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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 20, 2022 2:00am-2:31am GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm kasia madera with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world: britain's prime minister borisjohnson says he will challenge any fight to his leadership, as the row surrounding parties in downing street during lockdown continues. you have sat there too long for all the good you have done. in the name of god, go! president biden sends a warning to russia if they invade ukraine, saying the us will do significant harm to moscow if it does. the us secretary of state antony blinken is in ukraine for urgent diplomatic talks, says that russia could launch an attack at "very short notice". emergency aid flights finally set off for tonga five days after a volcanic eruption and tsunami cut the pacific nation off
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from the rest of the world. and making motoring history — we speak to guanyu zhou, formula one's first—ever chinese driver. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. the british prime minister borisjohnson has insisted he will fight any challenge to his leadership of the conservative party, despite another bruising day caused by the row about lockdown drinks parties at downing street. during prime ministers questions, the former brexit secretary, david davis, called on mrjohnson to step down, telling him: "in the name of god, go". earlier, one the prime minister's own backbenchers
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dramatically defected to the opposition labour party. but the prime minister batted away repeated calls to resign and in a statement which pleased many, he went on to announce an end to the main covid restrictions in england. our political editor laura kuenssberg has the latest. the atmosphere in the prime minister's neighbourhood is full of risk. danger dangles all around for borisjohnson, uncertainty hanging in the air. downing street confronting the truth that some of his own mps want him gone. as ministers gathered to agree to ditch some covid rules, some of his own side waiting and watching, thinking about ditching him. is it under control, chief whip? yeah. all is calm. all is calm 7 do you think you might be in denial about that if you think this is calm? i think we need to focus on propping up the country and dealing with covid and making sure we've got that right. but can it really go on like this?
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some of your mps are putting letters in. is it all over for the prime minister, do you think? don't be ridiculous. it is not, perhaps, ridiculous, despite his allies�* claim to suggest their boss could be gone before too long. reporter: is it time to resign?! it was no ordinary wednesday. pressure on borisjohnson after weeks of claims about what went on in number 10 during lockdown. 20 mps who discussed sending letters of no confidence in their leader, then a shock. political chat interrupted. hearing christian wakeford, the bury mp, is defecting to the labour party. a huge surprise for his colleagues, and the rest. that is quite incredible. the first tory mp since 2007, christian wakeford, cheered to the rafters in the commons as he defected and took a seat for labour instead. can i start by warmly welcoming the honourable member for bury south to his new place? cheering.
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and to the parliamentary labour party. mr speaker, like so many people up and down the country, he has concluded that the prime minister, the conservative party have shown themselves incapable of offering the leadership and government this country deserves. a sting from keir starmer at a vulnerable moment for borisjohnson. and as for bury south, mr speaker, as far as for bury south, let me say it... in a unionjack mask, the new labour mp opposite, not behind, the prime minister this time. we will win again in bury south at the next election. there was more energy from the prime minister today in a chaotic prime minister's questions as he sought to stand and fight, mocked by the labour leader. doesn't the country deserve so much better than this out of touch, out of control, out of ideas and soon to be out of office prime minister?
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mr speaker, when the history of this pandemic comes to be written and the history of the labour party comes to be written — and, believe me, they are history and will remain history, mr speaker — it will show... it will show... it will show that we delivered while they dithered and we we vaccinated while they vacillated, mr speaker. then, just when he thought he might have got through without a new wound, a brutal blast from his own side. a prominent tory quoting cromwell to try to oust the leader of the tories�* 21st century revolution. i expect my leaders to shoulder the responsibility for the actions they take. yesterday, he did the opposite of that, so i'll remind him of a quotation. "you have sat there too long for all the good you have done. "in the name of god, go." david davis and borisjohnson used to be allies of a sort. "what a day," you hear the speaker, aghast.
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what a day. what else to say? hi. it's good to see you again. so a senior tory, the latest to call for the prime minister's exit, the smiling labour leader welcoming a conservative to his fold. yet there have been more public efforts from conservatives to get out and defend. well, he is the bounce back king. i've always supported boris and i wouldn't be an mp here if it wasn't for him. mps and ministers who want borisjohnson to stay have been falling over themselves to call for cool heads all round. one loyal cabinet minister even claimed the threat to borisjohnson wasn't real. it is true to say no—one can be sure in a secret process how many conservative mps are really willing to try to oust him. yet today's chaos demonstrates clearly there are members of different tory tribes who want to see him gone.
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reporter: mr cummings, are you going to provide i sue gray with evidence that borisjohnson lied? the prime minister has always had political detractors and has gathered enemies along the way. he may not want to rest until this is over. and tory tradition shows when the party concludes the leader is out of line, they are removed. but only two years after a huge election victory, borisjohnson will resist attempts for a changing of the guard. if you want to know more about borisjohnson�*s situation and what might happen nextjust head to our website. you'll find lots of analysis and reaction — that's all at bbc.com/news or you can download the bbc news app. let's get some of the day's other news: the man behind the deaths of 39 vietnamese migrants in 2019 has been given 15 years in prison. vo van hong led a gang of people—smugglers, who would charge $27,000
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a head to get into the uk. the migrants had suffocated on the journey and were found dead inside a lorry in england. a major global study has found that more than a million people died in 2019 from infections caused by bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics. the researchers, writing in the lancet medicaljournal, say this is higher than the annual number who die from malaria or hiv/aids around the world. international airlines have cancelled dozens of flights to the united states because of safety concerns surrounding aircraft altimeters and 56 technology that has just been launched. the airlines, including emirates and british airways, made the decision despite a temporary halt to the sg rollout near airports. one of the favourites in the africa cup of nations football tournament, tunisia, say they have lost 12 players for their next match, after they tested positive for covid. among those missing for the final,
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crucial group game against gambia later on thursday is their star striker, wahbi khazri. president biden has predicted that russian troops will move into ukraine but warned vladimir putin that his country would pay dearly for a full—scale invasion. russia has around 100,000 troops deployed at the border but denies it's planning military action. mr biden said that moscow would face severe economic consequences from fresh sanctions. we'll have more on president biden�*s comments in a moment but first here's our diplomatic correspondent, paul adams. british military equipment arriving in ukraine. short—range anti—tank missiles, with a small team of trainers to follow. the latest western gesture of support for a country facing a mounting threat from russia. diplomatic support, too. the us secretary of state antony blinken flew to kyiv, promising relentless
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american efforts to prevent russia from invading. washington's message to ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky — there will be no talks about you without your involvement. and all the while, russian troops maintain their menacing presence on ukraine's northern and eastern borders. now, in neighbouring belarus, too, preparing for what are called joint military drills. american officials say these could be used as a cover for an invasion of ukraine. kyiv says it has what it takes to withstand an attack. we have 261,000 in our ukrainian army. we have the options to have territorial defending forces, 130,000. we have 400,000 veterans of ukrainian—russian war, so i'm sure that we have a capacity to deter this activity from moscow.
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last week, we saw a diplomatic trail that criss—crossed europe from geneva to brussels and vienna. at the end of it, the russian foreign minister, sergei lavrov, appeared to throw in the towel. "0ur patience," he said, "is at an end." but here we are, four days on, and the process is actually shifting up a gear. mr lavrov and antony blinken are due to meet on friday, once again in geneva. the talking, it seems, is not quite over. but the tremors of this crisis are being felt right across europe. 0n the baltic island of gotland, sweden is beefing up its presence, concerned about nearby russian activity and what it calls russia's direct threat to europe's security. paul adams, bbc news. in a news conference, marking his first anniversary as us president, joe biden warned russia that the consequences of a large war would be heavy — but implied that may not occur if moscow stopped short of full invasion.
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it is one thing if it is a major occurrence but if they do what they are capable of doing it is going to do a disaster for russia as a further invade ukraine and our allies and partners are ready to impose severe cost and significant harm on russia and the russian economy. the cost of going into the ukraine in terms of physical loss of life for the russians and they will prevail over time, russians and they will prevail overtime, but russians and they will prevail over time, but it is going to be heavy and real and consequential. president brydon marking his first year as president. brett bruen was director of global engagement at the white house, and is now a consultant specialising in crisis mamagement and communications. when we talk about what we
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heard from the president, what do you make of it? this was supposed to be one of the speeches to silence critics that it does not discuss or engage with reporters enough and yet shortly after making that, they had to be a clarification as to what he meant by minor incursion. what does it say about the us and its interests and how it is dealing with ukraine? figs its interests and how it is dealing with ukraine? as a former white _ dealing with ukraine? as a former white house - dealing with ukraine? as a former white house press| former white house press officer, it is never a good moment when you have to send out those tweets or those clarifying press statements and clearly the president misspoke. i think he ceded too much ground both figuratively but also allowing the west, the nato allowance, not be as severe in their response to
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quote unquote a minor incursion. i think any violation of a nation? sovereignty is significant. —— nation's. it is not a moment we needed now. he nation's. it is not a moment we needed "ow-— nation's. it is not a moment we needed now. he said there would be consequences _ needed now. he said there would be consequences for _ needed now. he said there would be consequences for russia - needed now. he said there would be consequences for russia if - be consequences for russia if it does engage but with soul what happened with crimea, during when barack 0bama was in office. there wasn't an appetite to stop russia from annexing crimea. even especially what we so in terms of the foreign policy with afghanistan, thus the us have a leg to stand up when it comes to dictating foreign policy when it comes to telling other countries how they should go about their business? i countries how they should go about their business?- about their business? i think we need t0- _ about their business? i think we need to. russia - about their business? i think we need to. russia invades i we need to. russia invades
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premier, they further invade ukraine after sanctions. 0ne premier, they further invade ukraine after sanctions. one of the point that i have been making repeatedly over the last few weeks, economic sanctions have not worked. i have not deterred vladimir putin from pursuing further action by the gas ukraine as well as other countries. i think we have to look at different tactics. —— further action against ukraine. this kind of behaviour will not be tolerated and we will use every resource to address it. giving this flareup message to moscow, when it came to what we saw in afghanistan, the withdrawal of troops in afghanistan and no—one will everforget afghanistan and no—one will ever forget the afghanistan and no—one will everforget the images afghanistan and no—one will ever forget the images of people holding onto planes as they were leaving couple, is they were leaving couple, is the us in any position to engage its authority in terms
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of international relations it looks like it is looking increasingly isolated. —— kabul. increasingly isolated. -- kabul. �* . , increasingly isolated. -- kabul. �* , ., , kabul. biden has been largely disengaged — kabul. biden has been largely disengaged especially - kabul. biden has been largely disengaged especially from i kabul. biden has been largely- disengaged especially from some major international crisis. as well as what russia is doing. but this was a moment whereby that needed to seize it, says to the world and certainly to those across europe whose spines needed to stiffen a bit, we're going to pursue this aggressively and not allow vladimir putin to block over the rights and territory of other countries. but after afghanistan, a lot of america's influence and credibility has been badly damaged and those who hoped american isolationism would end with donald trump, with disappointed to see this president also abandoning some of our allies.—
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of our allies. this is marking the one year— of our allies. this is marking the one year anniversary - of our allies. this is marking the one year anniversary for| the one year anniversary for the one year anniversary for the president. exceptional times with the pandemic but when you look at what he has achieved thus far, with the bid terms coming up, easy way he to be? ., ~' terms coming up, easy way he to be? ., ~ ., , ., terms coming up, easy way he to be? ., ~ .,, ., ., be? no, i think he has had a difficult first _ be? no, i think he has had a difficult first year _ be? no, i think he has had a difficult first year and - be? no, i think he has had a difficult first year and it - be? no, i think he has had a difficult first year and it was | difficult first year and it was never going to be easy, obviously with the pandemic and economic challenges here at home and abroad, he faced steve had went but there have just been repeated own goals. —— had wins. as well as issues on the border and that is just speaking about border and that isjust speaking about foreign border and that is just speaking about foreign policy. not being able to deliver on the promises made to the american people that he was going to be a steady hand and then he has been overly ambitious especially under the domestic agenda.— ambitious especially under the domestic agenda. really good to net our domestic agenda. really good to
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get your opinion. _ lots more analysis on our website when it comes to president biden's speech. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: making formula 1 history — 22—year—old guanyu zhou will become the first ever chinese driver to take up a spot on the starting grid next season. donald trump is now the 45th president of the united states. he was sworn in before several hundred thousand people on the steps of capitol hill in washington. it's going to be only america first. america first. demonstrators waiting for mike gatting and his rebel cricket team were attacked with tear gas and set upon by police dogs.
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anti—apartheid campaigners say they will carry on the protests throughout the tour. they called him the 'butcher of lyon'. klaus altmann is being held on a fraud charge in bolivia. the west germans want to extradite him for crimes committed in wartime france. there, he was the gestapo chief klaus barbie. millions came to bathe as - close as possible to this spot. a tide of humanity that's believed by officials - to have broken all records. this is bbc world news. the latest headlines: britain's prime minister vows to fight any challenges to his leadership as he faces calls to resign because of parties at downing street during lockdown. president biden has warned vladimir putin that the us will do significant harm to russia if he decides to invade ukraine.
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the first flights carrying aid to tonga following saturday's volcanic eruption and tsunami have taken off from new zealand and australia. the runway at tonga's main airport had to be cleared of large quantities of volcanic ash to make it safe for planes to land. the tongan government has released more pictures. they say many houses on the islands have been destroyed. estimates from new zealand suggest the main communications cable in tonga will take around four weeks to repair. we can now speak tojoanne mataele, who spoke to us earlier this week whilst feeling anxious over not being able to reach herfamily following the eruption. understandably so. now, thankfully, some lines of communication have been restored with tonga. tell me. how are they. what have you heard? i tell me. how are they. what have you heard?— tell me. how are they. what have you heard? i heard from my arents have you heard? i heard from my parents yesterday _ have you heard? i heard from my parents yesterday at _ have you heard? i heard from my parents yesterday at about - parents yesterday at about 1:30pm australian time and you know, it's a relief to finally hear their voices and to
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finally know how they are back home. my dad had told me that they are fine. no major damage to our homes. it's pretty much just houses along the coastline that have been pretty much damaged and houses along the west coast of tonga. you know, it's just, west coast of tonga. you know, it'sjust, yeah, as i mentioned, just a relief to finally hear from them. it is such a huge _ finally hear from them. it is such a huge relief— finally hear from them. it is such a huge relief and - finally hear from them. it is such a huge relief and it's l such a huge relief and it's really great that you managed to speak to them and of course, there are so many people that have had their homes destroyed, lives have been lost. have they been able to give you an account of what the situation is like on the ground? we've been hearing about this huge amount of ash that people are having to clear.— having to clear. yes, that's correct. — having to clear. yes, that's correct. so _ having to clear. yes, that's correct, so the _ having to clear. yes, that's correct, so the only - correct, so the only information that my parents were able to tell me over the phone was people are busy trying to get the ash cleared, especially from their homes and the ground as well. i think
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that's, yeah, that'sjust the main concern, other than the damage to the homes on coastal lines, it's pretty muchjust trying to get rid of the ash and clearing it out. find trying to get rid of the ash and clearing it out. and as well, concern _ and clearing it out. and as well, concern about - and clearing it out. and as well, concern about the i well, concern about the drinking water because not only contaminated by the ash but also the salt water from the sea as the tsunami wave came through. sea as the tsunami wave came throu:h. ., , sea as the tsunami wave came throu:h. . , . sea as the tsunami wave came throu:h. . . , , through. that is correct, yes. so as through. that is correct, yes. 50 as we _ through. that is correct, yes. so as we know, _ through. that is correct, yes. so as we know, the - through. that is correct, yes. so as we know, the major i so as we know, the major concerns as of now is drinking water. i had actually spoken to my auntie as well over the phone and, you know, she mentioned that food, food at the moment is fine, the major concerns are the drinking water and medical supplies and shelter as well.— and medical supplies and shelter as well. ., , ., shelter as well. now, when you seak to shelter as well. now, when you speak to your— shelter as well. now, when you speak to your aunt, _ shelter as well. now, when you speak to your aunt, i _ shelter as well. now, when you speak to your aunt, i believe i speak to your aunt, i believe she is working on the radio there, the radio station there. yes. ,, , ., ., ., ., yes. she must hear an lot of stories when _ yes. she must hear an lot of stories when she _ yes. she must hear an lot of stories when she is - yes. she must hear an lot of stories when she is talking i yes. she must hear an lot of| stories when she is talking to people that she knows there.
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we've seen images of the amount of destruction, and you touched upon it, the houses that have been completely demolished by this. this is going to be a long—term rebuilding process. how do you think people feel about that?— how do you think people feel about that? ., ~ ., , , about that? you know, because this is the _ about that? you know, because this is the first _ about that? you know, because this is the first major _ about that? you know, because this is the first major damage i this is the first major damage that has happened in tonga, and it is the first, you know, like, mother nature disaster that has happened, people are also worried about their health at the moment. homes and things like that, we have our neighbours staying with each other if they do not have shelter. you know, but yeah, the news back home that my auntie and had mentioned was everyone was just devastated. also scared, is what she described.— also scared, is what she described. devastated and scared, absolutely - scared, absolutely understandable, but we are so relieved that you are able to communicate with your family and really good of you to share
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that with us. joanne, thank you for that and we wish them all the best. joanne mataele, thank you forjoining us.— history will be made in next season's formula 1 championship when, for the first time ever, a chinese driver will be on the grid. 22—year—old guanyu zhou will line up alongside valtteri bottas for the alfa romeo team. it is hoped his inclusion will boost the sport's popularity in the country. he says it's been hard work but he hopes to inspire others. hopefully there will be more chinese drivers, chinese faces you know, in the motorsports area because for us, as a chinese driver, to be having the dream — of course, it's always easy to have the dream and to be achieve that, to be getting close to that is very difficult because, of course, i've been through this journey from the beginning of car team, all the way from f4, formula 3, formula 2 and now formula 1, finally, but i knew how hard it is, how much stuff you really have to forgive,
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how much stuff you have to compromise your lifestyle and to be really, you know, believe in yourself and i think the word of never giving up really, you know, paid off in myjourney, that's for sure. and, yeah, it's been super intense but i'm just very thankful that, you know, we finally made it. but for me, there's still a long way to go in formula 1 so hopefully, can be prove myself and do well in the formula 1 world. i'm sure he will. 0ur i'm sure he will. our thanks to three for speaking to bbc news. —— our thanks three for speaking to bbc news. —— ourthanks to three for speaking to bbc news. —— our thanks to guanyu zhou. many brave souls across eastern europe have been taking a dip in icy waters for epiphany. a christian 0rthodox tradition to commemorate the baptism ofjesus in the riverjordan, swimmers symbolically wash away their sins with a quick plunge. the first person to retrieve a holy cross thrown into the water is believed to be blessed with happiness for the year ahead. don't forget, those waters are
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very cold! and you can get in touch with me and the team on twitter. i'm @bbckasiamadera. do get in touch. goodbye for now. hello there. we've got a much colder day of weather coming up today. it was yesterday that we had a cold front bring a bit of patchy rain southwards. as that cleared, we had a fine end to the day in hampshire — a lovely sunset here. for northern scotland, though, it was quite a turbulent day. gusty winds, and those winds have been bringing in some snow showers to shetland, we've seen some in 0rkney and, more recently, across the north of the mainland as well. that will leave a risk of some icy patches here as we get into the first part of thursday morning with the frost otherwise pretty widespread. for many of us, though, the skies will be clear. now, any showers in northern scotland very quickly will lose their wintriness and turn back to rain. some very slightly less cold air works in here. and for most of the uk,
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although a cold and frosty start, there will be sunshine pretty much from dawn till dusk. it's going to be a lovely, if somewhat chilly, winter's day. now, there will be some showers coming down the north sea. they'll be affecting eastern parts of scotland. and with the winds blowing more or less parallel to the eastern coasts of england, most of the showers will stay offshore. the greatest risk of a shower will be across norfolk. you might see one or two coming into the north york moors as well. another cold night to come on thursday night — if anything, even colder across parts of england and wales, plumbing the depths. temperatures could get down to about —5, —6 degrees in the coldest spots but it will be turning milder in the north—west — that's because we've got some thicker cloud here. that'll probably give us quite a nice sunrise for some but the best of the sunshine through the day will be across eastern wales, central and eastern england, eastern scotland, probably eastern counties of northern ireland, whereas in the west, you're likely to see some of the higher temperatures but you will also see the thickest of the cloud, perhaps with some mist and fog patches developing around the coasts and the hills at times. little overall change, really, into the weekend. high pressure stays firmly with us — the same one that's been with us for ages now — and for the most part,
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that will keep weather fronts at bay — this one just skirting into northern scotland but it will be a weak affair. so, for saturday, mist and fog and some frost patches around first thing in the morning. again, it's western areas that will keep the thickest cloud. and here's our weak weather front, bringing a little bit of light rain or drizzle — no great amounts. for the western isles and the highlands, temperatures could reach double figures here but otherwise, still quite chilly across the south—east — 5 or 6 celsius here. and, to be honest, looking at the long—range forecast through the rest of the week and most of next week, the weatherjust stays dry, thanks to that same area of high pressure.
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this is bbc news,
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the headlines: the british prime minister, borisjohnson has insisted he will fight any challenge to his leadership of the conservative party. he's been under mounting pressure over social gatherings involving his staff during lockdowns. an inquiry is due to report next week. president biden has said he thinks russia will invade ukraine, but has warned that the united states will impose severe costs and significant harm on moscow in response. moscow has about 100,000 troops on the ukrainian border but denies it's planning an invasion. the first flights carrying aid to tonga following saturday's volcanic eruption and tsunami have taken off from new zealand and australia. the runway at tonga's main airport had to be cleared of large quantities of volcanic ash to make it safe for the planes to land.
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now on bbc news, global questions.

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