is a yesterday, you can see the sunshine trying desperately hard to peek through the cloud and i suspect thatis peek through the cloud and i suspect that is what we are going to see today. absolutely beautiful aurora in aberdeenshire. on the whole, it is sang quite cloudy. it is a saying quite quiet, that is a good news. more of the south—westerly track, this feed of moist air coming in of the atlantic and that is why we have all these cloud around at the moment and the winds are said to strengthen
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in the far north—west of scotland. there is a front trying to squeeze in. the emphasis with cloud. light winds across england and wales, not helping to break up of the cloud. if we keep the dense cloud, temperatures around five — six degrees. at the west nine celsius the maximum. largely cloudy skies but we get a few holes, patchy mist and fog not out of the question and could turn onto the chilli side. our front gradually arrived to the far north—west of scotland with temperatures holding up. it will bring rain to the northern isles, western isles and the far north of scotland we start off monday but it is a weak affair and will not produce significant rainfall. we're
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stilljust under the influence of high pressure although it continues to drift steadily eastwards. cloudy conditions for southern england. this is the weak weather front. temperatures be a similar story to today. underneath the dense cloud, five — six degrees. elsewhere with sunshine coming through we might see nine celsius as a high. time to look at the spot. dave r din it time to look at the spot. dave ryding it is — time to look at the spot. dave ryding it is a _ time to look at the spot. dave ryding it is a name _ time to look at the spot. dave ryding it is a name we - time to look at the spot. dave ryding it is a name we will- time to look at the spot. dave ryding it is a name we will be | ryding it is a name we will be talking a lot. he has produced a brilliant result earning britain's atan at an alpine world cup event. for someone who grew up in lancashire, not known for its mountain ranges... cold but not much snow. he not known for its mountain ranges... cold but not much snow.— cold but not much snow. he started to learn on — cold but not much snow. he started to learn on dry _ cold but not much snow. he started to learn on dry ski _ cold but not much snow. he started to learn on dry ski courses. - cold but not much snow. he started to learn on dry ski courses. given i to learn on dry ski courses. given the opportunity to take up skiing
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properly, after all the hard work and determination, he has won. ihe and determination, he has won. he never gave up. and determination, he has won. he never gave pp- a — and determination, he has won. he never gave up. a slice _ and determination, he has won. he never gave up. a slice of _ and determination, he has won. he never gave up. a slice of history i never gave up. a slice of history that no-one _ never gave up. a slice of history that no-one else _ never gave up. a slice of history that no-one else has _ never gave up. a slice of history that no-one else has achieved. | slalom skier dave ryding says he never stopped believing after he became the first briton to win an alpine world cup event. the 35 year—old, who learnt to ski on a dry slope in lancashire winning on one of the most prestigiouis ski runs in the world in kitzbuel, austria. and you wonder what else might lie ahead, with the winter olympics round the corner. adam wild reports. british alpine skiing has never before reached such heights. in more than half a century of world cup competition, there is not a brit who has done more than what dave ryding was doing here. sixth after his opening run, by the time he'd reached the bottom of his second, ryding was on top. commentator: he dips, he dives, he gets there! come on! yes! in the lead, only one other skier could stop him.
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and ryding, great britain, has won! always happens when you don't expect it. it has been a long road. it was more disbelief when i realised i had done it. i did not know what to say, just that it was crazy. winning world cup gold seems a world away from the dry slopes of britain. this was how ryding learned to ski. often have to dodge sheep — a skill that would come in useful on the slalom's snow. now at 35, he's become the event's oldest ever world cup winner. the winter olympics are less than a fortnight away and in the alpine snow, british skiing hopes are warming up nicely. adam wild, bbc news. amazing. what a story. dodging sheep set him in good stead. we will be speaking to him just after 8:30am.
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sixth seed rafael nadal is safely through to the quarter finals at the australian open. he had a titanic struggle in the first set against france's adrian mannarinbo. nadal eventually won the tie break 16—14, but after that it was plain sailing, nadal winnig the next two sets 6—2. but after that it was plain sailing, nadal winning the next two sets 6—2. nadal remember has only won the aussie open once — back in 2009. he'll play denis shapovalov next. it's seems batting collapses aren'tjust an issue for the england men's test cricket team after the t20 side were thrashed by west indies. jason holder took four wickets as england were bowled out forjust 103 runs in barbados in their first of a five match series. brandon king top—scored for the home side and hit the winning runs as west indies took victory by nine wickets. the second t20 is this evening. there's been more frustration for england's women cricketers overnight. their third t20 ashes match against australia in adelaide was abandoned without a ball being bowled. that's after the second match yesterday was abandoned afterjust over four overs.
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the points are shared, so australia lead the multi—format series 4 points to two there are four games in the premier league today, liverpool, arsenal, leicester, all in action — the big game sees tottenham take on chelsea at 4.30. yesterday city dropped points for the first time in three months against souhampton — one all it finished. saints took the lead through kyle walker—peters. the champions equalised through aymeric laporte. their 12—match winning run in the league brought to an end. fourth tier kelty hearts produced a cup upset knocking out the holders stjohnstone in the fourth round of the scottish cup. after a goalless 90 minutes, kallum higginbotham broke clear to score an extra—time winner no less, for the runaway league 2 leaders. after this dream win the team from kelty in fife will face another top—tier side, st mirren next month. kelty will be joined
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in the next round by celtic — they won 2—1 at league one alloa. liel abada with a great second goal. championship side raith rovers are up next at celtic park. ulster survived a scare to make it four wins from four in rugby union's champions cup. this try from robert baloucoune put them clear before a late fight back by clermont set up a nervy finish, but the irish side held on for the win by 34 points to 31. bristol produced a dominant second half display to beat scarlets 52—21. pat lam's team had already qualified for the last 16, but scarlets campaign is over for another season. elsewherer leinster are into the last 16 after thrashing bath and at the monte carlo rally, the welshman setting a fast pace during the first half of the stage when this happened. he clipped a bank and was left stuck on the hillside. in
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fact you can see it at the top of the screen. you can see how steep that bank is. a dangerous situation leading to a red flag. itjust shows, if you get it wrong, that is what happens. it is shows, if you get it wrong, that is what happens-— what happens. it is so tight. you know ou what happens. it is so tight. you know you have — what happens. it is so tight. you know you have it _ what happens. it is so tight. you know you have it wrong - what happens. it is so tight. you know you have it wrong when i what happens. it is so tight. you| know you have it wrong when you what happens. it is so tight. you i know you have it wrong when you are setting up and there are a lot of faces looking down. this doesn't look good- _ faces looking down. this doesn't look good. you _ faces looking down. this doesn't look good. you have _ faces looking down. this doesn't look good. you have the - faces looking down. this doesn't i look good. you have the run-offs, look good. you have the run—offs, the tyres. to get it wrong in a rally cloud, zero room for error. —— car. do what dave ryding does an ski down. looking forward to speaking today in about an hours time. time now for this week's click, and the technology team are in la.
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los angeles, the place where anything is possible — even the weird stuff that i've got up to here over the years. it's a town that revels in the new, and right now, that town seems to be talking about nfts. now, as a reminder, nfts are a way of recording who owns what — mainly digital art and music. frankly, the mind still boggles every time i remember that this image by beeple sold for almost $17 million at auction. so, i thought i'd jump on the bandwagon. now, anyone can create,
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or "mint" an nft. in fact, i havejust minted myself, which was refreshing! that means that this mini animation now has a unique identifier which has been recorded on... ..the blockchain! an indisputable record of who owns it and who buys it afterwards. 2022 looks like being the year that hollywood sits up, takes notice and decides, "yeah, i wouldn't mind a bit of all that!" simon hancock has been talking to some of those hoping to mint some films to print some films and make a mint. that sounded better in my head. over to you, simon. for over 100 years, hollywood has been the centre of the movie—making world. this is the city of angels, the city where people come every year to turn their dreams to reality. but those dreams, of course, don't come for free. while those in hollywood may be
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more used to massaging egos rather than breaking down the blockchain, it hasn't stopped them spotting an opportunity — and if there is one thing people here love more than anything else, it is opportunity. six months ago, i thought nft was a football club in germany — i'm not kidding. nft stuttgart or something. as a producer working with martin scorsese on the likes of the irishman and silence, nielsjuul is used to spending years trying to get films made. and despite the rise of streamers like netflix and apple, he believes it's getting more and more difficult to secure money for independent and mid—budget films. a movie like kramer vs kramer, for instance, or any big, great oscar movies that we all love and cherish, today — or at least in the last six years — would never have been made in this climate, because it's simply not possible to raise the money for it. and if you do, it's an average time of 5—6 years to get it financed, because it's a complex operation and it's complex how it works.
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his next film, though, won't be financed through traditional means. with several other investors, niels has started nft studios — a studio he believes can democratise film financing with tokens being minted and bought by an online community. when i heard about this, there was two aspects of it that was really, really interesting. one is that these are communities that very engaged in art and music and, you know, film, et cetera, but also, that they are engaged investors. and how interesting it would be to have people invest in something where they have an excitement to be involved in it from an art perspective orfrom a movie perspective. and then we started thinking, "oh, boy! "there's a marketing hub in every investor" — and as a producer, that's the best you can get. the studio plans to make a $10 million budget movie called a wing and a prayer, that focuses on the british adventurer brian milton and his quest to travel around the globe in an ultralight aircraft.
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the film's star will be announced next month and cameras are set to roll in malta on 14june. those willing to part with their hard—earned cash will secure tokens in the film and, a bit like some crowdfunding campaigns, will receive perks depending on the level of their contribution. they will also have a say in how the studio is run as part of a decentralised autonomous organisation, or dao. we don't want to have to put every single process to the dao, right? how much are we gonna pay the cameraman? how much are gonna allocate for catering when we're on malta, filming this movie? the decisions are too small and process is too long to leave everything up to the community, right? so what we want to do is let the community have this creative direction. what scripts are we gonna play? who's gonna compose the score? and, like, have that feeling of involvement without having to really deal with the really nitty—gritty stuff involved in this. coming from even like a marketing standpoint, there is no, like, "we must
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target this exact demographic, from the ages of 16 to 29 with this salary, from this place". that isjust not the case any more. we're — it's creating a decentralised world where people, everyone can be involved in the arts. you don't have to have millions of dollars to be involved in a film any more, and that's what's so exciting. but buying an nft can't force anyone to make a film and with all the risks in the movie game, what guarantees are there for contributors it will ever happen? we will make this movie, and i don't have a choice — we don't have a choice. we came out and said we're gonna do it, we're gonna have to do it — that's just how it is. and so, if i had to sell two of my children out of three, that's not so bad. i will sell — i don't know which one yet. i'll have to get back to you on that. no, but we will get it done. it is gold rush time for nfts, and notjust films. the market for movie memorabilia is potentially huge. and in this new frontier, that means headaches all round. this week, quentin tarantino put scans of handwritten pulp fiction script notes up for auction. i have the entire pulp fiction script, written in my own hand. the nft drop has led
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to a bitter legal battle between the filmmaker and miramax... mother... ! crash. ..the company behind the film. kal raustiala is a professor in international law and has written extensively about nfts. he thinks hollywood will be watching the outcome of the tarantino case closely. you know, there's so much money potentially to be made, but if it keeps flowing, there's gonna be disputes and the disputes, again, will turn on what does the given contract say? and no—one anticipated any of this. so this will not necessarily decide the issue, because every contract is a little bit different, but it will certainly help shape some of the debate in the courts, and also what's happening right now in town, here in la — how are contracts being written today? and then, will people team up to make the money or will they argue over the money? there is an air of desperation around nfting anything possible in the hopes that somehow, money will rain down. i'm not convinced that
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all of these things will work, but some of them may. so far, the big companies have been reluctant to abandon their usual financial methods in favour of community—led collaboration. that may well change if the nft space continues to attract deep pockets. my good friend phil said — he quoted me from moneyball, this movie moneyball, where he said, "if you want to be the first man to walk through a wall, you're going to expect a bloody nose". and we feel that way! but we are happy with it because we know that this industry needs some disruption. the financial system of this is broken. it hasn't kept up with a digital streamers at all. so, it is an industry that is lagging behind modern world, digital world, streaming world and new financings worlds, and so, yeah, we are the first and that's why also, we have — we feel the pressure. it's clear that change is on the horizon. whether nfts are part of that long term is a question that only audiences will be able to answer. shang—chi and the legend of the ten rings, one of the films from last year that proves there are glimmers of life returning
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to the box office. now, this is a marvel superhero origin story that combines impressive choreography with equally impressive visual effects and after seeing it, well, we had to find out how it was done, didn't we? you are a product of all who came before you. the legacy of your family. you are your mother. and whether you like it or not, you are also your father. music builds. we did the final battle with the good versus evil, the demons versus the humans. it's got everything that you really want to work on as a cg artist. it has, you know, dragons and beasts and massive effects, and kung fu fighting. i mean, it's pretty much everything you could possibly want. you know, it's this insane action, it's this crazy action beats going on, dragons, and then it's like, "oh yeah, but make it —
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try and make it realistic at the same time". and so, that was sort of our challenge is to always try and, you know, as fantastical as it is, try and ground it a little bit as well and not — not, yeah, not — not push it too far in either direction and, you know, from an emotion standpoint, just trying to keep it — that movement somewhat grounded in reality. and, you know, if you have got, you know, these two huge beasts fighting, you're — luckily, you have these two human characters there also, so you try and, you know, stick the camera around them, try and frame it from their prospective, which, luckily, gives you a lot of scale as well. we looked at a lot of reference, even for things like, you know, dragons, it was — we are trying to always find something that would give it an element of realism. like, we are looking at, you know, sea snakes and iguanas sort of moving through the ocean and how they sort of push their tail and move around, so it was some
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element of, yeah, realism, despite all the craziness that was going on. it always starts with good intentions. we've had a few of these on marvel shows where they shoot something and then, the story kind of changes a little bit so they — more than once, we've had to just roto the actors off the plates and replace it with an entirely cg environment. it's still a bit tricky to make it feel not quite stage—lit, you know, when you have an enclosed environment or a semi—enclosed environment, making sure that you can adjust the plate lighting to match the cg lighting and vice—versa, is a bit tricky at times. aside from the characters, we had to replace the entire environment. to get a rough idea of how render—intensive this show was, the water especially, the shot where the dragon encases the beast and all the demons are feeding him to power him up, the water alone would have taken a single—core processor 25 years to render.
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you can't outrun... ..who you really are. that is it for the short cut of this week's programme from la. the full—length version is waiting for you on iplayer. don't forget, we live on social media on facebook, youtube, instagram and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and nina warhurst. our headlines today: former conservative minister nusrat ghani tells the sunday times she was sacked from herjob, because of her muslim faith. the government chief whip mark spencer says her claim is completely false.
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the uk accuses vladimir putin of planning to install a pro—russia leader in ukraine, as fears of an invasion grow. a stray bullet killed british scientist matthew willson in the us city of atlanta — a witness who lives in the flat has told us about how the incident happened it wasn't just 20 or 30 it wasn'tjust 20 or 30 minutes. it kept on going until a bullet hit matthew. a moment of british skiing history. from the dry slopes of lancashire to the mountains of austria, dave ryding wins britain's first ever alpine skiing world cup gold medal — we'll be speaking to him in the next hour. good morning. a quiet one out there. high pressure still with us and that means a lot of dry weather. a lot of cloud making it feeljust a little bit colder with the winds strengthening in the far north—west of scotland later on. all the details coming up shortly.
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it's sunday, the 23rd of january. the conservative mp, nusrat ghani, has said her muslim faith was given as one of the reasons behind the decision to sack her as a minister two years ago. the education secretary, nadhim zahawi, has called for her claims to be properly investigated. the chief whip, mark spencer, has revealed he was the person who spoke to ms ghani, and insists her accusations are false. let's get more on this with our political correspondent, helen catt. helen, this was in an interview in the sunday times? a in the sunday times? story on the sunday times t( with a story on the sunday times today with nusrat ghani, the first muslim woman to ever speak from the dispatch bulge in the house of commons, in her role as minister of transport. —— dispatch box. she says when she was asking for an explanation a government whip told
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her muslim status and status as minister made colleagues uncomfortable. she was told if she did not drop the matter her career would be destroyed and she would be ostracised. last night the conservative chief whip mark spencer identified himself as the person being referred to. he said the accusations were completely false and defamatory and denied using the words she said he did. he said it was disappointing at the time she had declined it to matter to a formal investigation the party. it is expected that sue gray's report into downing street lockdown parties will come in the next day or two, now it's being reported that she's looking into event in the prime minister's private flat too? it is understood sue gray has widened her enquiry to investigate allegations there were gatherings in
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the flat with the prime minister and his wife lived and it is said there was two aides who were supposed to be friends of borisjohnson is a wife had visited the flat a number of times. initially sue gray had said that she accepted that was for work purposes but investigators wondered why there was so much time spent in downing street because they worked for the cabinet office. the foreign office says it's uncovered a plot by moscow to install a pro—russian leader in ukraine, amid increasing tension over a possible invasion. the kremlin has sent tens of thousands of troops to the ukrainian border in recent months. moscow has accused the uk of spreading "disinformation". our diplomatic correspondent paul adams reports. american weapons arriving in ukraine, 90 tonnes of what washington calls lethal aid. others including britain also sending supplies. hardly enough to defeat an invading russian army but the message to moscow is clear, "if you do this, it will come at a price".
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but now london and washington say they see signs of a russian plan to install a puppet government in kyiv after an invasion. pro—russian politicians, they say, in contact with russian intelligence officers involved in planning the attack. the foreign office says this man, former mp, yevheniy murayev, is being considered as a future leader by the kremlin. but four others named are thought to be in moscow. it is not clear what, if any role, they could realistically play. but russia's build—up goes on. it says, repeatedly, it has no plans to invade. fighter jets now flying to locations in belarus, north of ukraine. moscow says they will be carrying outjoint drills. but diplomacy also continues. friday's meeting in geneva settled nothing
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but the us secretary of state, antony blinken, has promised a written reply within days to russia's expensive demands. further talks could follow. british ministers are expected to travel to european capitals in the coming days. the defence secretary, ben wallace, likely to visit moscow. downing street says it plans to ramp up pressure on russia. sanctions being discussed among allies, the government says, would pierce the heart of the russian economy. paul adams, bbc news. police in the us city of atlanta say they're following up on a number of leads after the killing of british scientist matthew willson. mr willson had only arrived two days earlier to visit his girlfriend when he was hit by a stray bullet while lying in bed, after a number of shots were fired nearby. vincent macavinny reports. the final photograph of matthew
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willson taken on a visit to his girlfriend. the couple were woken up by gunshots in what police call a random and senseless act one of the shots penetrated the wall of the room hitting matthew. your mac a friend called 911. i room hitting matthew. your mac a friend called 911.— friend called 911. i saw he was l in: on friend called 911. i saw he was lying on the — friend called 911. i saw he was lying on the bed _ friend called 911. i saw he was lying on the bed and - friend called 911. i saw he was lying on the bed and we i friend called 911. i saw he was lying on the bed and we told i friend called 911. i saw he was i lying on the bed and we told 911 instantly and tried our best to stop the wound. a , instantly and tried our best to stop the wound-— instantly and tried our best to stop the wound. n, , .,, ., ., , the wound. matty was a former phd student at the _ the wound. matty was a former phd student at the university _ the wound. matty was a former phd student at the university of - the wound. matty was a former phd student at the university of exeter i student at the university of exeter no working remotely for university in belgium. the foreign office has said they are in contact with us authorities and are supporting the family of marty who have described him as a warm and wise person such a
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beautiful soul.— beautiful soul. graduate students don't have a _ beautiful soul. graduate students don't have a tonne _ beautiful soul. graduate students don't have a tonne of— beautiful soul. graduate students don't have a tonne of money. i beautiful soul. graduate students don't have a tonne of money. we | beautiful soul. graduate students i don't have a tonne of money. we are on a budget but we try to stay in the safest universe and this is one of the atlanta suburbs and is considered safe and he and catherine moved in in august last year and we heard shots back in october and we had called the cops that we had gunshots. but againjust had called the cops that we had gunshots. but again just a few shops go past in a couple of minutes and then in november and then we heard this time but this time the unusual part was the wasn't just a few shots or a few minutes, it kept going on for 20 or 30 minutes until one of the stray bullets hit matthew. police in the us are offering a reward for information. no arrests have been made but officers say they are determined to put those responsible behind bars.
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the first talks in europe involving senior taliban officials begin today in norway. the afghan delegation will meet envoys from the united states and european countries. taliban leaders are still subject to us and un sanctions. the talks will focus on ways of getting help to the millions of afghans short of food. it's ten past eight. some people in parts of the uk say they're waiting around a month for post arrive, as the royal mail struggles with covid—related staff absences. the regulator, ofcom, has told the service it must improve, after hundreds of complaints. we've been hearing from people who say the delays have caused them problems. we haven't seen what i would call the regular level of paused for a number of months. we never received any christmas cards and the bills which would normally come and we haven't received. thankfully we are
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paying them through direct debit. my daughter's party was at the beginning ofjanuary and she has had the cards she was expecting from the wider family to come the cards she was expecting from the widerfamily to come into the cards she was expecting from the wider family to come into the house and it has been quite sad for her. you have a letter for and it has been quite sad for her. you have a letterfor an and it has been quite sad for her. you have a letter for an appointment at the _ you have a letter for an appointment at the hospital and you get the letter— at the hospital and you get the letter after the date of the appointment and you are missing something is important in your life. i something is important in your life. | -et something is important in your life. i get a _ something is important in your life. i get a call— something is important in your life. i get a call on the 2nd of december when i am in a meeting and i didn't recognise it and i got a voice mail saying this is the cabinet office, we sent you a letter last week, you haven't responded, can you please call urgently. when i finally did get back i was there was a letter telling me i had been nominated for an mbe and had missed the deadline and could they please have me let them know whether i would accept it or not. i said yes, absolutely delighted to do so and then about a week or so later a letter drop
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through the letterbox dated the 29th of november which was the letter i should have had and should have responded back by the 3rd of december so if i hadn't had that phone call from a nice lady in the cabinet office i would have probably missed out on the mbe. we can speak now to ricky mcaulay, operations director at royal mail. hearing the very real and very human implications are notjust about christmas cards arriving late, somebody nearly missed an mbe and hospital appointments, it's real important letters arrive when they're supposed to. let important letters arrive when they're supposed to.- important letters arrive when they're supposed to. let me 'ust start by apologising i they're supposed to. let me 'ust start by apologising to i they're supposed to. let me 'ust start by apologising to alli they're supposed to. let me just start by apologising to all those| start by apologising to all those customers that are in the areas where we are seeing some delay. it has been a very challenging month through the back end of december into early january linked to the omicron variant and we have had some 15,000 colleagues absent from work either unwell or not able to attend
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or self isolating, double the level of absence and it puts a huge strain on all the postmen and women up and down the country. i would like to take this opportunity to thank them. they are doing an incrediblejob in very difficult circumstances but royal mail, like the nhs and the real industry has experienced very significant spikes in absence. == significant spikes in absence. -- the significant spikes in absence. —— the railway industry. what would you say to someone here said the omicron variant has impacted other businesses in the same way? i variant has impacted other businesses in the same way? i would sa we are businesses in the same way? i would say we are doing _ businesses in the same way? i would say we are doing everything - businesses in the same way? i would say we are doing everything we i say we are doing everything we possibly can. as we came out of the christmas period we retained up to 20,000 seasonal staff across all parts of our network. the nature of the omicron variant, when you get an isolation, it is a very big spike so whilst it is double the level of absence in some areas had one third of employees absent, it takes is a little bit of time to get on top of
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that and get everything moving through to our customers and we are doing everything we possibly can to make sure we get back to normal service everywhere. i looked ten days ago, we had 15,000 people. for thousand of those people are back at work and on the royal mail website we have published areas that have some form of delay which is dropped from 77 to 18 and we expect that improvement to continue. £311" from 77 to 18 and we expect that improvement to continue. our viewers miaht improvement to continue. our viewers might sympathise _ improvement to continue. our viewers might sympathise with _ improvement to continue. our viewers might sympathise with the _ improvement to continue. our viewers might sympathise with the situation i might sympathise with the situation but will want to know when things will get back to normal from your perspective. what are you doing extra to make sure things improve? we are working on today myself to give some support so everyone is very much committed to working through the hours, additional staff
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have been brought in and some 20,000 retained and the get placed into the units that need the support most and we are working very, very hard to make sure we get back to the normal high levels of service people expect from royal mail.— from royal mail. wants the ofcom warnin: from royal mail. wants the ofcom warning mean _ from royal mail. wants the ofcom warning mean to _ from royal mail. wants the ofcom warning mean to you? _ from royal mail. wants the ofcom warning mean to you? how- from royal mail. wants the ofcom warning mean to you? how does l from royal mail. wants the ofcomj warning mean to you? how does it mean things will have to change? we are in mean things will have to change? , are in constant contact with ofcom have been since start of the pandemic and are very open with ofcom about some of the challenges that we are facing. in truth, we respond to the need of the customer. we know in pockets we have not been at our best and will share with ofcom everything we have done in response but our motivation is to make sure we get back to our very best for our customers as quickly as we possibly can. pare best for our customers as quickly as we possibly can-— we possibly can. are you concerned that in the meantime _ we possibly can. are you concerned that in the meantime customers i we possibly can. are you concerned i that in the meantime customers may decide to go with different delivery companies? the decide to go with different delivery comanies? ., , decide to go with different delivery companies?— decide to go with different delivery com anies? ., ., ., , ., companies? the vast ma'ority of the r0 al mail companies? the vast ma'ority of the royal mail network i companies? the vast ma'ority of the royal mail network is i companies? the vast majority of the royal mail network is operating i companies? the vast majority of the royal mail network is operating very j royal mail network is operating very well. we have 18 depots experiencing
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some delay and high absence levels. those are the ones we are supporting. actually, the vast majority of the network is working well up and down the country. as i said at the start, i would like to apologise to those customers that have been impacted. we have had delays and we are working incredibly hard to make sure they are minimised as much as possible.— as much as possible. imagine you can't ut as much as possible. imagine you can't put a _ as much as possible. imagine you can't put a timeframe _ as much as possible. imagine you can't put a timeframe on - as much as possible. imagine you can't put a timeframe on when i as much as possible. imagine you i can't put a timeframe on when things are back to normal.— are back to normal. omicron are still with us _ are back to normal. omicron are still with us and _ are back to normal. omicron are still with us and we _ are back to normal. omicron are still with us and we take - are back to normal. omicron are still with us and we take all i are back to normal. omicron are still with us and we take all the l still with us and we take all the precautions you can in the workplace following public health england guidance of the devolved authorities to make sure we do everything we can to make sure we do everything we can to protect our people and limit the level of absence. we have retained additional resource at work but i can't predict exactly what happens with absence levels going forward. we are taking significant amounts of action up and down the country and our employees are working massively hard to make sure we're back to our best for all customers. you
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hard to make sure we're back to our best for all customers.— best for all customers. you have said many _ best for all customers. you have said many times _ best for all customers. you have said many times you _ best for all customers. you have said many times you are - best for all customers. you have i said many times you are absolutely doing your best and i'm sure your staff are working very hard and trying to follow the covid rules. which areas we do need to think twice about sending a letter in advance, where are the hotspots? fin advance, where are the hotspots? on the royal mail website we have service disruption areas. there are 18 delivery depot is highlighted there. it is not that the products won't get through, there might be a delay and we are very transparent, one of the few delivery companies that publish areas where we have delay but there was a visible on the website. that is 18 of 1002 and 50 depots. the royal mail network is running well. depots. the royal mail network is running well-— running well. that is some useful advice. i running well. that is some useful advice- i hope — running well. that is some useful advice. i hope things _ running well. that is some useful advice. i hope things get - running well. that is some useful advice. i hope things get better. running well. that is some useful. advice. i hope things get better for you all soon. it has been some gorgeous winter
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weather but apparently it's going to change. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. this is my kind of weather, crisp underfoot. this was norwich yesterday and 24 hours later this is this morning. a blanket of cloud sitting across much of the country today. it is preventable temperatures falling far. frost free for this morning but a pretty drab sunday ahead. dry, bare that in mind. high pressure drifting off into the near continent, quite a lot of cloud feeding and behind that high and coming in from the west. it is milder but unfortunately that means we continue with tressle on exposed west facing course. quite a great start for many. some glimpses of sunshine likely to be brief and the cloud tending to come and go. areas that may keep that thick cloud all day, for example norwich, their
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temperatures will struggle. when satellite and will not shift the cloud around at all. here temperatures peaking at 5 degrees and 6 degrees but further north and west that is where the mildest of the weather is likely to be. top temperatures nine celsius. through the evening not much change and similar overnight. some breaks in the cloud from time to time and patchy mist and fog but we keep the cloud for most of us and will see outbreaks of rain develop into the far north of scotland as the winds gust to gale force with the rain. here are around 7 degrees first thing on monday and a little colder for the south. again still a quiet story. high pressure drifting away allowing these frontal systems to slowly push in. taking its time in doing so and on the whole for monday across england and wales a lot of cloud, a grey day. further north the cloud, a grey day. further north the cloud may break up the sunshine and a weak weather front producing
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nuisance rain through the course of monday. temperatures pretty similar to what we have seen over the weekend. as we move into tuesday we could potentially start to see the arrival of another weather front which might bring heavy rain. that will gradually sink steadily south. it means we will see some wetter weather on wednesday through the north. that may well push across england and wales wednesday night into thursday but once that front clears through we are back to dryer hopefully sunnier and just a bit milder. each week ros atkins takes an in—depth look at new stories making the headlines, and today he explains the reasons each week ros atkins takes an in—depth look at new stories making the headlines, and today he explains the reasons behind china's 'zero covid' policy. in europe, there are millions of cases of covid every week.
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in china, there are very few. and china's commitment to its zero covid strategy remains as strong as ever. translation: china's overall situation remains stable i and regional clusters of locally transmitted cases can be effectively controlled within a short period of time. and this is what effective control means in practice. they discovered three asymptomatic cases — three — and that has led, within a very short period of time to a city with over! million people being shut down. zero covid means lockdowns. it means testing on a huge scale. it means disinfecting public transport ahead of a busy travel season. it means quarantine camps for those suspected of having covid. as well as that, officials are warning against ordering things from overseas. they believe omicron may have arrived in beijing via infected mailfrom canada. there is even a hamster cull in hong kong after cases were traced to a pet shop.
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the virus may have first been identified in china but, as you can see, it very much wants to keep it out now — and so far, largely, it has. there have beenjust over 100,000 cases recorded in china since the start of the pandemic, almost two years ago. compare that to the us and the uk, where there have been tens of millions. and china's low case numbers have meant a low official death toll, too. here, you can see china compared with the uk and us with the us heading towards a million deaths, china is in the low thousands. in fact, there hasn't been a covid death in china for months and supporters of zero covid say that that makes the case. they also point to the chinese economy. official data shows that china's gdp grew by over 8% last year — that exceeded most expectations. there are, though, caveats. my colleague mariko oi explains. now, china's strict zero covid policy has meant that some major cities started to go back into lockdown from last month, due to the omicron variant, and we have yet to see the full
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impact of that. for now, though, china believes its zero covid strategy has worked, for the economy and for public health. but sooner, rather than later, it faces a decision — how long to stick with zero covid? and it may have its hand forced. omicron is popping up across the country and the will find it difficult to prevent it spreading. —— the world. ——they will. we know omicron is highly transmissible and variants pose a challenge to zero covid policies. we've seen that in australia. the arrival of the delta variant forced the government to change tack. prime minister scott morrison abandoned zero covid last year, saying that australia would now
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live with the virus. or there's new zealand. while visiting from overseas remains limited, prime ministerjacinda ardern did say this last october. now we do. so we can begin to change the way we do things. vaccines. they are the route out of zero covid. vaccinate the population, then ease restrictions — that's the theory. and according to chinese government health officials, over 1.2 billion people in china have been vaccinated — that's nearly 90% of the population. we also know two of china's vaccines, sinopharm and sinovac have been approved for emergency use by the who, but there's an issue. when it comes to omicron, the reality is that china will be still reliant on its zero covid strategy. neither sinopharm nor sinovac do give a high degree of support against the omicron or against the delta strains, of course, which we are still worried about. that's right. there is evidence that china's vaccines are not as effective as western vaccines, like moderna and pfizer. a top chinese official admitted last april that its vaccines don't have very high rates of protection. now, the same official later said
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he had been misinterpreted. but lynette ong from the university of toronto says this issue is real. this is another reason why the government is very concerned about relaxing its control and they are not willing as of note to import vaccines, they're not willing to tell the rest of the world the chinese are simply not as effective. —— the chinese vaccines. so already, we have seen a number of reasons why ending zero covid isn't easy for china. it has succeeded in minimising covid deaths but it also does not want to admit the limitations of its vaccines and, in turn, those limitations mean its population is less protected. as well as that, because cases are low, china has a population without any natural immunity from prior infection. and because of all of these reasons — and others, too — a recent study by china's centre for disease control
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concluded this, that if western strategies were adopted, it it would cause infection throughout the nation. and so for now, keeping covid out remains a priority for china. and there are two other factors that are relevant to this. the first — well, that's the winter olympics, in beijing this february. china does not want any covid disruptions during this moment on the world stage, so foreign spectators are barred, tickets are not being sold, and such measures appear to be popular. translation: as bei'ing is china's capital city,i the prevention measures here are definitely a bit stricter. tickets not being sold is a way of epidemic prevention, so i support it. the other key event this year is the national party congress in october. it's held every five years — these pictures are from the last one in 2017. and this congress decides the future leadership of the chinese communist party and, in turn, the leadership of china. now, president xi jinping is already the most powerful chinese ruler since chairman mao. but in 2018, he abolished presidential term limits and this autumn, we are
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expecting him to be confirmed for a third term. that looks all but certain. but it remains a politically sensitive moment and president xi does not want rising covid cases to complicate that. he has, though, talked of life beyond covid. translation: we must do everything necessary to clear the shadow - of the pandemic and boost economic and social recovery and development so that the sunshine of hope may light up the future of humanity. and that is the rub — how to move clear of "the shadow of the pandemic" when that will involve letting the virus in with all of the uncertainty that comes with that. in the short—term. in a recent report, it concludes: and as we consider this, bear in mind what the world health organisation recently said about the uk. i'm saying i can see where the end is, i can see light at the end
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of the tunnel, but i really do anticipate, right throughout the world, a bumpyjourney ahead during 2022. "light at the end of the tunnel," says the who. president xi talked of "the sunshine of hope". but china and the west are in two quite different places. the west has lost many more people but it's edging towards a life not dominated by the management of this virus. china, with its strict lockdowns and travel restrictions, is not. and for all the political, pr and public health reasons we've considered, it's unlikely to make that move anytime soon. borisjohnson is at chequers this weekend, the prime minister's offical countryside retreat. a report into parties at number 10 during lockdown is expected in the next few days. to try and get an idea of what we can expect, let's speak to george parker from the financial times, and the economics editor for the independent, anne isaac.
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george, there is so much going on right now. give me a sense of what we might hear. i think all eyes are on this su grey enquiry in terms of lockdown parties. we thought we might be getting it last week but it looks like this because when it lands. ,, , , . lands. sue gray is the sinner civil servant -- _ lands. sue gray is the sinner civil servant -- senior— lands. sue gray is the sinner civil servant -- senior civil _ lands. sue gray is the sinner civil servant -- senior civil servant i servant —— senior civil servant looking into parties in downing street and elsewhere across the government estate across lockdown and more and more events have emerged which is why it was delayed from from last week. we expected to come on monday or tuesday or possibly wednesday next week. the prime minister is often extremely anxious about what she has to say on one of the reasons why he is at his country retreat with his team making phone calls to ministers and to potentially rebellious mps to try to shore up his position before the
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report comes out because that is a darkening mood i sense about how punchy the sue gray report will actually be. is punchy the sue gray report will actually be— punchy the sue gray report will actually be. is that your sense it will be quite _ actually be. is that your sense it will be quite damning _ actually be. is that your sense it will be quite damning when i actually be. is that your sense it will be quite damning when it i actually be. is that your sense it i will be quite damning when it comes out? . . will be quite damning when it comes out? . , ., , ., out? the latest of elements we have heard about — out? the latest of elements we have heard about in _ out? the latest of elements we have heard about in reports _ out? the latest of elements we have heard about in reports this _ out? the latest of elements we have heard about in reports this weekend | heard about in reports this weekend suggests— heard about in reports this weekend suggests it could be quite challenging, particularly if it does as reports— challenging, particularly if it does as reports suggest, look into the movements of people in and out of the downing street flat. there are some _ the downing street flat. there are some reports suggesting that aids known _ some reports suggesting that aids known to— some reports suggesting that aids known to be friends of carrie johnson _ known to be friends of carrie johnson was seen there and without explanation is that it becomes very difficult _ explanation is that it becomes very difficult situation for the prime minister— difficult situation for the prime minister if that proves to be correct _ minister if that proves to be correct. use of swipe card data will make _ correct. use of swipe card data will make it _ correct. use of swipe card data will make it very— correct. use of swipe card data will make it very hard to determine if you have — make it very hard to determine if you have chosen to give a lighter account — you have chosen to give a lighter account of— you have chosen to give a lighter account of what happened versus a full someone. that could be quite challenging for people, particularly if they— challenging for people, particularly if they are found to have been in the building at a certain time and they may— the building at a certain time and they may have said they went away
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they may have said they went away the party— they may have said they went away the party going on its wood does look like — the party going on its wood does look like it is going to be perhaps more _ look like it is going to be perhaps more thorough than some people expected — more thorough than some people expected. the timing may or may not change _ expected. the timing may or may not change it— expected. the timing may or may not change it is— expected. the timing may or may not change. it is hard to tell, i am finding, — change. it is hard to tell, i am finding, because it has shifted so many— finding, because it has shifted so many times but i think short of another— many times but i think short of another huge development it is very likely— another huge development it is very likely to _ another huge development it is very likely to come middle of next week. i do likely to come middle of next week. i do agree _ likely to come middle of next week. i do agree with george the mood has .ot a i do agree with george the mood has got a bit _ i do agree with george the mood has got a bit darker and the sense of people _ got a bit darker and the sense of people have held back in terms of backing _ people have held back in terms of backing the prime minister until the investigation is published but i think— investigation is published but i think they will need to see signs of exoneration, notjust not too bad beating _ exoneration, notjust not too bad beating on— exoneration, notjust not too bad beating on the findings to determine what they— beating on the findings to determine what they do next and that is a sense — what they do next and that is a sense that unless it is much better—than—expected they may not back the _ better—than—expected they may not back the prime minister and a few days ago— back the prime minister and a few days ago there was thought it would be the _ days ago there was thought it would be the other way around.
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you say the move may be darkening, so how will that play out? what will everyone be positioning to do right now? , ., , ., now? the problem for the prime minister is _ now? the problem for the prime minister is the _ now? the problem for the prime minister is the mood _ now? the problem for the prime minister is the mood in - now? the problem for the prime minister is the mood in the i minister is the mood in the parliamentary party is very feeble rail and there is almost toys and running through parts of the party and you can see discipline breaking down. it is hard tojudge what people are going to do next. that is what the challenge is for boris johnson. last week, the mood oscillated up and down, is he going to go, is he going to stay? my sense is, the mood is deteriorating quite quickly. borisjohnson has his favoured supporters with him to try and fight on if there is this vote of confidence. there is a growing acceptance that they will be able to assemble the 54 letters required to
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trigger the nonconfidence vote. borisjohnson trigger the nonconfidence vote. boris johnson says trigger the nonconfidence vote. borisjohnson says he will fight on but it becomes much more difficult for him and to see how he will survive as the leadership contenders limber up in the paddock outside. who is limbering up? that limber up in the paddock outside. who is limbering up?— who is limbering up? that people exect to who is limbering up? that people expect to challenge _ who is limbering up? that people expect to challenge would - who is limbering up? that people expect to challenge would be i who is limbering up? that people| expect to challenge would be rishi sunak, liz truss, the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, the former health secretary and foreign secretary. he says his ambitions haven't been dimmed. and other people could emerge, people talk increasingly about nadeem sahalee, the education secretary, the vaccine minister is a potential candidate and someone who you have heard less about, the chairman of the foreign affairs committee. a load of people fancy their chances and it gets very messy at that point. boris johnson
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has to stop it getting to the point where there is a vote of no confidence. d0 where there is a vote of no confidence.— where there is a vote of no confidence. , ., , ., ., confidence. do you see a world in which ltoris _ confidence. do you see a world in which boris johnson _ confidence. do you see a world in which boris johnson will - confidence. do you see a world in which boris johnson willjust i confidence. do you see a world in i which boris johnson willjust decide which borisjohnson willjust decide to walk away, or will it be the vote of no confidence to take him down? by of no confidence to take him down? by all accounts, his mood has shifted — by all accounts, his mood has shifted quite a lot, oscillating, as george _ shifted quite a lot, oscillating, as george described through the party, and also _ george described through the party, and also through number ten with mr johnson, _ and also through number ten with mr johnson, according to people i talk to. johnson, according to people i talk to at— johnson, according to people i talk to. at times he feels keen to fight on, to. at times he feels keen to fight on. at _ to. at times he feels keen to fight on. at other— to. at times he feels keen to fight on, at other times he seems less confident— on, at other times he seems less confident in— on, at other times he seems less confident in his abilities to survive _ confident in his abilities to survive this. i think the biggest test is — survive this. i think the biggest test is the _ survive this. i think the biggest test is the fact that this has become _ test is the fact that this has become about much more about the party. _ become about much more about the party. it— become about much more about the party. it has— become about much more about the party, it has become a broader examination of the leadership, conversation about levelling up, this much— conversation about levelling up, this much awaited white paper will materialise and how convincing an argument — materialise and how convincing an argument that will be. it has become about— argument that will be. it has become about whether the government can deal with— about whether the government can deal with the of living crisis ahead
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of february the 7th, when we find out how— of february the 7th, when we find out how much energy bills will rise in april _ out how much energy bills will rise in april it — out how much energy bills will rise in april. it has become much more about— in april. it has become much more about the — in april. it has become much more about the future of the government and winning the next election. as soon _ and winning the next election. as soon as— and winning the next election. as soon as that becomes the conversation, it becomes much bigger and harder— conversation, it becomes much bigger and harder to survive itjust on the basis _ and harder to survive itjust on the basis on _ and harder to survive itjust on the basis on the — and harder to survive itjust on the basis on the outcome of the investigation. we have to offer your mps a _ investigation. we have to offer your mps a comprehensive plan for government in the next two years in the lead _ government in the next two years in the lead up — government in the next two years in the lead up to the election.- the lead up to the election. george, as if the party _ the lead up to the election. george, as if the party investigation - the lead up to the election. george, as if the party investigation was i as if the party investigation was not difficult enough for everyone in westminster right now, we know william wragg will speak to met police in the house of commons about allegations of coercion and pressure on mp5 when it comes to some of the handling around this. that will also be front and centre of discussions this week and about whether that may change the thinking of mps who say they have been pressured into acting in a certain way? that they have been pressured into acting in a certain way?— in a certain way? that is true, these are _ in a certain way? that is true,
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these are serious _ in a certain way? that is true, i these are serious investigations from william wragg. we know rough stuff has been going on in the wet�*s office, but these are parliamentary enforcers whose job it is to get the government's business three. they always use flattery and threats to get what they want, but the fact that this has been referred to the police by william wragg takes it to a different level. it illustrates the level of ill feeling, almost nastiness that is starting to circulate in parts of the conservative party. it makes the party itself very difficult to manage. there is a general view that the whipping operation, often the allegations of a rough stuff has broken down in terms of party discipline as well. i think it boris johnson to survive through next week, one of the things he will do is start to clear out of those party whips to try to make a new start. there will be a lot of throwing people overboard by the prime minister to save his own job.
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finally, you are hanging off every twist and turn of this, so are we, so are you, george, but i have heard people say, it is just what politicians have always done, always been one rule for them, and another for the rest of us. do been one rule for them, and another for the rest of us.— for the rest of us. do they care? i was doing — for the rest of us. do they care? i was doing a _ for the rest of us. do they care? i was doing a general— for the rest of us. do they care? i was doing a general chit - for the rest of us. do they care? i was doing a general chit chat i for the rest of us. do they care? i i was doing a general chit chat with people _ was doing a general chit chat with people around here for a piece i am working _ people around here for a piece i am working on— people around here for a piece i am working on and it it has cut through harder_ working on and it it has cut through harder than— working on and it it has cut through harder than a lot of other things that have — harder than a lot of other things that have dominated the agenda. these _ that have dominated the agenda. these are — that have dominated the agenda. these are just general rules, they are things — these are just general rules, they are things for flat decoration, where — are things for flat decoration, where people were aware of it, and there _ where people were aware of it, and there was— where people were aware of it, and there was a — where people were aware of it, and there was a lot of debate and discussion about bass and the funding — discussion about bass and the funding of it, people were aware of it, funding of it, people were aware of it. annoyed — funding of it, people were aware of it, annoyed by it and then thought it, annoyed by it and then thought it wasn't— it, annoyed by it and then thought it wasn't that important. this isn't a buggy— it wasn't that important. this isn't a buggy story. people have vivid memories— a buggy story. people have vivid memories of how difficult some of these _ memories of how difficult some of these rules were. i talk to a retail
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worker— these rules were. i talk to a retail worker said — these rules were. i talk to a retail worker said they were going to leave retail— worker said they were going to leave retail because it is too difficult trying — retail because it is too difficult trying to— retail because it is too difficult trying to wear a mask wearing in the shop and _ trying to wear a mask wearing in the shop and people have not reacted well when — shop and people have not reacted well when they were asked to wear their mass — well when they were asked to wear their mass. it has cut through to people _ their mass. it has cut through to people because their whole lives were _ people because their whole lives were affected by these rules and i definitely— were affected by these rules and i definitely say it is notjust another— definitely say it is notjust another westminster bubble story and people _ another westminster bubble story and people are _ another westminster bubble story and people are reading about this, they are listening to this and they are interested — are listening to this and they are interested in terms of what the investigation finds and what comes next _ investigation finds and what comes next. it— investigation finds and what comes next. , investigation finds and what comes next. . . investigation finds and what comes next. , . , , ., , investigation finds and what comes next. , . , . next. it will be a big story, and potentially _ next. it will be a big story, and potentially this _ next. it will be a big story, and potentially this week _ next. it will be a big story, and potentially this week the - next. it will be a big story, and. potentially this week the results next. it will be a big story, and - potentially this week the results of that enquiry. george and anna, thank you so much for your time this morning. for a fora man for a man who grew up with not much snow in lancashire, dry ski slope, he has done good? it is, dave ryder, we will be talking about this in the days to come. he achieved something
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that no one has ever done before. he won britain's first alpine cup gold medal. which is a stunning 20 grew up medal. which is a stunning 20 grew up in lancashire with no snow around him. plenty of cold, plenty of rain, just none of the white stuff which is crucial if you want to be successful at skiing. good morning. the dreams of slalom skier dave ryding have become a reality. the briton who learnt to ski at six on a dry ski slope in lancashire winning alpine world cup gold. the 35—year—old taking top spot on the podium after a brilliant run on one of the most prestigiouis ski runs in the world in kitzbuel, austria. we'll be finiding out what this means for the him and the team heading into the winter olympics, but first adam wild on how he did it. british alpine skiing has never before reached such heights. in more than half a century of world cup competition, there is not a brit who has done more than dave ryding was doing here.
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sixth after his opening run, by the time he'd reached the bottom of his second, ryding was on top. commentator: he dips, he dives, he gets there! l come on! yes! in the lead, only one other skier could stop him. and ryding, great britain, has won! always happens when you don't expect it. it has been a long road. it was more disbelief when i realised i had done it. i did not know what to say, just that it was crazy. winning world cup gold seems a world away from the dry slopes of britain. this was how ryding learned to ski. often have to dodge sheep — a skill that would come in useful on the slalom's snow. now at 35, he's become the event's oldest ever world cup winner. the winter olympics are less than a fortnight away and in the alpine snow, british skiing hopes are warming up nicely. adam wild, bbc news.
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we were hoping to speak to dave, but we've got a last minute substitute. vicky gosling, chief exceutive of gb snowsportjoins us now. good morning, vicky. morning. was dave partying _ good morning, vicky. morning. was dave partying too — good morning, vicky. morning. was dave partying too hard _ good morning, vicky. morning. was dave partying too hard last - good morning, vicky. morning. was dave partying too hard last night? i dave partying too hard last night? he is exhausted, as you would imagine. not so much partying because we have the olympics in a couple of weeks. but what he achieved is huge. i couple of weeks. but what he achieved is huge.— couple of weeks. but what he achieved is huge. couple of weeks. but what he achieved is hue. . , achieved is huge. i imagine he needs achieved is huge. i imagine he needs a lie down after _ achieved is huge. i imagine he needs a lie down after that. _ achieved is huge. i imagine he needs a lie down after that. it _ achieved is huge. i imagine he needs a lie down after that. it was - achieved is huge. i imagine he needs a lie down after that. it was a - a lie down after that. it was a momentous moment, but it into context for us?— momentous moment, but it into context for us? this is absolutely massive for _ context for us? this is absolutely massive for britain. _ context for us? this is absolutely massive for britain. we - context for us? this is absolutely massive for britain. we have - context for us? this is absolutely | massive for britain. we have seen over the couple of years, we have got more athletes across more podiums in snow sport than in british history. alpine is really tough, you highlighted why it is tough, you highlighted why it is tough, not having the mountain ranges on our doorsteps and lots of
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snow. the fact dave has got... is so significant for this country and where we are heading on this trajectory with snow sports now and the timing for beijing couldn't be any better. irate the timing for bei'ing couldn't be an better. ~ . ., the timing for bei'ing couldn't be an better. ~ .., ., the timing for bei'ing couldn't be any better._ any better. we will come to the winters in _ any better. we will come to the winters in a _ any better. we will come to the winters in a moment, _ any better. we will come to the winters in a moment, but - any better. we will come to the winters in a moment, but as . any better. we will come to the j winters in a moment, but as far any better. we will come to the i winters in a moment, but as far as the sport and what dave has achieved, growing up in lancashire and learning to ski on a dry ski slope, he didn't ski on actual snow until he was 13, in terms of inspiring people, he has done that with this momentous achievement? he: has one of those unconquered spirits and the fact he has that mental determination, he is clearly, one of the best in the well, if not the best in the well technically in this discipline. it hasn't done him too much harm in how he has trained. but showing the nation what can be done and what can be done with dry slopes and what can be done with dry slopes and the snow domes and building those skills and taking it to the
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mountains is really exciting. that will create that belief hopefully and we will see a lot more people taking part and more people driving forward. we need to open up the opportunity, take down the barriers and get more people doing it. for a british person _ and get more people doing it. for a british person taking _ and get more people doing it. for a british person taking on _ and get more people doing it. for a british person taking on the established skiing nations, he was up established skiing nations, he was up against an olympic champion yesterday, kind of says how much he has managed to achieve in that time, when he doesn't have mountains of snow on his doorstep? it is snow on his doorstep? it is literally getting _ snow on his doorstep? it is literally getting the - snow on his doorstep? it 3 literally getting the divers to be training nonstop with no diving board other cyclists with no velodrome. we don't have that here, but what we have is some good snow domes and dry slopes. it really sets the bar about what can be done if you are given a disadvantage from the get go. we have been up against david and brexit, now he is reaching the heights of beyond anybody in britain. he has set up our people
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will be striving to achieve, because it is fantastic.— it is fantastic. you talk about achieving _ it is fantastic. you talk about achieving heights, _ it is fantastic. you talk about achieving heights, he - it is fantastic. you talk about achieving heights, he is- it is fantastic. you talk about| achieving heights, he is doing it is fantastic. you talk about i achieving heights, he is doing it it is fantastic. you talk about - achieving heights, he is doing it in the latter stages of his career, this will be his fourth olympics in beijing. his previous results, 27th, 17th and ninth, so in 2022, what is the realistic expectation for him? he has just shown you what he can achieve. actually, he has got better with age, hasn't he? he has a ways been good, but i don't think his age has held him back, he is strong physically and mentally and he puts that commitment and dedication in. anything is possible and faced with his unconquered spirit, the other nations have something to be scared of. , .., ., nations have something to be scared of. , ., ,�* of. dave is coming for them, isn't he? he is— of. dave is coming for them, isn't he? he is coming _ of. dave is coming for them, isn't he? he is coming for— of. dave is coming for them, isn't he? he is coming for them, - he? he is coming for them, absolutely. _ he? he is coming for them, absolutely. all _ he? he is coming for them, absolutely. all the - he? he is coming for them, absolutely. all the other . absolutely. all the other competitors, it will be so exciting when you look across what we are putting on snow from snowboard cross
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and then across the spectrum, it is brilliant. . . ~ and then across the spectrum, it is brilliant. . ~' , ., and then across the spectrum, it is brilliant. . ,, , ., ., brilliant. vicky, thank you for ste- -|n~ brilliant. vicky, thank you for stepping in — brilliant. vicky, thank you for stepping in this _ brilliant. vicky, thank you for stepping in this morning, - brilliant. vicky, thank you for l stepping in this morning, many thanks. mr; stepping in this morning, many thanks. y . stepping in this morning, many thanks. g , . ~ stepping in this morning, many thanks. g , ., ~' stepping in this morning, many thanks. g , ., m thanks. my pleasure, thank you. if dave is enjoying — thanks. my pleasure, thank you. if dave is enjoying a _ thanks. my pleasure, thank you. if dave is enjoying a nice _ thanks. my pleasure, thank you. if dave is enjoying a nice lie - thanks. my pleasure, thank you. if dave is enjoying a nice lie in - thanks. my pleasure, thank you. if dave is enjoying a nice lie in this . dave is enjoying a nice lie in this morning, of all the mornings, this has got to be it. vicky was a superstar, wasn't she? she was, giving us a sense of what we can expect from our athletes, those taking part across a range of different disciplines. for dave, what he has done previously, even though after a performance like this, will this be his moment. just a taster. exciting. are you going to get your skis on now? no. in a word. cold and dangerous. it is a touchy subject. i will be on my own. thank you, john. you are with breakfast from bbc news. a schoolboy who cares for his disabled mum in their council flat has been awarded an £80,000
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scholarship to study at eton. 15—year—old ilyan is, understandably, overjoyed about what this means for his future. let's speak to him and mum, lalia now. good morning to you both. so lovely to see you this morning. tell us what this means, you have on this great scholarship and you will be starting at eton pretty soon. talk me through how excited you are, what are you planning? i am me through how excited you are, what are you planning?— are you planning? i am ecstatic. over the moon. _ are you planning? i am ecstatic. over the moon. it _ are you planning? i am ecstatic. over the moon. it is _ are you planning? i am ecstatic. over the moon. it is an - are you planning? i am ecstatic. l over the moon. it is an incredible opportunity. thanks to this, my future looks genuinely so bright. i think i can achieve something, thanks to this award.— think i can achieve something, thanks to this award. explain a bit about your — thanks to this award. explain a bit about your role _ thanks to this award. explain a bit about your role in _ thanks to this award. explain a bit about your role in looking - thanks to this award. explain a bit about your role in looking after. about your role in looking after your mum as well. you have not only got this amazing scholarship, you have been doing it whilst caring for your mum?— have been doing it whilst caring for your mum? yes, she has a medical
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condition called _ your mum? yes, she has a medical condition called decker-macro, - your mum? yes, she has a medical. condition called decker-macro, which condition called decker—macro, which causes slurred speech, partial blindness. i have been cooking, cleaning and helping her with day—to—day tasks, some times are changing and going to the toilet. lalia, what do you make of your boy? i am so proud of him. even when i was -- _ i am so proud of him. even when i was -- he— i am so proud of him. even when i was -- he was— i am so proud of him. even when i was —— he was a little boy, he was a miracle _ was —— he was a little boy, he was a miracle because i spent seven years trying _ miracle because i spent seven years trying to— miracle because i spent seven years trying to have him. he is so caring. he is— trying to have him. he is so caring. he is all— trying to have him. he is so caring. he is all what— trying to have him. he is so caring. he is all what am... sorry, because of he is allwhat am... sorry, because of nry— he is all what am... sorry, because of my emotions. because of my conditions. _ of my emotions. because of my conditions, sometimes i can't really talk properly, sorry for that. don�*t
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talk properly, sorry for that. don't a oloaise talk properly, sorry for that. don't apologise at _ talk properly, sorry for that. don't apologise at all. _ talk properly, sorry for that. don't apologise at all. ilyan, _ talk properly, sorry for that. don't apologise at all. ilyan, tell- talk properly, sorry for that. don't apologise at all. ilyan, tell us - apologise at all. ilyan, tell us about the application process, because it was pretty gruelling? yes, eversince because it was pretty gruelling? yes, ever since i was young, i have always wanted to go to college. i applied, filled out the registration and then there were entrance exams and then there were entrance exams and interviews for a couple of days, i had to spend the night there. it was quite challenging, i was with other peoples who all wanted the same scholarship i did. dare other peoples who all wanted the same scholarship i did.— same scholarship i did. are you nervous? _ same scholarship i did. are you nervous? honestly, _ same scholarship i did. are you nervous? honestly, it- same scholarship i did. are you nervous? honestly, it is- same scholarship i did. are you nervous? honestly, it is really| nervous? honestly, it is really excitina , nervous? honestly, it is really exciting. but _ nervous? honestly, it is really exciting, but at _ nervous? honestly, it is really exciting, but at the _ nervous? honestly, it is really exciting, but at the same - nervous? honestly, it is reallyj exciting, but at the same time nervous? honestly, it is really i exciting, but at the same time it nervous? honestly, it is really - exciting, but at the same time it is a complete, new experience so i genuinely don't know what to expect. lalia, what are you going to do without him?— lalia, what are you going to do without him? ~ , . lalia, what are you going to do without him? ~ , , ., without him? when they invited us to co without him? when they invited us to no there without him? when they invited us to go there and — without him? when they invited us to
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go there and asked _ without him? when they invited us to go there and asked us _ without him? when they invited us to go there and asked us to _ without him? when they invited us to go there and asked us to spend - without him? when they invited us to go there and asked us to spend two l go there and asked us to spend two days there — go there and asked us to spend two days there for the interviews and exams, — days there for the interviews and exams, it— days there for the interviews and exams, it is— days there for the interviews and exams, it is when i discovered what is really— exams, it is when i discovered what is really eaten. i had heard about it, is really eaten. i had heard about it. lrut— is really eaten. i had heard about it. but i_ is really eaten. i had heard about it, but i didn't really know the situation _ it, but i didn't really know the situation. but when i was there, first of— situation. but when i was there, first of all— situation. but when i was there, first of all they were very welcoming. i was expecting people, first of all they were very welcoming. iwas expecting people, i felt people were down to earth, but the positive imagery and good bad. ilyan canre — the positive imagery and good bad. ilyan came to me and he said, i can see nryself— ilyan came to me and he said, i can see myself here. i said, i can see you _ see myself here. i said, i can see you i_ see myself here. i said, i can see you i want — see myself here. i said, i can see you. i want them to call us back, that— you. i want them to call us back, that you — you. i want them to call us back, that you through all these exams and interviews _ that you through all these exams and interviews and you will the scholarship. being a single mum, having _ scholarship. being a single mum, having this — scholarship. being a single mum,
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having this condition, i have been through— having this condition, i have been through a — having this condition, i have been through a lot of health problems. i was very— through a lot of health problems. i was very worried, but when i went to eton and _ was very worried, but when i went to eton and i_ was very worried, but when i went to eton and i saw what they have the i felt like _ eton and i saw what they have the i felt like this is a safe area, safe atmosphere. i said to myself, whatever— atmosphere. i said to myself, whatever is going to happen to me, i know— whatever is going to happen to me, i know that _ whatever is going to happen to me, i know that my son is on the right path _ know that my son is on the right path and — know that my son is on the right path and in _ know that my son is on the right path and in a safe place. for me, i am going — path and in a safe place. for me, i am going to — path and in a safe place. for me, i am going to miss him, but i know that, _ am going to miss him, but i know that, first — am going to miss him, but i know that, first of— am going to miss him, but i know that, first of all he is not going to have — that, first of all he is not going to have that burden he has since he was littlem — to have that burden he has since he was little... sorry. but he will be in the _ was little... sorry. but he will be in the right— was little... sorry. but he will be in the right place and with the right— in the right place and with the right people. and i know he is going to make _ right people. and i know he is going to make a _ right people. and i know he is going to make a brilliant future. lalia,
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it sounds like _ to make a brilliant future. lalia, it sounds like he _ to make a brilliant future. lalia, it sounds like he has _ to make a brilliant future. lalia, it sounds like he has all- to make a brilliant future. lalia, it sounds like he has all that - it sounds like he has all that support around him sat on that sofa this morning. ilyan, as a young mum has painted, it is a team effort, you have done this together and also with the help of your current school and particular teachers who have helped you out in this process? honestly, i could name every single teacher, they have been so helpful. my teacher, they have been so helpful. my mathematics teacher, miss aslan, the head teacher, mr elliott, have helped me in every process. and in the application process, mr collins. i cannot name enough teachers, they have all been extremely helpful and i feel i can have all been extremely helpful and ifeel i can make something of myself. it is an incredible feeling, growing up in east london, you see people your age going through a life of crime, doing things that are really dangerous but thanks to this
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i can see myself going somewhere where i can make an impact on the world. , . .. where i can make an impact on the world. ,~ ,, ., ., world. ilyan, i think eton has produced _ world. ilyan, i think eton has produced the _ world. ilyan, i think eton has produced the most _ world. ilyan, i think eton has produced the most prime - world. ilyan, i think eton has - produced the most prime ministers, that could be you. mil produced the most prime ministers, that could be you.— that could be you. all the community. _ that could be you. all the community, they - that could be you. all the community, they are - that could be you. all the i community, they are saying that could be you. all the - community, they are saying my that could be you. all the _ community, they are saying my god, he is _ community, they are saying my god, he is going _ community, they are saying my god, he is going to be the first algerian going _ he is going to be the first algerian going there with a scholarship. we can maybe — going there with a scholarship. we can maybe see him as prime minister. why not? _ can maybe see him as prime minister. wh not? ~ . , ., can maybe see him as prime minister. wh not? ., , . , can maybe see him as prime minister. wh not? ., , . why not? when he was four years old, i had health — why not? when he was four years old, i had health issues _ why not? when he was four years old, i had health issues as _ why not? when he was four years old, i had health issues as well _ why not? when he was four years old, i had health issues as well and - why not? when he was four years old, i had health issues as well and we - i had health issues as well and we went— i had health issues as well and we went for— i had health issues as well and we went for therapy and the nurse was the and _ went for therapy and the nurse was the and she — went for therapy and the nurse was the and she saw me, i was a bit down and she _ the and she saw me, i was a bit down and she asked if i was ok. i said, i am not— and she asked if i was ok. i said, i am nota— and she asked if i was ok. i said, i am not a cake, i am alone, i and she asked if i was ok. i said, i am not a cake, iam alone, i have this little — am not a cake, iam alone, i have this little boy and he was playing in the _ this little boy and he was playing in the play area. she said to me, i can imagine— in the play area. she said to me, i can imagine one day this boy you
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have _ can imagine one day this boy you have here, — can imagine one day this boy you have here, maybe he will be the prime _ have here, maybe he will be the prime minister in the future. and then— prime minister in the future. and then when— prime minister in the future. and then when he said to me about eton, i said, _ then when he said to me about eton, lsaid, oh. _ then when he said to me about eton, lsaid, oh. my— then when he said to me about eton, i said, oh, my god! then when he said to me about eton, isaid, oh, my god! is then when he said to me about eton, i said, oh, my god! is it a dream coming— i said, oh, my god! is it a dream coming true? really? someone said something _ coming true? really? someone said something at that point. it is coming true? really? someone said something at that point.— something at that point. it is meant to be. it is meant _ something at that point. it is meant to be. it is meant to _ something at that point. it is meant to be. it is meant to be. _ something at that point. it is meant to be. it is meant to be. exactly. i to be. it is meant to be. exactly. please stay _ to be. it is meant to be. exactly. please stay in — to be. it is meant to be. exactly. please stay in touch, _ to be. it is meant to be. exactly. please stay in touch, and - to be. it is meant to be. exactly. please stay in touch, and when l to be. it is meant to be. exactly. i please stay in touch, and when you are prime minister, only give your interviews to bbc breakfast. what a great story, i love that, it has cheered me up this morning. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. he has got my vote already. this is
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norfolk, hard frost but beautiful sunshine. this morning, frost free because of this blanket of cloud overhead unfortunately you will keep that throughout the day. high pressure is starting to slip eastwards and we have a weather front arriving but that will take all day to get there. the winds will strengthen ahead of it, gusting to gale force in the far north—west of scotland but we keep a lot of cloud and it will be a dry day pretty much across the board. maybe the cloud thick enough for a spot or two of drizzle. a few brief glimpses of sunshine but don't hold out too much hope for that. light winds generally across england and wales and the stronger winds in the far north—west. temperatures of 9 degrees here, but if you keep the cloud, grey skies, temperatures 506 so it will be on the chilly side. stays the same for tomorrow with light, patchy rain moving into the north—west. back to you too.
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ben has left me, he's going to read the news on sophie's programme. now, if you've got children in your life — there's a chance you'll know all about disney's latest animated film 'enca nto'. #we # we don't talk about bruno. the music from the film is also a huge hit, and this song from it "we don't talk about bruno" has become the first disney song to reach number one in the uk charts. so why is everyone talking about bruno? #we # we don't talk about bruno, no, no, no. # we don't talk about bruno. singing
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ijust i just like ijust like we i just like we don't talk about bruno, it is a really nice song. # we don't talk about bruno, no, no, no. what i like about this song, they always have something to say about bruno and it always switches from fast to slow, high to low tone and thatis fast to slow, high to low tone and that is what makes it really catchy. let's speak now to dominic broomfield—mchugh, professor of musicology at the university of sheffield. good morning, what is it specifically about bruno that is
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stuck in our ears? i specifically about bruno that is stuck in our ears?— specifically about bruno that is stuck in our ears? i think there is two things. _ stuck in our ears? i think there is two things. one _ stuck in our ears? i think there is two things, one is _ stuck in our ears? i think there is two things, one is the _ stuck in our ears? i think there is two things, one is the song i stuck in our ears? i think there is two things, one is the song is i two things, one is the song is clever with this latin rhythm and the joke in the opening clever with this latin rhythm and thejoke in the opening line clever with this latin rhythm and the joke in the opening line about we don't talk about bruno, no, no, no. will that immediately engages you. then it gets stuck in the song because it is actually the same very simple chord progression repeated over and over with lots of variation. you get to the end of the song and you still feel stuck in it song and you still feel stuck in it so you want to go back and listen to it again. it has become an earworm because of these two features. it is because of these two features. it is a real ensemble _ because of these two features. it is a real ensemble number so every one of the characters in the family has a little twist in it, as that little girl observed, just keeps moving as a song? girl observed, 'ust keeps moving as a son: ? . . girl observed, 'ust keeps moving as a son: ? , , , . girl observed, 'ust keeps moving as a son? , , , . ., girl observed, 'ust keeps moving as asona? , , , . ., . a song? yes, it is unusualfor a hit disney song _ a song? yes, it is unusualfor a hit disney song in _ a song? yes, it is unusualfor a hit disney song in that _ a song? yes, it is unusualfor a hit disney song in that normally i a song? yes, it is unusualfor a hit disney song in that normally it i a song? yes, it is unusualfor a hit disney song in that normally it is l disney song in that normally it is things like let it go, beauty and the b, it is the big ballads that
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become the hits from disney and that this is a specific moment in the story and all the characters are involved, it is quite perplexing. it sounds like you are at a party. you can see why it is infectious. it is can see why it is infectious. it is mysterious. _ can see why it is infectious. it is mysterious. it _ can see why it is infectious. it is mysterious, it has _ can see why it is infectious. it is mysterious, it has an _ can see why it is infectious. it is mysterious, it has an air of mystery so explain to people who might not know the writer and his back catalogue and why he cannot stop turning these out? he catalogue and why he cannot stop turning these out?— turning these out? he wrote two ma'or turning these out? he wrote two major stage _ turning these out? he wrote two major stage musicals _ turning these out? he wrote two major stage musicals which i turning these out? he wrote two major stage musicals which was| major stage musicals which was turned into a film last year and hamilton. he has also got very involved in disney in the last few years, and he was in mary poppins return and has become this amazingly successful figure.— successful figure. encanto was released in — successful figure. encanto was released in the _ successful figure. encanto was released in the cinema - successful figure. encanto was released in the cinema very i successful figure. encanto was i released in the cinema very shortly on the plan was to roll it out on
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the act quite quickly. disney have been quite surprised on how this has taken off? yes, if you have seen the film, it is quite a small story really. it film, it is quite a small story reall . . film, it is quite a small story reall . , . . film, it is quite a small story reall. _, . . , film, it is quite a small story reall. . . , . really. it is about a family and their internal— really. it is about a family and their internal tensions. it i really. it is about a family and| their internal tensions. it feels like quite domestic compared to the grand tales of princesses and castles from other disney films. at the same time, i think releasing a story so warm about a familyjust before christmas, especially this difficult christmas we have just had, was very clever, even if they didn't realise they were doing it. it has captured the imagination, colourful and it is warm. the weather is warm in the film, it is very happy and the songs are catchy and it is the ideal combination for and it is the ideal combination for a hit at this time. you and it is the ideal combination for a hit at this time.— a hit at this time. you will be loved by _ a hit at this time. you will be loved by your— a hit at this time. you will be loved by your family - a hit at this time. you will be l loved by your family regardless a hit at this time. you will be i loved by your family regardless of your skills and what you are good at. my kids would say the song that leads us things about being strong is even better than the bruno one. it is more empowering and actually a
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bit like let it go in that sense. the big disney songs tend to be empowering songs and that is why i am surprised bruno has taken the lead. especially the message of the song is quite negative, it is about how no one mentions this guy that foresees bad things in the future that actually happens. essen that actually happens. even sometimes _ that actually happens. even sometimes the _ that actually happens. even sometimes the experts i that actually happens. even sometimes the experts are | that actually happens. even sometimes the experts are successful about —— confused about songs that are successful in the arts. that's all from us this morning. breakfast will be back from 6:00 tomorrow, enjoy the rest of your weekend.
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and around the globe. i'm ben brown. our top stories. tonga's government warns there's a long road to recovery — a week after the volcanic eruption and tsunami. survivors recall the moment the wave hit. nobody knew that there was a wave coming so, you know, in every household that was on the road, we were just shouting out, "tsunami, tsunami!" — you know, "get to higher ground!" the uk says it's uncovered a plot by moscow to install a pro—russian leader in ukraine, as tensions rise over a possible invasion. intense fighting in syria, former conservative minister nusrat ghani tells the sunday times she was sacked from herjob, because of her muslim faith. the government chief whip mark spencer says her claim is completely false.

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