Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 21, 2022 5:00pm-5:46pm GMT

5:00 pm
tonight at 5pm... amid fears that russia could be about to invade ukraine, russia and america hold urgent talks in geneva, with both sides laying out their security concerns. we've been clear. if any russian military forces move across ukraine's border, that's a renewed invasion. it will be met with swift, severe, and a united response. translation: no-one is hiding the fact that weapons _ are being handed overto ukraine, that hundreds of military instructors are flocking to ukraine. aid agencies say dozens of people have been killed and many more have been wounded in an air strike by the saudi—led coalition on a detention centre in northern yemen.
5:01 pm
a former metropolitan police counter—terrorism detective who secretly filmed models during fake photoshoots has been jailed for three years for voyeurism. a one billion pound shortfall in state pension payments to tens of thousands of women has been branded "a shameful shambles" by a committee of mps. # likea # like a bat out of hell, i'll be gone when the morning comes... and the singer meat loaf, who recorded one of the biggest selling albums of all time, has died at the age of 7a. and coming up in the film review — mark kermode gives his unique insight into this week's films, including one from belfast. and the rest of the weeks big releases in the film review at 5.45pm.
5:02 pm
welcome to bbc news, i'm jane welcome to bbc news, i'mjane hill. talks have been held in geneva between foreign ministers from russia and the us about fears that russia could invade ukraine. the us secretary of state anthony blinken said there had been a "frank and substa ntive" exchange. he also warned of a swift and severe response, and "massive consequences" were moscow to invade. but the russian foreign minister, sergei lavrov, said there are no plans to attack ukraine, adding he hoped emotions will calm down. well, the first members of a 30—strong british military team have arrived in ukraine to help train local forces to use of anti—tank weapons. borisjohnson says any russian incursion would be a disaster for both countries, and the world. this report from paul adams. russian surface—to—air missiles on the move
5:03 pm
in the country's far east, due to join what russia calls military drills close to ukraine next month — part of an invasion plan or merely russia visibly piling on the pressure? the atmosphere in geneva is febrile. the stakes couldn't be higher or the mood less optimistic. if the greetings seemed awkward, well, that is hardly surprising. is an invasion likely, as president biden suggested? mr lavrov seems to suggest it is up to the united states. and then, after a meeting that lasted just an hour and a half, tentative signs that diplomacy is not over. talks, mr lavrov said, had been open and useful. translation: this is not the end of our dialogue, l as i said, and next week, as secretary blinken has said on many occasions, we will get a written reaction to our initiative. mr blinken says he will share
5:04 pm
america's concerns and ideas in more detail next week, but... we have been clear if any russian military forces move across ukraine's border, that is a renewed invasion. it will be met with swift, severe and united response from the united states and our partners and allies. fresh satellite images show russia still massing men and equipment at strategic locations. american officials have said an attack of some kind could come soon, but diplomats haven't lost hope. we still believe that there is a slight possibility that the catastrophe can be averted, and that is what our american colleagues did, what uk colleagues are doing, the europeans, trying to persuade him that there is still a way to avoid a catastrophic war. but if it does come to a fight, ukraine says it is better prepared than before, releasing these pictures yesterday to drive home the point. the country's allies telling russia
5:05 pm
not to expect a walkover. the ukrainians will fight this. this could end up as a quagmire, . and i think that should be seriously considered by russia. for now, russia appears to believe there is still value in talking. mr lavrov said he hoped emotions would now cool. but the gulf which divides the two sides is still immense. the russians have made very high—level demands, calling for nato to pull back to 1997 borders, to never extend the option for ukraine and georgia tojoin nato, and for the united states to pull back its nuclear commitment to europe. this is clearly unacceptable. geneva's windswept lakeside has now been the backdrop for two rounds of high—level diplomacy. is there now a process that can avert conflict? it is too early to say. paul adams, bbc news. let's speak to our kyiv
5:06 pm
correspondent, james waterhouse. to what extent are these talks in geneva being followed? what's the mood and atmosphere where you are? i think going into these, jane, expectations in kyiv certainly were low, given the nature of russia's demands. president zelinski today has been in poland looking to build support from neighbouring countries, and today he's thanked poland for recognising its sovereignty and borders. and that's the priority for ukraine, its continued priority. what the government really wants our new and immediate sanctions. anthony blinken was asked about that, and he said they only really work if you are reacting to something and, sort of, reaffirmed his talks next week with russia. just around the corner from here, there a food market — and
5:07 pm
it is not a scene of people thinking about or preparing for a possible invasion. people are genuinely split about the prospects of what might happen next — partly because they have possibly more faith in the government here, partly because they think president putin is bluffing. but there seems to be a disconnect between normal people and these high—level talks in geneva. between normal people and these high-level talks in geneva. james, thank ou high-level talks in geneva. james, thank you for— high-level talks in geneva. james, thank you for now. _ let's speak to the conservative mp and chair of the commons defence select committee, tobias ellwood. very good evening to you. anthony blinken described those talks in geneva as frank, because in diplomatic speak, we know what that means. what are your thoughts about whether anything will have changed other result of those talks? yes. whether anything will have changed other result of those talks?- other result of those talks? yes, i think nothing _ other result of those talks? yes, i think nothing was _ other result of those talks? yes, i think nothing was going _ other result of those talks? yes, i think nothing was going to - other result of those talks? yes, i | think nothing was going to change. this was the last diplomatic turn before the inevitable. an invasion is now imminent, you werejust
5:08 pm
speaking about prudent�*s ultimatum to nato which was never going to be accepted —— vladimir putin. that gave him the pretext of paint nato as the aggressor. you've already spoken about the combat ready troop formations — these troop numbers begin to dust continue to rise, cyber attacks have already commenced, as well, and we've had some wobbly talk by the us president which almost gave the green light to a minor incursion. these are exactly the words that putin wants to hear. and i'm afraid these talks have been designed to failfrom and i'm afraid these talks have been designed to fail from russia's perspective. i'mjust designed to fail from russia's perspective. i'm just saddened that more countries haven't done what britain has lastly done, which is provide some hardware. if all nato countries had stepped forward, we may be looking at something very different today. but right now, it does look like an invasion will take place in the next few days. goodness, so you think it is inevitable and is actually coming quite soon — for what purpose, what
5:09 pm
is russia's endgame, then? weill. is russia's endgame, then? well, that's the big _ is russia's endgame, then? well, that's the big question. _ is russia's endgame, then? well, that's the big question. from - is russia's endgame, then? ji that's the big question. from the operational perspective, putin has actually boxed himself into a corner — he's set the bar very high indeed, as i said, with this nato ultimatum, saying unless you do this, then we will have to take action. but this isn't so much about ukraine, though, we absurdly need to be there to support ukraine as much as we can. this is more about russia actually reasserting itself a great superpower, the most powerful state in europe and taking full advantage of a risk—averse, hesitant, disunited europe, and somewhat timid nato, as well. and there wouldn't be a better time, nato, as well. and there wouldn't be a bettertime, i'm afraid, nato, as well. and there wouldn't be a better time, i'm afraid, from russia's perspective to invade, because over time ukraine will build up because over time ukraine will build up its weapons systems and strength, and so forth. but right now, an invasion is very likely take place. and russia doing it because it can,
5:10 pm
because it wants to look strong's or because it wants to look strong's or because this is about the internal — putin talking to his internal market and uniting people in his country behind a common enemy, as he would portray it? you behind a common enemy, as he would ortra it? ., ., ., , portray it? you are actually right, sot on. portray it? you are actually right, spot on- every — portray it? you are actually right, spot on. every dictator— portray it? you are actually right, spot on. every dictator needs - portray it? you are actually right, spot on. every dictator needs an l spot on. every dictator needs an advertorial democrat adversary to blame for all their problems, and putin's adversary is nato and the west. this is all about having a legacy that he can actually expand the russian empire. he was very upset, very demoralise by the loss of the soviet union, and his approach is to maintain an escalation of dominance, as it called, redrawing the map on his terms and setting the new normal so they can't be rolled back. we see that in georgia and crimea — it's the same people in charge, by the way. sergei lavrov, these are the same people back in 214. like i
5:11 pm
said, 100,000 troops arejust same people back in 214. like i said, 100,000 troops are just off ukraine, specialised forces. this isn't about gesturing, this is about getting ready for a major operation. so if your production is correct, this happens and the coming days, even weeks, what should the west's response b? what are its options? the wider picture as we should recognise that if we are timid, that timidity is exploited notjust by russia but other authoritarian states, as well for us to if we remain strong, that's respected — and we have to learn that, after afghanistan and what's happening in ukraine, we have to press the reset button and get creative resolve, particularly from the united states. if they won't do it, then britain has to step up to the plate — and like i said, i really congratulate britain for taking a step forward, although it was very late in the day. other countries are now coming forward to support, as well, france
5:12 pm
and spain in particular. it is really not a collective effort by nato at all. i sanctions themselves won't have a big effect on russia, they know that because of the likely have a longer term impact on the countries russia trades with. and russia controls much of european gas, as well. the further we alienate russia over the next couple decades, the closer they'll get to china — and that of course as a whole another question. china - and that of course as a whole another question. goodness, i wish we had — whole another question. goodness, i wish we had time _ whole another question. goodness, i wish we had time to _ whole another question. goodness, i wish we had time to go _ whole another question. goodness, i wish we had time to go into - whole another question. goodness, i wish we had time to go into that. - whole another question. goodness, i wish we had time to go into that. i i wish we had time to go into that. i hope we will be talking in coming days about all this. just before i let you go, if i may, on matters closer to home, i'm interested in your view on the fact that downing street says it will not investigate any allegations that some mps have been blackmailed by government whips? is that the right response to such a charge? i whips? is that the right response to such a charge?— such a charge? i haven't seen those details, i'm — such a charge? i haven't seen those details, i'm aware _ such a charge? i haven't seen those details, i'm aware they _ such a charge? i haven't seen those details, i'm aware they have - such a charge? i haven't seen those details, i'm aware they have been l details, i'm aware they have been made. all i'll say is that this is a very difficult time for our party.
5:13 pm
the country are continues to be rightly angry by some of the activities taking place over the last couple months, and they continue to watch what we actually do. this blue on blue activity i think is unhelpful, we need to stay calm and focus, look towards what solutions can be brought. i would like to see an upgraded advance, and overhaul as to how number ten does business — that doesn't need to wait for the sucre report, we need to start looking at solutions rather than arguing with each other. so and overhaul in the _ than arguing with each other. so and overhaul in the way _ than arguing with each other. so and overhaul in the way number- than arguing with each other. so and overhaul in the way number ten - than arguing with each other. so and | overhaul in the way number ten does business — that's a striking way to put it be, because you'll have heard the allegations, encouraging... that's not the way any party should be behaving within itself to its own people, is it? be behaving within itself to its own peeple. is it?— people, is it? well, the other aspect of _ people, is it? well, the other aspect of this _ people, is it? well, the other aspect of this is _ people, is it? well, the other aspect of this is that - people, is it? well, the other aspect of this is that we - people, is it? well, the other aspect of this is that we all i people, is it? well, the other. aspect of this is that we all have to work together on the flip side of this. wherever this does go — on
5:14 pm
number ten itself, we do know that there requires a cultural change. you heard this from all of her down, the chair of the party who set himself that there needs to be a change in the command structure, tone and style, and the direction —— all over dowd in. that would be a major step forward in trying to solve some of the problem is we have. 50 solve some of the problem is we have. v, , solve some of the problem is we have. , ., . ., have. so it requires a cultural chance, have. so it requires a cultural change, culture _ have. so it requires a cultural change, culture is _ have. so it requires a cultural change, culture is set - have. so it requires a cultural change, culture is set by - have. so it requires a cultural change, culture is set by the | have. so it requires a cultural. change, culture is set by the top have. so it requires a cultural- change, culture is set by the top in any organisation, it set by the leadership, so does that mean it's the wrong person at the top currently kudela there are absolutely formidable strengths ant; absolutely formidable strengths any leader has, and there's also weaknesses that they'll have. it is “p weaknesses that they'll have. it is up to the leader to recognise his or her weaknesses and have people around him who can compensate and make up for those weaknesses. and that provides overall leadership. 50 that provides overall leadership. so that provides overall leadership. so that leadership hasn't been there, given the stories we've heard about behaviour during lockdown when people up and down the country have had their lives curtailed to a large
5:15 pm
extent? ., .. , had their lives curtailed to a large extent? ., , , extent? you underline exactly why the country _ extent? you underline exactly why the country is _ extent? you underline exactly why the country is angry, _ extent? you underline exactly why the country is angry, very - extent? you underline exactly why the country is angry, very angry i the country is angry, very angry indeed, and rightly so, and rightly why we've lost trust and we need to repair that trust. to why we've lost trust and we need to repair that trust.— repair that trust. to elwood, thank ou ve repair that trust. to elwood, thank you very much. — repair that trust. to elwood, thank you very much, indeed, _ repair that trust. to elwood, thank you very much, indeed, for - repair that trust. to elwood, thank you very much, indeed, for your. you very much, indeed, for your perspective on ukraine, as well. at least 70 people have been killed or wounded in an air strike by the saudi—led coalition which hit a detention centre in yemen, aid agencies say. it happened when a facility was struck in saada, a stronghold of the rebel houthi movement, early on friday. it follows nights of intensified bombing raids in the wake of a deadly houthi attack on the uae, a saudi ally. saudi arabia has led a coalition of arab states in a war against the rebels since 2015 which has devastated yemen. our correspondent anna foster sent this report.
5:16 pm
they've stepped up their military campaign in recent days after the houthis launched an attack on abu dhabi, which killed three people. the group now say their health care system is facing a massive emergency. their health minister said medical staff were exhausted and struggling to cope with the number of casualties from the increased air strikes. a former counter—terrorism officer at scotland yard has been jailed for three years after admitting 19 offences of voyeurism. between 2017 and 2020, detective inspector neil corbel, who's 40, secretly filmed women in hotels and aianbs in london, brighton and manchester. the court heard corbel used a false name to meet his victims — many of them were models. he placed cameras in the rooms, disguised as everyday items including tissue boxes, phone chargers, clocks, and glasses.
5:17 pm
anna adams has this report. they thought they had been booked for a modelling assignment, but instead, dozens of women were secretly filmed by an off—duty police officer while they were undressing. he called himself harrison and said he was a pilot, but in fact, he was detective inspector neil corbel from the met. he covertly recorded 31 women between 2017 and 2020 and stored the images on his police laptop. corbel, who has now resigned from the met, admitted to 19 counts of voyeurism. he was sentenced to three years in jail. the judge that his actions had been seriously undermined public trust in the police. he was tracked down by fellow officers, after an 18—month investigation. there is still disbelief when i hear of officers doing things such as this, because it's a betrayal. it damages trust and it damages confidence. it really hurts, cos i know how hard i work and i know how hard my officers work, the met works, to look after people, to care for people. one of the women who we're calling jessica was booked by corbel after he found her photos on the modelling
5:18 pm
website purple port. he seemed professional, at first. he introduced himself and said how he did photography as a hobby and how he had seen my portfolio, there seemed to be nothing out of the ordinary about it. but this was no normal photoshoot. corbel had used spy cameras hidden in an alarm clock and a phone charger to secretly record her when she was naked. later, on a dinner date, he even brought her a book that mirrored his own lies. he brought me a book called catch me if you can, about a man pretending to be a pilot, just like he claimed to be. it's strange. just weird. jessica was eventually called into a police station and told she was one of corbel�*s victims. they showed me a video that he had recorded of me undressing and asked me to identify myself. ijust said "yeah, that's me," and asked them to turn it off. i didn't want to watch it with an officer sat opposite me. it raises further questions for the met, just weeks after another officer, wayne couzens, was given a whole life sentence for the kidnap
5:19 pm
and murder of sarah everard. —— just months after. jessica says both cases have changed the way she now views police officers. it makes you not trust the police. people call the police when they are in vulnerable positions and they want someone they can trust. ijust think it's shocking. anna adams, bbc news. a man has been charged with murder and attempted murder, following an attack on a married couple in their 80s at their home near shirebrook, in derbyshire. freda walker died and her 88—year—old husband, kenneth walker, suffered life—threatening injuries. the couple were found by a neighbour on saturday. vasile culea has been remanded in custody. a british man has been shot and killed while visiting his girlfriend in the united states. matthew willson from surrey, was found in bed with a single gunshot wound to the head. police were called on 16january after neighbours in brookhaven, georgia reported hearing multiple
5:20 pm
shots being fired. local police said the shooting was "random" and involved the "reckless discharge of firearms". from today, some covid restrictions are easing in wales and northern ireland. in wales, restrictions on outdoor sporting events and outdoor hospitality have lifted. and in northern ireland, the rule of six has been dropped at hospitality venues. we'll hear the latest from our ireland correspondent, emma vardy, in a moment. but first, our wales correspondent tomos morgan spoke to us from cardiff. the big one i think is now that spectators can go to stadiums now. a game in swansea, football, over the weekend. a big one here, the six nations in the principality just a few weeks away. a huge boost economically, notjust for the welsh rugby union but also for south wales as a whole, really, that people can go and watch this game again. also, as you mentioned outdoor hospitality restrictions easing and the first minister saying that if things keep moving in the right direction,
5:21 pm
indoor hospitality restrictions, the rule of six and two metres will go next friday and nightclubs will be able to reopen. he has also said today that they have been following the science here in wales whereas in england he said that borisjohnson's government are more focused on the headlines and not the covid situation. the first and deputy first ministers in northern ireland have said that the relaxation of rules here reflects the fact that they believe we are now past the peak in terms of the number of cases of omicron and the number of hospitalisations. so from today, you can go back to a bar and order a drink at the bar, the end of the mandatory table service only rule and that limit of six people to a table here, well, that is also being dropped now in pubs and restaurants. as you might expect, it has been welcomed by the hospitality industry. lots of businesses in northern ireland in that sector had always been quite frustrated, always felt they had to bear the brunt of the rules to try and control the virus. there is also another big change
5:22 pm
here coming on wednesday next week, there will be an end to the legal requirement to show vaccine passports in northern ireland if you're going to pubs and restaurants and cinemas, something else that has been welcomed here by businesses. they always felt they were pretty tricky to enforce on the doors. but saying all that, those relaxations are happening but the message from ministers here is asking the public still to take some level of personal responsibility in all this, still for people to take their own precautions. the us rock star meatloaf has died at the age of 74. he sold more than 100 million albums in a career that spanned six decades — "bat out of hell," which was released in 1977, is one of the best—selling albums of all time. his family announced the news on facebook, and said their hearts are broken. our arts correspondent david sillito reports. # like a bat out of hell, i'll be gone when the morning comes... meat loaf, bat out of hell.
5:23 pm
a sweat—drenched rock and roll epic that turned marvin lee aday into one of the biggest—selling rock stars in the world. there have been many tributes, among them cher, who sang with him on dead ringer for love, bonnie tyler, and from i'd do anything for love, lorraine crosby. we just gelled. we gelled perfectly. and obviously that's why the song went the way it did. and so every time i think of meat loaf, i think about being in the studio with him. # i would do anything for love... # i'd never lie to you, and that's a fact... tearfully: you just knew. you knew it was going to be great, you know. i'm sorry, i'm getting... you just knew instinctively that the album was going to be huge. # and i would do anything for love... born in dallas, his mother was a teacher and singer, his father a policeman,
5:24 pm
and his childhood was tough. he was an alcoholic and he would always beat me up as a kid. threw me through a plate glass window, threw me through a door. his escape was acting and musicals. he got a part in hair and then the rocky horror picture show. bat out of hell was a project he had been working on for years with the writer, jim steinman. the rock establishment was scornful, but the fans, especially in britain, loved it. # like a bat out of hell! but its huge success and the pressures it brought almost killed him. then followed years of lawsuits. he claimed he never made a dime out of it. but he did go on to make some great records, but nothing would ever top bat out of hell. a glorious, over—the—top, emotional battering ram. a rock and roll masterpiece.
5:25 pm
we can speak now to robert emery, a conductor and musical director who worked with meat loaf to bring bat out of hell to the stage in 2015. a very warm welcome to the programme because you are speaking to us from the new wimbledon theatre where the show is currently running — so it is still pulling people in. it still pulling people in. it is, that's correct. _ still pulling people in. it is, that's correct. you - still pulling people in. it is, that's correct. you could . still pulling people in. it is, l that's correct. you could see still pulling people in. it is, - that's correct. you could see the amazing set right behind me. we are selling out night after night — and it's all to do with the legend that is meat loaf, and his epic songs, his epic personality, he was a brilliant person who loved this show, and he came to see it many times. we are all deeply saddened in this building. times. we are all deeply saddened in this building-— this building. what was he like to work with? _
5:26 pm
this building. what was he like to work with? so _ this building. what was he like to work with? so this _ this building. what was he like to work with? so this is _ this building. what was he like to work with? so this is the - this building. what was he like to work with? so this is the odd - this building. what was he like to | work with? so this is the odd thing about him - _ work with? so this is the odd thing about him - you — work with? so this is the odd thing about him - you saw— work with? so this is the odd thing about him - you saw him - work with? so this is the odd thing about him - you saw him on - work with? so this is the odd thing about him - you saw him on stage | work with? so this is the odd thing . about him - you saw him on stage and about him — you saw him on stage and you had this massive man, massive voice, big tanner song coming out of his voice. and you throw him into a room and have a conversation with him, he was actually quite soft—spoken. very polite chap, a real lovely gentleman to work with, actually. real lovely gentleman to work with, actuall . ~ . , real lovely gentleman to work with, actuall . ~ . real lovely gentleman to work with, actuall . . ., ., , real lovely gentleman to work with, actuall . . . ., , ., ., actually. was a really passionate about the idea _ actually. was a really passionate about the idea of _ actually. was a really passionate about the idea of bringing - actually. was a really passionate about the idea of bringing it - actually. was a really passionate about the idea of bringing it to l actually. was a really passionate i about the idea of bringing it to the stage? was he an ideas person? what was his enthusiasm levels when you had the idea?— was his enthusiasm levels when you had the idea? totally- he met a man named jim steinman _ had the idea? totally- he met a man named jim steinman back _ had the idea? totally- he met a man named jim steinman back in - namedjim steinman back in 1976, they wanted to write a musical called neverland about peter pan. they've tried to get the rights for it and they were denied the rights, and they weren't sure what to do. so they thought to pull the music together on an album and they called that album bat out of hell. then decades later, they've sold more than 65 million records — to the state, they still sell a quarter of a million records every year of bat
5:27 pm
out of hell. finally in 2015, we managed to get the show on stage, the bat out of hell musical, which we are touring right across the country. we are touring right across the count .1 we are touring right across the count , , country. across the country, but it's one country. across the country, but it's gone all— country. across the country, but it's gone all over _ country. across the country, but it's gone all over the _ country. across the country, but it's gone all over the world, - country. across the country, but l it's gone all over the world, hasn't it? ~ , , it's gone all over the world, hasn't it? ,~,., ., it's gone all over the world, hasn't it? absolutely, australia, america, german , it? absolutely, australia, america, germany. new— it? absolutely, australia, america, germany, new zealand, _ it? absolutely, australia, america, germany, new zealand, all- it? absolutely, australia, america, germany, new zealand, all over. it? absolutely, australia, america, | germany, new zealand, all over the place. and it deserves to be because it's an astonishing show — you can see it's massive, it's bonkers, it's see it's massive, it's bonkers, its huge, just like meat loaf and his personality, and his singing and his music. ~ �* . ., ., music. we've reflected today that he had some tough _ music. we've reflected today that he had some tough times, _ music. we've reflected today that he had some tough times, as _ music. we've reflected today that he had some tough times, as well- music. we've reflected today that he had some tough times, as well as . music. we've reflected today that he | had some tough times, as well as the upbeat times and the periods of enormous success, of course. you've been working with him in the not that distant past— was that something that he weathered that difficult peered of his life? to be still have an absolute love of music and commitment to everything he was doing? he and commitment to everything he was doinu ? ., , ., and commitment to everything he was doinu ? .,, ., ., doing? he did, he was one of the most passionate _ doing? he did, he was one of the most passionate man _ doing? he did, he was one of the most passionate man i _ doing? he did, he was one of the most passionate man i ever- doing? he did, he was one of the most passionate man i ever met| doing? he did, he was one of the | most passionate man i ever met in doing? he did, he was one of the - most passionate man i ever met in my life. having said that, i knew him later on in his life when he was
5:28 pm
much more mellow, i heard many a story of him being very dramatic and diva like when they were recording bat out of hell in the 19705. but when i knew him, he was a big softy, a gentle giant. aha, when i knew him, he was a big softy, a gentle giant-— a gentle giant. a gentle giant, that's a lovely _ a gentle giant. a gentle giant, that's a lovely way _ a gentle giant. a gentle giant, that's a lovely way to - a gentle giant. a gentle giant, that's a lovely way to describe | that's a lovely way to describe someone, isn't it? do you think the musical will keep running? who come5 mu5ical will keep running? who comes to see it, what sort of cross section of the audience, if you can gauge that?— gauge that? this is the incredible thin , we gauge that? this is the incredible thing. we have — gauge that? this is the incredible thing, we have teenagers - gauge that? this is the incredible thing, we have teenagers here, l gauge that? this is the incredible - thing, we have teenagers here, 85-90 thing, we have teenagers here, 85—90 —year—olds here, we have women, men here, everybody in between. and it's got a massive, massive following, and the fan base is so extraordinary and the fan base is so extraordinary and they are so supportive of us, and they are so supportive of us, and they are so supportive of us, and they always have been. and i think that will continue to be. you know, meat loaf is the first person ever to create this rock opera genre, he really invented it — like we had queen over here with bohemian rhapsody, they created that massive epic pop music, and meat loaf did
5:29 pm
his thing with the rock opera. and i think because of that, his music and his legend will live on forever. find his legend will live on forever. and an one his legend will live on forever. and anyone who's _ his legend will live on forever. and anyone who's got tickets for tonight's performance, that will be a poignant day. how will you are member him this evening? every night for ears member him this evening? every night for years now. — member him this evening? every night for years now, we've _ member him this evening? every night for years now, we've been _ member him this evening? every night for years now, we've been singing - for years now, we've been singing songs like i would do anything for love but not that. we perform them on a nightly basis, but tonight when we sing heaven can wait, there will be a special moment in the show and all our hearts for the legend that was meat loaf.— all our hearts for the legend that was meat loaf. ., ~ , ., . ., was meat loaf. thank you so much for talkin: to was meat loaf. thank you so much for talking to us. — was meat loaf. thank you so much for talking to us, thank _ was meat loaf. thank you so much for talking to us, thank you _ was meat loaf. thank you so much for talking to us, thank you very - was meat loaf. thank you so much for talking to us, thank you very much . talking to us, thank you very much indeed, the musical director of bat out of hell — tonight on stage at the new wimbledon theatre in south london, and it's been all over the world as we were just reflecting. remembering the life of meat loaf, who's died at the age of 74.
5:30 pm
now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hi,jane. we hi, jane. we looking forward to the weekend. forsome hi, jane. we looking forward to the weekend. for some of us today, it was blue sky all the way, that won't continue, the cloud is spilling into the uk and will over in most areas through the next couple days. it does mean overnight, as cloud increases into those areas that have been cleared today, it does limit the extent and severity of frost, there will still be some across parts of central, eastern and southern england, parts of england and through northeast scotland, as well. overall it's a cloudy, dry picture into tomorrow, though there will be some outbreaks. into the western highlands, quite breezy here, but in terms of seeing some sunshine and parts of eastern england to the southeast, northeast england, double figure temperatures in northern scotland, but else where temperatures are a little bit higher than they've been, but still in the chilly side with cloud cover. overnight again, a touch of frost developing with any clear spells,
5:31 pm
fog patches could be an issue on both saturday and sunday morning, and it continues to be a mainly cloudy, mainly dry story. this is bbc news. the headlines... amid warnings that russia could be about to invade ukraine, russia and america have held urgent talks in geneva with the two sides laying out their concerns. aid agencies say dozens of people have been killed in an air strike by the saudi led coalition in a detention centre in northern yemen. a former metropolitan police counterterrorism detective who is secretly filmed models during fake photo shoots has been jailed for three years for voyeurism. a £1 billion shortfall in the state pension payments to tens of thousands of women because of
5:32 pm
government errors has been branded as shameful shambles by a committee of mp5. the singer meatloaf who recorded one of the biggest selling albums of all time has died at the age of 74. time now to take a look at all the latest sports news today. that comes from lizzie greenwood hughes. we're starting with rugby union and it looks like england will have a new captain for the start of the 6 nations after owen farrell suffered an injury in club training. farrell has been out since november with a seperate injury to his ankle and was it only confirmed this week by head coach eddiejones — that he'd keep the captaincy. he was hoping to return for saracens against london irish in the challenge cup this weekend. england's first game is against scotland on february the 5th. meanwhile — scotland's women have made it into the world cup play—off final after two
5:33 pm
of their rivals withdrew. they'll take on kazakhstan or colombia in a one—off match in dubai on 25th february, with hong kong and samoa unable to play due to covid travel restrictions. if scotland win, they'll be in group a for the delayed tournament — along with australia, wales and hosts new zealand. it starts on the 8th of october. next to a shock at the australian open where the defending women's champion — naomi osaka — has been knocked—out by the unseeded american amanda ani—simova. was seeded 13th due to just coming back to the game after 4 months off. but she'd eased through the opening rounds and started well against ani—simona winning the first set, then the american fought back to level it and then after surviving two match points, she took the decider in a tie break. going into this match, and he and had to play sharp if wa nted to give myself a
5:34 pm
chance. naomi is a lwa ys going to be playing well and she is an absolute champion, so i knew i had to step up my game and be aggressive. honestly, i am so grateful that i was able to play so well today and get this win. it means a lot. well the reward for anisimova is a match against the world number one and home favourite ash barty. she's yet to drop a set at the tournament, most recently beating camila giorgi 6—2; 6—3 (pres) in the men's event rafa nadal�*s quest for an outright record of 21 grand slam titles continues...
5:35 pm
there's some disturbing data released by the uk's football policing unit... which show that arrests at matches across the top five leagues in england are at their highest in years. the figures are based on the first half of this season and show a significant increase in the number of disturbances at grounds with incidents at almost half of all games — 759 reports on total — up from 34 per cent in the same period last season, and there were 802 football related arrests — which is nearly double — and the highest number since they started collating the data back in 2015. and according to the senior lecturer in criminal law — geoff pearson, the figures follow a national increase in violence and disorder. it may be that we've got a post lockdown effect, which is that fans didn't have the opportunity for that sort of transgressive behaviour during the lockdown, and now are essentially letting their hair down and engaging in more of that sort of
5:36 pm
behaviour that is challenging and on the line of criminalisty. it may also be that because there is a big turnover in terms of ticket holders during lockdown for various reasons. we are getting more irregular new fans attending matches who simply aren't detoured to the same effect. scotland's scott jamieson is still leading golf�*s world tour season opener in abu dhabi after two rounds. it's tough going there for all the players with high winds on the course. but jamieson coped well, only dropping two shots to finish on seven under par. he's one ahead of england's ian poulter and james morrison and viktor hovland of norway. we'll have more for you in sportsday at 6.30pm. that's it from me. thanks, lizzie. two thirds of all adults in the uk have now had three doses of a covid vaccine — which means 16 million people haven't yet had a boosterjab. and there are more than four million adults who haven't taken up
5:37 pm
the offer of a first dose. our health correspondentjim reed has been out with nhs teams who are trying to get vaccines to people who've been harder to reach. it's more than a year since the first covid vaccines, and in portsmouth, barry is finally getting his first dose. i was on the streets. a bit of an issue with me, i was on the streets since 2015. i done my research and asked a lot of people who've had the jabs, and they said cos you've got copd, you're high risk. how do you feel now, after having that done, barry? pretty, i've achieved something, and i mean, they're not even finished yet. no, and it's a good day. so this is your card... there is a steady stream coming through this clinic, held at a project for those at risk of homelessness. there's 20% of people in portsmouth that haven't had their first vaccines, so to get somebody here today, who has that complex needs, up to have his first vaccine, isjust amazing. it's just one of the reasons why we do this. 57—year—old martin wood has come
5:38 pm
in with his dog for his third jab. martin, can we ask you why you thought it was so important to come down and get your booster today? well, because i don't want covid! i don't want to be unwell. and it'sjust... i want to be able to get out still. i ain't got long left, so... overall in the uk, more than 90% of adults have now had at least one dose of a covid vaccine. the mass vaccination programme is still going, boosterjabs are still being rolled out. this year, though, the nhs is really trying to get at those groups who are much harder to reach. people who might not have good access to a gp, or to health care in general. this part of essex is home to a community of 2,000 showmen, running fun fairs across the country. relax, it's ok. at a mobile service near the site, 19—year—old maddison is having her second jab.
5:39 pm
we've got the fun fair rides, so we're always out, dealing with hundreds of people, day in, day out. if everyone doesn't get the vaccine then we're just going to keep back in the same circle we've been going into for the past two years now. so, life's got to carry on and we've got to get the vaccine, haven't we, i suppose. the nhs staff here say that, for communities like this, access to a gp is a major barrier to getting vaccinated, but it is also about correcting some of the myths spread on social media. we're always going to have someone that doesn't want it. _ |we, you know, we can try our best, j we can put the messages out there, but there'll be always someone out there that'll say say, _ "no, it's not for me." it's never going to be 100%? unfortunately, no. i do not think it will be. but we are going try our hardest. in the past, some communities in the uk have struggled to access health services. are you feeling well today? when this vaccine drive is over, the hope is that new relationship with the nhs can continue,
5:40 pm
and improve lives in the longer term. jim reed, bbc news. mp5 have called the underpayment of state pensions to more than 100,000 women, a "shameful shambles" and have warned that the mistakes could be repeated during the work to correct them. the department for work and pensions says it's resolving cases as quickly as possible — but the efforts have been described as ineffective, and the staffing costs for the correction work are expected to reach £24 million. sarah corker reports. for four decades, thousands of women across the uk have been underpaid their state pensions. some are owed life—changing amounts of money. you expect that the pension department won't make errors, really. the bbc has been following the stories of those who have battled to get errors corrected. itjust doesn't seem right when so much time has been lost and so much money has been lost in the interim. and john's mother was short—changed for 20 years.
5:41 pm
it was £107,852, which is an amazing amount. so what went wrong? a damning reports by the public accounts committee shows mistakes going back as far as 1985. in total, 134,000 pensioners are owed an estimated £1 billion. some widows, divorcees and women able to claim through their husbands pension contributions have been underpaid. complex rules, outdated computer systems and manual handling have all been blamed. the dwp needs to sort out the error and get cracking with making sure that people and their estates where they have died have the payments that they are owed, but they also need to make sure they are sorting out their it systems in future, and crucially we want to see proper compensation. it was former pensions minister steve webb who first revealed the scale of the problems. it is clear to me that mistakes are still being made today. i hear from people who get letters telling them everything is fine, and when we check, it is not. the government needs to take this
5:42 pm
issue much more seriously and much more urgently. some women will be fully repaid, but others like jan in fife can only backdate claims for 12 months, that's because of when her husband retired. i first spoke to her last year. today, she is still fighting to get the full amount. i feel really angry. i feel let down by the system, and it's just so unfair. around 40,000 women have already died without getting the money they are owed. the dwp says it is resolving cases as quickly as possible, and a team of up to 500 civil servants will be working to trace those affected, but it is a huge task, and it could take until the end of 2023 to complete. all of this has a knock—on effect. experienced staff have been moved away from day—to—day duties to fix these issues, and that is already causing a backlog in processing new applications. sarah corker, bbc news.
5:43 pm
urgent talks in geneva about mounting fears of potential russian invasion of ukraine. a former metropolitan police counterterrorism detective who secretly filmed models during fake photo shoots has been jailed for three years for voyeurism. aid agencies say dozens of people have been killed and many more wounded in an air strike by the saudi led coalition at a detention centre in northern yemen. coming up on bbc news, the latest from the australian open where naomi osaka is out. beaten by amanda on day five in melbourne. she goes on
5:44 pm
to face as party at the home favourite in the next round. the men's draw, not dial safely through, could he go all the way and left a second title? we will be discussing all of that and more in sportsday at 6:30pm. now though on bbc news, it's time for the film review. hello, and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. hi, mark. hello. we are fully into a word season _ hi, mark. hello. we are fully into a word season as _ hi, mark. hello. we are fully into a word season as he _ hi, mark. hello. we are fully into a word season as he can _ hi, mark. hello. we are fully into a word season as he can tell- hi, mark. hello. we are fully into a word season as he can tell by - hi, mark. hello. we are fully into a word season as he can tell by the l word season as he can tell by the big beasts that are coming into cinema. we have belfast, the new film by kenneth branagh. we have nightmare alley, the new film by guillermo del toro. and we have
5:45 pm
journalforjordan which guillermo del toro. and we have journal forjordan which is the new film by denzel washington. 50. film by denzelwashington. so, belfast. kenneth branagh grew up in belfast. some people might not realise that. this is very much inspired by his childhood, the story of a nine—year—old boy in belfast whose main worry is he has fallen in love with somebody at school and he doesn't know how to talk to her. he needs to take advice on the subject, and he takes advice largely from his grandmother and grandfather played by damejudy dench and... here is a clip from the film. the wee girl is still showing some interest, yeah? she looks at me sometimes, but were not allowed - to talk in the class, - so i can't say anything. and then when we go out - to the playground, she always goes off with the other girls. anyways, i think she i loves that other fella. well, you don't know that for sure.
5:46 pm
women are very mysterious. and women can smash your face in two, mister.

21 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on