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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 22, 2022 6:00am-10:01am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and ben thompson. our headlines today: the impact of rising energy prices — an urgent call for government to intervene to help businesses and households manage spiralling bills. a senseless act. police in the us city of atlanta react to the death of british man matthew willson, who was killed by a stray bullet as he lay in bed. our victim is someone that was completely innocent, had no involvement whatsoever with the individuals that were involved in the reckless discharging of a firearm. the biggest update to the highway code in a generation. more rights for walkers
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and cyclists, but the aa says a third of drivers don't know about the changes. the great escape is on for norwich. they're out of the relegation zone for the first time this season, after a thumping win at watford, who now find themselves in the bottom three. it's saturday, the 22nd of january. a quiet start to the weekend in weather, not quite as cold but not quite as sunny either. i will have all the details shortly. it's saturday, the 22nd of january. our top story: five of the uk's leading business groups have called on the government to act now to support both businesses and consumers, who they say face spiralling energy bills. they've written to the chancellor, rishi sunak, demanding urgent action to tackle the ongoing crisis. here's our business correspondent, ramzan karmali.
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these five prominent business groups have warned the chancellor that energy price rises on the horizon could push millions of people into fuel poverty. in a letter sent to rishi sunak, they say that if the issue is: the reason our energy is getting more expensive is down to the massive rise in wholesale prices, as economies around the world begin easing covid restrictions. the energy regulator, often, is due to announce a new energy price from april, and it is expected to rise dramatically, to £2000 for the average household. i dramatically, to £2000 for the average household.— dramatically, to £2000 for the average household. i think it is really vital _ average household. i think it is really vital that _ average household. i think it is really vital that the _ average household. i think it is| really vital that the government thinks, how can we not protect everybody from global energy prices, that feels really hard to do, but to smooth the cliff edge for most households for him in £800 rise in their bills will really be too much, as well as supporting the most
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disadvantaged in our society to be able to cope with really significant increases. and when it comes to businesses, 2022 is already proving to be a massive hit to cash flow. for a whole range of reasons. put a secondary glazing _ for a whole range of reasons. put a secondary glazing undersides... for a whole range of reasons. put a| secondary glazing undersides. .. the ener: secondary glazing undersides... energy bill secondary glazing undersides... tie: energy bill for this hotelier in scarboroughjumped up from £2000 a month to £10,000 in november. she has no choice but to pass on some of these rising costs. aslur has no choice but to pass on some of these rising costs.— these rising costs. our challenge in that it is coming _ these rising costs. our challenge in that it is coming towards _ these rising costs. our challenge in that it is coming towards the - these rising costs. our challenge in that it is coming towards the end i these rising costs. our challenge in i that it is coming towards the end of the pandemic now, opening backup to travel, so we are now in a position where our hotel is competing with very cheap foreign hotels, foreign travel. we are in a position now that if the costs keep rising we have to pass those costs onto our customers, we are not going to be able to keep that market.- able to keep that market. rising ener: able to keep that market. rising energy costs _ able to keep that market. rising energy costs are _ able to keep that market. rising energy costs are putting - able to keep that market. risingl energy costs are putting pressure able to keep that market. rising energy costs are putting pressure on notjust families energy costs are putting pressure on not just families but energy costs are putting pressure on notjust families but businesses, too, and the calls on the government too, and the calls on the government to act now our growing ever louder. for that part, the treasury said it
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is helping families with £12 billion worth of support, targeting the lowest paid over the next two years. police in the us have descibed the death of a british man from a stray bullet as a "reckless, senseless act." 31—year—old astrophysicist matthew willson was killed while he lay in bed during a trip to the city of atlanta. simonjones has this report. killed and what officers are describing as a random and senseless arcs. matthew wilson was in bed last sunday beside his girlfriend, pictured in this image released by police. he was hitting jihad by a bullet fired from a neighbouring block of flats. he bullet fired from a neighbouring block of flats.— bullet fired from a neighbouring block of flats. he had 'ust arrived in the atlanta h block of flats. he had 'ust arrived in the atlanta area _ block of flats. he had 'ust arrived in the atlanta area to _ block of flats. he had just arrived in the atlanta area to visit - block of flats. he had just arrived in the atlanta area to visit his - in the atlanta area to visit his girlfriend, they were laying down for bed that night when they heard the gunfire erupted, and what appears right now, a stray bullet entered the exterior walls of their apartment and struck him. this is a very tragic incident, our victim is
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someone that was completely innocent, had no involvement whatsoever with the individuals that were involved in the reckless discharging of their firearms. police were initially cold to the area following reports shots were being fired into the air. they received a second call from matthew willson's girlfriend, saying he had been hit. in a brief statement, the foreign office here in london said it was supporting the family of a british man following his death in the united states. he added that it was in contact with the authorities over there. matthew willson was a former phd student at the university of exeter. it said he was : the police in the us are offering a reward for information. no arrests have been made, but offices say they are determined to put those responsible injail. the first shipment of military aid
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from the united states to ukraine has arrived in kyiv, as russian troops continue to build near the border. acording to the us embassy, the package contains ammunition for ukraine's front—line forces. it comes a day after russia's foreign minister and his us counterpart held what both sides called "frank" talks, in an effort to cool tensions. campaign groups are calling on the government to urgently publicise changes to the highway code which comes into effect next saturday. the move will see walkers and cyclists given greater priority. cycling uk says it'll be the biggest update in a generation. but according to the aa, a third of drivers don't know about the changes. the department for transport says it's working with key organisations to ensure that messages about the update are as widespread as possible. adults living with obesity in england are now being offered extra weight—loss support from community pharmacists. until now, patients had to be seen by their gps before they could access an nhs12—week weight management plan. it is designed to help the estimated one in four adults who are obese.
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from today, almost all coronavirus restrictions are being lifted in the republic of ireland. social distancing measures and limits on gatherings will be scrapped, while workers will return to offices on a staggered basis. an 8:00pm curfew for restaurants, bars, cafes and pubs will also be lifted. it was about the same yesterday, atm, we heard news that the us singer meat loaf died at the age of 74. singer meat loaf died at the age of 7a. many tributes have been paid. born marvin lee aday, the rockstar was known for his powerful voice and larger—than—life character. his album bat out of hell is one of the biggest—selling in music history. stars have taken to twitter to praise his achievements. pop icon, cher, who features in his 1981 hit dead ringer for love, tweeted:
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welsh rock legend bonnie tyler said he was "a larger than life character with a voice and stage presence to match, and is one of those rare people who truly was a one—off talent and personality." theatre composer andrew lloyd webber posted: he also sent his best wishes to the late songwriterjim steinman, who wrote bat out of hell. and �*80s pop star boy george recalled a time meat loaf "turned him upside down" at a chinese restaurant. we can speak now to rock legend gene simmons, the co—lead singer of kiss. hello, good morning. how are you? because you knew meat loaf, you know, we saw a lovely picture of you both posted, and he was one of your era, your time. both posted, and he was one of your era. yourtime-_ era, your time. well, yes, i knew meat loaf— era, your time. well, yes, i knew meat loaf through _ era, your time. well, yes, i knew meat loaf through the _ era, your time. well, yes, i knew meat loaf through the years - era, your time. well, yes, i knew meat loaf through the years and | era, your time. well, yes, i knew. meat loaf through the years and in fact once i gave up my penthouse in
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new york, i gave it tojim steinman, who wrote all those wonderful songs. i know that pearl, his daughter... the sadness of this is notjust to the fans who love the music and the stage shows and all that, but through the years, i have found meat loaf, or meat as he referred to himself, when you met him, he was very informal and very sort of how are you doing, nice guy, he was a kind, kind soul, and the saddest part of all is that the world has lost a kind man, part of all is that the world has losta kind man, and if part of all is that the world has lost a kind man, and if you asked him, hey, what you want is to call you, meat loaf? he would say, no, just call me meat. it was just a very sad thing, and i sent my present condolences to his family, pearl, his daughter, who is happily married, i know this has got to be devastating. we all wish them the best. �* , ,., , ., , devastating. we all wish them the best. �* , , ., , .,, best. absolutely. i mean, why was he our
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best. absolutely. i mean, why was he your friend? — best. absolutely. i mean, why was he your friend? because _ best. absolutely. i mean, why was he your friend? because you _ best. absolutely. i mean, why was he your friend? because you would - best. absolutely. i mean, why was he your friend? because you would meet so many people in your industry, come across so many people, through work. how did he become yourfriend? i met him in the early days. i was at diana frost�* �*s house, i had been going out with her at that time, and herformer husband, bob ellis, was managing meat loaf, so there was an outdoor soiree, managing meat loaf, so there was an outdoorsoiree, hot managing meat loaf, so there was an outdoor soiree, hot dogs and sort of americana, and meat loaf came by with his wife and said, hey, gene! it's with his wife and said, hey, gene! it�*s me, meat. and here�*s leslie, loaf. he said, i�*m meat, she�*s loaf. it was immediately, you liked the person. you know, there is the celebrity part of it, you can�*t help it have liked him, and through the years we would run into each other. just a nice human being. so while we
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were all celebrating celebrity and the wonderful work that he has done, and we are all fans, you would have been a lucky person if you ever met him, just a kind soul. find been a lucky person if you ever met him, just a kind soul.— him, just a kind soul. and it is times like _ him, just a kind soul. and it is times like this, _ him, just a kind soul. and it is times like this, isn't _ him, just a kind soul. and it is times like this, isn't it, - him, just a kind soul. and it is times like this, isn't it, but. him, just a kind soul. and it isj times like this, isn't it, but we -et times like this, isn't it, but we get that— times like this, isn't it, but we get that real insight into the person— get that real insight into the person behind the name, behind the headline _ person behind the name, behind the headline. talk to me about some of your favourite memories of him? we were at your favourite memories of him? were at an your favourite memories of him? - were at an awards show, and i had to dress up with the big hair and the make up and the dragon birds and everything, and in my kiss persona, at the time i was going out of somebody else, we both stood and took photos with meat, the cameras are going crazy and of course he was joking the whole time, and he above everybody else noticed that unfortunately, my two cracks left
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foot dragon boots, have a seven or eight inch platform heels, with dragon faces on them, and they had packed the wrong kind. so i was twisted with my right foot, facing to the left. and he goes, hey buddy, what�*s going on down there? and of course the entire media took their cameras and started taking photos of us. you know, that�*s meat. not polished, not trying to pose for anybody, just a goodhearted, funny quy- anybody, just a goodhearted, funny guy. t anybody, 'ust a goodhearted, funny i u _ , ., anybody, 'ust a goodhearted, funny guy. i understand he was quite mischievous. _ guy. i understand he was quite mischievous. did _ guy. i understand he was quite mischievous. did you - guy. i understand he was quite mischievous. did you see - guy. i understand he was quite mischievous. did you see that l guy. i understand he was quite - mischievous. did you see that side of him? , . , mischievous. did you see that side of him? , ., , , ., mischievous. did you see that side of him? , .,, , ., ., of him? yes, i was the butt of one or two of his _ of him? yes, i was the butt of one or two of his 1-liners. _ of him? yes, i was the butt of one or two of his 1-liners. what's - of him? yes, i was the butt of one or two of his 1-liners. what's with | or two of his 1—liners. what�*s with the make up, buddy? well, i make a living. yeah. it was like that. you know, living. yeah. it was like that. you know. when _ living. yeah. it was like that. you know. when you _ living. yeah. it was like that. you know, when you spoke to him about his music, why do you think his music cut through? i was listening to some reviews of his music before, and we have this phrase here, in
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yourface, unapologetic, your face, unapologetic, in—your—face, loud, yourface, unapologetic, in—your—face, loud, here i am, and cut through. in-your-face, loud, here i am, and cutthrough-— in-your-face, loud, here i am, and cutthrou:h. . cut through. welcome in the same way that coins have — cut through. welcome in the same way that coins have to _ cut through. welcome in the same way that coins have to different _ cut through. welcome in the same way that coins have to different sides, - that coins have to different sides, there was meat loaf, the onstage persona, and underneath that wasjim steinman, who wrote all those songs. and jim was steinman, who wrote all those songs. andjim was much more operatic in nature. there were beginnings, prolog �*s, stories about the dashboard lights, you know, you could almost see the cinematic version. in fact, could almost see the cinematic version. infact, i could almost see the cinematic version. in fact, i was having dinner is years after he had become a big star, andjim steinman never unfortunately got his claim to fame, because he wrote all his songs, and overlap the other table was brian depalma, the famous american director, and he andjim steinman were talking about putting on a musical phantom of the opera before the one you are aware of. this was early, early, late 70s, early 805. i
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early, early, late 705, early 805. i was there at that moment, again, the sadness of this is not so much about celebrity, a5 sadness of this is not so much about celebrity, as far as i�*m concerned. the 5adne55 i5 celebrity, as far as i�*m concerned. the 5adne55 is that a kind per5on the 5adne55 is that a kind person has passed, and the world is worse off than him not being here. we are very mindful. _ off than him not being here. we are very mindful, because _ off than him not being here. we are very mindful, because of— off than him not being here. we are very mindful, because of course - off than him not being here. we are very mindful, because of course it l very mindful, because of course it was your friend, and we know you are talking to us while reading as well, and for that we are very grateful. gene, he was still working, wa5n�*t he? i understand he was working on another project, he had so many ideas, he didn�*t stop being creative? he ideas, he didn't stop being creative?— ideas, he didn't stop being creative? ., , ., ~ ., creative? he was working all the way until the end- — creative? he was working all the way until the end. the _ creative? he was working all the way until the end. the saddest _ creative? he was working all the way until the end. the saddest part - creative? he was working all the way until the end. the saddest part of. until the end. the saddest part of all, and i wasn�*t there to hear all the specifics, it has been reported that he was anti—vaxxer5 and had problems with wearing a mask. —— anti—vax. i hope to god that his passing wa5n�*t due directly because pa55ing wa5n�*t due directly because of being on vaccinated or not wearing a mask. that would be the saddest part of all of it. you know, it is difficult enough to lead a
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healthy life, especially for your loved ones and your fans, but the stupidity of this pandemic i5 loved ones and your fans, but the stupidity of this pandemic is that it affects everybody, no matter what your political beliefs, and i hope to god that meat, the facts are coming out, i hope to god that meat didn�*t pass because of covid. it appears some new sources are reporting that he had. ye5, yes, some are and as yet we don�*t have any confirmation about any of it but i wanted to talk about the you posted yesterday on your social media, a picture of you and metlife and sure and talk u5 media, a picture of you and metlife and sure and talk us through what was happening when the picture was taken. —— cher. i was happening when the picture was taken- -- cher-— taken. -- cher. i was seeing her at the time and _ taken. -- cher. i was seeing her at the time and my — taken. -- cher. i was seeing her at the time and my - _ taken. -- cher. i was seeing her at the time and my - the _ taken. -- cher. i was seeing her at the time and my - the two - taken. -- cher. i was seeing her at the time and my - the two were i taken. -- cher. i was seeing her at the time and my - the two were on the time and my — the two were on dragon boots and i am wearing two left feet and right before or after the photos is when you start
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pointing down and that was the moment. of course i became his personal pinata at this point. cher i5 personal pinata at this point. cher is on the side laughing her head. it was fun moment. haifa is on the side laughing her head. it was fun moment.— is on the side laughing her head. it was fun moment. how are you going to remember him? _ was fun moment. how are you going to remember him? it _ was fun moment. how are you going to remember him? it has _ was fun moment. how are you going to remember him? it has been _ was fun moment. how are you going to remember him? it has been a - was fun moment. how are you going to remember him? it has been a day - was fun moment. how are you going to remember him? it has been a day now| remember him? it has been a day now and you— remember him? it has been a day now and you have _ remember him? it has been a day now and you have heard 24 hours on since we were _ and you have heard 24 hours on since we were told — and you have heard 24 hours on since we were told the news that he has passed, _ we were told the news that he has passed, how will you remember him when _ passed, how will you remember him when you _ passed, how will you remember him when you sit— passed, how will you remember him when you sit and take a moment? i when you sit and take a moment? remember when you sit and take a moment? i remember him, and its two soon, you know, time heals all wounds, they say, but also the impact and the sadness i5 say, but also the impact and the sadness is going to be coming up 5adne55 is going to be coming up when dad ring out or something come5 when dad ring out or something comes up you are going to be a bit sort of, remember, yeah, i rememberwhen that happened, and sadly, whether one greatest past recently, it�*5 one greatest past recently, it�*s
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just... prince, david bowie, on and ju5t... prince, david bowie, on and on and on. and the sadness of it is every time, you know, if i had a personal relationship or knew the5e famou5 personal relationship or knew the5e famous people when the music comes on, it reminds the personal thing. the ma55e5 will remember how much the music affected them because let�*5 the music affected them because let�*s be clear about this, music isn�*t let�*s be clear about this, music i5n�*tju5t mu5ic. let�*s be clear about this, music i5n�*tju5t music. your favourite song is the soundtrack of your life. and so mu5ic, song is the soundtrack of your life. and so music, when a truly important, really affects you. it�*s the music you play your winnings, sometimes that your funerals but certainly, it�*5 sometimes that your funerals but certainly, it�*s the soundtrack of our lives and apropos meat loaf, 5o... our lives and apropos meat loaf, so... it our lives and apropos meat loaf, so... , �* our lives and apropos meat loaf, so... ,�* ., ., ., so... it isn't poignant thought to on and gene _ so... it isn't poignant thought to on and gene we _ so... it isn't poignant thought to on and gene we will _ so... it isn't poignant thought to on and gene we will say - so... it isn't poignant thought to on and gene we will say as - so... it isn't poignant thought to on and gene we will say as well, so... it isn't poignant thought to - on and gene we will say as well, you have lost your friend and spoken to us and for that we very grateful and we wish you well. [30 us and for that we very grateful and we wish you well.— we wish you well. do yourselves a favour. we wish you well. do yourselves a favour- the _ we wish you well. do yourselves a favour. the best _ we wish you well. do yourselves a favour. the best way _ we wish you well. do yourselves a favour. the best way to _ we wish you well. do yourselves a | favour. the best way to remember meat loaf, put bat out of hell on, dim the lights complete from
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beginning to end, turn off your cellphone, don�*t do social media, for god�*s sake, somebody stop doing it, and listen to meat loaf think his heart out.— his heart out. actually i did it yesterday. — his heart out. actually i did it yesterday. i _ his heart out. actually i did it yesterday, i turned _ his heart out. actually i did it yesterday, i turned it - his heart out. actually i did it yesterday, i turned it up - his heart out. actually i did itj yesterday, i turned it up loud his heart out. actually i did it - yesterday, i turned it up loud and did a bit of a dance, as much as i could, and enjoyed it so you are right, the best way to remember him. thank you so much for taking the time to speak to us. really fascinating in5ight. it�*s time5 time to speak to us. really fascinating in5ight. it�*s times like this that you get all of those stories and hear all of those stories. if you are going to name drop as well, do you know what i mean? diana ross, cher, with the sungla55e5, looking completely cool, and what a gem. 18 minutes past six. here�*5 louise with a look at this morning�*s weather. did you get some meat loaf on yesterday? we did you get some meat loaf on yesterday?— did you get some meat loaf on esterda ? ~ ., . ., ., yesterday? we were dancing around the house but _ yesterday? we were dancing around the house but what _ yesterday? we were dancing around the house but what was _ yesterday? we were dancing around the house but what was interesting l the house but what was interesting is that my eldest son is 23 and he knew all of the words! you are 23, how do you know the words? that is a
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classic truck. it cro55e5 cla55ic truck. it cro55e5 generations. classic truck. it crosses generations.— classic truck. it crosses uenerations. ., . ~ . generations. -- track. dancing weather? _ generations. -- track. dancing weather? do _ generations. -- track. dancing weather? do you _ generations. -- track. dancing weather? do you know - generations. -- track. dancing weather? do you know what, i generations. -- track. dancing i weather? do you know what, not generations. -- track. dancing - weather? do you know what, not bad weather. quite _ weather? do you know what, not bad weather. quite quiet, _ weather? do you know what, not bad weather. quite quiet, and _ weather? do you know what, not bad weather. quite quiet, and that's - weather. quite quiet, and that�*s what we need at the moment, an air of calm. in comparison to yesterday, it is cold. we have seen one or two places fall below freezing, a5 it is cold. we have seen one or two places fall below freezing, as you can see clearly acro55 eastern england and a few break5 can see clearly acro55 eastern england and a few breaks in wales, look at this. 0nce england and a few breaks in wales, look at this. once again, the far north—west of scotland, incredibly mild start, that means cloudy and still the chance of some drizzle. from this weak weather front, but its high pressure still dominating the story, still keeping these things very quiet. light winds so pretty much when you wake up, that is what you will keep for much of the day. there are some breaks in the day. there are some breaks in the cloud and some bright spells of the cloud and some bright spells of the cloud and some bright spells of the cloud will fill as we go through the cloud will fill as we go through the day. this is the drizzle, to the north—west of the great then, and here some more breeze. running from the south—west so a milder source.
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the temperatures likely to peak between ten and 12, above where they should be. not quite as cold across england and wales, highs of around 7-9. a england and wales, highs of around 7—9. a quiet saturday for many. if you have plans, i don�*t think the weather will spoil it. through the evening, i will not be too clever, the holes in the cloud will come and go and if that happens for any length of time, you will see patchy mist and fog insulted eastern areas favourite spots so temperatures may be low enough here for a touch of light frost in rural parts but once again, incredibly mild start. and, a repeat performance developing on sunday but the only difference is a bit more of a breeze developing, gale force gusts on winds on exposed coasts as the wind arrived but it will take most of its time to do so so again, dry, quite great up there but with light winds and temperatures one or two degrees and weather have been in the last couple of days, pleasant enough of being
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upside with the kids or maybe 20 of the gardens —— outside. highs of 6—8 across england and wales and still relatively mild up into the far north—west. the weather front will bring some rain as we go into monday across scotland, elsewhere is business as usual, grey and mild. patchy mist and fog is around first thing in the morning and temperatures pretty similar to what we have seen all through the weekend. the only chance something more significant and even then, just clutching at straws a bit, is living through tuesday and into wednesday with a weather front starting to push in. high really isn�*t retreating very fast so for most of england and wales we keep the drier weather. that�*s a theme continues right to close out the month. at}! right to close out the month. of january. but is not a bad way to end january. but is not a bad way to end january. thanks, louise. —— that is not. today�*s papers feature a mix of papers. the times says the prime minister is calling on the ministerial
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loyalists who helped him secure the conservative party leadership in 2019 in a bid to save his premiership. the daily mail says mp5 and business leaders havejoined its campaign to postpone a rise in national insurance this april. the paper also features a tearful adele. the singer postponed her las vegas shows because they weren�*t ready. the guardian says the prime minister is facing calls from opposition mp5 to ensure all evidence on the downing street parties is published alongside the results of the official inquiry. it also joins a number of other papers in featuring a photograph of rock star meat loaf, following his death at the age of 74. and as tensions between ukraine and russia intensify, the bbc news website has a handy question and answer guide to get you up to speed with the situation. i saw this story inside and it reminded me of you. {lilli i saw this story inside and it reminded me of you. do not
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reminded me of you. oh no. do not take offence- _ reminded me of you. oh no. do not take offence. whenever— reminded me of you. oh no. do not take offence. whenever anybody i reminded me of you. oh no. do not l take offence. whenever anybody says that... 0k, take offence. whenever anybody says that... ok, i— take offence. whenever anybody says that... ok, i am — take offence. whenever anybody says that... ok, i am braced. _ take offence. whenever anybody says that... ok, i am braced. when - take offence. whenever anybody says that... ok, i am braced. when you i take offence. whenever anybody says | that... ok, i am braced. when you go awa , if that... ok, i am braced. when you go away. if you — that... ok, i am braced. when you go away. if you manage _ that... ok, i am braced. when you go away, if you manage to _ that... ok, i am braced. when you go away, if you manage to get _ that... ok, i am braced. when you go away, if you manage to get away - that... ok, i am braced. when you go away, if you manage to get away for. away, if you manage to get away for away, if you manage to get away for a break, i imagine you go some nice places. i a break, i imagine you go some nice laces. , ., a break, i imagine you go some nice places- when _ a break, i imagine you go some nice places- when you _ a break, i imagine you go some nice places.- when you grew- a break, i imagine you go some nice places.- when you grew up, | places. i try to. when you grew up, did ou places. i try to. when you grew up, did you keep _ places. i try to. when you grew up, did you keep your _ places. i try to. when you grew up, did you keep your room _ places. i try to. when you grew up, did you keep your room tidy? - places. i try to. when you grew up, did you keep your room tidy? yes, | places. i try to. when you grew up, | did you keep your room tidy? yes, i have the tiniest _ did you keep your room tidy? yes, i have the tiniest room. _ did you keep your room tidy? yes, i have the tiniest room. i _ did you keep your room tidy? yes, i have the tiniest room. i had - did you keep your room tidy? yes, i have the tiniest room. i had no - have the tiniest room. i had no option. have the tiniest room. i had no otion. ., ., , , option. for the tallest person in the house? _ option. for the tallest person in the house? pretty— option. for the tallest person in the house? pretty much. - option. for the tallest person in the house? pretty much. i - option. for the tallest person in the house? pretty much. i can l the house? pretty much. i can imaaine the house? pretty much. i can imagine you — the house? pretty much. i can imagine you kind _ the house? pretty much. i can imagine you kind of— the house? pretty much. i can| imagine you kind of clambering around. it imagine you kind of clambering around. . imagine you kind of clambering around. , ., ., , around. it is not quite harry potter--- — around. it is not quite harry potter... it— around. it is not quite harry potter... it wasn't - around. it is not quite harry potter... it wasn't a - around. it is not quite harryj potter... it wasn't a pigsty? around. it is not quite harry - potter... it wasn't a pigsty? never. there is a _ potter... it wasn't a pigsty? never. there is a pigsty — potter... it wasn't a pigsty? never. there is a pigsty for _ potter... it wasn't a pigsty? never. there is a pigsty for you _ potter... it wasn't a pigsty? never. there is a pigsty for you to - potter... it wasn't a pigsty? never. there is a pigsty for you to stay - there is a pigsty for you to stay in. i love how it reminds me wonderful reminds you of me. £90 a night. bf} wonderful reminds you of me. £90 a niaht. ' :: wonderful reminds you of me. £90 a night-- there _ wonderful reminds you of me. £90 a night-- there is _ wonderful reminds you of me. £90 a night.- there is nowhere - wonderful reminds you of me. £90 a night.- there is nowhere to | night. 90 quid! there is nowhere to wash apparently- — night. 90 quid! there is nowhere to wash apparently. well, _ night. 90 quid! there is nowhere to wash apparently. well, it _ night. 90 quid! there is nowhere to wash apparently. well, it is - night. 90 quid! there is nowhere to wash apparently. well, it is a - wash apparently. well, it is a ms . wash apparently. well, it is a pigsty- pay — wash apparently. well, it is a pigsty- pay £70 _ wash apparently. well, it is a pigsty- pay £70 a _ wash apparently. well, it is a pigsty. pay £70 a night - wash apparently. well, it is a pigsty. pay £70 a night with i wash apparently. well, it is a i pigsty. pay £70 a night with £5 wash apparently. well, it is a - pigsty. pay £70 a night with £5 more for heating. — pigsty. pay £70 a night with £5 more for heating. £15 _ pigsty. pay £70 a night with £5 more for heating, £15 more _ pigsty. pay £70 a night with £5 more for heating, £15 more for— pigsty. pay £70 a night with £5 more for heating, £15 more for bedding . for heating, £15 more for bedding and you sleep in the corrugated i
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pigsty in a woodland in capture, an ex— animal charity centre. it is called the pigpen and you can book into it, sleeping up to two people, and apparently they big hit and you have a communalfield kitchen and apparently they big hit and you have a communal field kitchen as well so there you go! but have a communal field kitchen as well so there you go!— well so there you go! but is a no from me- _ well so there you go! but is a no from me- oh! — well so there you go! but is a no from me. oh! why _ well so there you go! but is a no from me. oh! why would - well so there you go! but is a no from me. oh! why would you i well so there you go! but is a no| from me. oh! why would you pay well so there you go! but is a no - from me. oh! why would you pay that much money to stay in a pigsty? i'm much money to stay in a pigsty? i�*m sorry, there are nicer places. something for us to discuss. time now for click and this week, the technology team are in la. los angeles, the place where anything is possible — even the weird stuff that i�*ve got up to here over the years.
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it�*s a town that revels in the new, and right now, that town seems to be talking about nfts. now, as a reminder, nfts are a way of recording who owns what — mainly digital art and music. frankly, the mind still boggles every time i remember that this image by beeple sold for almost $17 million at auction. so, i thought i�*d jump on the bandwagon. now, anyone can create, or "mint" an nft. in fact, i havejust minted myself, which was refreshing! that means that this mini animation now has a unique identifier which has been recorded on... ..the blockchain! an indisputable record of who owns it and who buys it afterwards. 2022 looks like being the year that hollywood sits up, takes notice and decides, "yeah, i wouldn�*t mind a bit of all that!"
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simon hancock has been talking to some of those hoping to mint some films to print some films and make a mint. that sounded better in my head. over to you, simon. for over 100 years, hollywood has been the centre of the movie—making world. this is the city of angels, the city where people come every year to turn their dreams to reality. but those dreams, of course, don�*t come for free. while those in hollywood may be more used to massaging egos rather than breaking down the blockchain, it hasn�*t stopped them spotting an opportunity — and if there is one thing people here love more than anything else, it is opportunity. six months ago, i thought nft was a football club in germany — i�*m not kidding. nft stuttgart or something. as a producer working with martin scorsese on the likes of the irishman and silence, nielsjuul is used
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to spending years trying to get films made. and despite the rise of streamers like netflix and apple, he believes it�*s getting more and more difficult to secure money for independent and mid—budget films. a movie like kramer v5 kramer, for instance, or any big, great 05car movies that we all love and cherish, today — or at least in the last six years — would never have been made in this climate, because it�*s simply not possible to raise the money for it. and if you do, it�*s an average time of 5—6 years to get it financed, because it�*s a complex operation and it�*s complex how it works. his next film, though, won�*t be financed through traditional means. with several other investors, niels has started nft studios — a studio he believes can democratise film financing with tokens being minted and bought by an online community. when i heard about this, there was two aspects of it that was really, really interesting. one is that these are communities that very engaged in art and music and, you know, film, et cetera,
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but also, that they are engaged investors. and how interesting it would be to have people invest in something where they have an excitement to be involved in it from an art perspective orfrom a movie perspective. and then we started thinking, "oh, boy! "there�*s a marketing hub in every investor" — and as a producer, that�*s the best you can get. the studio plans to make a $10 million budget movie called a wing and a prayer, that focuses on the british adventurer brian milton and his quest to travel around the globe in an ultralight aircraft. the film�*s star will be announced next month and cameras are set to roll in malta on 14june. those willing to part with their hard—earned cash will secure tokens in the film and, a bit like some crowdfunding campaigns, will receive perks depending on the level of their contribution. they will also have a say in how the studio is run as part of a decentralised autonomous organisation, or dao. we don�*t want to have to put every single process to the dao, right? how much are we gonna pay the cameraman?
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how much are gonna allocate for catering when we�*re on malta, filming this movie? the decisions are too small and process is too long to leave everything up to the community, right? so what we want to do is let the community have this creative direction. what scripts are we gonna play? who�*s gonna compose the score? and, like, have that feeling of involvement without having to really deal with the really nitty—gritty stuff involved in this. coming from even like a marketing standpoint, there is no, like, "we must target this exact demographic, from the ages of 16 to 29 with this salary, from this place". that isjust not the case any more. we're — it's creating a decentralised world where people, everyone can be involved in the arts. you don't have to have millions of dollars to be involved in a film any more, and that's what's so exciting. but buying an nft can�*t force anyone to make a film and with all the risks in the movie game, what guarantees are there for contributors it will ever happen? we will make this movie, and i don�*t have a choice — we don�*t have a choice. we came out and said we�*re gonna do it, we�*re gonna have
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to do it — that�*s just how it is. and so, if i had to sell two of my children out of three, that�*s not so bad. i will sell — i don�*t know which one yet. i�*ll have to get back to you on that. no, but we will get it done. it is gold rush time for nfts, and notjust films. the market for movie memorabilia is potentially huge. and in this new frontier, that means headaches all round. this week, quentin tarantino put scans of handwritten pulp fiction script notes up for auction. i have the entire pulp fiction script, written in my own hand. the nft drop has led to a bitter legal battle between the filmmaker and miramax. —— between the filmmaker and miramax... mother... ! crash. ..the company behind the film. kal raustiala is a professor in international law and has written extensively about nfts. he thinks hollywood will be watching the outcome of the tarantino case closely. you know, there�*s so much money potentially to be made,
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but if it keeps flowing, there�*s gonna be disputes and the disputes, again, will turn on what does the given contract say? and no—one anticipated any of this. so this will not necessarily decide the issue, because every contract is a little bit different, but it will certainly help shape some of the debate in the courts, and also what�*s happening right now in town, here in la — how are contracts being written today? and then, will people team up to make the money or will they argue over the money? there is an air of desperation around nfting anything possible in the hopes that somehow, money will rain down. i�*m not convinced that all of these things will work, but some of them may. so far, the big companies have been reluctant to abandon their usual financial methods in favour of community—led collaboration. that may well change if the nft space continues to attract deep pockets. my good friend phil said — he quoted me from moneyball, this movie moneyball, where he said, "if you want to be the first man to walk through a wall, you�*re going to expect a bloody nose". and we feel that way! but we are happy with it because we know that this
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industry needs some disruption. the financial system of this is broken. it hasn�*t kept up with a digital streamers at all. so, it is an industry that is lagging behind modern world, digital world, streaming world and new financings worlds, and so, yeah, we are the first and that�*s why also, we have — we feel the pressure. it�*s clear that change is on the horizon. whether nfts are part of that long term is a question that only audiences will be able to answer. shang—chi and the legend of the ten rings, one of the films from last year that proves there are glimmers of life returning to the box office. now, this is a marvel superhero origin story that combines impressive choreography with equally impressive visual effects and after seeing it, well, we had to find out how it was done, didn�*t we? you are a product of all who came before you. the legacy of your family. you are your mother.
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and whether you like it or not, you are also your father. music builds. we did the final battle with the good versus evil, the demons versus the humans. it's got everything that you really want to work on as a cg artist. it has, you know, dragons and beasts and massive effects, and kung fu fighting. i mean, it's pretty much everything you could possibly want. you know, it�*s this insane action, it�*s this crazy action beats going on, dragons, and then it�*s like, "oh yeah, but make it — try and make it realistic at the same time". and so, that was sort of our challenge is to always try and, you know, as fantastical as it is, try and ground it a little bit as well and not — not, yeah, not — not push it too far in either direction and, you know, from an emotion standpoint, just trying to keep it — that movement somewhat grounded in reality. and, you know, if you have got, you know, these two huge beasts
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fighting, you�*re — luckily, you have these two human characters there also, so you try and, you know, stick the camera around them, try and frame it from their prospective, which, luckily, gives you a lot of scale as well. we looked at a lot of reference, even for things like, you know, dragons, it was — we are trying to always find something that would give it an element of realism. like, we are looking at, you know, sea snakes and iguanas sort of moving through the ocean and how they sort of push their tail and move around, so it was some element of, yeah, realism, despite all the craziness that was going on. it always starts with good intentions. we've had a few of these on marvel shows where they shoot something and then, the story kind of changes a little bit so they — more than once, we've had to just roto the actors off the plates and replace it with an entirely cg environment.
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it's still a bit tricky to make it feel not quite stage—lit, you know, when you have an enclosed environment or a semi—enclosed environment, making sure that you can adjust the plate lighting to match the cg lighting and vice—versa, is a bit tricky at times. aside from the characters, we had to replace the entire environment. to get a rough idea of how render—intensive this show was, the water especially, the shot where the dragon encases the beast and all the demons are feeding him to power him up, the water alone would have taken a single—core processor 25 years to render. you can't outrun...
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..who you really are. that is it for the short cut of this week�*s programme from la. the full—length version is waiting for you on iplayer. don�*t forget, we live on social media on facebook, youtube, instagram and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks for watching and we�*ll see you soon. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and naga munchetty. time to talk about sports. we have so much to talk about. that standings at the australian open. for how long? hopefully all the way,
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thinkers crossed.— thinkers crossed. interestingly he has already _ thinkers crossed. interestingly he has already been _ thinkers crossed. interestingly he has already been complaining - thinkers crossed. interestingly he has already been complaining in i thinkers crossed. interestingly he i has already been complaining in the match. bizarrely, somewhere around melbourne park somebody is doing some bad karaoke, singing let it be, and it has been fed into the court, putting the players. and evans made about in the first set. mas putting the players. and evans made about in the first set.— about in the first set. was he moanin: about in the first set. was he moaning about _ about in the first set. was he moaning about the _ about in the first set. was he moaning about the quality i about in the first set. was he moaning about the quality of| moaning about the quality of singing? moaning about the quality of sintain ? . moaning about the quality of sinttin? , ., , moaning about the quality of sintitn? , ., , ~ ., singing? yes, quality. a fantastic sont , singing? yes, quality. a fantastic song. when _ singing? yes, quality. a fantastic song. when it— singing? yes, quality. a fantastic song, when it is _ singing? yes, quality. a fantastic song, when it is done _ singing? yes, quality. a fantastic song, when it is done right - singing? yes, quality. a fantastic song, when it is done right it - singing? yes, quality. a fantastic song, when it is done right it is i song, when it is done right it is lovely, but not on this occasion. so far, the crooner hasn�*t affected evan�*s form, and he should be feeling fresh as he didn�*t have to hit a ball in the last round, because his opponent withdrew due to injury. so here he is in the melbourne sunshine trying to reach the last 16, for only the second time. he�*s up against the 9th seed, felix auger aliassime from canada. and so far, it�*s going with serve. aliassime is 3—2 up, but evans holding his own. staying down under, and there was frustration for england�*s women cricketers overnight with their second ashes t—20 match abandoned due to rain in adelaide. they�*d actually made a decent start, after being put into bat, reaching 25 without loss in just over four overs, before the weather ruled out further play.
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the forecast isn�*t great either for the third match on monday morning our time. australia lead the multi format series 2—0 after a thumping win in the first match. now, having spent all season in the relegation zone, the great escape looks on for norwich city. they beat watford, the team who were just above them, thanks to their 21—year—old americanjosh sergeant. his first goal was sublime — great little flick. it did cross the line. he�*sjust become a dad, too, so a real spring in his step. some of the floodlights then went out at carrow road, but both teams agreed to play on with less light. watford may regret that, because norwich scored two more, with another from sargant, and had a man sent off. and watford now find themselves in the bottom three after norwich�*s second win on the trot. it will be a big boost for everybody but we also know that the table at the moment looks very uneven. with all the postponements that have been. but to win one game in the
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premier league is hard for newly promoted teams, to win back—to—back games is even harder. really pleased with the performance. manchester united defender victor lindelof won�*t be involved in this afternoon�*s game against west ham after his home was broken into while he was playing on wednesday. lindelof�*s wife posted the news on instagram, saying she had locked herself in a room with the couple�*s children during what she called the "scary and traumatic" break—in. united manager ralf rangnick confirmed that the swedish international is not in the right frame of mind to play. this was really a traumatic event, especially for his, for his wife, and even their three year son, he said to me that right now, he needs to stay at home, he doesn�*t want to leave his wife and his family on their own, which i can fully understand, being a father of two children myself, we agreed that he
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will not be training today and also not be on duty tomorrow for the game. the fifth round draw for the scottish cup takes place later, after this afternoon�*s fourth round ties. rangers are already in the hat. they beat stirling albion 4—0 at ibrox. and what a moment for teenager alex lowry, he scored the opening goal on his debut, after coming on as a substitute. harlequins arejoint top of their pool, after another last—minute comeback in rugby union�*s european champions cup. already guaranteed a place in the last 16, quins made several changes for the game against castres, and they were nearly made to pay, but england�*s alex dombrandt was influential — scoring a hat—trick, including the winning try, way into overtime. an update from the tennis? yes, please. an update from the tennis? yes, lease. , . . an update from the tennis? yes, lease. , ., , ., ., please. they are still going with a server, please. they are still going with a server. and _ please. they are still going with a server. and as — please. they are still going with a server, and as far _ please. they are still going with a server, and as far as _ please. they are still going with a server, and as far as i _ please. they are still going with a server, and as far as i know - please. they are still going with a server, and as far as i know the i server, and as far as i know the singing has not started up again. they have found the crooner and have taken him away. for they have found the crooner and have
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taken him away-— they have found the crooner and have taken him away._ they . taken him away. for lessons. they have switched _ taken him away. for lessons. they have switched off _ taken him away. for lessons. they have switched off his _ taken him away. for lessons. they have switched off his microphone. | have switched off his microphone. you have got a tough gig this morning. _ you have got a tough gig this morning, you need to keep across all yes, rollercoaster. thank you. for the last eight months, with every passing sunrise and sunset, a solitary figure has stepped into a glass box eight stories above the ground in hull. it�*s part of an art installation called the hull vigil, which aims to encourage a selection of local volunteers to peacefully keep watch over their city. crispin rolfe has been speaking to some of them. the day that i did my vigil, there was a fantastic sunrise and a beautiful harvest moon. i was doubly blessed. it beautiful harvest moon. i was doubly blessed. . . , . blessed. it was extremely humbling to have that — blessed. it was extremely humbling to have that really _ blessed. it was extremely humbling to have that really unique _ to have that really unique perspective over my home city and feel like _ perspective over my home city and feel like that protector, because there _ feel like that protector, because there was— feel like that protector, because there was that sense of
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responsibility and duty while looking _ responsibility and duty while looking over everybody. lovely to see the sun _ looking over everybody. lovely to see the sun set _ looking over everybody. lovely to see the sun set over— looking over everybody. lovely to see the sun set over the - looking over everybody. lovely to see the sun set over the city, - looking over everybody. lovely to j see the sun set over the city, and being _ see the sun set over the city, and being in— see the sun set over the city, and being in that— see the sun set over the city, and being in that box _ see the sun set over the city, and being in that box was _ see the sun set over the city, and being in that box was just - see the sun set over the city, and| being in that box was just surreal, really— being in that box was just surreal, really surreal _ being in that box was 'ust surreal, really surreah really surreal. every sunrise and every sunset _ really surreal. every sunrise and every sunset since _ really surreal. every sunrise and every sunset since may - really surreal. every sunrise and every sunset since may three i really surreal. every sunrise and l every sunset since may three last year, watched and witnessed over hull. it year, watched and witnessed over hull. . . year, watched and witnessed over hull. ., , ,, , , :: year, watched and witnessed over hull. ,, , , :: . hull. it was september 20. i chose that date because _ hull. it was september 20. i chose that date because it _ hull. it was september 20. i chose that date because it marked - hull. it was september 20. i chose that date because it marked 50 - hull. it was september 20. i chose i that date because it marked 50 years since i first came to hull, i came for three years, unlike many people just stayed. tat, for three years, unlike many people just stayed-— for three years, unlike many people 'ust sta ed. �* , ., ., ., just stayed. a visual made even more totinant b just stayed. a visual made even more poignant by the _ just stayed. a visual made even more poignant by the time _ just stayed. a visual made even more poignant by the time being _ just stayed. a visual made even more poignant by the time being lived - just stayed. a visual made even more poignant by the time being lived in. i poignant by the time being lived in. the last 18 months that we live three has been tough on everybody in different ways, but considering it is an experience that you take part in alone, people have found that it is actually incredibly connecting. i remember being pushed up the ramp onto the _ remember being pushed up the ramp onto the ambulance. and remember being pushed up the ramp onto the ambulance.— onto the ambulance. and for key worker carrie _ onto the ambulance. and for key worker carrie and _ onto the ambulance. and for key worker carrie and her— onto the ambulance. and for key worker carrie and her family. .. i onto the ambulance. and for keyj worker carrie and her family. .. it worker carrie and herfamily... it is hard when you live together, so that it would vulnerable adults at
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risk. �* ., , ., risk. after her entire household cau t ht risk. after her entire household caught covid — risk. after her entire household caught covid at _ risk. after her entire household caught covid at the _ risk. after her entire household caught covid at the height - risk. after her entire household caught covid at the height of i risk. after her entire household | caught covid at the height of the pandemic, the vigils provided a brief moment of peace. in pandemic, the vigils provided a brief moment of peace.- pandemic, the vigils provided a brief moment of peace. in the 'ob that i do, brief moment of peace. in the 'ob that t to, being �* brief moment of peace. in the 'ob that i do, being in i brief moment of peace. in the 'ob that i do, being in a i brief moment of peace. in the 'ob that i do, being in a busy i brief moment of peace. in the job that i do, being in a busy family i that i do, being in a busy family home, somebody always wants a piece of me. and just to be in that moment with no distractions, no phone, nothing, it was just so calm. i nothing, it wasjust so calm. i picked the 11th of november, armistice day, i thought it would be really poignant moment for me, just watch the sunrise over the city and really reflect on everything that day. i really reflect on everything that da . ., ., , , day. i wore a dress covered in poppies. _ day. i wore a dress covered in poppies. not _ day. i wore a dress covered in poppies, not that _ day. i wore a dress covered in poppies, not that i _ day. i wore a dress covered in poppies, not that i think i day. i wore a dress covered in i poppies, not that i think anyone can see it from a distance, from the ground looking up. my parents took a photo, very blurry. the ground looking up. my parents took a photo. very blurry-— photo, very blurry. the vigil is not over et. photo, very blurry. the vigil is not over yet- for— photo, very blurry. the vigil is not over yet. for the _ photo, very blurry. the vigil is not over yet. for the next four - photo, very blurry. the vigil is not i over yet. for the next four months, a lucky few will be left alone with their thoughts as the sun sets or rises over hull. mt; their thoughts as the sun sets or rises over hull.— their thoughts as the sun sets or rises over hull. ~ , ., ., , ., rises over hull. my dad has done the vi t il, rises over hull. my dad has done the vitil, and rises over hull. my dad has done the vigil. and my — rises over hull. my dad has done the vigil, and my husband _ rises over hull. my dad has done the vigil, and my husband has— rises over hull. my dad has done the vigil, and my husband has also i rises over hull. my dad has done the vigil, and my husband has also done vigil, and my husband has also done vigil and my sister is due to direct. it was great, yes. it was good thinking inside the box, in
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fact. that was crispin rolfe reporting. you quite like the idea of that, don�*t you? i you quite like the idea of that, don't you?— don't you? i love that story. i think there _ don't you? i love that story. i think there is _ don't you? i love that story. i think there is something i don't you? i love that story. i think there is something so i don't you? i love that story. i i think there is something so serene and calming about it. every sunrise and calming about it. every sunrise and every sunset, somebodyjust they are watching. you and every sunset, somebody 'ust they watching.— are watching. you can do that by 'ust are watching. you can do that by just looking _ are watching. you can do that by just looking out _ are watching. you can do that by just looking out the _ are watching. you can do that by just looking out the window, i are watching. you can do that by just looking out the window, you know that? it just looking out the window, you know that?— just looking out the window, you know that? , ., ., ., know that? it is the idea of someone was beint know that? it is the idea of someone was being there. _ know that? it is the idea of someone was being there, it _ know that? it is the idea of someone was being there, it is _ know that? it is the idea of someone was being there, it is lovely. - know that? it is the idea of someone was being there, it is lovely. good. i was being there, it is lovely. good. s-etakin was being there, it is lovely. good. speaking of — was being there, it is lovely. good. speaking of calm. _ was being there, it is lovely. good. speaking of calm, serene, - was being there, it is lovely. good. | speaking of calm, serene, relaxing, here is louise with the weather. very chilled story to tell, try to stay awake because it is very quiet and very dull in some respects but thatis and very dull in some respects but that is good news because we do not have rain to talk about if you don�*t want it at moment. it has been a similar theme all week with the milder air sitting across scotland and much colderfurther milder air sitting across scotland and much colder further south milder air sitting across scotland and much colderfurther south but nowhere near as cold as yesterday morning, temperatures perhaps lowest down to bury st edmunds, —4, and the reason it isn�*t so cold is because is more in the way of cloud about, the pressure shifting position a
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little bit. a bit more of a breeze into the far north—west and a weak weather front just into the far north—west and a weak weather frontjust producing a little bit of patchy light drizzle into the far north—west, that�*s about the only weather to talk about. the south—westerly feed comes in to the cloud and the moisture here so west—facing coasts also claudia and the best of any breaks first thing out of the east but even then i suspect cloud will arrive the afternoon. temperatures fairly widespread between seven and nine across the country, may be double figures once again after the very mild start up into the far north—west. through the night, a similar story. where we continue to see breaks in the cloud, temperatures will fall to freezing and they could be patchy mist and fog that they will be hit and miss, the emphasis is with the cloudy skies. that will keep temperatures above freezing for many but when you get one or two breaks, perhaps in rural spots, you will see temperatures falling below freezing.
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baha�*is are still with us, still little in the way of change and you can see how the isobars are well spaced which means very little in the way of wind, except the far north—west. gusting to galdos by the end of the day because there is gradually a weather front that is trying desperately to push in and squeeze the high pressure out of the way but tomorrow, lots of cloud, dry storage at relatively quiet story with top thames between six and nine degrees, quite widely, for the country. into monday, the higher is still with us and little in the way of change. this is the front bringing rain into the far north—west but we keep the grey theme but still, a quiet, dry and to january. how many of us can say that? a dry and to january! temperatures between five and eight, and it looks likely that frontal bring some rain albeit light and patchy through the middle part of the week —— end to january. in the
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high bills again so we are not in that much of a rush to close out the month ofjanuary, that much of a rush to close out the month of january, staying that much of a rush to close out the month ofjanuary, staying quiet. 0n the whole it�*s dominantly cloudy, temperatures where they should be for the time of year and most of the rain into the far north. it feels unseasonably appropriate. i like that. but bright _ unseasonably appropriate. i like that. but bright and _ unseasonably appropriate. i like that. but bright and sunny i unseasonably appropriate. i like that. but bright and sunny but i unseasonably appropriate. i like i that. but bright and sunny but cold is a tood that. but bright and sunny but cold is a good winter _ that. but bright and sunny but cold is a good winter weather. - time now for the film review with jane hill and mark kermode. hello, and a very warm welcome again to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week�*s cinema releases, mark kermode again. hi, mark. hello. we are fully into award season... yes! ..as you can tell by the kind of big beasts that are coming into the cinema. so we have belfast, the new film by kenneth branagh. we have nightmare alley,
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which is the new film by guillermo del toro. and we have ajournal forjordan, which is the new film by denzel washington. so, belfast. yeah. kenneth branagh grew up in belfast. he did. some people might not realise. and this is very much inspired by his childhood. it is the story of a nine—year—old boy in �*605 belfast whose main worry is he�*s fallen in love with somebody at school and he doesn�*t know how to talk to her and he needs to take advice on the subject, and he takes advice largely from his grandmother and grandfather, played by ciaran hinds and damejudi dench. here�*s a beautiful clip from belfast. the wee girl is still showing some interest, yeah? she looks at me sometimes, but we're not allowed to talkj in the class, so i i can't say anything. and then, when we goj out to the playground, she always goes off| with the other girls. anyways, i think she i loves that other fella. ah, you don't know that for sure.
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women are very mysterious! and women can smash your face in two, mister! your granny has become less mysterious over the years. so, you really like her? when i grow up, i want to marry her. yeah, sounds like you really like her. you know, she's not only at school. you can see where she lives maybe. it's reynolds drive, _ four houses in from the right — the one with the wonky eight. well, you've done your research. i pass it every day on the way home. i try to look in, - but she never sees me. she's always doing i her bloody homework! if she were a wee bit| more stupid like me, we'd be sitting together by now. ah, pity beyond all telling is head and the heart of love. ah, he�*s full of pretty answers, that one! come on, it�*s time to go. we don�*t want your mummy shouting at me because you�*re late. cheerio, son! cheerio! aw! now, everyone — everyone in my ear, everyone who�*s listening to that, they�*re all chuckling in a really lovely way. none of us have seen it, and we all already want to see it,
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i think. it�*s lovely. and then, of course, what happens is that with the rise of the troubles, there are, you know, barricades and divisions and the world around him starts to change. and so, here�*s the thing with the film — on the one hand, it�*s like, you know, john boorman�*s hope and glory is being referenced here, because it�*s like a child�*s—eye view of conflict. yep. it also has something of alfonso cuaron�*s roma — which, of course was a big success at the oscars. it�*s shot in black—and—white, branagh said, because he remembers his past in black and white, but also because black and white enables you to do infinite shades of grey in terms of the political turmoil. i also think it�*s important to acknowledge that there is a lot of terence davis in this — particularly in the fact that when he — the kid goes to the cinema and the cinema is suddenly in colour, chitty chitty bang bang is suddenly in colour, and that thing about the rapture of going to the cinema when you�*re young is something that, really, terence davis kind of pioneered and i think that branagh has taken a leaf out of his book. i think this is a very charming, engaging, to some extent slightly schmaltzy, but, hey,
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i think it hits that sweet spot between the film that pleases the critics and the film that absolutely pleases the crowds. i think it�*s got a really strong shot at being — i told you this before — i think it�*s the best picture contender. i mean, i — it would not surprise me at all if this walked off with the top prize at the oscars because it�*s kind of got that written all over it. it�*s made with real love and heart, and there are a couple of things that are a little bit hokey about it and it�*s slightly sentimentalised, but it�*s a childhood view — it�*s a memoir about childhood. it�*s fiction, but it�*s clearly inspired by real life, and as you said, from watching that clip, if that clip didn�*t sell you the movie, nothing well, frankly. yes! it sounds delightful. and it�*s funny because british people, ithink, think of kenneth branagh still as a classical stage actor, but actually, he has directed a lot of films, and this is a... 0h, he�*s a — he�*s a very accomplished film—maker. i will still fly the flag for frankenstein, which is much derided, and i think that is a very, very underrated film. so, second film this week. total change of gear.
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nightmare alley — new film by guillermo del toro who, obviously, shape of water, but this actually dates back to when he was making cronos, which was like a vampire movie. and this is based on a novel from the �*405 that was first filmed in 1947 — a kind of a film noir. story is bradley cooper is a natural born con man. he�*s running away from his past. he takes up with a carnival. he learns the tricks of mentalism — like a coded way in which you can do an act that makes you look like a mind reader. first half of the film takes place in a carnival, the second half takes place in the city, where he develops an act as the great stanton — the great mind reader. and then, his path crosses with cate blanchett, who is a psychoanalyst, and he�*s kind of offered the opportunity to sell his soul, which hejumps at. what i love about this is, well, three things. firstly, i love guillermo del toro�*s films anyway, because he�*s a properfilm—maker. he make films that they — he create worlds. you know, the world is artificial, but it�*s also got its feet on the ground. the whole thing is completely immersive. second thing is, yes, this is a neo noir but it�*s —
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it owes a lot to horror, it owes a lot to tod browning�*s freaks from the 19305. it�*s a real sort of cinematic treat. and the other thing is it has the darkest ending of any film in recent memory, and i love the fact that it doesn�*t bottle out. i love the fact that it�*s — the story has got an arc to it and it goes from here to the — and the place that it�*s going to is inevitable and it does not look away from it. it�*s real cinema, it�*s transportive. i thought it was great. i know you�*re not a horrorfan, so i�*m going to say to you it�*s a film noir, it�*s a neo noir, it�*s not a horrorfilm, 0k? i am intrigued, most definitely. i think you�*ll like it. i — i sort of enjoyed the shape of water, which won the oscar, didn�*t it? yeah, absolutely. but in a slightly odd way, perhaps without understanding it, but i — but i enjoyed it. it�*s, you know... visually, it was extraordinary, and i�*m getting a sense that this is, too. shape of water is a creature from the black lagoon meets splash. this is nightmare alley, as re—envisioned as a horrorfilm, but it�*s not a horror film. 0k! 0k. i get it, i get it! ajournalforjordan. ajournalforjordan — again, this couldn�*t
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be more different. directed by denzel washington. a true story about first sergeant charles monroe king who, while he was in iraq, kept a diary for his son of home truths and life lessons. chante adams and michael bjordan are the journalist and soldier who are the parents tojordan. here�*s a clip. ah, there we go! little head. ispy... yeah... heartbeat. dana, thank you. i love you. i love you, too. you guys want to know the sex? both: yes! chuckles. it's a boy. i knew it! yes, it's a boy! ah, what's up, little fella? how you doin'? it's papa! chuckles. i knew it was a boy! i knew it! so, here�*s the thing — i mean, it feels, to some extent, like a tv movie.
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0n the good side, it is good to see a film in which male heroism is portrayed as being caring and being sensitive and teaching lessons about respecting yourself, respecting your heritage, respecting women particularly, and its messages are all very positive. it does, however, feel — it�*s a little bit kind of ordinary. it has a strange time structure flashing backwards and forwards which i kind of thought complicated rather than compressed the narrative. and it�*s — it�*s not a brilliantly made film but it is a film, whose heart is in the right place and i do confess, as i get older, you know, you see a film in which — which is so clearly — look, these are good messages, these are strong messages, these are the kinds of things that people — i can imagine somebody — in the right frame of mind, somebody really taking it to heart. i thought it was ok. it was more of a tv movie than a film. 0k. but its heart in the right place. 0k. and your best 0ut this week is still... licorice pizza. and you still don�*t like it?
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well, i don�*t love it! i don�*t love it. i cannot tell you how many frank exchanges i have had in the newsroom in the last week about licorice pizza. yeah. and there�*s a divide out there. oh, it�*s very... there�*s a real divide. it has proved surprisingly divisive — much more so than i thought it was going to — but, hey, you know, in a way, that�*s what cinema is meant to do. it is meant to divide opinion. and i still love the two central performances, and we�*re looking at them now. alana haim isjust great. i mean, and she — you know, neither of them have starred in a movie before and, i don�*t know, it feels natural and funny and — i mean, idid — i — i just found it enchanting. i know people who absolutely loathe it! so, it�*s, you know, it is kind of interesting the way it�*s dividing audiences but, you know, it�*s a paul thomas anderson film and like punch drunk love, his films are not for everyone. and i�*m intrigued by your choice of dvd this week. yeah — well, this is streaming. i don�*t know it, but i�*m interested. so not dvd — streaming. streaming, streaming. ok, so but it is also in cinemas, but mainly streaming. so mass, which is on sky cinema — but is also in some cinemas. this is a forehander about two sets
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of parents meeting in a room in a church in a wake of the tragedy that has engulfed them. and they are having the meeting in order to attempt to find some kind of reconciliation. and it�*s jason isaacs, martha plimpton, reed birney, ann dowd — really, really great actors. fran krantz is the writer—director. debut feature. i thought it was astonishingly good. i saw it a year ago when it played at sundance, which was the virtual festival, and it�*s kind of now got lost in all the awards. but it�*s an ensemble cast like you�*ve never seen before, um... and i looked at it and wondered whether it had started life as a play, actually, because of the american actors are real, classic stage actors — martha plimpton among them. yeah, yeah — i mean, great performances. no, it didn�*t. and weirdly, enough, it is actually very cinematic when you consider that it is a film about four people in a room, talking. the other thing to say is the subject matter that it�*s dealing with may be very, very dark and very, very difficult, but it is a — it is not a film about despair, it is a film about hope, and that makes it quite a hard film
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to sell because it is dealing with some very, very dark subject matter — school shootings and, you know, tragedies like that — but the performances are brilliant — i mean, absolutely brilliant — and i saw it, knowing nothing about it other than a friend of mine had said "jason isaacs is in the best film i�*ve seen in ages" and it�*s — i would really hope if you get a chance to see it in a cinema, go and see it in a cinema. otherwise, it is on sky cinema. but however you see it, see it, because it is one of the most powerful films i�*ve seen in a good many years. and it�*s funny how something can get lost, actually, maybe in that covid way, things have been so different and... it has been such a strange time for cinema and, you know, stuff opening on the small screen rather than the big screen and then simultaneously. and also, around awards season — as you can telljust in this one show — we�*ve had nightmare alley, we�*ve had belfast, all of these things suddenly backing up whereas last week, it was a very different — was a very different picture. so i think during awards season, things do get lost in the shuffle. please, don�*t miss out on mass. 0k. it is so worth your time. i�*d love to know what you think of it.
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i�*m looking forward to that, despite — yeah, really looking forward to that, streaming and in cinemas. thank you very much, mark. thank you. it�*s a cracking week. thank you. see you next time and enjoy your cinema—going, whatever you choose to see. see you very soon. bye— bye.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and ben thompson. 0ur headlines today: the impact of rising energy prices — an urgent call for government to intervene to help businesses and households manage spiralling bills. a senseless act. police in the us city of atlanta react to the death of british man matthew willson, who�*s killed by a stray bullet as he lay in bed. 0ur victim is someone that was completely innocent, had no involvement whatsoever with the individuals that were involved in the reckless discharging of their firearms. the biggest update to
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the highway code in a generation — more rights for walkers and cyclists, but the aa says a third of drivers don�*t know about the changes. the last brit standing in the australian open singles, dan evans, is carrying the nations hopes this morning as he tries to reach the last 16 for only the second time, and it�*s tight and tense in the first set, against felix auger aliasseem. a quiet start to the weekend's weather~ _ a quiet start to the weekend's weather. not quite as cold, but not as sunny— weather. not quite as cold, but not as sunny either. i will have all the details _ as sunny either. i will have all the details coming up shortly. it�*s saturday, the 22nd of january. our top story: five of the uk�*s leading business groups have called on the government to act now to support both businesses and consumers, who they say face spiralling energy bills. they�*ve written to the chancellor, rishi sunak, demanding urgent action to tackle the ongoing crisis. here�*s our business correspondent, ramzan karmali. these five prominent business groups have warned the chancellor that energy price rises on the horizon
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could push millions of people into fuel poverty. in a letter sent to rishi sunak, they say that if the issue is: the reason our energy is getting more expensive is down to the massive rise in wholesale prices, as economies around the world began easing covid restrictions. the energy regulator, 0fgen, is due to announce a new energy price from april, and it is expected to rise dramatically, to £2000 for the average household. i think it is really vital that the government thinks, how can we not protect everybody from global energy prices, that feels really hard to do, but to smooth the cliff edge for most households for him in £800 rise in their bills will really be too much, as well as supporting
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the most disadvantaged in our society to be able to cope with really significant increases. and when it comes to businesses, 2022 is already proving to be a massive hit to cash flow for a whole range of reasons. put a secondary glazing on this side... the energy bill for this hotelier in scarboroughjumped up from £2000 a month to £10,000 in november. she has no choice but to pass on some of these rising costs. 0ur challenge is that it is coming towards the end of the pandemic now, foreign markets are opening back up for travel, so we are now in a position where our hotel is competing with very cheap foreign hotels, foreign travel. we�*re in a position now that if the costs keep rising and we have to pass those costs onto our customers, we are not going to be able to compete with that market. rising energy costs are putting pressure on notjust families but businesses, too, and the calls on the government to act now are growing ever louder. for their part, the treasury said
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it�*s helping families with £12 billion worth of support, targeting the lowest—paid over the next two years. ramzan karmali, bbc news. police in the us have descibed the death of a british man from a stray bullet as a "reckless, senseless act." 31—year—old astrophysicist matthew willson was killed while he lay in bed during a trip to the city of atlanta. simonjones has this report. killed in what officers are describing as "a random and senseless act." matthew willson was in bed last sunday beside his girlfriend, pictured in this image released by police. he was hit in the head by a bullet fired from a neighbouring block of flats. he had just arrived in the atlanta area to visit his girlfriend, they were laying down for bed that night when they heard the gunfire erupt, and what appears right now, a stray bullet entered the exterior wall of their apartment and struck him. this is a very tragic incident, our victim is someone that was completely innocent,
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had no involvement whatsoever with the individuals that were involved in the reckless discharging of their firearms. police were initially called to the area following reports shots were being fired into the air. they received a second call from matthew willson�*s girlfriend, saying he had been hit. in a brief statement, the foreign office here in london said it was supporting the family of a british man following his death in the united states. it added that it was in contact with the authorities over there. matthew willson was a former phd student at the university of exeter. it said: the police in the us are offering a reward for information. no arrests have been made, but officers say they are determined to put those responsible injail.
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the senior tory backbencher who accused number 10 of trying to "blackmail" rebel mp5 will meet police to discuss his allegations. william wragg, who has called for borisjohnson�*s resignation, says he�*ll speak to scotland yard detectives in the house of commons early next week. 0ur political correspondent helen cattjoins us now. helen, remind us of the allegations? so, this is to do with how the whips, and peas appointed by the parties to make sure that their colleagues basically vote in the right way, a row has a rough at about some of the tactics that are being used, so quite extraordinary news earlier this week, william bragg, a senior tory mp, said that in the recent weeks, some of his colleagues had found that it had been suggested, for example, that
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stories that would be embarrassing about the might be published in the press, those who are suspected of not supporting boris johnson. press, those who are suspected of not supporting borisjohnson. and more damaging leak, there were also suggestions that whips had told mp5 they would withhold money from their constituencies if they did not vote in certain ways. he said that amounted to blackmail. he has requested a meeting with the metropolitan police, is expected to meet with them this week, in parliament, to discuss this. number ten has said that if there was any evidence brought forward to these allegations, they would look at it carefully. mr bragg said he would prefer the experts, as he put it, to look into this. it comes at a time when those methods of persuasion will be under huge scrutiny ahead of what might be another big crunch point when the sue grey report is published this week. the first shipment of military aid from the united states to ukraine has arrived in kyiv, as russian troops continue to build
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near the border. acording to the us embassy, the package contains ammunition for ukraine�*s front—line forces. it comes a day after russia�*s foreign minister and his us counterpart held what both sides called "frank" talks, in an effort to cool tensions. former olympic champion cyclist, chris boardman, is to head up a new government body that aims to encourage cycling and walking in england. active travel england aims to improve infrastructure for cyclists and pedestrians, as well as funding projects to improve air quality. luxmy gopal reports. getting from a to be on foot or by bike is good for our health and environment. —— from a to b. but how goodis environment. —— from a to b. but how good is our infrastructure for pedestrians and cyclists? the issue is beint pedestrians and cyclists? the issue is being given _ pedestrians and cyclists? the issue is being given cash _ pedestrians and cyclists? the issue is being given cash from _ pedestrians and cyclists? the issue is being given cash from the i is being given cash from the government had clout from the former 0lympic cyclist chris boardman. it has been set up to encourage walking
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and cycling, by inspecting the standards of local highways, major planning applications for pedestrians and cyclists, and funding projects to improve air quality. the government has also announced today that it is spending £3 million on improving cycling infrastructure on train stations, including secure cycling facilities stop and £300 million to subsidise the cargo bikes are small businesses. this is all part of the £2 billion funding it has already pledged toward cycling and walking schemes over a five year period. the question is, how far that will go in improving infrastructure enough to make walking or cycling safe and practical travel options across the country. luxmy gopal, bbc news. adults living with obesity in england are now being offered extra weight—loss support from community pharmacists. until now, patients had to be seen by their gps before they could access an nhs12—week weight management plan. the scheme is designed to help
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the estimated one—in—four adults who are obese. from today, almost all coronavirus restrictions are being lifted in the republic of ireland. social distancing measures and limits on gatherings will be scrapped, while workers will return to offices on a staggered basis. an 8:00pm curfew for restaurants, bars, cafes and pubs will also be lifted. it is going to feel like a completely new world and the republic of ireland. because in england we didn�*t have those restrictions, curfews in particular. i think the curfew is another thing people will find such a change, as well. because we have sort of got used to with some of the other restrictions.— restrictions. social distancing, absolutely- — restrictions. social distancing, absolutely. it _ restrictions. social distancing, absolutely. it always - restrictions. social distancing, absolutely. it always feels i restrictions. social distancing, i absolutely. it always feels weird tutttin it absolutely. it always feels weird putting it back — absolutely. it always feels weird putting it back to _ absolutely. it always feels weird putting it back to how _ absolutely. it always feels weird putting it back to how it - absolutely. it always feels weird putting it back to how it was, i absolutely. it always feels weird | putting it back to how it was, you feel too close. rfleet putting it back to how it was, you feel too close.— putting it back to how it was, you feel too close. get in touch, if you are watching- _ from next saturday, the roads we walk, drive and cycle on will be bound by new rules and regulations. that�*s because the highway code is being updated — a move described by cycling uk as the "biggest change of a generation". let�*s take a look at some of those changes. for the first time, a hierarchy
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of road users is being introduced. it places pedestrians�* safety at the top, followed by cyclists�*. as you can see, car and van drivers are further down the list. the new rules will require drivers to give way to pedestrians waiting to cross the road at a junction. until now, vehicles only had to stop if the pedestrian had already stepped onto the road. and the updated code also aims to make roads safer for cyclists, with drivers urged not to cut across people on bicycles when turning into a junction or changing lanes. let�*s get reaction now to those changes. we�*rejoined by the head of campaigns for cycling uk, duncan dollimore. a lot of this, if i�*m being completely honest, sounds like common sense.— completely honest, sounds like commonsense. , , common sense. yes, but a big change. a bit common sense. yes, but a big change. a big change — common sense. yes, but a big change. a big change nonetheless. _ common sense. yes, but a big change. a big change nonetheless. let's i common sense. yes, but a big change. a big change nonetheless. let's get i a big change nonetheless. let�*s get a reaction. we�*rejoined by the head of campaigns for cycling uk, duncan dollimore. it does seem like common sense, doesn�*t it? i mean, don�*t cut across cyclists? doesn't it? i mean, don't cut across clists? ~ ., , ., , ., cyclists? well, lots of people have said, wh cyclists? well, lots of people have said. why are _ cyclists? well, lots of people have said, why are we _ cyclists? well, lots of people have said, why are we having _ cyclists? well, lots of people have said, why are we having these i said, why are we having these changes? _ said, why are we having these changes? surely it is common sense?
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but the _ changes? surely it is common sense? but the highway code rules, a set of rules— but the highway code rules, a set of rules that _ but the highway code rules, a set of rules that are supposed to frame how we behave _ rules that are supposed to frame how we behave on the roads, and sadly, not everybody does behave on the roads. _ not everybody does behave on the roads. so — not everybody does behave on the roads. so it — not everybody does behave on the roads, so it is important that we .et roads, so it is important that we get that— roads, so it is important that we get that right. in relation to not cutting — get that right. in relation to not cutting across people, the current highway _ cutting across people, the current highway code has 14 different rules, which _ highway code has 14 different rules, which set _ highway code has 14 different rules, which set something out about who has priority— which set something out about who has priority at particular junctions, so this idea of simplifying matters is common sense but it isht— simplifying matters is common sense but it isn't what we have now, and that is— but it isn't what we have now, and that is why — but it isn't what we have now, and that is why this change are really important — that is why this change are really im tortant. ~ . that is why this change are really im-ortant. ~ ., , . important. what difference will it make in reality? _ important. what difference will it make in reality? as _ important. what difference will it make in reality? as you - important. what difference will it make in reality? as you said, i important. what difference will it i make in reality? as you said, there are rules in place now. lots of people don�*t know about them in the first place and even fewer will know about these changes being introduced. it about these changes being introduced.— about these changes being introduced. , , introduced. it is disappointing there has not _ introduced. it is disappointing there has not been _ introduced. it is disappointing there has not been more i introduced. it is disappointing i there has not been more publicity about— there has not been more publicity about these changes, we expected them _ about these changes, we expected them to— about these changes, we expected them to come in a week from today, they should — them to come in a week from today, they should have been more publicity in advance. _ they should have been more publicity in advance, but there are two phases to this _ in advance, but there are two phases to this one — in advance, but there are two phases to this. one is communicating what the changes are, because they have le-al the changes are, because they have legal implications, the day that they come in. i think there has to
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be a _ they come in. i think there has to be a separate push to make sure that more _ be a separate push to make sure that more people are aware that it is actually— more people are aware that it is actually their responsibility to know— actually their responsibility to know what the rules say. after that, there _ know what the rules say. after that, there is _ know what the rules say. after that, there is a _ know what the rules say. after that, there is a cultural change, because people's— there is a cultural change, because people's behaviour doesn't change overnight— people's behaviour doesn't change overnight stop there needs to be that long—running awareness nudging people's— that long—running awareness nudging people's behaviour, when we introduced access alcohol drug driving — introduced access alcohol drug driving tests and drunk driving test. — driving tests and drunk driving test. we — driving tests and drunk driving test, we didn'tjust do one announcement of an item say, that's it, announcement of an item say, that's it. there _ announcement of an item say, that's it, there were long—term campaigns to highlight that, to such an extent that drunk— to highlight that, to such an extent that drunk driving effectively became _ that drunk driving effectively became culturally unacceptable. it wasn't. _ became culturally unacceptable. it wasn't, when it was first introduced. people objected to those laws. introduced. people objected to those laws but— introduced. people objected to those laws. but over time people adjusted their cultural view of it, and that is what — their cultural view of it, and that is what we — their cultural view of it, and that is what we need a long—running and clear— is what we need a long—running and clear message awareness campaign. some _ clear message awareness campaign. some of— clear message awareness campaign. some of the things that have changed, the hierarchy, and how important is that? it is notjust a case of, i have more rights than
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you. it comes down to insurance claims and things like that, doesn�*t it? and reports, it unfortunately there is an accident. it is strange. if ou there is an accident. it is strange. if you think _ there is an accident. it is strange. if you think of— there is an accident. it is strange. if you think of a _ there is an accident. it is strange. if you think of a workplace, i if you think of a workplace, factory, you would always work on the principle that the person in charge of the most dangerous machinery, the one that could cause the most time, would have greater responsibilities than the person operating the photocopier. but on the roads, we have never had a principle. we have always had that language that everybody has the same responsibility, responsibility is shared. frankly, that is daft. a5 responsibility, responsibility is shared. frankly, that is daft. as a child walking along the pavement at the same responsibility for the safety as others have somebody in charge of 44 ton lorry? it makes nonsense, that we have always had that approach to road safety in this country, ratherthan that approach to road safety in this country, rather than looking at where responsibility lies in terms of your potential to cause harm to somebody else. and all the hierarchy is, it is a statement of physics, but actually, the person in charge of the largest vehicle has the greatest responsibility. but also, it looks at those who are
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most likely to be injured in the event of a collision so it�*s pedestrians first, they have the priority, is that how it is being seen? then cyclists, horseriders, motorcyclists and then cars, et cetera, and bigger vehicles? it�*s motorcyclists and then cars, et cetera, and bigger vehicles? it's to do with responsibility, _ cetera, and bigger vehicles? it's to do with responsibility, as _ cetera, and bigger vehicles? it's to do with responsibility, as were i cetera, and bigger vehicles? it's to i do with responsibility, as were most vulnerable, pedestrians, and we think beyond the austrians about children, elderly people, people with a disability are the most vulnerable and those, we go up the hierarchy so cyclists now have a greater responsibility towards pedestrians, for example. there still a conflict _ pedestrians, for example. there still a conflict because _ pedestrians, for example. there still a conflict because there i pedestrians, for example. there still a conflict because there are| still a conflict because there are more _ still a conflict because there are more people using a diminishing resource. — more people using a diminishing resource, you have drivers and pedestrians and cyclists trying to .et pedestrians and cyclists trying to get down — pedestrians and cyclists trying to get down the same road and in reality— get down the same road and in reality what you want to do is segregate them more safely and this is guidance and what you want to see is guidance and what you want to see is better— is guidance and what you want to see is better cycle lane, pavement, crossing — is better cycle lane, pavement, crossing were pedestrians. isn�*t crossing were pedestrians. isn't that the heart _ crossing were pedestrians. isn't that the heart of _ crossing were pedestrians. isn't that the heart of this? - crossing were pedestrians. isn�*t that the heart of this? course. we�*ve been campaigning for separated
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infrastructure where possible for cycling for many, many years and clearly, we need that investment in infrastructure. however, we have rural roads where the reality is we are unlikely to have that anytime soon and therefore we need to look at people�*s behaviour on the roads where we don�*t have separation of people. so it is not an either/or but these are all very important in terms of those circumstances where we don�*t have separation. did terms of those circumstances where we don't have separation.— we don't have separation. did you know about _ we don't have separation. did you know about the _ we don't have separation. did you know about the dutch _ we don't have separation. did you know about the dutch reach i we don't have separation. did you | know about the dutch reach before this? i know about the dutch reach before this? ., , .., , know about the dutch reach before this? ., , , ., this? i did not, because we have been campaigning _ this? i did not, because we have been campaigning on _ this? i did not, because we have been campaigning on it. - this? i did not, because we have been campaigning on it. do i this? i did not, because we have been campaigning on it. do you | this? i did not, because we have i been campaigning on it. do you know this? it is been campaigning on it. do you know this? it is so — been campaigning on it. do you know this? it is so important. _ been campaigning on it. do you know this? it is so important. will- been campaigning on it. do you know this? it is so important. will i - been campaigning on it. do you know this? it is so important. will i be i this? it is so important. will! be the car door— this? it is so important. will! be the car door or _ this? it is so important. will! be the car door or you? _ this? it is so important. will! be the car door or you? so - this? it is so important. will! be the car door or you? so that i this? it is so important. willl be the car door or you? so that is l this? it is so important. will i be i the car door or you? so that is the car door. you are driving along, right—hand drive, usually when you open the car door, you would pull the handle with his hand. and the door would open this way. i don't think we are doing this justice. but what you need to do is the dutch reach and this is for cyclists, to
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help, it forces you, so you lean over and do it with the opposite hand. and because then physically you've turned, you will naturally look that way. and then you will see a cyclist. j look that way. and then you will see a clist. ~ , ., ., a cyclist. i think it is fair to say that because _ a cyclist. i think it is fair to say that because it _ a cyclist. i think it is fair to say that because it has _ a cyclist. i think it is fair to say that because it has a _ a cyclist. i think it is fair to say that because it has a name, i a cyclist. i think it is fair to say l that because it has a name, tag, a cyclist. i think it is fair to say - that because it has a name, tag, but some _ that because it has a name, tag, but some media — that because it has a name, tag, but some media attention. 50 that because it has a name, tag, but some media attention. so having —— that has_ some media attention. so having —— that has got— some media attention. so having —— that has got some media attention. so that has got some media attention. 50 having _ that has got some media attention. 50 having a — that has got some media attention. so having a name helps promoted but the reality— so having a name helps promoted but the reality is this is not about exactly— the reality is this is not about exactly how you open the door, it is about— exactly how you open the door, it is about awareness of the fact that we have cyclists that die, about 500 people _ have cyclists that die, about 500 people are injured every year when somebody— people are injured every year when somebody opens a car door without looking _ somebody opens a car door without looking so — somebody opens a car door without looking. so it is highlighting the importance, howeveryou looking. so it is highlighting the importance, however you open the car door, _ importance, however you open the car door, to _ importance, however you open the car door, to be _ importance, however you open the car door, to be aware of what is behind you. _ door, to be aware of what is behind you. use _ door, to be aware of what is behind you. use your— door, to be aware of what is behind you, use your mirrors and look behind — you, use your mirrors and look behind because lots of people passed their driving test without actually thinking — their driving test without actually thinking about that issue. andl their driving test without actually thinking about that issue. and i do thinking about that issue. and i do think about _ thinking about that issue. and i do think about it— thinking about that issue. and i do think about it but _ thinking about that issue. and i do think about it but i _ thinking about that issue. and i do think about it but i do _ thinking about that issue. and i do think about it but i do think - thinking about that issue. and i do think about it but i do think that i think about it but i do think that will... it think about it but i do think that will... ., . , think about it but i do think that will... .,. , ., think about it but i do think that will... ., ., ., will... it forces you to look around our will... it forces you to look around your shoulder. _ will... it forces you to look around your shoulder. really _ will... it forces you to look around
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your shoulder. really good - will... it forces you to look around your shoulder. really good to - will... it forces you to look around your shoulder. really good to talkj your shoulder. really good to talk to ou. your shoulder. really good to talk to you- duncan — your shoulder. really good to talk to you. duncan dollimore, - your shoulder. really good to talk to you. duncan dollimore, thank i your shoulder. really good to talk - to you. duncan dollimore, thank you. i bet louise knew all about that. dutch reach? that is a new one for me. �* ., ., , ., ., ., me. after our demonstration, are you any wiser? — me. after our demonstration, are you any wiser? i — me. after our demonstration, are you any wiser? i am! _ me. after our demonstration, are you any wiser? i am! louise _ me. after our demonstration, are you any wiser? i am! louise has— me. after our demonstration, are you any wiser? i am! louise has got - me. after our demonstration, are you any wiser? i am! louise has got it! i any wiser? i am! louise has got it! the other thing _ any wiser? i am! louise has got it! the other thing that _ any wiser? i am! louise has got it! the other thing that is _ any wiser? i a�*ni louise has got it! the other thing that is annoying is people not scraping the cars and not be misting the cars and they are trying to drive like this first thing in the morning. —— demisting. and you will need to scrape this morning if you are waking up in suffolk. it is colder morning is the one just past but there are, as you can see, some frosty starts, temperatures across the south—east and in parts of eastern scotland as well have fallen below freezing and -2 well have fallen below freezing and —2 in cardiff but look once again into the north—west. this is getting boring! a mild start. still the south—westerly flow driving in the moisture of the atlantic still,
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quite a bit of cloud but a milder story. some drizzle once again but all about the higher, it means the weather story is not changing only for today and tomorrow but into next week. we will close out the month of january on a quiet theme. there are some subtle differences and today, more in the way of cloud. high pressure shifting a little, allowing more of the south—westerly flow to drive moisture in from the west to areas, if you have the sunshine it may cloud over in the afternoon. temperatures 7— nine across england and wales, double digits in the far north—west of scotland. through the night we will see a few holes in that cloud across the midlands, down into oxford just to hear, temperatures may fall around freezing. touches of mist and fog and frost forming. generally, we keep the cloud with us. it will keep the temperatures up and again, another mild start into the northern and western isles. almost a repeat performance as we go into part two of the weekend with the high is not
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going very far very fast and yes, we will continue to see a good deal of dry weather. winds strengthening by the end of the day with the arrival of the weather front which is taking its time in doing so but it is a change in the story with delforce gusts —— gale force gusts of wind across the far north but elsewhere, quiet and grey but tranquil in the afternoon, and the temperatures between six and nine. continuing to see that weather front gradually putting toward scotland for the start of the week and then as we move through the week ahead, one front moves through, another one trying to put in through the middle part of the week which may bring some changes but generally speaking, the high never really leaves the shores of england and wales. we keep the dry story. there will be a fair amount of cloud around and temperatures on the whole pretty much where they should be for the time of year. much where they should be for the time of year-— time of year. always, thank you so much. see you later.
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it may sound like something out of a science fiction movie but, in a uk first, a woman from london has been granted the gift of better sight, thanks to a bionic eye. this is fascinating, this. the ground—breaking operation involved inserting a microchip into the patient�*s retina. victoria hollins has been finding out more. here comes the glasses. making the final adjustments _ here comes the glasses. making the final adjustments for _ here comes the glasses. making the final adjustments for a _ here comes the glasses. making the final adjustments for a patient i here comes the glasses. making the final adjustments for a patient who l final adjustments for a patient who is virtually blind in her left eye. the glasses contain a camera link to a small computer which connects to a microchip recently inserted under her retina. , , ., her retina. chip is placed in the of the retina which _ her retina. chip is placed in the of the retina which is _ her retina. chip is placed in the of the retina which is the _ her retina. chip is placed in the of the retina which is the seeing i her retina. chip is placed in the ofj the retina which is the seeing part of the eye and we can stimulate the chip for her to start to see different types of signals. so that shows that we will hopefully be able to now train her to see things within the centre of her eye, which she never saw before. i within the centre of her eye, which she never saw before.— within the centre of her eye, which she never saw before. i could see my grandchildren- _ she never saw before. i could see my grandchildren. when _ she never saw before. i could see my grandchildren. when i— she never saw before. i could see my grandchildren. when i look— she never saw before. i could see my grandchildren. when i look in - she never saw before. i could see my grandchildren. when i look in the i grandchildren. when i look in the mirror, _ grandchildren. when i look in the mirror, in — grandchildren. when i look in the mirror, i'm going to get a shock!
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this— mirror, i'm going to get a shock! this is— mirror, i'm going to get a shock! this is part — mirror, i'm going to get a shock! this is part of a clinical trial, five years in the making, which is why we are not using the patient because name. she has a chip inserted by month ago and this is herfirst set of inserted by month ago and this is her first set of five test. keep lookin: her first set of five test. keep looking up- — her first set of five test. keep looking up. once _ her first set of five test. keep looking up. once the - her first set of five test. keep looking up. once the lights i her first set of five test. keepl looking up. once the lights are her first set of five test. keep i looking up. once the lights are out, the exoerts — looking up. once the lights are out, the exoerts can _ looking up. once the lights are out, the experts can begin _ looking up. once the lights are out, the experts can begin to _ looking up. once the lights are out, the experts can begin to work- looking up. once the lights are out, the experts can begin to work out . the experts can begin to work out what she can see. 50 the experts can begin to work out what she can see.— what she can see. so what is the colour? green. _ what she can see. so what is the colour? green. i— what she can see. so what is the colour? green. iwill— what she can see. so what is the colour? green. iwill go - what she can see. so what is the colour? green. i will go out i what she can see. so what is the | colour? green. i will go out more because i— colour? green. i will go out more because i have _ colour? green. i will go out more because i have not _ colour? green. i will go out more because i have not been - colour? green. i will go out more because i have not been going i colour? green. i will go out more | because i have not been going out that much — because i have not been going out that much. justice —— just a church on saturday— that much. justice —— just a church on saturday undergo out during the week _ on saturday undergo out during the week. maybe it will be better now if i can week. maybe it will be better now if i can see _ week. maybe it will be better now if i can see better, yeah.— i can see better, yeah. age-related macular degeneration _ i can see better, yeah. age-related macular degeneration causes i i can see better, yeah. age-related macular degeneration causes loss l i can see better, yeah. age-related| macular degeneration causes loss of vision in the centre of the eye. it is the most common cause of significant site loss in the developed world.- significant site loss in the developed world. significant site loss in the develo ed world. ~ , ., developed world. when i first heard about this particular _ developed world. when i first heard about this particular technology i developed world. when i first heard about this particular technology and seeing the results from stanford, i thought this had potential to really be a game changer and we're now seeing that a clinical trial so from a personal note, i am so happy now
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that i can talk to patients about a new technology that potentially could benefit them, and all of these years there has been nothing. his grandmother will have to undergo many training sessions to encourage improvements in her vision but moorfields eye hospital hopes to recruit more people into the study and help the millions affected by a life—changing disease. that really is life—changing. each week, ros atkins takes an in—depth look at new stories making the headlines, and today he explains the reasons behind china's zero covid policy. in europe, there are millions of cases of covid every week. in china, there are very few. and try to's commitment to its zero covid strategy remains a strong as ever —— and china's. strategy remains a strong as ever -- and china's-— and china's. translation: china's situation remains _ and china's. translation: china's
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situation remains stable _ and china's. translation: china's situation remains stable and - situation remains stable and regional busters of locally transmitted cases can be effectively controlled within a short period of time. �* , , ., , . time. and this is what effective control means _ time. and this is what effective control means in _ time. and this is what effective control means in practice. i time. and this is what effective control means in practice. they discovered three asymptomatic cases, three, and that is led within a short interval within a very short period of time to a city with overi million people being shut down. zero covid means lockdown, it means testing on a huge scale. it means disinfecting public transport ahead of a busy travel season. it means quarantine camps for those suspected of having covid. as well as that, officials are warning against ordering things from overseas. they believe omicron may have arrived in beijing via infected mailfrom canada. it is even a hamster coal in hong kong after cases were traced to a pet shop. the virus may have first been identified in china but as you can see, it very much want to keep it out now, and so far largely it has. they have beenjust it out now, and so far largely it has. they have been just over 100,000 cases recorded in china
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since the start of the pandemic, almost two years ago. compare that to the us and uk, where there have been tens of millions. and china's lowercase numbers have meant a lower official death toll too. here you can see china compared with the uk and us with the us heading towards1 million deaths, china is in the low thousands. in fact, there hasn't been a covid death in china for months and supporters of zero covid say that that makes the case. i also point to the chinese economy. official data shows china's gdp grew tjy official data shows china's gdp grew by over 8% last year, that exceeded most expectations. there are those caveats. my colleague mariko oi explains. caveats. my colleague mariko oi exlains. ., , , . ., explains. now china's strict zero covid policy _ explains. now china's strict zero covid policy has _ explains. now china's strict zero covid policy has meant - explains. now china's strict zero covid policy has meant that i explains. now china's strict zero l covid policy has meant that some major cities started to go back into lockdown from last month due to the omicron variant and we have yet to see the full impact of that. for now thou . h, see the full impact of that. for now though. china _ see the full impact of that. for now though, china believes— see the full impact of that. for now though, china believes its- see the full impact of that. for now though, china believes its zero i though, china believes its zero covid strategy has worked, for the economy and for public health. but
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sooner rather than later, it faces a decision. how long to stick with zero covid? and it may have its hand forced. we know omicron is highly transmissible and variance pose a challenge to zero covid policies. seen that in australia. the arrival of the delta variant forced the government to change tack. minister scott morrison abandoned zero covid last year, saying that australia would now live with the virus. or there is new zealand. while visiting from overseas remains limited, prime ministerjacinda ardern did say this last october. ministerjacinda ardern did say this last october-— last october. elimination was important — last october. elimination was important because _ last october. elimination was important because we - last october. elimination was important because we did i last october. elimination was| important because we did not last october. elimination was i important because we did not have vaccines. now we do. so we can begin to change the way we do things. vaccines. they are the root out of zero covid. vaccinate the population, then ease restrictions.
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but the theory. and according to chinese government health officials, over 1.2 billion people in china have been vaccinated. that's nearly 90% of the population. we also know two of china's vaccine, sinopharm and sinovac have been improved —— approved by emergency gives for the who but there is an issue. ianthem approved by emergency gives for the who but there is an issue.— who but there is an issue. when it comes to omicron, _ who but there is an issue. when it comes to omicron, the _ who but there is an issue. when it comes to omicron, the reality i who but there is an issue. when it comes to omicron, the reality is i comes to omicron, the reality is that china will be still reliant on its equity strategy. neither sinopharm or sinovac to give a high degree of support against the omicron or against valtr strains which we are still worried about. == which we are still worried about. -- delta. which we are still worried about. —— delta. there is evidence that china's vaccines are not as effective as western vaccines like moderna and pfizer. top chinese official admitted last april but it's vaccines don't have very high rates protection. the same official later said he had been misinterpreted. but the university of toronto says this issue is real.
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so already we have seen a number of reasons why ending zero covid isn't easy for china. it has succeeded in minimising covid deaths at it also does not want to admit the limitations of its vaccines and those limitations mean its population is less protected. as well as that, because cases are low, china has a population without any natural immunity from prior infection. and because of all of these reasons, and others too, a recent study by china center for disease control included this: and so for now, keeping covid out remains a priority for china. and there are two other factors that are relevant to this. the first, well, that's the winter olympics. in
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beijing this february. china does not want any covid disruptions during this moment on the world stage. so foreign spectators are barred, tickets are not being sold, and such measures appear to be popular. translation: i5 and such measures appear to be popular. translation: is bei'ing is china's popular. translation: is bei'ing is china-scapnarfi popular. translation: is bei'ing is china's capital city, i popular. translation: is bei'ing is china's capital city, the i popular. translation: is beijing is china's capital city, the prevention l china's capital city, the prevention measures here are definitely a bit stricter. tickets not being sold as a way of pandemic protections i support it. a way of pandemic protections i support it— a way of pandemic protections i support it. the other key events this ear support it. the other key events this year is _ support it. the other key events this year is the _ support it. the other key events this year is the national - support it. the other key events this year is the national party i this year is the national party congress in october. it is held every five years, these pictures are from the last one in 2017. congress decides the future leadership of the chinese communist party and, in turn, the leadership of china. president xijinping is turn, the leadership of china. president xi jinping is already the most powerful chinese rulers since chairman mao. but in 2018, he abolished presidential term limits and this autumn, we are expecting him to be confirmed for a third term. that looks all but certain. but it remains a politically sensitive moment and present xi jinping does not want rising covid
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cases to complicate that. he has though talked of life beyond covid. translation: we though talked of life beyond covid. translation:— though talked of life beyond covid. translation: ~ , ., , translation: we must do everything necessa to translation: we must do everything necessary to clear _ translation: we must do everything necessary to clear the _ translation: we must do everything necessary to clear the shadow - translation: we must do everything necessary to clear the shadow of i translation: we must do everything necessary to clear the shadow of the i necessary to clear the shadow of the pandemic and boost economic and social recovery and development. so that the sunshine of hope may light up that the sunshine of hope may light up the future of humanity. and that the sunshine of hope may light up the future of humanity. and that is the rub. how— up the future of humanity. and that is the rub. how to _ up the future of humanity. and that is the rub. how to move _ up the future of humanity. and that is the rub. how to move clear i up the future of humanity. and that is the rub. how to move clear of i up the future of humanity. and that | is the rub. how to move clear of the shadow of the pandemic when that will involve letting the virus in with all of the uncertainty that comes with that. the erasure group cannot see that decision being taken in the short—term. in a recent it concludes: and as we consider this, bearin concludes: and as we consider this, bear in mind what the world health organisation recently said about the uk. �* ,_ .., organisation recently said about the uk.�* , uk. i'm saying i can see where the end is, i uk. i'm saying i can see where the end is. i can _ uk. i'm saying i can see where the end is, i can see _ uk. i'm saying i can see where the end is, i can see light _ uk. i'm saying i can see where the end is, i can see light at _ uk. i'm saying i can see where the end is, i can see light at the i uk. i'm saying i can see where the end is, i can see light at the end i end is, i can see light at the end of the tunnel but i really do anticipate right throughout the world a bumpyjourney ahead during 2022. world a bumpy 'ourney ahead during 2022. ., .,
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2022. light at the end of the tunnel, 2022. light at the end of the tunnel. says _ 2022. light at the end of the tunnel, says the _ 2022. light at the end of the tunnel, says the who. i 2022. light at the end of the - tunnel, says the who. president xi talked of sunshine of hope. but china and the west are in two quite different places. the west has lost many more people but it's edging towards a life not dominated by the management of this virus. china, with strict lockdowns and travel restrictions, is not. and for all the political pr and health reasons we've considered, it's unlikely to make that move anytime soon. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and naga munchetty. the united states has warned of a "swift, severe and united" response to russian aggression in ukraine, as international concerns grow that europe could be facing a new war. yesterday, russia's foreign minister and his us counterpart held what both sides called "frank" talks, in an effort to cool tensions. let's get more now from the chair of the foreign affairs committee, tom tugendhat. good morning. this is so much more
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than a war of words, isn't it? but may be to people watching it this morning why we should be interested in what is happening between these two sides? ~ ., in what is happening between these two sides? ~ . ., , in what is happening between these two sides? ~ . . , ., two sides? what we are seeing at the moment is about _ two sides? what we are seeing at the moment is about 100,000, _ two sides? what we are seeing at the moment is about 100,000, maybe i two sides? what we are seeing at the moment is about 100,000, maybe a | two sides? what we are seeing at the i moment is about 100,000, maybe a bit more, russian troops surrounding the ukraine on really two or three sides. it is a slightly strange shape, like many countries, it is not exactly regular. and what that means is that they are threatening the ukrainian people over a number of issues. this is not an idle threat. in 2014 russian troops invaded and annexed crimea, and have done the same in two other regions in the south—east. now, the danger of courses changing borders by force, 2014 was the first time it was done since the second world war, it really does stir up fears in many other countries, including countries that are members of nato,
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other countries, including countries that are members of nate, and that border russia, countries like estonia, latvia, lithuania and poland. so this is a major concern to many european countries and that is why the uk has been absolutely at the forefront of supporting the ukrainian people to defend themselves against this aggression. and as you said, even though russia has denied it has any plans to invade the ukraine, it has 100,000 troops deployed near the border, so anybody looking out but will see why there are those tensions. what have we learned from those talks? particularly yesterday, they were described as frank talks, but did they make any progress? well. described as frank talks, but did they make any progress? well, they made some — they make any progress? well, they made some progress _ they make any progress? well, they made some progress in the - they make any progress? well, they made some progress in the sense i they make any progress? well, they l made some progress in the sense that they clarify the position on both sides and made sure that russia is now in no doubt that this will not be some far—off country about which we know little, but this is something that the us, the uk and as i said, several other countries, are looking to stand by, and we have supplied some anti—tank weapons, sunlight anti—tank weapons, the
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americans have done the same, and i believe some stinger missiles as well. various other countries have stepped in to support the ukrainian people. i stepped in to support the ukrainian --eole. ., ~' stepped in to support the ukrainian --eole. ., ~ ., people. i would like to ask you about that _ people. i would like to ask you about that uk _ people. i would like to ask you about that uk involvement. i people. i would like to ask you - about that uk involvement. we've heard a lot about, a lot from president biden with threats to rush if it does invade. what is the uk's involvement? and should be uk be getting more involved? the uk's involvement i think is very important. involvement i think is very important-— involvement i think is very im ortant. , ., ., ~ important. these light anti-tank wea ons, important. these light anti-tank weapons. they— important. these light anti-tank weapons, they are _ important. these light anti-tank weapons, they are not _ important. these light anti-tankl weapons, they are not aggressive weapons, they are not aggressive weapons, they are not aggressive weapons, they are not the sort of thing you could use to invade any other country. but they are extremely capable of disabling and destroying armour, tanks, personnel carriers and things like that, which the russian army might use if they were to invade. i think that is an important contribution. the uk has also supplied trainers from regiments who are going to be going out beryl may already be out there, in order to help the ukrainian forces defend themselves. i think this is an important contribution, but i would like to see all of us
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going further, because one of the things that is delaying the ability of the ukrainian people to mobilise their armed forces to be ready is of course it has a huge effect only country's economy committee take hundreds of thousands of people out of the workforce in order to stand guard, that is going to have a real impact onjobs and guard, that is going to have a real impact on jobs and lives in other sectors, as we have all learned from lockdown in the last couple of years, the impact that house. so we need to be ready to support the ukrainian people financially as well. ~ ., ~ ., , ., , well. when we talk about stories like this, it _ well. when we talk about stories like this, it underlines _ well. when we talk about stories like this, it underlines what - well. when we talk about stories like this, it underlines what is i like this, it underlines what is going on in the world right now, and a little closer to home, you might say we are very distracted by events in downing street, there is the ongoing row about the parties in downing street, and sue grey�*s report that we might get this week, but inevitably takes focus away from big international events that we should be keeping a close eye on. it
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can do, and i hope it won't too much. then wallace, for example, the defence secretary, has been extremely focused on the ukraine and made a statement about it the other day, i think it was monday or tuesday, in the house of commons. he is in australia right now with liz truss, speaking to the opposite numbers marise payne and peter dutton. these are important talks, as you know. we not only have the aukus deal, that deal in which we agreed to sell nuclear submarines to australia, but they are also going to be talking about trade and the fact that china has been closing down some of australia's markets in order to punish it... i down some of australia's markets in order to punish it. . .— order to punish it... i see that, but at the _ order to punish it... i see that, but at the same _ order to punish it... i see that, but at the same time, - order to punish it... i see that, but at the same time, there i order to punish it... i see that, but at the same time, there is| order to punish it... i see that, | but at the same time, there is a order to punish it... i see that, - but at the same time, there is a lot of destruction. it isn't business as in downing street right now. well. in downing street right now. well, that is true. _ in downing street right now. well, that is true, which _ in downing street right now. well, that is true, which is _ in downing street right now. well, that is true, which is why - in downing street right now. well, that is true, which is why am - in downing street right now. -m that is true, which is why am very pleased to say that we have a cabinet government, because that means that ministers can get on with things, the foreign secretary can get on with things, the defence secretary can get on with things, while number ten may or may not be
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distracted. well, it is, isn't it, to the moment. but it means that our government can get on for the british people, because frankly, the entire purpose of government is not to get wrapped up in a he said she said in downing street, but rather to deliver for the british said in downing street, but rather to deliverfor the british people in terms of security in europe and around the world, as well as trade and influence. the around the world, as well as trade and influence.— and influence. the other big story we're following, _ and influence. the other big story we're following, of— and influence. the other big story we're following, of is _ and influence. the other big story we're following, of is those - we're following, of is those allegations of blackmail, all of course related to those ministers who want to see borisjohnson removed from office. have you experienced blackmail? his. removed from office. have you experienced blackmail?- experienced blackmail? no, i haven't. and _ experienced blackmail? no, i haven't. and as _ experienced blackmail? no, i haven't. and as you - experienced blackmail? no, i haven't. and as you may - experienced blackmail? no, i haven't. and as you may wellj experienced blackmail? no, i- haven't. and as you may well know, i haven't. and as you may well know, i have not always been the government's biggest supporter. i have voted against the government on occasions when i thought it right, and have to say i have always had a close relationship with the chief whip and indeed a very productive relationship with all the whips, so i am waiting to hear more about this because it is not something that i can talk about more enticing more.
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do you recognise the evidence that is being presented? l do you recognise the evidence that is being presented?— is being presented? i haven't seen any evidence. _ is being presented? i haven't seen any evidence, so _ is being presented? i haven't seen any evidence, so i'm _ is being presented? i haven't seen any evidence, so i'm afraid - is being presented? i haven't seen any evidence, so i'm afraid i - is being presented? i haven't seen any evidence, so i'm afraid i can'tl any evidence, so i'm afraid i can't say. any evidence, so i'm afraid i can't sa , , ., any evidence, so i'm afraid i can't sa. ., ,, ., any evidence, so i'm afraid i can't sa. , say. good to speak to you this morning- _ say. good to speak to you this morning. thanks _ say. good to speak to you this morning. thanks for— say. good to speak to you this morning. thanks for being - say. good to speak to you this | morning. thanks for being with say. good to speak to you this - morning. thanks for being with us, but was time to get out, so many issues right now particularly, of course, talking about these tensions between russia and ukraine, but so much going on in downing street as well as head of a very busy week. busy on the tennis court as well. good morning! now, you have been watching--- — good morning! now, you have been watching... yes, _ good morning! now, you have been watching... yes, fingers _ good morning! now, you have been watching... yes, fingers crossed - good morning! now, you have been watching... yes, fingers crossed for dan evans- — watching. .. yes, fingers crossed for dan evans- it— watching. .. yes, fingers crossed for dan evans. it isn't— watching... yes, fingers crossed for dan evans. it isn't going _ watching... yes, fingers crossed for dan evans. it isn't going well. - dan evans. it isn't going well. badly. — dan evans. it isn't going well. badly. in— dan evans. it isn't going well. badly, in one word. high hopes, but he is _ badly, in one word. high hopes, but he is up _ badly, in one word. high hopes, but he is up against the number nine seed, _ he is up against the number nine seed. felix — he is up against the number nine seed, felix auger—aliassime from canada. _ seed, felix auger—aliassime from canada. a — seed, felix auger—aliassime from canada, a really strong player. when ou sa canada, a really strong player. when you say badly- -- _ canada, a really strong player. when you say badly... well, _ canada, a really strong player. when you say badly... well, i _ canada, a really strong player. when you say badly. .. well, i will- canada, a really strong player. when you say badly... well, i will tell - you say badly... well, i will tell ou the you say badly... well, i will tell you the story — you say badly... well, i will tell you the story of _ you say badly... well, i will tell you the story of what _ you say badly... well, i will tell you the story of what has - you say badly... well, i will tell - you the story of what has happened, basically _ you the story of what has happened, basically. he has two sets down, so it is pretty— basically. he has two sets down, so it is pretty bad. it is not all bad, if you _ it is pretty bad. it is not all bad, if you see — it is pretty bad. it is not all bad, if you see what i mean. there is still a _ if you see what i mean. there is still a chance he can fight back. he
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should _ still a chance he can fight back. he should he — still a chance he can fight back. he should be feeling fresh, as he didu'i— should be feeling fresh, as he didn't have to hit upon the last round — didn't have to hit upon the last round because his opponent withdrew due to _ round because his opponent withdrew due to injury. he is trying to reach the fourth — due to injury. he is trying to reach the fourth round for the second time, _ the fourth round for the second time, the — the fourth round for the second time, the first time since 2017, i think _ time, the first time since 2017, i think eariy— time, the first time since 2017, i think. early on he was not happy. this was— think. early on he was not happy. this was early in the match, his concentration was disturbed by somebody singing let it be somewhere. the sound was feeding through to the court and it was bad, so evans couldn't let it be. he refocused and, cheered on by andy murray, held his own for most of the first set against the ninth seed, felix auger aliasseem, who'd just had the edge to win that set 6—4. and that knocked evans' confidence, as he lost the first two games of the second set, but is fighting to stay in the contest. staying down under, and there was frustration for england's women cricketers overnight with their second ashes t—20 match abandoned due to rain in adelaide. they'd actually made a decent start, after being put into bat, reaching 25 without loss in just over four overs — before the weather ruled out further play. the forecast isn't great either for the third match on monday
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morning our time. australia lead the multi—format series 2—0, after a thumping win in the first match. on to the premier league, and the great escape now looks on for norwich city after two wins on the trot. and for the first time this season they have moved out of the relegation zone after beating watford 3—0 thanks to their 21—year—old, american josh sergeant. his first goal a great little flick. it did cross the line. he'sjust become a dad, too, so a real spring in his step. some of the floodlights then went out at watford, but both teams agreed to play on with less light, and the home team may regret that, because norwich scored two more, with another from sargant. and watford had a man sent off. so watford now drop into the bottom three, while norwich have such confidence now. it will be a big boost for everybody, but we also know that the table at the moment looks very uneven, with all the postponements that have been. but to win one game in the premier league's hard for newly—promoted teams, to win back—to—back games is even harder, so, really pleased
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with the performance. five matches in the premier league today and manchester united will come up against their former manager david moyes. his west ham side have been one of the stories of the season so far and the hammers find themselves in the champions league places, two points ahead of his old side. there's not many managers who go to old trafford and find a team is above them in the premier league over many years, so you would think when sir alex was the manager, how hard it was for andy to get in front of manchester united. i am pleased we are back in front, no, but what really matters is us getting three points. what matters is that we are ahead of them, certainly coming into the season. the fifth round draw for the scottish cup takes place later, after this afternoon's fourth round ties. rangers are already in the hat. they beat stirling albion 4—0 at ibrox. and what a moment for teenager alex lowry. he scored the opening goal on his debut, after coming on as a substitute.
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it was another late, late show from harlequins, in rugby union's european champions cup. already guaranteed a place in the last 16, quins made several changes for the game against castres, and they were nearly made to pay — but england's alex dombrandt was influential, scoring a hatrick, including the winning try, way into overtime. so quinsjust behind leicester on points. have a quick look at the tennis. 1—1 in the third set, dan evans, two sets down. he needs to get over what happened in the second set. sometimes you see that, to player plasma confidence goes. but he has got a chance to regroup and refocus now and get back the match somehow. they are also mentally strong, aren't they?— they are also mentally strong, aren't they?_ it - they are also mentally strong, j aren't they?_ it just aren't they? absolutely. it 'ust comes down i aren't they? absolutely. it 'ust comes down to i aren't they? absolutely. it 'ust comes down to who is i aren't they? absolutely. itjust| comes down to who is stronger aren't they? absolutely. itjust - comes down to who is stronger than the other. , ., , ., the other. yes, that is how it works. the other. yes, that is how it works it _ the other. yes, that is how it works- it is _
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the other. yes, that is how it works. it is usually _ the other. yes, that is how it works. it is usually how- the other. yes, that is how it works. it is usually how it. the other. yes, that is how it - works. it is usually how it works! there is your _ works. it is usually how it works! there is your statement - works. it is usually how it works! there is your statement of - works. it is usually how it works! there is your statement of the i there is your statement of the obvious for the morning. you sound like a football _ obvious for the morning. you sound like a football manager, _ obvious for the morning. you sound like a football manager, talking - obvious for the morning. you sound like a football manager, talking in l like a football manager, talking in cliches. l like a football manager, talking in cliches. ., �* ~ ., ., like a football manager, talking in cliches. ~ ., ., . . cliches. i don't know what cliche i can use to _ cliches. i don't know what cliche i can use to throw _ cliches. i don't know what cliche i can use to throw to _ cliches. i don't know what cliche i can use to throw to louise. - cliches. i don't know what cliche i can use to throw to louise. good | can use to throw to louise. good morning, louise. its, can use to throw to louise. good morning, louise.— can use to throw to louise. good morning, louise. a mixed picture out there? we are stuck on repeat! actually, i could have had three max kanter and play the forecast from yesterday because it is pretty much a repeat performance, the weather story at the moment. cold and frosty, not quite as cold and frosty as this time yesterday. we have actually got a lot of sunshine coming through across eastern areas, look at this beautiful start in bradford stop that said, quite a lot of cloud around out to the west, once again we still have that high pressure with us and it is still continuing to give this quiet story. more of a breeze in the far north—west, once again the cloud is producing a bit
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of drizzle. we are stuck in repeat mode, the difference as we go through the day is potentially more cloud pushing in from the west. early morning sunshine may turn increasingly hazy, may be cloudy skies by the end patchy skies continuing to the far north—west of scotland. in terms of the feel of the weather, we will see this temperature speaking in between seven degrees and nine degrees for england and wales, may be double figures continuing once again in the north—west. through the night tonight, we will keep a lot of cloud around. that is going to stop those temperatures from falling too far, but where we see a few breaks, i'm not going to be too clever about where to pinpoint where they are likely to be, we will see some patchy fog following an temperatures just below freezing as well. holding up just below freezing as well. holding up once again into the far north. another cloudy start for many of us. another cloudy start for many of us. another largely quiet one, the high pressure is not in a hurry to go anywhere. in actualfact pressure is not in a hurry to go anywhere. in actual fact it will probably stay with us, on the whole, to close out the month of january.
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gradually we will start to see a breezy day and gale force winds by the end of the afternoon on exposed north—west coast. the rain is coming but it will take its time in doing so into the far north—west. it is a grey afternoon for many, across the country it is a quiet afternoon, and those temperatures ranging from 6— nine celsius. we keep those themes going into the start of a new and working week, weather fronts trying to come in across the high from time to come in across the high from time to time and place on patchy arrangement and ran into the far north—west, as you can see, but largely, if you have plans and are trying to plan through the week, it isn't looking too badly. temperatures where they should be for this time of year. the emphasis is on the cloudy conditions, but i must stress, most of us it will be largely dry. that's what we like. it has been glorious this week. now, it's been quite a week for millie, a 3—year—old jack russell from hampshire. we will introduce you to her. a
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fabulous story attached to this dog. fi lamdin is with her now in her garden and can explain why. good morning, explain this. yes, iood good morning, explain this. yes, good morning. — good morning, explain this. yes, good morning. i— good morning, explain this. yes, good morning, i mean, _ good morning, explain this. yes, good morning, i mean, what on earth am i holding? reid regiment. she is am i holding? reid regiment. she is a little _ am i holding? reid regiment. she is a little bit _ am i holding? reid regiment. she is a little bit nervous and when you understand why you will get it —— meet _ understand why you will get it —— meet millie. she was missing for four days — meet millie. she was missing for four days and was rescued with this drawing, _ four days and was rescued with this drawing, this exact piece of string hanging _ drawing, this exact piece of string hanging from the drone and look, this half— hanging from the drone and look, this half eaten piece of sausage. this is— this half eaten piece of sausage. this is the — this half eaten piece of sausage. this is the exact sausage from one week_ this is the exact sausage from one week ago — this is the exact sausage from one week ago. let's meet her owner, mr tell us— week ago. let's meet her owner, mr tell us quickly, how quick terrified were _ tell us quickly, how quick terrified were you — tell us quickly, how quick terrified were you when she went missing and you thought you would never see her -- emma _ you thought you would never see her -- emma. , -- emma. extremely terrified, losing our do -- emma. extremely terrified, losing your dog and — -- emma. extremely terrified, losing your dog and going — -- emma. extremely terrified, losing your dog and going to _ -- emma. extremely terrified, losing your dog and going to sleep - -- emma. extremely terrified, losing your dog and going to sleep knowing | your dog and going to sleep knowing she was— your dog and going to sleep knowing she was out— your dog and going to sleep knowing she was out on— your dog and going to sleep knowing she was out on the _ your dog and going to sleep knowing she was out on the mudflats - your dog and going to sleep knowing she was out on the mudflats was - your dog and going to sleep knowing she was out on the mudflats was not a nice _ she was out on the mudflats was not a nice feeting~ — she was out on the mudflats was not a nice feeling. tind— she was out on the mudflats was not a nice feeling-— a nice feeling. and today after day, her bed was — a nice feeling. and today after day, her bed was empty _ a nice feeling. and today after day, her bed was empty and _ a nice feeling. and today after day, her bed was empty and you - a nice feeling. and today after day, l her bed was empty and you probably thought— her bed was empty and you probably thought we would never get her back?
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did not— thought we would never get her back? did not think so and it was heartbreaking _ did not think so and it was heartbreaking seeing - did not think so and it was heartbreaking seeing her. did not think so and it was i heartbreaking seeing her bed did not think so and it was - heartbreaking seeing her bed empty so we _ heartbreaking seeing her bed empty so we actually — heartbreaking seeing her bed empty so we actually did _ heartbreaking seeing her bed empty so we actually did put _ heartbreaking seeing her bed empty so we actually did put it _ heartbreaking seeing her bed empty so we actually did put it away - heartbreaking seeing her bed empty so we actually did put it away for. heartbreaking seeing her bed empty so we actually did put it away for a i so we actually did put it away for a bit because — so we actually did put it away for a bit because we _ so we actually did put it away for a bit because we actually— so we actually did put it away for a bit because we actually thought i so we actually did put it away for a i bit because we actually thought no, she is— bit because we actually thought no, she is not— bit because we actually thought no, she is not coming _ bit because we actually thought no, she is not coming back. _ bit because we actually thought no, she is not coming back. the- she is not coming back. the ingenious — she is not coming back. the ingenious idea _ she is not coming back. the ingenious idea to _ she is not coming back. ingenious idea to rescue she is not coming back.- ingenious idea to rescue her she is not coming back— ingenious idea to rescue her with a drone _ ingenious idea to rescue her with a drone and — ingenious idea to rescue her with a drone and a — ingenious idea to rescue her with a drone and a sausage. to entice her of the _ drone and a sausage. to entice her of the mudflats. s. drone and a sausage. to entice her of the mudflats.— drone and a sausage. to entice her of the mudflats. s. the drone come u . of the mudflats. s. the drone come u- and it of the mudflats. s. the drone come up and it worked. _ of the mudflats. s. the drone come up and it worked. it _ of the mudflats. s. the drone come up and it worked. it enticed - of the mudflats. s. the drone come up and it worked. it enticed her- of the mudflats. s. the drone come up and it worked. it enticed her off| up and it worked. it enticed her off onto higher— up and it worked. it enticed her off onto higher land. _ up and it worked. it enticed her off onto higher land. we _ up and it worked. it enticed her off onto higher land. we got— up and it worked. it enticed her off onto higher land. we got her- up and it worked. it enticed her off onto higher land. we got her off. up and it worked. it enticed her off. onto higher land. we got her off the mudflats, _ onto higher land. we got her off the mudflats, brilliant. _ onto higher land. we got her off the mudflats, brilliant. she _ onto higher land. we got her off the mudflats, brilliant.— mudflats, brilliant. she is still re mudflats, brilliant. she is still pretty nervous— mudflats, brilliant. she is still pretty nervous and _ mudflats, brilliant. she is still pretty nervous and she - mudflats, brilliant. she is still pretty nervous and she has i mudflats, brilliant. she is still. pretty nervous and she has lost a lot of— pretty nervous and she has lost a lot of weight. she pretty nervous and she has lost a lot of weight-— pretty nervous and she has lost a lot of weight.- but - pretty nervous and she has lost a lot of weight.- but she i pretty nervous and she has lost a j lot of weight.- but she is lot of weight. she has. but she is home. lot of weight. she has. but she is home- she _ lot of weight. she has. but she is home- she is _ lot of weight. she has. but she is home. she is home, _ lot of weight. she has. but she is home. she is home, happy, - lot of weight. she has. but she is. home. she is home, happy, eating lot of weight. she has. but she is - home. she is home, happy, eating and slee-iin. home. she is home, happy, eating and sleeping- and — home. she is home, happy, eating and sleeping- and you _ home. she is home, happy, eating and sleeping. and you are _ home. she is home, happy, eating and sleeping. and you are getting - home. she is home, happy, eating and sleeping. and you are getting a - sleeping. and you are getting a trainer next _ sleeping. and you are getting a trainer next week? _ sleeping. and you are getting a trainer next week? i _ sleeping. and you are getting a trainer next week? i am - sleeping. and you are getting a trainer next week? i am glad i sleeping. and you are getting a j trainer next week? i am glad to sleeping. and you are getting a - trainer next week? i am glad to help her with her— trainer next week? i am glad to help her with her confidence _ trainer next week? i am glad to help her with her confidence about - her with her confidence about people — her with her confidence about --eole. ~ ., her with her confidence about eo le, . ., ., her with her confidence about --eole. ~ ., ., , her with her confidence about n-eole. . . . ,., people. we have all sorts of fun lanned people. we have all sorts of fun planned for— people. we have all sorts of fun planned for the _ people. we have all sorts of fun planned for the one _ people. we have all sorts of fun planned for the one this - people. we have all sorts of fun | planned for the one this morning with awards and so many things but i want to— with awards and so many things but i want to leave you with this image. if want to leave you with this image. if only— want to leave you with this image. if only it— want to leave you with this image. if only it was spell the vision. this— if only it was spell the vision. this is— if only it was spell the vision. this is a _ if only it was spell the vision. this is a bag of bacon used to help bring _ this is a bag of bacon used to help bring hen — this is a bag of bacon used to help bring her. can you imagine it
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dangiing~ _ bring her. can you imagine it dangling. what a clever idea. dangling over her and this sort of guided _ dangling over her and this sort of guided her— dangling over her and this sort of guided her back this way towards the shore! _ guided her back this way towards the shore! let— guided her back this way towards the shore! let me show you, that is the exact— shore! let me show you, that is the exact sausage. if you are eating sausage — exact sausage. if you are eating sausage this morning for your breakfast, i am sausage this morning for your breakfast, lam hoping it looks breakfast, iam hoping it looks better— breakfast, lam hoping it looks better than this one! fi, breakfast, i am hoping it looks better than this one!— breakfast, i am hoping it looks better than this one! fi, that is disgusting- _ better than this one! fi, that is disgusting. i'm _ better than this one! fi, that is disgusting. i'm sorry. - better than this one! fi, that is disgusting. i'm sorry. none - better than this one! fi, that is disgusting. i'm sorry. none of| better than this one! fi, that is i disgusting. i'm sorry. none of us wishes that there was some television. —— smelly vision. sorry! a brilliant story and we will hear more from you later. she gets all of the bestjobs. l more from you later. she gets all of the best jobs-— the best 'obs. i brilliant 'ob of doini a the best jobs. i brilliant 'ob of doing a demo * the best jobs. i brilliant 'ob of doing a demo of i the best jobs. i brilliant 'ob of doing a demo of that. h the best jobs. i brilliant 'ob of doing a demo of that. ifh the best jobs. i brilliant job of doing a demo of that. if you l the best jobs. i brilliant job of. doing a demo of that. if you are havin: doing a demo of that. if you are having your _ doing a demo of that. if you are having your breakfast _ doing a demo of that. if you are having your breakfast and - doing a demo of that. if you are having your breakfast and fi - doing a demo of that. if you are having your breakfast and fi isl having your breakfast and fi is shopping but in yourface, that's not nice. it was a very good description. —— fee is shoving that in your face. description. —— fee is shoving that in yourface. back description. —— fee is shoving that in your face. back with the headlines at eight o'clock. time now for newswatch. hello and welcome to newswatch
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with me, samira ahmed. not for the first time, the bbc�*s political coverage comes underfire for an alleged lack of balance. we asked fran unsworth, soon to leave the corporation after four years leaving its news division, about impartiality, accountability and making the most of a shrinking budget. it's been a significant week for a bbc, with monday's announcement from culture secretary nadine dorries that the licence fee would be frozen for the next two years. bbc chairman richard sharp reacted like this. what it means for the bbc is with less money in real terms, we are going to have to address how we do what we do differently. and there will have to be changes and consequences. if you diminish capital resources, there are going to be effects. now, the bbc has already had ten years of real reduction by about 30%.
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the news department has not been exempt from those cuts with an £80 million savings target to be met by this year. and that's meantjob losses in areas such as political and business news. some viewers have been detecting an effect on the output over recent months, with hannah fearn tweeting: well, let's talk to fran unsworth, who firstjoined the bbc in 1980, starting in local radio, but who rose to become its director of news and current affairs and she retires next week. thank you, fran, for coming on newswatch. it's a pleasure. would you say you're leaving bbc news in a better place than it was when you first started working here? well, it's a very different place than when i first started working here because, of course, we do so much more output. so, when ijoined bbc news, it was just radio and television. and now, there is the website, there's social, the app, there is continuous news tv,
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radio continuous news, so there's a lot more of it. so, is that better or worse? it's better in that i think we are responding to what people want and how they live their lives and how they don't want to just kind of make an appointment to see news or to listen to news, they need it there, instantly so it's better in that respect. is the quality of what we do worse or better? i think the quality of what we do is actually incredibly good. you mentioned quality but, as you've heard, some people think there has been a loss of quality because of the cuts that you've had to make of the past few years. recently, the bbc admitted it had been a mistake to interview the lawyer alan dershowitz after ghislaine maxwell's conviction. do you accept that with fewer experienced journalists in the newsroom, mistakes like that are going to happen more? well, mistakes do happen — i'm not going to deny that — but i think in that particular case, it was less
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with cuts, to be honest, and more to do with covid! it was also 28 december, it was night, i think the teams, actually, are quite thinned out, no doubt about it — but that's not because of cuts so much as where we are between christmas and new year. really? people thought you should have just googled alan dershowitz, you'd have known you shouldn't be putting him on air in that context. well, possibly — actually, i think there was — i think the teams now know that actually, they could have avoided it by doing some kind of more considered handovers to each other on it. but — and we admitted it was a mistake and dealt with it. mistakes happen — they do — but i don't necessarily think there are any more of them now than when ijoined the bbc nearly 40 years ago — or if there are, it's probably a factor of having so much more output. after this week's announcement on the licence fee, bbc news is going to have to make more cuts, it's a tough time.
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is it time to just cut a whole programme or a service like say, newsnight? well, it might be something we would want to look at. but obviously we are in the early stages of what this licence fee settlement means. we have planned quite carefully over the past few years. as you've alluded, in news, part of our modernising news plan was — it wasn'tjust about taking money out, it was in order to us to shape news for the future so that we could have more impact with what we were doing across a greater number of platforms and also put digital at the heart of our commissioning process. now, it's not for me to second—guess my successor�*s views about if there are any further cuts expected of the news division, where those might be. i'm sure that she will come in and have a look around and think about it. but where we start from is what are the audiences that we need to serve, and how do we need to serve them?
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let's pause there for a moment, fran, because since you've been in post, you've faced as busy a news agenda than most journalists can remember. and this week was no exception with the temperature at westminster raised to fever pitch. tonight at 10:00, we are live in downing street after a day in which borisjohnson faced a wave of calls for his resignation. reporter: is it all. over, prime minister? well, we mentioned on last week's programme complaints that the bbc�*s coverage of those downing street parties has been "excessive" and "biased" against the prime minister. and those continued this week, for instance with this phone call. woman: i'm ringing to complain about the amount of news - on borisjohnson. it's about time you stopped being judge, jury and executioner. i think as for the bbc being impartial, i most certainly don't think you are. as ever, though, another side to the story, and philip pooley agreed that:
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you have been in news for a very long time so complaints like that you know, one side and then the other side, won't come as a surprise. does it feel to you like the polarisation of political views has become kind of nastier? um, it's a really interesting question, whether it's become nastier. it certainly feels more polarised, yes. and it certainly feels as though people kind of want to default a bit to their own echo chambers sometimes. and if they don't see the views that they agree with reflected then i do think they perceive us as being biased. but, you know, ourjob is to hold a national conversation. 0urjob is to show people that there is a whole range of views on every subject.
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i don't subscribe to the view thatjust because we are getting hammered by both sides, one set of the audience sees us as biased and the other from another political getting it right — i don't buy into that idea. but i do think that the whole nature of discourse has been quite impacted by social media, for instance. it's become pretty robust, it's become quite difficult, well, very difficult for some of ourjournalists, in fact, who are repeatedly subjected to online abuse of the most horrible, vicious nature, quite often. misogynistic — laura kuenssberg, marianna spring — and i think that's what i have seen change over the course of my career. it's interesting you say that, because we do get complaints from viewers that they feel bbc
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politicaljournalists are often putting a personal spin on stories, and i wonder if that compromises the bbc�*s commitment to impartiality. yes, it would do, and that's why we brought out social media guidelines, to remind our staff that we need to be cautious in the social media space about your insertion of your own political views and political opinions. because if we are not impartial, there is no point to us. we can't charge a licence fee off everybody in the uk if we are not impartial. and it's beholden on all of our staff to remember that and to act accordingly in that way. stay with us again, fran. we want to talk about another of the principles behind bbc news, which is accountability. we want to talk in fact a little bit about newswatch
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itself — this programme started in 2004 after the hutton inquiry which strongly criticised the bbc over its coverage of the lead up to the iraq war and the death of the government scientist david kelly. in response, newswatch was established as part of an initiative to make bbc news more accountable. but viewers regularly question whether it is truly fulfilling that role. here's howard price. how would you answer that? well, we obviously don't take the view that 99% of the time we're always right. and i will admit we don't always get everything right. we actually, i think — executives from news do appear
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on newswatch quite frequently. hmm, not a great hit rate, i would say. we've checked, and on the big stories, you're not coming on. well, we normally would give a statement if an executive isn't available. but i would also say it's not the only hit of accountability that the bbc has in place, of course. we have feedback on radio. and we have the most robust complaints process as well. which means that anybody can write in a complaint and get an answer to it. under your tenure, there's been a number of controversies involving bbc management, such as the revelations about martin bashir and the row over naga munchetty�*s comments on breakfast about donald trump. what's your biggest regret? 0h... laughs. i've got quite a few, to be honest! hindsight is a wonderful thing, isn't it? you look back and you say, "oh, if only i'd taken a slightly different decision there." i'm not going to go into them
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here, but believe me there are some things i wish i had done differently over the course of my career. it would be arrogant and blind of me not to recognise that. fran unsworth, thank you for coming on newswatch. thank you very much. and thank you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions about what you see, hear or read on bbc news on tv, radio, online and social media, email newswatch: or you can find us on twitter. you can call us. and do have a look at our website for previous interviews. that's all from us. we'll be back to hear you thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. bye— bye.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and ben thompson. 0ur headlines today: the impact of rising energy prices — an urgent call for the government to intervene to help businesses and households manage spiralling bills. a senseless act — police in the us city of atlanta react to the death of british man matthew willson, who's killed by a stray bullet as he lay in bed. 0ur victim is someone that was completely innocent, had no involvement whatsoever with the individuals that were involved in the reckless discharging of their firearms. police are to meet the senior conservative backbencher who accused downing street of trying to blackmail rebel mps. the biggest update to the highway code in a generation — more rights for walkers and cyclists, but the aa says a third of drivers don't know about the changes. good morning, it's a quiet start our
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weekend's weather, not quite as cold but not as sunny, either. all the details up shortly. it's saturday the 22nd of january. our top story. five of the uk's leading business groups have called on the government to act now to support both businesses and consumers, who they say face spiralling energy bills. they've written to the chancellor, rishi sunak, demanding urgent action to tackle the ongoing crisis. here's our business correspondent, ramzan karmali. these five prominent business groups have warned the chancellor that energy price rises on the horizon could push millions of people into fuel poverty. in a letter sent to rishi sunak, they say that if the issue is: the reason our energy is getting more expensive is down to the massive rise in wholesale prices, as economies around the world began easing
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covid restrictions. the energy regulator, 0fgem, is due to announce a new energy price cap from april, and it is expected to rise dramatically, to £2000 for the average household. i think it is really vital that the government thinks, how can we, not protect everybody from global energy prices, that feels really hard to do, but to smooth the cliff edge for most households, for whom an £800 rise in their bills will really be too much, as well as supporting the most disadvantaged in our society to be able to cope with really significant increases. and when it comes to businesses, 2022 is already proving to be a massive hit to cash flow for a whole range of reasons. put a secondary glazing on this side... the energy bill for this hotelier in scarboroughjumped up from £2000 a month to £10,000 in november. she has no choice but to pass on some of these rising costs. 0ur big challenge in that it is coming towards the end
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of the pandemic now, foreign markets are opening back up for travel, so we are now in a position where our hotel is competing with very cheap foreign hotels, foreign travel. we're in a position now that if the costs keep rising and we have to keep putting those prices onto our customers, we are not going to be able to compete with that market. rising energy costs are putting pressure on notjust families but businesses, too, and the calls on the government to act now are growing ever louder. for their part, the treasury said it's helping families with £12 billion worth of support, targeting the lowest—paid over the next two years. ramzan karmali, bbc news. police in the us have descibed the death of a british man from a stray bullet as a reckless, senseless act. 31—year—old astrophysicist matthew willson was killed while he lay in bed during a trip to the city of atlanta. simonjones has this report. killed in what officers are describing as a random and senseless act.
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matthew willson was in bed last sunday beside his girlfriend, pictured in this image released by police. he was hit in the head by a bullet fired from a neighbouring block of flats. he had just arrived in the atlanta area to visit his girlfriend. they were laying down for bed that night when they heard the gunfire erupt, and what appears right now, a stray bullet entered the exterior wall to their apartment and struck him. this is a very tragic incident. 0ur victim is someone that was completely innocent, had no involvement whatsoever with the individuals that were involved in the reckless discharging of their firearms. police had initially been called to the area following reports that shots were being fired into the air. they then received a second call from matthew willson's girlfriend, saying he had been hit. in a brief statement, the foreign office here in london said it was supporting the family of a british man following his death in the united states. it added that it was in contact with the authorities over there.
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matthew willson was a former phd student at the university of exeter. it said... the police in the us are offering a reward for information. no arrests have been made, but officers say they are determined to put those responsible injail. the senior tory backbencher who accused number 10 of trying to "blackmail" rebel mps will meet police to discuss his allegations. william wragg — who has called for boris johnson's resignation — says he'll speak to scotland yard detectives in the house of commons early next week. 0ur political correspondent helen cattjoins us now. so these allegations, it's worth taking us through these. yes. so these allegations, it's worth taking us through these. yes, these are iuite taking us through these. yes, these are quite serious _ taking us through these. yes, these are quite serious allegations - taking us through these. yes, these are quite serious allegations that i are quite serious allegations that william wragg has made and there are a couple of things. what he's saying
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is that in the course of to persuade mps who think borisjohnson should 90, mps who think borisjohnson should go, trying to give them onside this week, that some in government have overstepped the murk to a level he said would seem to constitute blackmail. so he says there are ministers, political advisers, staff at number ten had encourage the publication of stories in the press that would be embarrassing to those mps who they suspected of not backing borisjohnson. he also said the whips, mps appointed by the government to try to make sure their colleagues without the right way, had in some cases threatened mps with withholding funding from their constituency, which of course is public money, that's a very serious charges that he made these allegations earlier this week he is now asked for a meeting with the police, which we expect to happen next week. number ten is that if any evidence emerges to support his allegations they will consider it very carefully. 0f allegations they will consider it very carefully. of course all of this comes at a time when there is
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an effort to shore up boris johnson's position because that report into the downing street parties is due to be published this week, too. parties is due to be published this week. too-— parties is due to be published this week, too. . , . the first shipment of military aid from the united states to ukraine has arrived in kyiv — as russian troops continue to build near the border. acording to the us embassy, the package contains ammunition for ukraine's front—line forces. it comes a day after russia's foreign minister and his us counterpart held what both sides called "frank" talks, in an effort to cool tensions. campaign groups are calling on the government to urgently publicise changes to the highway code which come into effect next saturday. the move will see walkers and cyclists given greater priority. cycling uk says it'll be the biggest update in a generation — but more needs to be done to make people aware of the changes. it's disappointing that there hasn't been more publicity of these changes we are expecting to come in a week today, there should have been more publicity in advance. but there is two phases to this. one is, communicating what the changes are, because they have legal implications
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the day they come in. and i think there needs to be a separate push to make sure more people are aware that actually, it is their responsibility to know what the rules say. but after that, there is a cultural change because people's behaviour doesn't change overnight. from today, almost all coronavirus restrictions are being lifted in the republic of ireland. social distancing measures and limits on gatherings will be scrapped, while workers will return to offices on a staggered basis. an 8pm curfew for restaurants, bars, cafes and pubs will also be lifted. the time is 8:09am. when chelsea women beat west ham 4—2 earlier this week, their win came thanks to a hat trick from danish striker pernille harder, who is one of the world's most expensive female players. scottish international erin cuthbert also scored.
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but the match report was probably not what they expected. this was how the sun newspaper decided to write up the match. the headline was, "harder, harder, cuthbert, harder" — and a sub headline which read "chelsea scorers sound like posh people having sex". this was some of the reaction. goal—scorer erin cuthbert described the coverage as "disturbing and embarrassing". women's football editor at versus magazine, amie cripps, complained that once again female athletes aren't being measured for their elite skill. the sun has now deleted this story from its website. let's speak to yvonne harrison, chief executive of women in football, and also to former england goalkeeper rachel brown—finnis. good morning, your reaction when you saw this? just good morning, your reaction when you saw this? , , , saw this? just bitterly disappointed. - saw this? just bitterly disappointed. i- saw this? just bitterly| disappointed. i mean, saw this? just bitterly _ disappointed. i mean, disgusted. it's unbelievable in this day and age we are actually seeing headlines like that, and i think if you think
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about the things we could talk about in that game, the fact that it was chelsea's first game back, the fact that harder scored a hat—trick on her 50th appearance, in the same week that emma hayes has been recognised by fifa, there's so much of the semi finals have been set up now... and that, the only comment on women's football, i think it's disgusting. women's football, i think it's disgusting-— women's football, i think it's disgusting. rachel, the same . uestion disgusting. rachel, the same question to — disgusting. rachel, the same question to you, _ disgusting. rachel, the same question to you, what - disgusting. rachel, the same question to you, what did - disgusting. rachel, the same| question to you, what did you disgusting. rachel, the same - question to you, what did you make of it when you read that headline? as women footballers we look through the papers _ as women footballers we look through the papers now, look online after a match _ the papers now, look online after a match and — the papers now, look online after a match and we want to see, you know, the match— match and we want to see, you know, the match correctly and accurately recorded, — the match correctly and accurately recorded, and i was disappointed overall— recorded, and i was disappointed overall that the coverage of the women's — overall that the coverage of the women's quarterfinals of the league cupiust_ women's quarterfinals of the league cupjust wasn't visible women's quarterfinals of the league cup just wasn't visible to anyone, but to— cup just wasn't visible to anyone, but to have — cup just wasn't visible to anyone, but to have that as the headline, if you picked — but to have that as the headline, if you picked up the match ball, if you're _ you picked up the match ball, if you're a — you picked up the match ball, if you're a man and you picked up the match— you're a man and you picked up the match batt— you're a man and you picked up the match ball for chelsea forgetting hat-trick, — match ball for chelsea forgetting hat—trick, you would not expect that _ hat—trick, you would not expect that it — hat—trick, you would not expect that it was _ hat—trick, you would not expect that. it was disgraceful. and it was embarrassing, is a female athlete,
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as a female — embarrassing, is a female athlete, as a female athlete, as of two, as a woman— as a female athlete, as of two, as a woman in— as a female athlete, as of two, as a woman in this industry, it was embarrassing to see that headline. and there — embarrassing to see that headline. and there are two it is here, as well. one is about the impact it will have on pernille harder and on erin cuthbert, but also, as you've touched on, the impact it has on the sport as a whole and all of the work you're trying to do, it's described as embarrassing, it's such a negative reaction to what you're trying to do. l negative reaction to what you're trying to do— trying to do. i don't think it will have a huge — trying to do. i don't think it will have a huge impact, _ trying to do. i don't think it will have a huge impact, i- trying to do. i don't think it will have a huge impact, i don't- trying to do. i don't think it will i have a huge impact, i don't think too have a huge impact, idon't think too many— have a huge impact, i don't think too many people take anything seriously— too many people take anything seriously that the sun paper produces, if i am being honest. so the impact — produces, if i am being honest. so the impact on it to pernille and ste erin witt— the impact on it to pernille and ste erin will he — the impact on it to pernille and ste erin will be negligible, they will be disappointed, they will not take up be disappointed, they will not take up that— be disappointed, they will not take up that paperagain, be disappointed, they will not take up that paper again, simple as that. they picked — up that paper again, simple as that. they picked up that headline, exclusive, of twitter, and run it as
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an "exclusive". they are professional players, there are some of the _ professional players, there are some of the world'sbest players, do you think— of the world'sbest players, do you think they— of the world'sbest players, do you think they will be affected by a sensationalist headline such as that? _ sensationalist headline such as that? they won't be, they will go track— that? they won't be, they will go back to _ that? they won't be, they will go back to doing what they do best, playing _ back to doing what they do best, playing football. but it's a little knock, — playing football. but it's a little knock, when we were moving in the film knock, when we were moving in the right direction with women's football, being seen as a professional sport, as it should be, and loading — professional sport, as it should be, and loading these players because of the talent _ and loading these players because of the talent and what they are achieving for women and for foothait _ achieving for women and for football. it'sjust a little nudge in the — football. it'sjust a little nudge in the wrong direction. i football. it'sjust a little nudge in the wrong direction.- football. it'sjust a little nudge in the wrong direction. i will play devils advocate _ in the wrong direction. i will play devils advocate here, _ in the wrong direction. i will play devils advocate here, 0k? - in the wrong direction. i will play devils advocate here, 0k? sayi in the wrong direction. i will play i devils advocate here, 0k? say the players were male and it was the men's football team and they put that headline up, it's on page three, it's been given province, its been given prominence in the sun newspaper, and what newspapers do and sub—editors do is come up with brilliant headlines that attract people to read the story. is it not just a good headline, clever use of words? l just a good headline, clever use of words? . ., .
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words? i have to disagree that it is. i words? i have to disagree that it is- i mean. _ words? i have to disagree that it is- i mean. yes. _ words? i have to disagree that it is. i mean, yes, it's— words? i have to disagree that it is. i mean, yes, it's called... - is. i mean, yes, it's called... excuse me. it's called peoples attention. but for all the wrong reasons, like i said, in terms of the game, all it does is layers as narrative and supports the inequalities that exist. i think for the men's game, ultimately, women's sport and men sport, never mind football, they are not on 11 playing field, for things like this, people think it is funny, it's not funny. —— they are not on a level playing field. -- they are not on a level playing field. i. ~ ., ,, field. do you think it drops the so-called _ field. do you think it drops the so-called level _ field. do you think it drops the so-called level playing - field. do you think it drops the so-called level playing field i field. do you think it drops the i so-called level playing field that so—called level playing field that doesn't exist already, does it drop the women's game there again, denigrates the women's game? absolutely, the journalists' views are outdated, and ultimately, we are not in the 1980s, we should not be reading this. i'm a mum, as well stop those two women are at the top of the game, their professional athletes, their somebody�*s daughter, and when you think about how hard they have had to work to get to that level, world—class players, and to be subjected to these views, it's just unacceptable. and like rachel
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said, it's lazyjournalism. he just unacceptable. and like rachel said, it's lazyjournalism.- said, it's lazy 'ournalism. he was iaettin it said, it's lazy journalism. he was getting it right — said, it's lazy journalism. he was getting it right at _ said, it's lazy journalism. he was getting it right at the _ said, it's lazy journalism. he was getting it right at the moment i said, it's lazy journalism. he was getting it right at the moment in | getting it right at the moment in terms of coverage? you know, what is improving? —— who is getting it right? improving? -- who is getting it riiht? , improving? -- who is getting it riiht? . .. improving? -- who is getting it riiht? . ., ., improving? -- who is getting it ritht? , ., ., ,, right? just go back to the sun -a er, right? just go back to the sun paper. they — right? just go back to the sun paper. they gave _ right? just go back to the sun paper, they gave no - right? just go back to the sun paper, they gave no injuries i paper, they gave no injuries whatsoever at all in their sports column, — whatsoever at all in their sports column, but was in the news section. -- no— column, but was in the news section. -- no inches— column, but was in the news section. —— no inches whatsoever. i would like to _ —— no inches whatsoever. i would like to see — —— no inches whatsoever. i would like to see that every broadsheet or however— like to see that every broadsheet or however you would like to term each of the _ however you would like to term each of the newspapers give some coverage to women's— of the newspapers give some coverage to women's football. we have seen where _ to women's football. we have seen where the — to women's football. we have seen where the barrie's as far as the bbc, _ where the barrie's as far as the bbc, their— where the barrie's as far as the bbc, their coverage, and sky sports, what's _ bbc, their coverage, and sky sports, what's been — bbc, their coverage, and sky sports, what's been done this season for those _ what's been done this season for those tv— what's been done this season for those tv channels, the coverage of women's _ those tv channels, the coverage of women's football has been excellent and that's— women's football has been excellent and that's really pushed on the coverage — and that's really pushed on the coverage of women's football and it's then — coverage of women's football and it's then seeping into more and more women _ it's then seeping into more and more women and _ it's then seeping into more and more women and families and people going to watch— women and families and people going to watch the games live, and we've .ot to watch the games live, and we've got big _ to watch the games live, and we've got big tournaments, the arnold clark, _ got big tournaments, the arnold clark, the — got big tournaments, the arnold clark, the first—ever one, the four top international teams playing during —
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top international teams playing during february half term, england one of— during february half term, england one of those, we are hosting the tournament so get your tickets now, and of— tournament so get your tickets now, and of course the euro is the summer. _ and of course the euro is the summer, we are hosting it in england. _ summer, we are hosting it in england, from north to south, east to west. _ england, from north to south, east to west. we — england, from north to south, east to west, we are all of the countries this summer, we can watch the girls .et this summer, we can watch the girls get the _ this summer, we can watch the girls get the silver, hopefully, go one better— get the silver, hopefully, go one better than the men and when it's the summer! is better than the men and when it's the summer!— the summer! is it a positive that this has been _ the summer! is it a positive that this has been called _ the summer! is it a positive that this has been called out - the summer! is it a positive that this has been called out so - the summer! is it a positive that i this has been called out so widely? it tells is a lot about this reaction and shows how far women's football has come, the fact it's been criticised this way? that's the only positive _ been criticised this way? that's the only positive we — been criticised this way? that's the only positive we can _ been criticised this way? that's the only positive we can take _ been criticised this way? that's the only positive we can take from - been criticised this way? that's the | only positive we can take from this, actually. you know, working women in football, we are striving to increase representation at all levels of the game, we want an industry and we want to support the industry and we want to support the industry were actually, everybody can reach their potential, so in that sense it's ourjob to empower people by education, through knowledge, through expertise, our support, and we've got great corporate members. so actually, i guess as you say, this is a platform
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to say, so many in the industry, the premier league, clubs up and down the country, media organisations, the country, media organisations, the corporate members of women in football, may be that sun needs to think about that. locate football, may be that sun needs to think about that.— football, may be that sun needs to think about that. we did contact the sun, the article _ think about that. we did contact the sun, the article has _ think about that. we did contact the sun, the article has been _ think about that. we did contact the sun, the article has been removed i sun, the article has been removed online. just unit being taken down, there is some recognition, isn't there? and that's a message, there is a message perhaps, do you feel, that's been sent out to the media about, you know, the seriousness of this and the impact of this? yes. this and the impact of this? yes, i think the fact _ this and the impact of this? yes, i think the fact that _ this and the impact of this? yes, i think the fact that they've - this and the impact of this? yes, i think the fact that they've taken i this and the impact of this? yes, i think the fact that they've taken it j think the fact that they've taken it down, absolutely, that is the right thing to do. but culturally, it should never have been approved. who has been allowed an article like that to happen? i have to say, there is a scholarship that the sun have and they are investing in female journalists, there are some great female journalists who can write
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brilliant things about football, and do. so it's not all that in that sense. but this article should not have been written. and i would strongly encourage them to consider that education through women in football so this doesn't happen again. football so this doesn't happen aaain. . ~' ,. football so this doesn't happen aaain. . ,, . football so this doesn't happen aaain. . . ., again. thank you so much for your time. again. thank you so much for your time- rachel _ again. thank you so much for your time. rachel brown-finnis, - again. thank you so much for your time. rachel brown-finnis, i - again. thank you so much for your time. rachel brown-finnis, i am i again. thank you so much for your i time. rachel brown-finnis, i am with time. rachel brown—finnis, i am with you, i think the women will go one better, definitely, in the summer with the euros! get in there! thanks. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. hello, everybody. a dry steam of whether to come as we go into the weekend, yes, it's frosty for some but not as frosty as yesterday, pacelli shally in scunthorpe though, but it will please sky and try still. still high pressure sitting across the country, still this westerly flow feeding in cloud,
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among other story into the far north—west of scotland but that is where we are likely to see a little more in the way of drizzle. that westerly feed is still producing a little more in the way of cloud generally on west facing cuts, and as we go through the afternoon, some of that will push its way steadily eastwards, so sunshine gradually being by cloud as we go to the afternoon, some bright spots, and temperatures quite widespread between six and nine across england and is around ten or 11 further north. so it won't be too cold out there in comparison to the last few days, we keep some cloud through the night tonight, somehow is here and there, patchy mist and fog forming, but cloudy skies for many. if the clear skies arrive we will see temperatures down in one or two spots below freezing and some patchy mist and fog forming, but generally tomorrow will be a great day. fairly drab sunday for many of us but a quiet sunday. a lot of drier weather so if you got at our plans, certainly you will not need to think
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about waterproof clothing. this weather system will gradually arrive in the far north—west, it will take its time, whens strengthened the gale force gusts and then we will see some rain by the afternoon, patchy to begin with. a grey and quite afternoon and once again temperatures peaking about where they should be, really, for the time of year. a similar story going into monday, and in fact, the high pressure will be with us throughout much of the week ahead. and for the closing ofjanuary, as much of the week ahead. and for the closing of january, as well. much of the week ahead. and for the closing ofjanuary, as well. we much of the week ahead. and for the closing of january, as well. we will closing ofjanuary, as well. we will start to closing of january, as well. we will start to see weather front pushing in from the atlantic and may be by the middle part of the week we will have more significant rain arriving, but as it bumps into the high pressure, just as we have seen in recent days, it will be enough, so for most of us, we keep quite a lot of cloud around, but we won't see any significant rain and temperatures once again ranging from seven to ten. so fairly straightforward. back to you. thank you, nice to see you. it's 8:20am.
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efforts to tackle obesity in england are being stepped up — with plans for community pharmacies to offer more help to people struggling to lose weight. under the scheme, high street pharmacists can now refer customers to a 12—week online nhs weight management programme. here to tell us more is reena barai from the national pharmacy association. good morning. how will this work? good morning. how will this work? good morning. how will this work? good morning. ithink good morning. how will this work? good morning. i think it's great that pharmacies have been included in this programme the nhs is providing, it will make it easier for people to access it, they will no longer need to go to their gp, they can go to their pharmacy so easily because they are everywhere, in the high streets, in the supermarkets, and we are a trusted health care professional. hose supermarkets, and we are a trusted health care professional.— health care professional. how are ou iioin health care professional. how are you going to _ health care professional. how are you going to do — health care professional. how are you going to do this _ health care professional. how are you going to do this so _ health care professional. how are you going to do this so that i health care professional. how are. you going to do this so that people feel comfortable walking into the pharmacy? when i go to my local pharmacy, there is a counter and there are often key is behind me, it's quite a personal thing to talk about, what kind of privacy are you affording these customers, and people who are wanting help? you're
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absolutely right, _ people who are wanting help? you're absolutely right, but _ people who are wanting help? you're absolutely right, but i _ people who are wanting help? you're absolutely right, but i think - people who are wanting help? you're absolutely right, but i think most i absolutely right, but i think most premises in england have a private consultation room like the one i am in now, so if people are concerned about their weight, they can always come into the pharmacy and ask to speak to the pharmacist in the private room, and often we offer a friendly face, people know as well because they're used to popping into the pharmacy and we offer that encouragement without that criticism and judgment, so i think people will feel comfortable coming into pharmacy. lh feel comfortable coming into pharmacy-— feel comfortable coming into harma . , ., , . . pharmacy. in terms of starting, are there enough _ pharmacy. in terms of starting, are there enough people? _ pharmacy. in terms of starting, are there enough people? if— pharmacy. in terms of starting, are there enough people? if it - pharmacy. in terms of starting, are there enough people? if it is i pharmacy. in terms of starting, are there enough people? if it is a i there enough people? if it is a local pharmacy, often there's just one person at the counter, do you have to book a time in? the one person at the counter, do you have to book a time in?— have to book a time in? the great thing about _ have to book a time in? the great thing about pharmacies _ have to book a time in? the great thing about pharmacies as - have to book a time in? the great thing about pharmacies as we i have to book a time in? the great thing about pharmacies as we are | have to book a time in? the great i thing about pharmacies as we are the only health care profession where you don't need an appointment, you canjust walk in, you don't need an appointment, you can just walk in, every pharmacy has a pharmacist that are trying to do this, there also health champions that are trained to white people, take their height, measure bmi and give that advice. —— changed the way people. and now we have this weight management programme, as well, which is an added bonus. the management programme, as well, which is an added bonus.— is an added bonus. the problem is that pharmacies _ is an added bonus. the problem is that pharmacies are _ is an added bonus. the problem is that pharmacies are often - is an added bonus. the problem is that pharmacies are often small, i that pharmacies are often small, aren't they? so there aren't as many
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staff, so what advice given in terms of being able to manage this? so we obviously have _ of being able to manage this? so we obviously have been _ of being able to manage this? so we obviously have been working - of being able to manage this? for he: obviously have been working really hard over this pandemic and stepped up hard over this pandemic and stepped up to every challenge the nhs has faced, whether we are a small or large pharmacy, we've been providing more flu vaccines, covid vaccines, lateral flow tests, this is just another string to our bow, and we are really proud of all the things i pharmacies are doing, even where they are small teams, but obviously we keep doing this and we're really proud that we are running a shoestring, and constant ask of organisations like the national pharmacy association are represented todayis pharmacy association are represented today is that the nhs need to invest in us so we can continue to provide the services and support people rely on in our local community. have you got enough support at _ on in our local community. have you got enough support at the _ on in our local community. have you j got enough support at the moment? on in our local community. have you i got enough support at the moment? i think we can always do with more support! pharmacies are willing and able to provide the services, we know people losing weight can have a profound effect on mental and physical well—being, and by helping them lose that weight we can reduce them lose that weight we can reduce the risk of cancers, strokes, heart
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disease. so losing weight is an essential thing for people to do, and we are injanuary right now when people are thinking about it, as well, so we are encouraging people to come into pharmacies, have a chat with us and hopefully we can refer you under this programme if you're eligible, and you can get matt taylor to help you need to help make them sustainable life changes. [30 them sustainable life changes. do ou them sustainable life changes. do you think the pandemic has increased the problems of obesity? i you think the pandemic has increased the problems of obesity?— the problems of obesity? i think it has. the problems of obesity? i think it has- haven't _ the problems of obesity? i think it has. haven't we _ the problems of obesity? i think it has. haven't we all— the problems of obesity? i think it has. haven't we all need - the problems of obesity? i think it has. haven't we all need is - the problems of obesity? i think it has. haven't we all need is more i has. haven't we all need is more than we should have done, and probably started doing really well without the exercise and then it's kind of waned. so i'm sure all of us have put on those extra pounds and could do with the extra help. and three in five adults in england are overweight and one in four are obese, so the stats are there, showing there are a lot of people who are obese and losing that weight would really, really be beneficial to them. . a . would really, really be beneficial tothem. . . , . , ., to them. reena barai, pharmacist and member of the — to them. reena barai, pharmacist and member of the national _ to them. reena barai, pharmacist and member of the national pharmacy i member of the national pharmacy association, thank you for talking to us this morning.— this morning, mark has been holding
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onto hope that the british interest in the australian open may hang on but sad news this morning. it's not happened. dan evans is out, ninth seed, he is lost against the ninth seed, he is lost against the ninth seed, 6—4, 6—1, 6—1, it lastedjust an hour so wejust thought seed, 6—4, 6—1, 6—1, it lastedjust an hour so we just thought we would let you know. he an hour so we just thought we would let you know.— an hour so we just thought we would let you know. he had a really iood would let you know. he had a really good story. — would let you know. he had a really good story. didn't _ would let you know. he had a really good story, didn't he? _ would let you know. he had a really good story, didn't he? he _ would let you know. he had a really good story, didn't he? he was i good story, didn't he? he was distracted earlier on because dan evans was complaining about, there was some karaoke or something in the background, some singing, till that would let it be two, which is now obviously in our heads,, great song but distracting! for the last eight months, with every passing sunrise and sunset, a solitary figure has stepped into a glass box — eight storeys above the ground in hull.
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i love this story, really harming for a saturday morning. —— really calming. it's part of an art installation called the hull vigil, which aims to encourage a selection of local volunteers to peacefully keep watch over their city. crispin rolfe has been speaking to some of them. the day that i did my vigil, there was a fantastic sunrise and a beautiful harvest moon. i was doubly blessed. it was extremely humbling to have that really unique perspective over my home city and feel like that protector, because there was that sense of responsibility and duty whilst looking over everybody. lovely to see the sun set overj the city, and being in that box was just surreal, really surreal. every sunrise and every sunset since the 3rd of may last year, watched and witnessed over hull. it was september the 20th.
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i chose that date because it marked 50 years since i first came to hull, i came for three years, and like many people, i just stayed. a vigil made even more poignant by the times being lived in. the last 18 months that we've been through has been tough on everybody in different ways, but considering it's an experience that you take part in alone, people have found that it's actually incredibly connecting. i remember being pushed up. the ramp onto the ambulance. and for key worker kerry and herfamily... it's hard when you live together, so that you put vulnerable adults at risk. ..after her entire household caught covid at the height of the pandemic, the vigils provided a brief moment of peace. in the job that i do, being in a busy family home, somebody always wants a piece of me. and just to be in that moment with no distractions, no phone, nothing, it was just so calm. i picked the 11th of november, armistice day.
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i thought it would be really poignant moment for me, just watch the sunrise over the city and really reflect on everything that day. i wore a dress covered in poppies, not that i think anyone can see it from a distance, from — the ground looking up. my parents took a photo — very blurry! the vigil�*s not over yet. for the next four months, a lucky few will be left alone with their thoughts as the sun sets or rises over hull. my dad has done the vigil, and my husband has also done vigil and my sister is due to do it. it was great, yes. it was good thinking inside the box, in fact. i love that piece. that was crispin rolfe reporting. really calming. plans to encourage more people to lace up their trainers and head out for a walk or cycle are being launched in england.
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former olympic champion cyclist, chris boardman, will head up the new government body, called active travel england. luxmy gopal has been finding out more. getting from a to b on foot or by bike is good for our health and environment. but how good is our infrastructure for pedestrians and cyclists? the issue is being given cash from the government and clout from the former olympic cyclist chris boardman. the gold medallist is to become interim commissioner of the government body active travel england. it's been set up to encourage walking and cycling, by inspecting the standards of local highways, major planning applications for pedestrians and cyclists, and funding projects to improve air quality. the government has also announced today that it's spending £3 million on improving cycling infrastructure around train stations, including secure cycle parking facilities, and £300,000 to subsidise e—cargo delivery bikes for small businesses. this is all part of the £2 billion funding it's already pledged
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toward cycling and walking schemes over a five—year period. the question is how far that will go in improving infrastructure enough to make walking or cycling safe and practical travel options across the country. luxmy gopal, bbc news. we can speak to former olympic champion cyclist, chris boardman, now. we heard about what you are hoping to achieve. what is the aim of this, it is more than getting people out on a bike. that has cued me up lovely there. i was thinking about, why am i sitting here? just over a decade ago my youngest daughter asked me a question that did change things dramatically. she said,
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can we ride to the park? it is 549 metres. i thought, can we ride to the park? it is 549 metres. ithought, it can we ride to the park? it is 549 metres. i thought, it is not right, it is not safe. it did not feel comfortable. you brought that out. 30% of car journeys, 250 million per year, are less than one kilometre. a lot of thatis less than one kilometre. a lot of that is a school run and getting places for leisure because stewart feel comfortable, it is not attractive, does not feel quite safe to do that. —— it does not feel comfortable. you want where kids can walk to school, you can travel to work on a bike. you will not do that unless you feel safe. that is what this agency will do. this is not a new call. we have wanted better cycling facilities for
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years. how do you deliver that? locate years. how do you deliver that? we now years. how do you deliver that? - now have national standards that you must meet. it means you've got to at the junction to leave the right space. if you do not do it, you do not get the money. if you do not —— if you do it badly, we will take the money back. this agency will also train engineers across the country to be able to do it. it will be all big planning for any developments have to incorporate active travel. it is proper big star. it is a bit dry and a bit geeky, but it is proper geeky. you were greater manchester is walking and cycling commissioner. what difference did you make is that? in this region there is now 1800 mile network. here is the standards we will build to,
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otherwise we are wasting public money. there is no more white lines down the side of the road are sending you some unless you do not want to go because it is convenient to keep you out of the way. they have done that in greater manchester. that is the basis of that. it is the basis of any sustainable transport system. is there increasing or decreasing hostility towards cyclists at this minute? ~ . ., hostility towards cyclists at this minute? ~ . . ., , . ~ minute? what we have got is packed roads, and minute? what we have got is packed roads. and it — minute? what we have got is packed roads, and it is _ minute? what we have got is packed roads, and it is people, _ minute? what we have got is packed roads, and it is people, it _ minute? what we have got is packed roads, and it is people, it is - roads, and it is people, it is packed roads. 20 billion extra mile being driven around. greater manchester, 1.7 billion. we have quietly taken away our options to travel differently. it is not going to be easy. we have used up the space. to be easy. we have used up the sace. �* , ., , space. but it is worth it. every time we talk _ space. but it is worth it. every time we talk about _ space. but it is worth it. every time we talk about something | space. but it is worth it. every i time we talk about something like this, there are people that get in touch and say, cyclists do not obey the rules, they go through red lights. we were talking about
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changes to the highway code this morning. they are on pavements. they are not in the right place. they are a menace on the roads. we were discussing highway code changes earlier, which come into next saturday. graham is saying, please prosecute cyclists that ride on pavements, through red lights, down one—way streets the wrong way. chris is asking, how do we know cyclists are safe on the open road. they have high risk of injuries, they have no structural protection on the vehicle. {iii they have no structural protection on the vehicle.— they have no structural protection on the vehicle. of course there is. that is a big _ on the vehicle. of course there is. that is a big part _ on the vehicle. of course there is. that is a big part of— on the vehicle. of course there is. that is a big part of all— on the vehicle. of course there is. that is a big part of all this. i that is a big part of all this. everybody has got to obey the rules. what we should do is follow the evidence. we start with the things that do everybody do most good. 40 people per year are killed on a pavement by cars. 8000 people killed or seriously injured by cars. one person per year are killed by cyclists. which should be focus on first? . .. cyclists. which should be focus on first? . ., . first? let me counter that. there are more cars —
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first? let me counter that. there are more cars and _ first? let me counter that. there are more cars and cyclists. i first? let me counter that. there are more cars and cyclists. 0f- are more cars and cyclists. of course there are. it is proportional, eitherway, one death is too much. it proportional, either way, one death is too much-— is too much. it is. which one would iive as is too much. it is. which one would give as best _ is too much. it is. which one would give as best return _ is too much. it is. which one would give as best return in _ is too much. it is. which one would give as best return in terms - is too much. it is. which one would give as best return in terms of- give as best return in terms of health or pollution or congestion? where should we focus our efforts? i am interested in what those efforts look like. you talk about local authorities how that money removed if they are not delivering. everywhere you go it is a very different strategy. some are just white lines painted on the side of the road. some have little bollards. some have an entire pavements. some are an entirely separate cycle lane. it is about a common approach, knowing where we are going, cyclists are here, cars are here. at the moment we have got patches of good stuff. nobody talks about cambridge 30% ofjourneys there are made actively because the environment is correct. you have got a pocket there. waltham forest in london, they have done it. you have got bits. now we need to make national standards, and join this stuff up. so that people think, i
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fancyjust pottering to school with the kids. those options become real. do you know the changes to the highway code coming in next week? i do. does it please you? do. does it lease ou? . . , does it please you? pedestrians first, then _ does it please you? pedestrians first, then cyclist. _ does it please you? pedestrians first, then cyclist. it _ does it please you? pedestrians first, then cyclist. it explicitly i first, then cyclist. it explicitly says he want to look after people who are the most vulnerable. these are the things that we do locally around our house, let us make sure that those people are protected. those i could do most harm, i'm not even mentioning those, though second to the most harm carry the most responsibility. can i put you on the spot? andy asks, when i stop at the traffic lights and they turn green, and i start to move, and podesta starts walking across the street, who has right of way? the walking across the street, who has right of way?— right of way? the pedestrian. for an bod , right of way? the pedestrian. for anybody. a _ right of way? the pedestrian. for anybody, a sensible _ right of way? the pedestrian. for anybody, a sensible driver, i right of way? the pedestrian. for anybody, a sensible driver, you i right of way? the pedestrian. for i anybody, a sensible driver, you duty is to look after them more vulnerable road users. side roads, if a pedestrian steps out they have
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right of way. new rules will be anybody going straight ahead whether on a bike, walking, in a car, has right of way. if you see somebody coming to a junction who is walking you will have to anticipate and go, that person wants to keep walking, they are right of way. getting out of your car, instead of doing that with your door, you actually lean. it makes you look over your shoulder. thank you so much. tributes are continuing to pour in for us singer meat loaf who's died at the age of 74. born marvin lee aday, the rock star was known for his powerful voice, with the album bat out of hell becoming one of the most successful in music history. sta rs have
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taken to twitter to praise his achievements. pop icon, cher, who features in the 1981 hit dead ringer for love tweeted: welsh rock legend, bonnie tyler said he was: theatre composer, andrew lloyd webber , posted: and '805 pop icon, boy george, recalled a time meat loaf: let's speak now to singer and meat loaf�*s friend, imelda may. iamso
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i am so sorry for your loss. this is a man had such a big impact. how have you remembering him? oh, my god. he was a larger than life character. he was everything that you would hope he would be. i said this to a few people. the world feels a little bit duller without him. he was wild and fun and brilliant and passionate about everything that he was talking about. he fully engaged in everything. and he was a joker as well. hejoked so much. it is sad. it is sad. he is such a big presence. we were eating out some of the tributes being paid. boy george saying he turned him upside down in a chinese restaurant. —— we were reading out.
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indulge us with some of your memories? where do i start? he asked me to sing with him. jeff beck introduced me to him. meat loaf asked me to sing with him. his assistant gave me a phone number, it said you will not know where, when, why, for what, but if he says he wants to work with you, you will get a call. a couple of years later i got a call. i ended up singing with him, recording with him. we became pals. early on he asked me to open for him in wembley. then he said, come and join me, sing a song with me. then he said to me, on the last tour, do you fancy throwing t—shirts out to the audience? i said, throwing t—shirts out to the audience? isaid, sure. you said yes, he said. i did not know what he
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meant. the next night, at the end of the show, we sang a couple of songs, the show, we sang a couple of songs, the place went mad. somebody called me to the side of the stage. they strapped on this giants, let us call it a hot dog. a hot dog? kind of. this hotdog on to me, with a motorised thing, and the t—shirts were in it, and i had to shoot them out to the audience. and meat loaf looked over to me and said, you have said yes. he said do not put them at peoples heads. he was filing at peoples heads. he was filing at peoples heads. he was filing at peoples heads. they were in on it, they knew this was coming. i nearly died laughing. it was wild. he was absolutely wild. i died laughing. it was wild. he was absolutely wild.— died laughing. it was wild. he was absolutely wild. i know you recorded absolutely wild. i know you recorded a version of — absolutely wild. i know you recorded a version of do _ absolutely wild. i know you recorded a version of do anything _ absolutely wild. i know you recorded a version of do anything for - absolutely wild. i know you recorded a version of do anything for love i a version of do anything for love together. i know you also spoke to him recently as well.—
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him recently as well. yes. i got to talk to him, _ him recently as well. yes. i got to talk to him, wednesday _ him recently as well. yes. i got to talk to him, wednesday night. i i him recently as well. yes. i got to i talk to him, wednesday night. i got to tell him that i loved him. i got a call from his right—hand man, lovely guitarist, one of his best friends. i had worked with him as well. i heard him laughing. i got to tell him i loved him. and to thank them so much. i loved the bones of that man. i will miss him greatly. every time i go to la, we would meet up, and maybe drink too much tequila and talk nonsense till the sun came up. i will really miss him. he is such a big character. and so talented. so extraordinarily talented, and his acting, in his operatic singing. i saw him give his
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all to his audience, and sometimes he was not well, it would not stop him, he would give everything on every day. he loved his audience, he loved his fans, and they loved him. it was such a beautiful love affair to watch each night. he was so supportive as well. he was lovely. he would sneak into my gigs when no one was watching, and cheer at the side of the stage, no one would know he was there. he was so lovely. i am so sorry you have lost your friend. he he was so lovely. i am so sorry you have lost your friend.— have lost your friend. he was a treat have lost your friend. he was a great pal- _ great pal. the energy he had. he did not stop working. he was working on projects all the time. his brain was, he would be flying. he would be constantly wanting to do this and that. he said to me, i am not a singer, i am not a musician. i
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was, what? he said, iwas not a singer, i am not a musician. i was, what? he said, i was an actor first, then i became a singer. he was saying, you need to act. you feel like i do. which i am doing now, and that is because of him. he had influence over everybody. he was so passionate about life. tell me the song that we should play today, just to rock out to, or sit and remember? it today, just to rock out to, or sit and remember?— today, just to rock out to, or sit and remember? it has to be bat out of hell. it and remember? it has to be bat out of hell- it has _ and remember? it has to be bat out of hell. it has to — and remember? it has to be bat out of hell. it has to be _ and remember? it has to be bat out of hell. it has to be bat _ and remember? it has to be bat out of hell. it has to be bat out - and remember? it has to be bat out of hell. it has to be bat out of- of hell. it has to be bat out of hell. and you have to put the volume app. hell. and you have to put the volume a. a, �* , , ., , hell. and you have to put the volume a.._m,., , ., ~' hell. and you have to put the volume a.--n,., , . ~ , hell. and you have to put the volume app. absolutely. crank it up. thank ou for app. absolutely. crank it up. thank you for talking _ app. absolutely. crank it up. thank you for talking to _ app. absolutely. crank it up. thank you for talking to us. _ app. absolutely. crank it up. thank you for talking to us. wish - app. absolutely. crank it up. thank you for talking to us. wish you i you for talking to us. wish you well, you for talking to us. wish you well. take _ you for talking to us. wish you well, take care. _ you for talking to us. wish you well, take care. thanks i you for talking to us. wish you well, take care. thanks a i you for talking to us. wish you well, take care. thanks a lot. | let's speak to rock and roll singer suzi quatro. ido i do not know how much of that last interview you are able to hear. have you been turning up the music pretty
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loud and listening? yes. you been turning up the music pretty loud and listening?— loud and listening? yes, when something _ loud and listening? yes, when something like _ loud and listening? yes, when something like this _ loud and listening? yes, when something like this happens i loud and listening? yes, when i something like this happens you tend to immerse yourself in the legacy. i was watching a documentary. i called my husband directly afterwards. i find myself saying, wow, just wow. what a talent. it's so funny. as a woman, he is not what you call good—looking, yet he was gorgeous. you know what i mean? he has something about it. we had a charisma. he was a rock and roll entertainer. i had a lot of dialogue with my promoter in australia for the past 35 years, who also did meat loaf, and they were very good friends. i asked loaf, and they were very good friends. iasked him if loaf, and they were very good friends. i asked him if he could tell me a little bit about him that many people don't know. i want to read you what he wrote. it is beautiful. he said, he gave the worlds best hugs, and he delegated me to number two, which i don't
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like. he loved golf. he loves baseball. he loved pizza. he considers himself an actor first, musician second. he loved movie acting. 60 movies. he was recording acting. 60 movies. he was recording a new album, scheduled forjanuary five, sessions did not happen. band members were all around his bedside in the last hours. he passed away quietly with deborah by his side. and i know from my friend harvey, his wife called harvey to speak with him, and he hadjust his wife called harvey to speak with him, and he had just been recovering from covid, did not wake up in time and did not get to speak to him, so he wanted to see if you words. what a legacy. he was a nice man. that's the whole thing. for all that, whatever he does, a nice, nice man. it is sad.
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an actor, an entertainer, and a musician. it is very hard to be good at all of those things, isn't it? it says. i kind of have an affinity with meat loaf. again, my promoter is always told me this. i am a rock and roll entertainer myself. i have also done foam and west end. i know the area he is coming from. it is bringing the rock and roll to the stage in all its glory, but being an entertainer with it. notjust putting your head down and going mad. it is being an entertainer. he really managed to do that. he entertained. if you do that, you are winning on every front. it is a certain sadness at times like this, of course the passing of a great talent. but it is often a tactic this that we look back and get a sense of how much they achieved and what they contributed. it reminds us of all these amazing
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stories. things that we as the public might not normally get to hear. how will you remember him? what legacy does he leave? for me, i will remember him doing those fabulous songs with all their power and grit and rock and roll, and seeing this little boys face, because he has a little boy is. even when many a snarling, i saw was vulnerability, which i found to be the most endearing thing about him. what a great guy. sadly missed. gone too soon. again, how many are we losing? my god, almighty. these are also times where we talk about whether there will ever be another? will there ever be another great artist like meat loaf? somebody who achieved what he achieved? i hope, and i see the speaking personally, i hope there is never another. anybody who is in that public eye has always said they
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are one offs. whatever he was, however he was, whatever he did, they will not be anybody to replace him. ijust immediately thought aboutjimi hendrix. there has been millions of great guitar players, but nobody like him. nobody like meat loaf. one offs. one offs. for that one thing alone, being a one off, you can be very proud that nobody can be used. nobody else can fill your shoes. nobody can be used. nobody else can fill your shoes-— fill your shoes. quite. lovely _ fill your shoes. quite. lovely to _ fill your shoes. quite. lovely to have - fill your shoes. quite. lovely to have you i fill your shoes. quite. i lovely to have you with us. fill your shoes. quite. _ lovely to have you with us. thank you. i note your latest tour continues as well. i you. i note your latest tour continues as well.- you. i note your latest tour continues as well. i have got to mention my — continues as well. i have got to mention my big _ continues as well. i have got to mention my big gig _ continues as well. i have got to mention my big gig coming i continues as well. i have got to mention my big gig coming up, otherwise i will be shot. my big gig which i've been looking forward to for two years, because of the restrictions. i am
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for two years, because of the restrictions. iam playing royal albert hall on april 20 and i am so looking forward to it. and i will have a thought for him while i am up there. i had to mention it. enjoy it. i will. thank you. nice to see you. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. weather watchers are coming in thick and fast at the moment. glorious, blue sky, sunshine, but it is cold. this is norfolk. but there is more cloud around the comparison to yesterday. out to the west, more
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cloud. cloudy skies. i suspect the cloud. cloudy skies. i suspect the cloud will continue to thicken as we go through the day. the reason for their quiet where there is this high pressure. why have we got some sunshine for salmon provide for others? it is to do with wind direction. this is coming off the milder atlantic and this producing a lot of cloud. picking up some drizzle and the far north—west. we keep some clear skies through the day, gradually the cloud will taint to develop as we go through the afternoon. get out, enjoy the sunshine where you can. top temperatures in scotland, ten or 11 celsius, elsewhere between seven and nine celsius. cloud through the night tonight. patchy mist and fog forming. maybe temperatures below freezing. not quite as cold a start for many, particularly once again into scotland and northern england,
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and we get some breaks we might see temperatures below freezing. the real cold air is into eastern europe at the moment. here is that south—westerly fade. milder yellow tones across the uk. a great start tones across the uk. a great start to sunday. still a dry one. no significant rain in the forecast. wenzel strength to the end the day. there might be read by the end of the afternoon into the far north—west of scotland. the high pressure is not moving very fast. it is still with us into monday. still the same setup. some rain from the front that is pushing into the far north of scotland, but again largely dry and fine. some brightness on the eastern pennines. temperatures will be cooler here. six and seven celsius, elsewhere eight or nine celsius. the last brit in the men's singles
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is out of the australian open. there was hope that dan evans could reach the last 16 for the second time in his career. he had been in great form. this was the start of his match today. he is complaining because it was six o'clock in the evening. somebody somewhere was singing and it disturbed his concentration. there is andy murray watching as well. in the first set against this canadian opponent, the canadian player, only 21, a rising star, evans matched him until a couple of errors towards the end of the first set. after that, his confidence was knocked out of melbourne park. it did not help that his opponent said he has played the best ever in a grand slam.
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if you are going to be beaten, you want your opponents to have played their best game. that is true. at the fatah could not even compete. the margin is not as big as 6—1, 6-1. —— and he could not even compete. in a tale that wouldn't feel out of place in a beano annual, a stranded dog has been rescued from mudflats in hampshire — using a drone and some sausages. let's find out what exactly happened — fi lamdin is with the jack russell and can tell us more.
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this is little millie. she is terribly timid. this is the drone. this is the string with the exact piece of sausage. it is over a week old, with a bite out of it. this is how she got rescued. hope that is not putting you off your breakfast. exact this time last week she was rescued after four nights of being stranded on mudflats. let us come over to her owner, emma. stranded on mudflats. let us come overto her owner, emma. it stranded on mudflats. let us come over to her owner, emma. it must have been absolutely awful. tell as what happened, she was out walking? yes. she was out walking, she slept. she is a rescue dog. she is scared anyway. she is a rescue dog. she is scared an a ., . . she is a rescue dog. she is scared an a , g , ., ., she is a rescue dog. she is scared an a. , . . ,, anyway. just ran all the way. she went ten miles. _ anyway. just ran all the way. she went ten miles. ended _ anyway. just ran all the way. she went ten miles. ended up - anyway. just ran all the way. she went ten miles. ended up on i anyway. just ran all the way. she went ten miles. ended up on the | went ten miles. ended up on the mudflats. ~ . , ., mudflats. what did you do? i contacted — mudflats. what did you do? i contacted denby _ mudflats. what did you do? i contacted denby drone i mudflats. what did you do? i contacted denby drone and i mudflats. what did you do? i - contacted denby drone and rescue. at that point you were thinking, four nights, we will not get her back.
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what did you amazing team do with the drone and the sausage on the string? bi; the drone and the sausage on the strin: ? �* , , the drone and the sausage on the strinu? j , ~ ., string? by this point millie had been on the — string? by this point millie had been on the mudflats - string? by this point millie had been on the mudflats for - string? by this point millie had been on the mudflats for two l string? by this point millie had - been on the mudflats for two nights, going _ been on the mudflats for two nights, going into _ been on the mudflats for two nights, going into the third day of the rescue — going into the third day of the rescue. the local coastguard had tried _ rescue. the local coastguard had tried to — rescue. the local coastguard had tried to get to her, was not possible _ tried to get to her, was not possible. last resort. coastguard had informed us of the tide and where — had informed us of the tide and where millie was, the tide would be coming _ where millie was, the tide would be coming in — where millie was, the tide would be coming in. we are she was dry at the moment, _ coming in. we are she was dry at the moment, at— coming in. we are she was dry at the moment, at some point that would submerge — moment, at some point that would submerge and the chances where she was going _ submerge and the chances where she was going out to sea. time submerge and the chances where she was going out to sea.— was going out to sea. time is runnina was going out to sea. time is running out. _ was going out to sea. time is running out, i _ was going out to sea. time is running out, i think— was going out to sea. time is running out, i think that - was going out to sea. time is running out, i think that she l was going out to sea. time is - running out, i think that she would drown. some come up with a brainwave. one of our drone pilots, dave, suggested that we know don't like high—value treats, attach a sausage to the drone, see if we could lure her to safety. had you done this before? _ could lure her to safety. had you done this before? it _ could lure her to safety. had you done this before? it was - could lure her to safety. had you done this before? it was a - could lure her to safety. had you done this before? it was a last . done this before? it was a last resort. ., ., , ., done this before? it was a last i resort-_ what resort. you what they are. what ha--ens resort. you what they are. what happens question _ resort. you what they are. what happens question but _ resort. you what they are. what happens question but that -
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resort. you what they are. what happens question but that she l resort. you what they are. what l happens question but that she ran after it? _ happens question but that she ran after it? she did. it was good to see that — after it? she did. it was good to see that she was still running. she was not _ see that she was still running. she was not injured in any way. she did run after— was not injured in any way. she did run after the — was not injured in any way. she did run after the sources. obviously she was hungry — run after the sources. obviously she was hungry. she had been out there at all— was hungry. she had been out there at all while — was hungry. she had been out there at all while. at one point she grabbed _ at all while. at one point she grabbed the sausage and we thought she was— grabbed the sausage and we thought she was going to pull the drone into the sea, _ she was going to pull the drone into the sea, that was worrying. at our main _ the sea, that was worrying. at our main aim — the sea, that was worrying. at our main aim is— the sea, that was worrying. at our main aim is to get her to safety. he could _ main aim is to get her to safety. he could not— main aim is to get her to safety. he could not rescue her at that point, we needed — could not rescue her at that point, we needed to get her to high ground. it obviously _ we needed to get her to high ground. it obviously worked. what was that light, that moment, that reunion? when she was eventually found it was so emotional. the entire team was in tears _ so emotional. the entire team was in tears everr— so emotional. the entire team was in tears. even our rough and tough men, i have _ tears. even our rough and tough men, i have to _ tears. even our rough and tough men, i have to say — tears. even our rough and tough men, i have to say. it had been a very emotional— i have to say. it had been a very emotional few days. we were very grateful— emotional few days. we were very grateful for her to be back. gratefulfor her to be back. emma, ou found gratefulfor her to be back. emma, you found out. _ gratefulfor her to be back. emma, you found out, what _ gratefulfor her to be back. emma, you found out, what was _ gratefulfor her to be back. emma, you found out, what was your- you found out, what was your reaction?— you found out, what was your reaction? , ., reaction? utter relief, 'ust having her back. brilliant, _ reaction? utter relief, just having her back. brilliant, really. - reaction? utter relief, just having her back. brilliant, really. this i her back. brilliant, really. this time last week _ her back. brilliant, really. this time last week she _ her back. brilliant, really. this time last week she was - her back. brilliant, really. this time last week she was still. her back. brilliant, really. this| time last week she was still out there, how is she now? she time last week she was still out there, how is she now?- time last week she was still out
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there, how is she now? she is ok. skiers, there, how is she now? she is ok. skiers. but — there, how is she now? she is ok. skiers, but surely _ there, how is she now? she is ok. skiers, but surely going _ there, how is she now? she is ok. skiers, but surely going for- there, how is she now? she is ok. skiers, but surely going for her- skiers, but surely going for her first walk tomorrow since then. irate first walk tomorrow since then. we have not first walk tomorrow since then. we have got a special award for her here. it is from gnasherfrom have got a special award for her here. it is from gnasher from the beano. i'm going to give it to you. it is a badge of bravery. gnasher from the beano has written a special message to millie. on behalf of everyone in beano town i would like to congratulate you on your bravery, following your nose out of trouble, a tactic that has saved me since 1968. everyone needs rescuing some time. this time, a simple sausage save your bacon. but the truth is, sausages are like life itself. you are officially won in a million and deserved to be recognised as such. that is from gnasher at the beano. a special award.
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that is from gnasher at the beano. a specialaward. here, we that is from gnasher at the beano. a special award. here, we thought let us give you something more tasty. this is a week old, there is a sausage. it is incredibly smelly. i think it might poison you. last night, and at your grill, i was cooking a nice fresh sausage. let us see if you will take it. well dan for being so brave. look. yes. there you go. last bit. do you take it from my hand? very brave. thank you so much. i am so pleased you are home. she has got such a soft mouth as well. she is so sweet. she is obviously tentative. but she has got sausage, she is happy. i have not got any more. that is the problem. now she is your friend for life. great story. thank you so much. look
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at millie. she is a sweetheart. drones, sausages. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty our headlines today: the impact of rising energy prices — an urgent call for the government to intervene to help businesses and households manage spiralling bills. a senseless act — police in the us city of atlanta react to the death of british man matthew willson, who's killed by a stray bullet as he lay in bed. our victim is someone
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that was completely innocent, had no involvement whatsoever with the individuals that were involved in the reckless discharging of their firearms. police are to meet the senior conservative backbencher who accused downing street of trying to blackmail rebel mps. british interest in the singles at the australian open is over — dan evans was beaten in straight sets by the ninth seed from canada, felix auger aliassime. tributes to meat loaf — kiss frontman, gene simmons, tells us about his fondest memories of his rock star friend. he was a kind, kind soul, and the saddest part of all is the world has lost a kind man. and if you asked him, "hey, what do you want us to call you, meat loaf?" he'd say, "no, just call me meat." good morning. it's a quiet start to our weekend's weather, not quite as cold but not as sunny, either. all the details coming up shortly.
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good morning. it's saturday the 22nd of january. our top story: five of the uk's leading business groups have called on the government to act now to support both businesses and consumers, who they say face spiralling energy bills. they've written to the chancellor, rishi sunak, demanding urgent action to tackle the ongoing crisis. here's our business correspondent, ramzan karmali. these five prominent business groups have warned the chancellor that energy price rises on the horizon could push millions of people into fuel poverty. in a letter sent to rishi sunak, they say that if the issue is: the reason our energy is getting more expensive is down to the massive rise in wholesale prices, as economies around the world began easing covid restrictions. the energy regulator, ofgem, is due to announce a new energy price cap from april,
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and it is expected to rise dramatically, to £2000 for the average household. i think it is really vital that the government thinks, how can we, not protect everybody from global energy prices, that feels really hard to do, but to smooth the cliff edge for most households, for whom an £800 rise in their bills will really be too much, as well as supporting the most disadvantaged in our society to be able to cope with really significant increases. and when it comes to businesses, 2022 is already proving to be a massive hit to cash flow for a whole range of reasons. put a secondary glazing on this side... the energy bill for this hotelier in scarboroughjumped up from £2000 a month to £10,000 in november. she has no choice but to pass on some of these rising costs. our big challenge in that it is coming towards the end of the pandemic now, foreign markets are opening back up for travel, so we are now in a position where our hotel is competing with very cheap
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foreign hotels, foreign travel. we're in a position now that if the costs keep rising and we have to keep putting those prices onto our customers, we are not going to be able to compete with that market. rising energy costs are putting pressure on notjust families but businesses, too, and the calls on the government to act now are growing ever louder. for their part, the treasury said it's helping families with £12 billion worth of support, targeting the lowest—paid over the next two years. ramzan karmali, bbc news. police in the us have descibed the death of a british man from a stray bullet as a reckless, senseless act. 31—year—old astrophysicist matthew willson was killed while he lay in bed during a trip to the city of atlanta. simonjones has this report. killed in what officers are describing as a random and senseless act. matthew willson was in bed last sunday beside his girlfriend, pictured in this image released by police. he was hit in the head by a bullet
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fired from a neighbouring block of flats. he had just arrived in the atlanta area to visit his girlfriend. they were laying down for bed that night when they heard the gunfire erupt, and what appears right now, a stray bullet entered the exterior wall to their apartment and struck him. this is a very tragic incident. our victim is someone that was completely innocent, had no involvement whatsoever with the individuals that were involved in the reckless discharging of their firearms. police had initially been called to the area following reports that shots were being fired into the air. they then received a second call from matthew willson's girlfriend, saying he had been hit. in a brief statement, the foreign office here in london said it was supporting the family of a british man following his death in the united states. it added that it was in contact with the authorities over there. matthew willson was a former phd student at the university of exeter. it said...
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the police in the us are offering a reward for information. no arrests have been made, but officers say they are determined to put those responsible injail. the senior tory backbencher who accused number 10 of trying to "blackmail" rebel mps will meet police to discuss his allegations. william wragg — who has called for boris johnson's resignation — says he'll speak to scotland yard detectives in the house of commons early next week. our political correspondent helen cattjoins us now. it's really important to be clear about these allegations, just run us through what is being alleged here? what william wragg is saying is that he believes that conservative mps who the whit�*s, who are mps appointed by the government to try to make sure their colleagues vote
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as the government wants them to, that the whips have been intimidating, he said, tory mps who are suspected of trying to get boris johnson out of office, and he came up johnson out of office, and he came up with a couple of specific allegations, he said there were reports that there had been encouragement for stories that would embarrass those mps to be published in the press, and potentially more seriously, he said he had heard reports that mps had been threatened with public money being withdrawn from their constituencies. now, he said those things, he said, seemed to constitute blackmail. he has now asked for this meeting with the met police, which we are expecting to take place this week. number ten has so far resisted calls to investigate but it has said that if any evidence to back up these allegations come to light, it will consider that very carefully. of course, all of this comes at a time when the ministers and government will be trying to shore up support for borisjohnson ahead of the publication of the report into alleged downing street parties, which we are expecting at the beginning of next week. helen,
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for now, thanks _ the beginning of next week. helen, for now, thanks very _ the beginning of next week. helen, for now, thanks very much. - the first shipment of military aid from the united states to ukraine has arrived in kyiv as russian troops continue to build near the border. acording to the us embassy, the package contains ammunition for ukraine's front—line forces. it comes a day after russia's foreign minister and his us counterpart held what both sides called "frank" talks, in an effort to cool tensions. campaign groups are calling on the government to urgently publicise changes to the highway code which come into effect next saturday. the move will see walkers and cyclists given greater priority. cycling uk says it'll be the biggest update in a generation. earlier, we spoke to the new boss of travel active england — former olympic cycling champion, chris boardman, and he explained some of the key changes. for any sensible driver, your duty is to look after them more vulnerable road users, but side roads, if it pedestrian steps out,
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the new rules will be anybody going straight ahead, whether they are on a bike, walking, or in a car, has right of way. if you seem somebody coming to a junction whose walking, you have to anticipate, that person wants to keep walking, they are right of way, if i am turning, i have to wait. adults living with obesity in england are now being offered extra weight—loss support from community pharmacists. until now, patients had to be seen by their gps before they could access an nhs12—week weight management plan. the scheme is designed to help the estimated one—in—four adults who are obese. from today, almost all coronavirus restrictions are being lifted in the republic of ireland. social distancing measures and limits on gatherings will be scrapped, while workers will return to offices on a staggered basis. an 8pm curfew for restaurants, bars, cafes and pubs will also be lifted. it's 9:09am. you need to know what's going on with the weather. it's a day, perhaps, for sitting on a
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bench, but ben is sensitive, so he wants a question! who takes a cushion out on a walk to sit on a bench? �* , cushion out on a walk to sit on a bench? fl .,, , cushion out on a walk to sit on a bench?_ come - cushion out on a walk to sit on a bench?_ come on, - cushion out on a walk to sit on a bench?_ come on, if. cushion out on a walk to sit on a i bench?_ come on, if you bench? it's frosty! come on, if you can't defend... _ bench? it's frosty! come on, if you can't defend... can _ bench? it's frosty! come on, if you can't defend... can you _ bench? it's frosty! come on, if you can't defend... can you imagine i can't defend... can you imagine going on a walk and taking a cushion? just wear some thermal leggings or something! fir just wear some thermal leggings or somethina! ., . just wear some thermal leggings or something!_ it's - just wear some thermal leggings or something!_ it's a - just wear some thermal leggings or something!_ it's a great i something! or a coat! it's a great ear and something! or a coat! it's a great year and it's _ something! or a coat! it's a great year and it's a — something! or a coat! it's a great year and it's a cold _ something! or a coat! it's a great year and it's a cold bench, - something! or a coat! it's a great year and it's a cold bench, that's| year and it's a cold bench, that's all i'm _ year and it's a cold bench, that's all i'm saying!— year and it's a cold bench, that's all i'm saying! i'm reminded of the fai tale, all i'm saying! i'm reminded of the fairy tale. the _ all i'm saying! i'm reminded of the fairy tale, the princess _ all i'm saying! i'm reminded of the fairy tale, the princess and - all i'm saying! i'm reminded of the fairy tale, the princess and the i fairy tale, the princess and the pea! , ., , , ., fairy tale, the princess and the pea! , .,, i. ., ., fairy tale, the princess and the pea! , ., ., ., ~' pea! the people you have to work with! hello, everybody. a real west east divide, the lowest temperatures have fallen through the night down to —a in one or two spots, further west it's just a beautiful but there's a lot more cloud, which is acted like a beautiful winter blanket, preventing the temperatures from radiating away, so it's milder out there. and already in scotland, just like last few mornings, in the far
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north—west, temperature sitting around nine. the reason is this south—westerly flow around the top of that high pressure, it's the high pressure keeping things very quiet indeed, most significant rain in the fog is to come for the next few days, but the cloud is thick enough for some drizzle, once again into the north—west, and going into the afternoon we might see sunshine coming increasingly hazy as the cloud arrives. at the temperatures not too bad, for the time of year. 7-9 not too bad, for the time of year. 7—9 across england and wales, double figures in scotland, and may be northern ireland as well. through the night tonight, hit and miss in terms of cloud cover. we might continue to see some breaks once again down through the midlands during the early hours, and temperature will fall away, and patchy mist and fog fawning. but the emphasis is with the cloud, and as you can see, continue to keep things on the mild side with temperatures above freezing in the far north—west of scotland. cold air sitting across eastern europe, that south—westerly flow of driving the yellow tones,
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milder air, across the country. it won't feel too bad on the hole on sunday, a lot of cloud around, grey, quiet day, but certainly a day forgetting at the bat and spending some time in fresh air. —— for getting out and about. by the end of the afternoon, highs of around 8 or 9 for many. similar story as we go into monday, i don't think there will be much in the way of sunshine around, again, cloudy skies, and a weather front around, again, cloudy skies, and a weatherfront bringing around, again, cloudy skies, and a weather front bringing more persistent rain but only once again into the far north of scotland. there is no rain in the forecast for the next five days across the majority of england, wales and northern ireland. and again, temperatures between seven, and 9 degrees. we will, however, start to see a weather front arriving in the north by the middle part of the week. here it is. again, windy with it as well. that could bring cyclic in brainerd to scotland but again as it bumps into high—pressure, it dies away, so we will continue to get bits and pieces of cloud as we go
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through the week. but largely fine and dry, some rain into the far north. �* and dry, some rain into the far north. . ., ., ., ,, ., and dry, some rain into the far north. . ., ., , ., north. and no need to take a cushion at! now, north. and no need to take a cushion at! now. ben. _ north. and no need to take a cushion at! now, ben, come— north. and no need to take a cushion at! now, ben, come on! _ north. and no need to take a cushion at! now, ben, come on! i— north. and no need to take a cushion at! now, ben, come on! iwill- north. and no need to take a cushion at! now, ben, come on! iwilltake. at! now, ben, come on! iwill take it anyway. — at! now, ben, come on! iwill take it anyway. just _ at! now, ben, come on! iwill take it anyway. just in _ at! now, ben, come on! iwill take it anyway, just in case. _ at! now, ben, come on! iwill take it anyway, just in case. have i at! now, ben, come on! iwill take it anyway, just in case. have you l it anyway, 'ust in case. have you not a it anyway, just in case. have you got a carrying — it anyway, just in case. have you got a carrying handle? _ it anyway, just in case. have you got a carrying handle? with i it anyway, just in case. have you got a carrying handle? with my i got a carrying handle? with my fleece blanket. _ got a carrying handle? with my fleece blanket. you _ got a carrying handle? with my fleece blanket. you will - got a carrying handle? with my fleece blanket. you will be i got a carrying handle? with my| fleece blanket. you will be sent got a carrying handle? with my i fleece blanket. you will be sent so many suggestions! _ fleece blanket. you will be sent so many suggestions! going - fleece blanket. you will be sent so many suggestions! going for i fleece blanket. you will be sent so many suggestions! going for a i fleece blanket. you will be sent so| many suggestions! going for a nice walk and sitting on a bench of the cushion! l walk and sitting on a bench of the cushion! ., �* , , ., cushion! i wouldn't sit with you an a ! cushion! i wouldn't sit with you anyway! you've _ cushion! i wouldn't sit with you anyway! you've got _ cushion! i wouldn't sit with you anyway! you've got no - cushion! i wouldn't sit with you anyway! you've got no choice, | cushion! i wouldn't sit with you i anyway! you've got no choice, we've not anyway! you've got no choice, we've . ot 45 anyway! you've got no choice, we've got 45 minutes _ anyway! you've got no choice, we've got 45 minutes left! _ anyway! you've got no choice, we've got 45 minutes left! we _ anyway! you've got no choice, we've got 45 minutes left! we will- anyway! you've got no choice, we've got 45 minutes left! we will move i got 45 minutes left! we will move on, shall we? it's on saturday morning, which means it's time for your covid questions to be answered. this week, with cases falling and restrictions easing across the uk, there's plenty to get at with our regular saturday panel — virologist dr chris smith and professor of public health linda bauld. good morning. big announcements about restrictions being eased in
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all parts of the uk, now, we are told, is the time to do it. what you make of that, first? i told, is the time to do it. what you make of that, first?— make of that, first? i think it's reasonable. _ make of that, first? i think it's reasonable. the _ make of that, first? i think it's reasonable. the extent - make of that, first? i think it's reasonable. the extent to i make of that, first? i think it's i reasonable. the extent to which they are easing up there around the uk, and it's really positive to hear that news from ireland, where they are really on the downward trajectory of the omicron ways. we can't keep things in place forever because that causes harm, so i think this is the right time to make these changes. we've seen continued in cases. we are also seeing around 10% reduction across the uk in admissions to hospital, which is good news. there is still mortality, people are still losing their lives from this disease every day, but i think, given the long—term accumulated harms we see, for example, from the night—time economy that's been shut in many parts of the uk, and distancing or table service and hospitality, and then of course, some businesses now really pleased that people can go back to the office, so we need to see if there is a surge of infections as a result of this, but i am optimistic,
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given the level of vaccine coverage we have, that that will not happen, so fingers crossed.— so fingers crossed. chris, same auestion so fingers crossed. chris, same question to _ so fingers crossed. chris, same question to you, _ so fingers crossed. chris, same question to you, in _ so fingers crossed. chris, same question to you, in a _ so fingers crossed. chris, same question to you, in a sense. i so fingers crossed. chris, same i question to you, in a sense. what linda sang there, it really is that balance between trying to get things open again and trying to operate as level i would like normal but keeping an eye on infection levels. __ up keeping an eye on infection levels. —— up praet as normal. if we are to see an increase, as people get back to normal, how long will that take to normal, how long will that take to show up in figures? the argument that has the — to show up in figures? the argument that has the level _ to show up in figures? the argument that has the level for _ to show up in figures? the argument that has the level for why _ to show up in figures? the argument that has the level for why we - to show up in figures? the argument that has the level for why we should | that has the level for why we should open things up is that we are effectively reverting to plan a from plan b. _ effectively reverting to plan a from plan b, and when plan a was in play, we had— plan b, and when plan a was in play, we had about— plan b, and when plan a was in play, we had about the same number of cases— we had about the same number of cases as _ we had about the same number of cases as we — we had about the same number of cases as we do at the moment, and we had a _ cases as we do at the moment, and we had a more _ cases as we do at the moment, and we had a more severe disease, with delta _ had a more severe disease, with delta it— had a more severe disease, with delta. it was more severe, it was producing — delta. it was more severe, it was producing more intense symptoms. so since we _ producing more intense symptoms. so since we now— producing more intense symptoms. so since we now have about the same number— since we now have about the same number of— since we now have about the same number of cases with a milder disease, — number of cases with a milder disease, and a trend that is strongly— disease, and a trend that is strongly downwards, both in terms of numbers— strongly downwards, both in terms of numbers of— strongly downwards, both in terms of numbers of cases and also people in hospital— numbers of cases and also people in
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hospital and people who are facing severe _ hospital and people who are facing severe disease in hospital, on ventilators and so on, there's not really— ventilators and so on, there's not really an— ventilators and so on, there's not really an argument to maintain more intense _ really an argument to maintain more intense restrictions, so we should be scaling — intense restrictions, so we should be scaling things back anyway. that was always — be scaling things back anyway. that was always the intention. but we've also got _ was always the intention. but we've also got to— was always the intention. but we've also got to see this situation through— also got to see this situation through the lens of where we now are. through the lens of where we now are we _ through the lens of where we now are we are — through the lens of where we now are. we are in a highly vaccinated country. — are. we are in a highly vaccinated country, 96% of the population have antibodies, — country, 96% of the population have antibodies, the evidence we have is that those _ antibodies, the evidence we have is that those vaccines work incredibly well _ that those vaccines work incredibly well and — that those vaccines work incredibly well. and this has been further supported by a study from america today. _ supported by a study from america today, showing that you get a 90% reduction _ today, showing that you get a 90% reduction in your risk of going off to hospital— reduction in your risk of going off to hospital with severe disease against — to hospital with severe disease against omicron if you have had your fill sequence of vaccine and a booster _ fill sequence of vaccine and a booster. so i think we are in about as we _ booster. so i think we are in about as we can — booster. so i think we are in about as we can be, _ booster. so i think we are in about as we can be, and also with a phone in case _ as we can be, and also with a phone in case load. — as we can be, and also with a phone in case load, and the weather is going _ in case load, and the weather is going to — in case load, and the weather is going to improve, we got to be thinking — going to improve, we got to be thinking ahead as well, we don't want _ thinking ahead as well, we don't want to— thinking ahead as well, we don't want to wait until things are ok and then open— want to wait until things are ok and then open things up because we've missed _ then open things up because we've missed the — then open things up because we've missed the boat. so now seems to be a good _ missed the boat. so now seems to be a good time _ missed the boat. so now seems to be a good time to start to move things.
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but obviously, we've got the knowledge of what to do if things do io knowledge of what to do if things do go wrong, _ knowledge of what to do if things do go wrong, we've got really good testing — go wrong, we've got really good testing capacity in this country, and we — testing capacity in this country, and we can keep a close eye on what's — and we can keep a close eye on what's happening and if we do need to make _ what's happening and if we do need to make changes, people need to be prepared _ to make changes, people need to be prepared for the fact that there may be some _ prepared for the fact that there may be some more handbrake turns on the road ahead, _ be some more handbrake turns on the road ahead, we is professor of public health in scotland, what do you make of the four nations going at different paces? 1 four nations going at different aces? ~ ., four nations going at different aces? ~' ., ., ., , paces? i think the devolved nations have always — paces? i think the devolved nations have always been _ paces? i think the devolved nations have always been a _ paces? i think the devolved nations have always been a bit _ paces? i think the devolved nations have always been a bit more - have always been a bit more cautious, and trying to really look at what's happening in their population, remember, we've got a health care service that is organised differently, there may be particular challenges, and most importantly, of course, health is devolved. so i think it is appropriate that, like anything in public health, you look at the data you have close to you, locally, regionally, nationally, in your area, and make those decisions. the changes are relatively modest, that highlight a couple of them. i think the legal requirement for face coverings is going to be dropped in
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england more quickly than, for example, here in scotland. we are looking very closely at the issue of face coverings in schools, we will discuss that this week, actually, in an advisory group, and also just thinking about, how do we discuss working from home, where there is a clear messaging, go back to the office in england, we are not quite there yet. i think we are definitely moving in the right direction and only in the fullness of time will be able to accurately do those comparisons between different parts of the uk and actually figure out which approach when was the right one to take. but let's be optimistic at the moment. all nations are moving in the same direction, even if there are modest differences. just a reassuring word, linda. sorry, chris, were you going tojump in there? sorry, chris, were you going to 'ump in there? ., sorry, chris, were you going tojump in there? lilo. sorry! just talking in there? no. sorry! just talking about being reassured, linda, i know we are constantly talk about new variants, when they will come, perhaps being grateful omicron wasn't so severe in terms of illness, what is out there at the
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moment and how are they being monitored?— monitored? good question and actuall a monitored? good question and actually a very _ monitored? good question and actually a very timely - monitored? good question and actually a very timely one, i monitored? good question and i actually a very timely one, because what we are seeing from the uk and particularly in the uk health security agencies that we have regular updates around the data we have on variance, and there is a global surveillance exercise under way, with colleagues sharing data regularly, reporting to the world health organization, and so we are able to pick that up. and as we have set on this programme many times before, the uk in partnership with countries like denmark etc has really good sequencing capacity. what's been in the news this week of course is that a new variant of concern has been picked up, i think, in december, the b2, which looks like a sub—lineage of omicron, we have some cases in the uk, there are some signs it might be more transmissible but no real cause for concern at the moment, but it's a variant of interest because it's been looked at and then we can decide whether there is cause for it
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to become a variant of concern, and that will happen in the future with others. we will continue to see this virus evolve but we have the capacity and we have learnt a lot about how to identify if there are things. $5 about how to identify if there are thin.s_ �*,., about how to identify if there are thinis, �*,., about how to identify if there are thins. a. ., things. as always, whenever we are seakin things. as always, whenever we are speaking to — things. as always, whenever we are speaking to ut _ things. as always, whenever we are speaking to ut two, _ things. as always, whenever we are speaking to ut two, there _ things. as always, whenever we are speaking to ut two, there are i things. as always, whenever we are speaking to ut two, there are of. speaking to ut two, there are of questions from viewers. and maybe you can answer this one, chris. sandra wants to know if the daily figures are decreasing because some people with a positive letter of protest are not reporting them and pcr tests are not compulsory now? —— positive lateral flow test. the answer is _ positive lateral flow test. the answer is we _ positive lateral flow test. the answer is we are _ positive lateral flow test. the answer is we are using the pcr test positive _ answer is we are using the pcr test positive as — answer is we are using the pcr test positive as a — answer is we are using the pcr test positive as a guide to how many cases— positive as a guide to how many cases we've got but there is a more accurate _ cases we've got but there is a more accurate way — cases we've got but there is a more accurate way to gauge what the numbers — accurate way to gauge what the numbers are, because the office for nationat— numbers are, because the office for national statistics run what we call a sentinel— national statistics run what we call a sentinel survey, and this is a much — a sentinel survey, and this is a much more _ a sentinel survey, and this is a much more sensitive measure of what things— much more sensitive measure of what things are _ much more sensitive measure of what things are really like, that what they're — things are really like, that what they're doing is not waiting for peopte — they're doing is not waiting for people to electively take a test. they— people to electively take a test. they sent — people to electively take a test. they sent out and enrol people in a
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programme — they sent out and enrol people in a programme where people just test regardless of symptoms. this means we get _ regardless of symptoms. this means we get a _ regardless of symptoms. this means we get a snapshot that is how the representative of the entire geography and entire social structure of the uk. —— that is hopefuttv_ structure of the uk. —— that is hopefully representative. and so that studies coming a week in retrospect because it takes time to gather— retrospect because it takes time to gather data, process samples and come _ gather data, process samples and come up — gather data, process samples and come up with answers, that's much more _ come up with answers, that's much more reflective of what reality is, and so _ more reflective of what reality is, and so we — more reflective of what reality is, and so we can marry that up with what _ and so we can marry that up with what caseload are showing and get some _ what caseload are showing and get some idea — what caseload are showing and get some idea as to what the real deal is, and _ some idea as to what the real deal is, and that— some idea as to what the real deal is, and that is mere what we are seeing, — is, and that is mere what we are seeing, which is a declining rate of cases— seeing, which is a declining rate of cases and — seeing, which is a declining rate of cases and notjust seeing, which is a declining rate of cases and not just cases that are testing _ cases and not just cases that are testing positive but cases that are in hospitat— testing positive but cases that are in hospital and also people that are becoming _ in hospital and also people that are becoming severely unwell, and that's the other— becoming severely unwell, and that's the other arm of the data, people may decide they don't want to test themselves or declare that has positive, — themselves or declare that has positive, but most people don't have a choice _ positive, but most people don't have a choice about whether they go to hospital— a choice about whether they go to hospital or— a choice about whether they go to hospital or itu, and those data are also there — hospital or itu, and those data are also there for a very reliable, bringing _ also there for a very reliable, bringing all that together is what we do _ bringing all that together is what we do when we work out what the
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direction — we do when we work out what the direction of — we do when we work out what the direction of travel for the diseases and therefore what the best next steps _ and therefore what the best next steps are — and therefore what the best next ste -s are. �* , and therefore what the best next stes are. �* , ., and therefore what the best next stesare. �* ,., . steps are. and there is also so much more to it. — steps are. and there is also so much more to it, when _ steps are. and there is also so much more to it, when you _ steps are. and there is also so much more to it, when you put _ steps are. and there is also so much more to it, when you put it - steps are. and there is also so much more to it, when you put it like - more to it, when you put it like that. linda, a question for you. we are hearing now about self isolation, and we've got so used to that, of course, if you get a positive test, you stay at home, be it five days, seven days or ten days. now there is, of course, the expectation that in march, that the current regulations will expire around having to self—isolate. it feels like that would be such a huge change after what we've got used to, the idea that you don't have to isolate, even if you have a positive test, talk us through that?- test, talk us through that? that's true, and test, talk us through that? that's true. and to _ test, talk us through that? that's true, and to add _ test, talk us through that? that's true, and to add to _ test, talk us through that? that's true, and to add to chris's - test, talk us through that? that's. true, and to add to chris's answer, if you do get a positive lateral flow, please register it, because we do need to know if you test positive, even if you're not getting a pcr. on self isolation, this is a tricky one, isn't it? all these things we've been told for so many months might be changing and it is confusing. i think the case specifically in england, to start
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off, is if you don't isolate and are advised to do so but test in place, as you could be fined and could be given a big fine, so i think moving away from that is reasonable, policymakers will decide on the timing. what will need to replace thatis timing. what will need to replace that is very strong advice to people about what they should do and i think if you are infectious, particularly if you have symptoms, of course you should stay at home, look after yourself and wait until you get better so you don't pass the virus on. and i'm hoping we will maintain access to testing for people. but in the longer term we do need to treat this like other respiratory infections, other viruses, where if you have symptoms, or people get a test and identify they have something, in this case covid—i9, they should isolate for a period and take advice from health care professionals and that's about taking all of us are keeping us away from others when we could be unwell. so i have some hesitancy about when
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this happens but i think it needs to be a shift from mentation to strong advice. and in the longer term, it should just be good practice for all of us, notjust with covid but for other infections that appear sort of answered what i wanted to ask there. it's that idea that normalising this, if you have a flu or cold, you would stay at home, it's about getting to that point, in what recognise what we're dealing with and how to respond, isn't it? absolutely, and i think we have to do away with the days where we turn up do away with the days where we turn up to the office with a runny nose and spread lots of things between others. the bit of the jigsaw we just need to be aware of his that people need support, whether that be financial or other forms of support, to be able to be off work or school etc, they need somewhere to look after them. so we need to recognise that it's not always easy for everyone but i think as we look ahead, this is something we should be accepting much more readily and recognising it is our responsibility to protect others when we could pass something else on. i will to protect others when we could pass something else on.—
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something else on. i will pick up on the idea protecting _ something else on. i will pick up on the idea protecting others. - something else on. i will pick up on the idea protecting others. chris, . the idea protecting others. chris, this question, says, my partner has copd end is concerned about the lifting of restrictions in england, can you provide advice on the way forward for him is a fairly vulnerable person? the changes are of course welcomed by so many but there are big changes in the way we are living and have done for the past two years. are living and have done for the past two years— are living and have done for the past two years. hello. what you're referrin: past two years. hello. what you're referring to — past two years. hello. what you're referring to is _ past two years. hello. what you're referring to is the _ past two years. hello. what you're referring to is the condition - referring to is the condition chronic— referring to is the condition chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, — chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, this is really an umbrella term _ disease, this is really an umbrella term for— disease, this is really an umbrella term for a — disease, this is really an umbrella term fora number of disease, this is really an umbrella term for a number of test disorders which _ term for a number of test disorders which are _ term for a number of test disorders which are in— term for a number of test disorders which are in some cases punctuated by seasonal— which are in some cases punctuated by seasonal exacerbations, people can get— by seasonal exacerbations, people can get really bad coughs and chests for a number can get really bad coughs and chests fora number of weeks, and gps can get really bad coughs and chests for a number of weeks, and gps are fora number of weeks, and gps are commonly— for a number of weeks, and gps are commonly seen this kind of thing. and if— commonly seen this kind of thing. and if you — commonly seen this kind of thing. and if you catch an infection, which for most _ and if you catch an infection, which for most people would be pretty mitd. _ for most people would be pretty mitd. it— for most people would be pretty mild, it can produce more severe symptoms — mild, it can produce more severe symptoms. people who have this, it's quite common, quite a few people have this — quite common, quite a few people have this kind of problem, and for many— have this kind of problem, and for
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many years. — have this kind of problem, and for many years, people have been dealing with these _ many years, people have been dealing with these problems themselves at home _ with these problems themselves at home because it's notjust covid that's— home because it's notjust covid that's a — home because it's notjust covid that's a problem for them, the flu can cause — that's a problem for them, the flu can cause problems, other respiratory viruses can cause problems, so really, the best guide here is, _ problems, so really, the best guide here is, if_ problems, so really, the best guide here is, if you get through the average — here is, if you get through the average winter by resorting to various— average winter by resorting to various processes and practices that keep you _ various processes and practices that keep you well, and your gp is on board _ keep you well, and your gp is on board supporting you with various what _ board supporting you with various what they— board supporting you with various what they call rescue packs were you know _ what they call rescue packs were you know to _ what they call rescue packs were you know to give people antibiotics in a hurry. _ know to give people antibiotics in a hurry, doses of steroids in a hurry, whatever— hurry, doses of steroids in a hurry, whatever works for you, will work against _ whatever works for you, will work against covid, to come in the sense that it _ against covid, to come in the sense that it is _ against covid, to come in the sense that it is keeping you well, so vou've — that it is keeping you well, so you've got to keep the practice up that you've — you've got to keep the practice up that you've got, that are tried and tested _ that you've got, that are tried and tested for— that you've got, that are tried and tested for you in the average winter~ — tested for you in the average winter. the same practices will protect— winter. the same practices will protect you across the winter against — protect you across the winter against covid as well. yes, there will he _ against covid as well. yes, there will be more cases circulating but it's not— will be more cases circulating but it's not a — will be more cases circulating but it's not a given this will be automatically worse than, say, if you were — automatically worse than, say, if you were to _ automatically worse than, say, if you were to run into the flu, so use the same _ you were to run into the flu, so use the same common sense approach you have before, _ the same common sense approach you have before, and that's going to protect— have before, and that's going to protect you as well as it did in
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previous— protect you as well as it did in previous years.— protect you as well as it did in previous years. chris, with your viral 'ust previous years. chris, with your viraljust head _ previous years. chris, with your viraljust head on, _ previous years. chris, with your viraljust head on, as _ previous years. chris, with your viraljust head on, as you - previous years. chris, with your| viraljust head on, as you always have, can you explain this? this question, if you get covid and are asymptomatic, will you always be a symptomatic if you get infected again? how does the virus work in that sense? the again? how does the virus work in that sense?— again? how does the virus work in that sense? the answer is, you can never say never _ that sense? the answer is, you can never say never in _ that sense? the answer is, you can never say never in medicine, - that sense? the answer is, you can never say never in medicine, and l that sense? the answer is, you can never say never in medicine, and if| never say never in medicine, and if isaid, _ never say never in medicine, and if isaid, it— never say never in medicine, and if i said. it will— never say never in medicine, and if i said, it will always be the case, i said, it will always be the case, i will— i said, it will always be the case, i will always almost certainly be wrong, — i will always almost certainly be wrong, because everybody is different and there will always be exceptions. the answer is, we don't know— exceptions. the answer is, we don't know for— exceptions. the answer is, we don't know for sure, but it's a good sign, if you _ know for sure, but it's a good sign, if you catch — know for sure, but it's a good sign, if you catch something and you catch it mitdtv. _ if you catch something and you catch it mildly, probably, you've got a good _ it mildly, probably, you've got a good underlying immune response to it and _ good underlying immune response to it and you _ good underlying immune response to it and you probably won't get severe disease _ it and you probably won't get severe disease in _ it and you probably won't get severe disease in the future. but your situation — disease in the future. but your situation could change. you will become — situation could change. you will become older, unfortunately, none of us have _ become older, unfortunately, none of us have invented a way of winding back us have invented a way of winding hack the _ us have invented a way of winding back the clock, we are all getting older. _ back the clock, we are all getting older. and — back the clock, we are all getting older, and as you get older, your risks_ older, and as you get older, your risks increase. you might acquire other— risks increase. you might acquire other medical conditions which will change _ other medical conditions which will change your risk. and you may also come _ change your risk. and you may also come of— change your risk. and you may also come of course, run into a different
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form _ come of course, run into a different form of— come of course, run into a different form of the — come of course, run into a different form of the virus, it may evolve and change _ form of the virus, it may evolve and change in _ form of the virus, it may evolve and change in the future and revert to a more _ change in the future and revert to a more dramatic type. we just don't know _ more dramatic type. we just don't know so — more dramatic type. we just don't know. so the answer is, be grateful you have _ know. so the answer is, be grateful you have had a mild infection, vou've — you have had a mild infection, you've probably had a mild infection because _ you've probably had a mild infection because you were vaccinated, the vaccine _ because you were vaccinated, the vaccine definitely do work, but in the future, — vaccine definitely do work, but in the future, that's not a given that it will— the future, that's not a given that it will automatically be mild, so we should _ it will automatically be mild, so we should not— it will automatically be mild, so we should not be complacent about the fact that _ should not be complacent about the fact that it _ should not be complacent about the fact that it was mild the first time because _ fact that it was mild the first time because it — fact that it was mild the first time because it might not be the second time, _ because it might not be the second time, that— because it might not be the second time, that the chances are it probably— time, that the chances are it probably will. i time, that the chances are it probably will.— time, that the chances are it probably will. i was very useful. this is the _ probably will. i was very useful. this is the point _ probably will. i was very useful. this is the point in _ probably will. i was very useful. this is the point in discussion i this is the point in discussion where we are less useful. —— always very useful. did you have a good birthday cake on your birthday, i think it was sunday, and linda, did you and yourfamily think it was sunday, and linda, did you and your family managed to eat different foods this week after... i'm going to say, actually, forcing them to eat vegetables four night on them to eat vegetables four night on the trot? i them to eat vegetables four night on the trot? . . , . them to eat vegetables four night on the trot? ., ., , . , ._ the trot? i had a very nice birthday cake! coffee _ the trot? i had a very nice birthday cake! coffee cake _ the trot? i had a very nice birthday cake! coffee cake with _ the trot? i had a very nice birthday cake! coffee cake with roasted - cake! coffee cake with roasted coffee — cake! coffee cake with roasted coffee beans, chocolate coated coffee — coffee beans, chocolate coated coffee beans, chocolate coated
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coffee beans on the top, and i saved you a _ coffee beans on the top, and i saved you a slice, — coffee beans on the top, and i saved you a slice, so if you would like to come _ you a slice, so if you would like to come visit, — you a slice, so if you would like to come visit, you and linda can have a slice! _ come visit, you and linda can have a slice! ~ .., come visit, you and linda can have a slice! ~ ~ come visit, you and linda can have a slice! . ~ ., ., slice! we called cake, no thanks! where is mine? _ slice! we called cake, no thanks! where is mine? you _ slice! we called cake, no thanks! where is mine? you can - slice! we called cake, no thanks! where is mine? you can have - slice! we called cake, no thanks! - where is mine? you can have smaller ortions! portions! i- portions! i checked in with them portions! — i checked in with them after last week, he was working all day on his birthday until 8pm, but at least he got it eventually, bless! the four day vegetarian chili, my husband was horrified i mentioned that! it was good, though. many in the country would join me in saying, if you make a big batch, you might as well keep eating it. but! a big batch, you might as well keep eating it. but i can assure you we have had a bit more variety this week, we are trying to our game. you know where — week, we are trying to our game. you know where you will get hints from when we say goodbye to you! have a lovely week, see you. have a lovely week, chris and linda, see you soon. we got to talk food, we have such a
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ticket over, and angela hartnett in the hot seat. —— saturday kitchen taking over. you wouldn't have vegetarian chili four nights on the trot? ., ., , ., ., trot? not four nights on the trot! ma be trot? not four nights on the trot! maybe one- -- — trot? not four nights on the trot! maybe one... what _ trot? not four nights on the trot! maybe one... what did _ trot? not four nights on the trot! maybe one... what did you - trot? not four nights on the trot! maybe one... what did you think| maybe one... what did you think about chris's _ maybe one... what did you think about chris's coffee _ maybe one... what did you think about chris's coffee cake? - about chris's coffee cake? interesting, yeah, sounds nice! where is he sharing the love, that's what i want to know? where is our coffee cake? it’s what i want to know? where is our coffee cake?— coffee cake? it's a week old! you wouldn't want _ coffee cake? it's a week old! you wouldn't want it! _ coffee cake? it's a week old! you wouldn't want it! what's - coffee cake? it's a week old! you wouldn't want it! what's coming l coffee cake? it's a week old! you . wouldn't want it! what's coming up? obviously that is not well today so i am sending it but i have some amazing guests, the fantastic actor, presenter, podcasting and one of my favourite comedians, rob brydon! yes! oh my god, just incredible. and i think that is gutted he is not here, sorry, matt, we will waive to you! laterwe here, sorry, matt, we will waive to you! later we will talk about your live show and have up to, what your suit have on entry fee tell? food
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heaven, suit have on entry fee tell? food heaven. it _ suit have on entry fee tell? food heaven. it is _ suit have on entry fee tell? food heaven, it is a _ suit have on entry fee tell? food heaven, it is a recent _ suit have on entry fee tell? food heaven, it is a recent thing, - suit have on entry fee tell? food heaven, it is a recent thing, i've| heaven, it is a recent thing, i've started — heaven, it is a recent thing, i've started to — heaven, it is a recent thing, i've started to get into lebanese food, there _ started to get into lebanese food, there is— started to get into lebanese food, there is a — started to get into lebanese food, there is a great takeaway near us, that's— there is a great takeaway near us, that's been— there is a great takeaway near us, that's been a revelation. hell, i mean. — that's been a revelation. hell, i mean. i'tt— that's been a revelation. hell, i mean, i'lltry that's been a revelation. hell, i mean, i'll try most things. i'm that's been a revelation. hell, i mean, i'lltry most things. i'm not a big _ mean, i'lltry most things. i'm not a big game — mean, i'lltry most things. i'm not a big game person, so i would say mavhe _ a big game person, so i would say maybe game. so a big game person, so i would say maybe game-— a big game person, so i would say ma be came. maybe game. so venison, partridge, that sort of — maybe game. so venison, partridge, that sort of thing. _ maybe game. so venison, partridge, that sort of thing. 0k, _ maybe game. so venison, partridge, that sort of thing. 0k, fair— maybe game. so venison, partridge, that sort of thing. 0k, fair enough. l that sort of thing. ok, fair enough. well, sorry, if you get yourfood hell, it could be a game dish, fair enough. and women in charge today, all us girls, sorry, only! part of the gang! i have the amazing anna and the amazing rav, what are you cooking for us? i and the amazing rav, what are you cooking for us?— cooking for us? i will do a marinated _ cooking for us? i will do a marinated fish _ cooking for us? i will do a marinated fish cake - cooking for us? i will do a marinated fish cake with l cooking for us? i will do a i marinated fish cake with this delicious— marinated fish cake with this delicious herby_ marinated fish cake with this delicious herby dressing - marinated fish cake with this. delicious herby dressing finish marinated fish cake with this - delicious herby dressing finish with capers— delicious herby dressing finish with capers and — delicious herby dressing finish with capers and sturgeon. _ delicious herby dressing finish with capers and sturgeon.— delicious herby dressing finish with capers and sturgeon. fantastic, and rav? apple — capers and sturgeon. fantastic, and rav? apple cooked _ capers and sturgeon. fantastic, and rav? apple cooked ham _ capers and sturgeon. fantastic, and rav? apple cooked ham with - capers and sturgeon. fantastic, and rav? apple cooked ham with bay i capers and sturgeon. fantastic, and| rav? apple cooked ham with bay and rosema . rav? apple cooked ham with bay and rosemary- do — rav? apple cooked ham with bay and rosemary- do you _ rav? apple cooked ham with bay and rosemary. do you like _ rav? apple cooked ham with bay and rosemary. do you like the _ rav? apple cooked ham with bay and rosemary. do you like the sound - rav? apple cooked ham with bay and rosemary. do you like the sound of. rosemary. do you like the sound of those, rosemary. do you like the sound of those. rob? _ rosemary. do you like the sound of those, rob? so _ rosemary. do you like the sound of those, rob? so i— rosemary. do you like the sound of those, rob? so i will— rosemary. do you like the sound of
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those, rob? so i will be _ rosemary. do you like the sound of those, rob? so i will be very - those, rob? so i will be very difficult, that sounds fantastic! i've tried it already, they are tasting good! and only smith will have some tricks, ready to go? standing by, yes, some incredible off the _ standing by, yes, some incredible off the beaten _ standing by, yes, some incredible off the beaten track— standing by, yes, some incredible off the beaten track gems, - standing by, yes, some incredible off the beaten track gems, and i standing by, yes, some incredible off the beaten track gems, and a i off the beaten track gems, and a mocktait, — off the beaten track gems, and a mocktait, and _ off the beaten track gems, and a mocktail, and i— off the beaten track gems, and a mocktail, and i hope _ off the beaten track gems, and a mocktail, and i hope it— off the beaten track gems, and a mocktail, and i hope it goes- off the beaten track gems, and a i mocktail, and i hope it goes heaven for you. _ mocktail, and i hope it goes heaven forvou. rob, — mocktail, and i hope it goes heaven forvou. rob, trut— mocktail, and i hope it goes heaven foryou, rob, but if— mocktail, and i hope it goes heaven for you, rob, but if it— mocktail, and i hope it goes heaven for you, rob, but if it goes- mocktail, and i hope it goes heaven for you, rob, but if it goes hell, - mocktail, and i hope it goes heaven for you, rob, but if it goes hell, i. for you, rob, but if it goes hell, i will send — for you, rob, but if it goes hell, i will send you _ for you, rob, but if it goes hell, i will send you to _ for you, rob, but if it goes hell, i will send you to paradise - for you, rob, but if it goes hell, i will send you to paradise with - will send you to paradise with some tiguid _ will send you to paradise with some liquid treasure! _ will send you to paradise with some liquid treasure! lots _ will send you to paradise with some liquid treasure!— liquid treasure! lots to see and we will see you _ liquid treasure! lots to see and we will see you all _ liquid treasure! lots to see and we will see you all at _ liquid treasure! lots to see and we will see you all at ten! _ liquid treasure! lots to see and we will see you all at ten! we - liquid treasure! lots to see and we will see you all at ten! we are - liquid treasure! lots to see and we will see you all at ten! we are a i will see you all at ten! we are a bit worried _ will see you all at ten! we are a bit worried about _ will see you all at ten! we are a bit worried about olly! - will see you all at ten! we are a bit worried about olly! he - will see you all at ten! we are a bit worried about olly! he is - will see you all at ten! we are a i bit worried about olly! he is match to church to _ bit worried about olly! he is match to church to the _ bit worried about olly! he is match to church to the wall, _ bit worried about olly! he is match to church to the wall, but - bit worried about olly! he is match to church to the wall, but i - bit worried about olly! he is match to church to the wall, but i am i to church to the wall, but i am liking it! i to church to the wall, but i am likin: it! ., �* , ., , liking it! i don't understand why he has to be somewhere _ liking it! i don't understand why he has to be somewhere else, - liking it! i don't understand why he has to be somewhere else, i i liking it! i don't understand why he has to be somewhere else, i madej liking it! i don't understand why he l has to be somewhere else, i made it clear to _ has to be somewhere else, i made it clear to the — has to be somewhere else, i made it clear to the producers, i would be happy— clear to the producers, i would be happy if— clear to the producers, i would be happy if he — clear to the producers, i would be happy if he just wore his electronic ta-! tag! laughter i would have been comfortable, it would _ i would have been comfortable, it would have been all right! from what i've heard, would have been all right! from what i've heard. rob. _ would have been all right! from what i've heard, rob, but— would have been all right! from what i've heard, rob, but only, _ would have been all right! from what i've heard, rob, but only, i'm - would have been all right! from what i've heard, rob, but only, i'm not- i've heard, rob, but only, i'm not sure you would! it looks like a fun programme, thanks very much. see you
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later. several of this morning's front pages feature a picture of meat loaf — the us singer and actor, who has died at the age of 7a. tributes continue to be paid to the rock star, who was known for his powerful voice and larger—than—life character. earlier we spoke to kiss frontman, gene simmons. he started by telling us one of the fondest memories he has of his friend. we were in an awards show and i had to dress up with the big here and the make up and the boots, my kiss persona. at the time i was going out with somebody else. we both stood and took photos with meat loaf. he was joking the entire time. he above everybody else noticed that
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unfortunately my crew had packed to left foot dragging boots, and they had packed the wrong kind, i twisted my right foot, facing to the left, he goes, what is going on there, the entire media started taking photos. not polished, not trying to pose for anybody, just a good and funny guy. i understand he was quite mischievous. yes. i was the bats of one or two of his one—liners. what's with the make up? i make a living. when you spoke with him about his music, why did his music cut through so much? i was a sting to some reviews of his music before, and
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there was this phrase, in your face, an apologetic, loud, here i am. it’s an apologetic, loud, here i am. it's cut an apologetic, loud, here i am. it�*s cut through. in the semi that coins have two different sides, there was meat loaf the onstage persona, —— in the same way that coins there was meat loaf, andjim steinman. jim was operatic in nature. stories about dashboard lights. in fact, i was having dinner years after meat loaf had become a big star. jim steinman never got his claim to fame, unfortunately, because he wrote all those songs. at the other table was brian de palma the famous director, he andjim brian de palma the famous director, he and jim steinman were talking about putting on a musical phantom of the opera, before the one that you are aware of. this was late
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19705, you are aware of. this was late 1970s, early 1980s. you are aware of. this was late 1970s, earlyi980s. iwas you are aware of. this was late 1970s, early 1980s. i was there at the moment. again, the sadness of all this is not so much about celebrity as far as i'm concerned, because i knew the person, the sadness is that a kind person has passed. and the world is worse off with him not being here. he was yourfriend, with him not being here. he was your friend, and we know you are talking to us whilst grieving. we are grateful for that. he was still working. i understand he was working on another project. he had so many ideas. we did not stop being creative. he was working all the way until the end. the saddest part of all, and i was not there to hear all the specifics, but it has been reported that meat loaf was anti—vax and had problems with wearing the mask. i hope that his passing was not due directly because of being an vaccinated or not wearing the mask. that would be the saddest part of
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all of it. it is difficult enough to lead a healthy life, especially for your loved ones and your fans, but the stupidity of this pandemic is that it affects everybody, no matter what your political beliefs. i hope to god meat loaf did not pass because of covid. it appears some news sources are reporting that he had. yes, some are. as yet we do not have any confirmation about any of that. i want to talk about the picture that you posted yesterday on your social media. a picture of you and meat loaf and cher. that social media. a picture of you and meat loaf and cher.— meat loaf and cher. that was the sto . i meat loaf and cher. that was the story- i was _ meat loaf and cher. that was the story. i was seeing _ meat loaf and cher. that was the story. i was seeing her _ meat loaf and cher. that was the story. i was seeing her at - meat loaf and cher. that was the story. i was seeing her at the i meat loaf and cher. that was the l story. i was seeing her at the time. i am actually wearing two left feet,
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the dragon boots. all the cameras wanted to see what he was talking about, that is the moment. i became his personal pinata at that point. cher was at the side, laughing her head off. ., , ., , head off. how will you remember him? one da on head off. how will you remember him? one day on since _ head off. how will you remember him? one day on since we _ head off. how will you remember him? one day on since we were _ head off. how will you remember him? one day on since we were told - head off. how will you remember him? one day on since we were told the i one day on since we were told the news that he has passed. when you sit down and take a moment, how will you remember him? i sit down and take a moment, how will you remember him?— sit down and take a moment, how will you remember him? i remember him, and it is too — you remember him? i remember him, and it is too soon. _ you remember him? i remember him, and it is too soon, time _ you remember him? i remember him, and it is too soon, time heals - you remember him? i remember him, and it is too soon, time heals all i and it is too soon, time heals all wounds, they say, but most of the impact and the sadness of it is going to be coming up when dead ringer, orsomething going to be coming up when dead ringer, or something else, going to be coming up when dead ringer, orsomething else, comes going to be coming up when dead ringer, or something else, comes up. you will remember when that happened. sadly, more than one great
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has passed recently. prince. david bowie. on and on. the sadness of it is, every time, if i had a personal relationship or new these famous people, when the music comes on, it remains the personal thing. the masses will remember how much the music affected them. let us be clear about this. music is notjust music. your favourite song is the soundtrack of your life. music, and it is really important, really affects you. it is the music you play at your wedding is, sometimes at yourfunerals, play at your wedding is, sometimes at your funerals, but certainly it is a soundtrack of our lives. apropos of meat loaf. there is been drama on the tennis
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courts. let's speak to britain's naomi broady. there were high hopes. going in, admittedly against the number one seed, but was thatjust admittedly against the number one seed, but was that just false optimism? no, he had a fantastic year. he played sydney last week, he had a great run, through to the semifinal before he lost to the guy that beat andy in the final. he got to a fantastic start in the australian open. walk over to second round, opponents withdrew. he was dragged into the last 16 for the second time in his career. early on something weird happened. some karaoke. we can see some pictures of how upset dan evans was by this
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disturbance to his concentration. the song was later to be, and he would not let it be. i do not know for took any of his concentration away. high hopes, as you say. a against one of the rising stars, the number nine seed, felix augur aliassime, stars, the number nine seed, felix auguraliassime, only 21. he has been penned as being one of the big hopes for a long time. early on in the match. they are known for being a rowdy crowd in australia. they have been referred to as a zoo. they have been referred to as a zoo. they have been locked down for so long. there is so much energy. but it definitely distracted dan. he really did match the canadian in the first set, 5—4 down, made a couple of errors, those errors cost him. then his confidence went. felix
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augur aliassime said he played the best tennessee has ever played in a grand slam. best tennessee has ever played in a grand slam-— grand slam. exactly that. close in the first set. _ grand slam. exactly that. close in the first set, dan _ grand slam. exactly that. close in the first set, dan mist _ grand slam. exactly that. close in the first set, dan mist a _ grand slam. exactly that. close in the first set, dan mist a break- the first set, dan mist a break point opportunity. the in their performances, felix augur aliassime was so good, dan was not up to it. the last of the seven brits in the singles has gone. what you make of the week overall? emma raducanu, with a blister. andy murray, he was hard on himself afterwards. and it was a similar story for dan as it was for andy. they did not put their best performances out on the court. both are fantastic start to view. dan said he will not allow this loss to get to him because he's had such a good start. you to continue positively. i think when they are hard on themselves, you know that they are fighting, and it means so much to them, and that is why the fans love them. we have still got brits in the doubles. ~ ., ., , ., ~ doubles. we do, lots of them. and lots in the — doubles. we do, lots of them. and lots in the wheelchair _ doubles. we do, lots of them. and lots in the wheelchair event - doubles. we do, lots of them. and lots in the wheelchair event as i lots in the wheelchair event as well. we are dominant in the doubles
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at the moment. why do we do so well? i do not know. we have got the british doubles men's coach, lta got involved early on, years ago. i think he is the best doubles coach in the world. that is may be something to do with it. they have got a great programme for doubles at the lta and are producing players after players. and the wheelchair tennis starts tomorrow. so much look forward to. we are really balanced on the sofa. smaller, taller. we have different stature. half a foot between you. there we are.
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now to the premier league and under pressure everton kick things off against aston villa at 12.30, followed by 4 more games. norwich showing their rivals, they can pull off the great escape. it's two victories in a row now. they won 3—nil at watford and for the first time, this season moved out of the relegation zone. it's a day to saviour for some of the smaller teams and maybe cause an upset, in the lith round of the scottish cup this afternoon. rangers are already in the hat. they beat stirling albion 4—0 at ibrox. teenager alex lowry scored the opening goal on his debut, after coming on as a substitute. a new documentary focusing on the last living generation of germans who took part in the third reich will air next week. final account highlights the stories of those who witnessed the rise and fall of adolf hitler, and his horrific crimes.
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let's take a look. we'rejoined now by the documentary�*s associate producer, sam pope.
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very different argument. one of the things that i thought was the most difficult to do, get people who want to relive and explain their lives, which for the rest of the world, they did abhorrent thing, they were part of an important thing. how did you go about that? the post—war period is always characterised as the great silence, nobly wanted to speak about their past. perhaps there were attempts at this in the years since. —— nobody wanted to speak. perhaps it was also a great not wanting to hear. there was an and willingness on our part, on the part of the children and grandchildren to ask the questions. we do not want to be confronted by this. what is interesting, this has been ten years in the making, lots of
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interviews filmed over ten years. you have little snapshots of little stories. together they are small stories, small involvement, someone ringing the authorities to report on someone who was hiding, someone who maybe give a tip off to someone else. collectively, we know what a horrific outcome that led to. it is those personal individual stories that are so moving. we opened the film with a line from primo levy, monsters exist, but they are too small in number to be dangerous, more dangerous as the common man... previous documentaries have covered the hierarchy, the decision makers. but without the ordinary germans and austrians, willing to act, who were just standing by, passively, this could not have taken place. we
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wanted to know, what did they know, why did they do what they did? and now, how did they reflect on it? how easy was it to get them to talk? particularly on the screen written backin particularly on the screen written back in some cases it was easier than others. taste back in some cases it was easier than others-— than others. we had to adopt multiple--- — than others. we had to adopt multiple... strategies. in- than others. we had to adopt l multiple... strategies. in some than others. we had to adopt - multiple... strategies. in some ways wasn't cathartic? _ multiple... strategies. in some ways wasn't cathartic? in _ multiple... strategies. in some ways wasn't cathartic? in part, _ multiple... strategies. in some ways wasn't cathartic? in part, yes. i wasn't cathartic? in part, yes. nobody had — wasn't cathartic? in part, yes. nobody had asked _ wasn't cathartic? in part, yes. nobody had asked them i wasn't cathartic? in part, yes. i nobody had asked them questions before. then, some wanted to explore. others were very resistant at first. one gentleman particularly who features in the film said, i am happy to speak to you, but i will not appear on camera. in those cases we said, we will record this interview, at the end of the interview, at the end of the interview, if you are not happy, i will hand you the tapes, you can do what you will, throw them in the bin, keep them for your own family records, perhaps you want to shouldn
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to your children, your grandchildren. or if you are happy, give them to me, i will put them in our archive. invariably, give them to me, i will put them in ourarchive. invariably, every our archive. invariably, every single ourarchive. invariably, every single time, there is only one instance where anyone with due consent for an interview over the ten years we were recording. these interviews bring into living memory, ratherthan these interviews bring into living memory, rather than being consigned to history, filmed in black and white, things that people might associate with the atrocities of the second world war, this very much brings things to the present. talk to us about your involvement. talk to us about luke, the director. you were involved later in the process of putting this together. luke hollins began filming this film in 2008. ijoined the project a year—and—a—half later injanuary year—and—a—half later in january 2011. year—and—a—half later injanuary 2011. i rememberwhen year—and—a—half later injanuary 2011. i remember when he invited me to the studio to sit down, chance
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encounter, seeing these interviews, you are struck by the relevance. it is these voices from history, echoes from history, sitting there. i had assumed that they were all dead. but to see them and to hear them. the bit i found most moving, to talk about bringing it into the present day, you take a former ss guard back to, and i will let you explain the significance of the location, and he meets students, young students, and he is talking to them about his history, the role and involvement in what happens. and he talks about being part of a murderous organisation. that for me was one of the most moving parts of the entire hour because you get a real sense of why it is important and relevant to talk about it today. that encounter is filmed between an ss man and a group of students whose teacher had identified them as
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potentially being radicalised, having neo—nazi orfascist having neo—nazi or fascist tendencies. having neo—nazi orfascist tendencies. she brought them to a memorial, where the final solution has been decided upon by the north sea political elite. in this confrontation you see these echoes from history smashing into the present. if nothing else, it throws up present. if nothing else, it throws up so many questions and concerns, contemporary concerns, about this moment. look across the world in europe, the us, globally, there is a rise in extremism, in a neo— nazism and fascism, that we should be worried about. this is a warning from history. it is one that if we do not start listening to and paying attention to it now, we are in deep trouble. what affected you the most? trouble. what affected ou the most? . what affected you the most? there is an encounter. — what affected you the most? there is an encounter, there _ what affected you the most? there is an encounter, there are _ what affected you the most? there is an encounter, there are moments i what affected you the most? there is| an encounter, there are moments with
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individuals where they seem so candidly honest about their involvement. when they accept their level of responsibility, except that they were part of this murderous organisation, they were responsible, evenin organisation, they were responsible, even in their small role, they bore some of the guilt, some of the blame. it is human and tragic and unforgivable. blame. it is human and tragic and unforgivable— blame. it is human and tragic and unforgivable. yes, it always takes me back. thank you for talking to us and thank you for making it. it is really moving. it is an incredible piece of television to stop it is cold final account, and it airs on stoney vale, bbc four, 10pm, 26th of january. -- it —— itairs —— it airs on storyville.
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she was one of the uk's best—loved radio djs and tv presenters — and tomorrow, the life of janice long will be celebrated in a special two—hour programme on bbc radio two. the former top of the pops host passed away on christmas day following a short illness. sir paul mccartney is among those who have paid tribute to her. i was sad to hear that my old liverpool mate janice long passed away. janice was a real fun loving lady. she always had a twinkle in her eye. if you talk about music, she was always very knowledgeable. she loved it. whenever we met it was a great pleasure and we always had a real good laugh. my sympathies go out to herfamilies real good laugh. my sympathies go out to her families and friends. we have lost a great scouse girl. but i will always have really fond memories of her and of the times we spent together. love you, janice. we can speak now with fellow broadcaster maggie philbin, who was close friends with janice.
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good morning. how are you doing? we all heard the news. all of us who are lucky enough to touch janice in real life, have one moment with her, she had an impact. you were close friends, yourfamily. she had an impact. you were close friends, your family.— friends, your family. yes. absolutely. _ friends, your family. yes. absolutely. to _ friends, your family. yes. absolutely. to be - friends, your family. yes. i absolutely. to be absolutely friends, your family. yes. _ absolutely. to be absolutely honest i am still trying to accept that that voice is not suddenly going to appear on my mobile phone. she used to phone up at wild and wonderful times. we would share a bit of gossip. that is very hard to take in. it has been lovely to hear some of the tributes paid to her. the thing that was so special about janice was her authenticity. that was deeply embedded across all of her incredible knowledge of the music industry. there is a lovely tribute
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coming up tomorrow on radio two, seven o'clock in the evening, where people share their memories, and what she meant to them. from my perspective, she was a great mate. she was someone who was a very straight talker. at the same time, the thing was that she was so much fun. ifeel incredibly the thing was that she was so much fun. i feel incredibly lucky. the thing was that she was so much fun. ifeel incredibly lucky. a the thing was that she was so much fun. i feel incredibly lucky. a few years ago, when her radio two show was coming from london, she lived with me during the week, it was wonderful. you do not imagine in your late 50s you are going to do this amazing flat share with the best possible flatmates. we worked at opposite ends of the day. i would be beavering away on my laptop and janice would come downstairs because she had been working until three in the morning. she would come in and 90. the morning. she would come in and go, guess what? it was like having
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my own personal news bulletin. all of the gossip that she pulled together ready for her show. she was a very wonderful human being. and has inspired so many people. whether it is the bands who she gave that first important play. because anyone can play an artist once they are well known. but she played adele, amy winehouse, a lot of these people she played for the first time. it also remained loyal to people. she was not always after the next best thing. many of the bands, back in the late1970s, 1980s, she absolutely believes in them, and still believed in them until she died. it is fairto died. it is fair to say you grew up together in broadcasting. young women starting in a very male dominated industry, and you worked your way up together. itoothed dominated industry, and you worked your way up together.— dominated industry, and you worked your way up together. what was that
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like? i met janice _ your way up together. what was that like? i met janice in _ your way up together. what was that like? i met janice in 1979. _ your way up together. what was that like? i met janice in 1979. i- your way up together. what was that like? i met janice in 1979. i met i like? i metjanice in 1979. i met her as the sister of my boyfriend. i knew that keith's family were very tight so it was important that janice approved. it was like sitting in a warm bath. she was so funny, irreverent. i absolutely loved her. i loved her. she was working at radio merseyside then. i got my firstjob in children's television. finding ourfeet, what did we firstjob in children's television. finding our feet, what did we want to do? then coincidentally round about november 1982, i began work on tomorrow's world, janice had that wonderful break, became the first female dj on radio one to have her own show. she really did carve what
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at times was quite a difficult path. then we were both pregnant at the same time. and encountered some rather old—fashioned attitudes. and rather old —fashioned attitudes. and were rather old—fashioned attitudes. and were able to share some of those anxieties. i am looking at some messages that janice and i exchanged. she was so supportive. matt taylor said she gave the best hugs. she was supportive to so many in this industry. she knew what it was like, and how it could be tough. that is one of her many legacies. she was incredibly generous. this is a very competitive business. but she
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never faltered a very competitive business. but she neverfaltered in a very competitive business. but she never faltered in terms of giving people the right advice, supporting them, encouraging them. many people see, a chat with janice at the right time made all the difference to theirfuture time made all the difference to their future career. time made all the difference to theirfuture career. she time made all the difference to their future career. she was very special. and a massive loss. it is hard. thank you for talking to us. we are proud to be able to remember her. and the documentary that muggy was talking about, tomorrow evening, seven o'clock radio two. —— muggy.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the first shipment of us military aid to ukraine arrives in kyiv — following 'frank�* talks over russia's troop build—up on the border. a conservative mp who's accused downing street of trying to "blackmail" politicians seeking to oust borisjohnson is to meet police to discuss his allegations. a week after tonga was devastated by a volcanic eruption and tsunami, humanitarian aid begins to reach the tens of thousands of people affected. the impact of rising energy prices — an urgent call for the uk government to intervene to help businesses and households manage spiralling bills. plus... the groundbreaking bionic eye operation — and the 88—year—old woman who's now able to see her grandchildren again.

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