Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 19, 2022 11:30pm-12:00am GMT

11:30 pm
borisjohnson has come under renewed pressure in parliament over claims that several gatherings in downing street broke lockdown rules. former conservative cabinet minister david davis said he must resign. another conservative mp has defected to the labour party. president biden has warned vladimir putin that the us will do significant harm to russia if he decides to invade ukraine. he said mr putin would test the united states, but he still thought moscow didn't want a full—scale war. new images of the devastation in tonga caused by the volanic eruption and tsunami over the weekend. international telephone links have been restored, and ships carrying aid are expected to arrive by friday. a vietnamese man has been sentenced to 15 years injail after a belgian court ruled he was the ringleader in the trafficking of 39 people
11:31 pm
found in a lorry. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. joining me are tom newton—dunn from times radio and polly mackenzie from the think tank demos. let's start with the front pages tomorrow. starting with the mirror. they say the prime minister is "hanging by a thread" and quotes former cabinet minister david davis�* call for borisjohnnson to "go", whereas the daily express uses the same quote urging for the tory party to back the prime minister. the metro, meanwhile, reports on the easing of restrictions that will see people return to working in the office — as well as former cabinet minister david davis�* call for borisjohnson to go.
11:32 pm
that quote again! the daily telegraph has spoken to david davis — he's told the paper the pm would have to be dragged "kicking and screaming" from office. the guardian has a similar story on david davis�* call for borisjohnson to go and christian wakeford�*s defection — they report that tory critics are now waiting for the results of sue gray�*s inquiry. the sun�*s take on that story features a pun about the pork pie plot, with a pie chart depicting the pm�*s position. the daily mail, meanwhile, is heavily critical of those against the prime minister. it also has a story saying his six—week—old daughter was "badly ill" with covid. finally, the times reports that the prime minister "fights on" amidst defection and attacks but says that government sources are increasingly concerned that sue gray�*s report will be more damaging than expected.
11:33 pm
let�*s begin with that, let�*s begin with the times, and so much to talk about today. it was a day of high drama in the house of commons, hence the reason that that story what on the reason that that story what on the floor during prime ministers question time, dominates all of the front pages today. it is a real struggle for any other story to get a look in, quite frankly, but let�*s start with an interesting detail in this times article, and it focuses in on this report we are all awaiting from the civil servant sue gray, and it says that... and it is quoting a government source here, it is not going to be as good as people think. what do you make of what this article is saying? i think. what do you make of what this article is saying?— article is saying? i think we have heard so much _ article is saying? i think we have heard so much about _ article is saying? i think we have heard so much about this - article is saying? i think we have heard so much about this sue i article is saying? i think we have l heard so much about this sue gray inquiry, it has been talked up by ministers as if it is a magic bullet that will come along and answer all
11:34 pm
of the questions. he wanted it to sound big and impressive. we have to remember that sue gray is a serving civil servant. remember that sue gray is a serving civilservant. her remember that sue gray is a serving civil servant. her boss is the cabinet secretary, her boss�*s boss is the prime minister, both of whose conduct she is investigating. she is not adjudicating whether he has broken the law, she is not a police officer, she is not a lawyer. i think what she is going to produce is report that starts with pages and pages and pages about the process she has taken, the limitations of what she is trying to analyse and only then goes into, essentially, setting out the facts as she has been able to establish them. she will then leave the judgment about whether those facts are acceptable, and acceptable, to broadly the court of public and political opinion,
11:35 pm
though there is the possibility, the metropolitan police have said, if criminal activity has taken place, that they would take a look at it. this is not going to be a big loss —— blockbuster movie, is going to be a born report, and yet what is going to be important is those small details, because if sucre uncovered some inconsistencies in the stories we have been told, and he —— and new stories, it will be a bigger story. the prime minister is in a better place tonight that he was yesterday evening, and the assumption is because he has survived another day, maybe some of the danger has passed, but the problem is this story does not go away until sue gray sings, as it were, and it looks like it is not going to be that quick either. irate
11:36 pm
going to be that quick either. we are still waiting for it, aren't we? are still waiting for it, aren�*t we? tom, you were in the house of commons to watch this extraordinary day unfold. i think we were all with the speaker of the house, when he could be heard muttering at the of the session, what a day. you were there to hear keir starmer repeating, why do we have to wait for an official report for the prime minister to know whether he broke covid rules or not? is this report really as important as it is being touted by some?— really as important as it is being touted by some? really as important as it is being toutedb some? ., ., �* touted by some? yeah, look, we don't know, is touted by some? yeah, look, we don't know. is the — touted by some? yeah, look, we don't know. is the gods _ touted by some? yeah, look, we don't know, is the gods honest _ touted by some? yeah, look, we don't know, is the gods honest truth, - touted by some? yeah, look, we don't know, is the gods honest truth, and i know, is the gods honest truth, and polly was _ know, is the gods honest truth, and polly was right, in that there is an awful lot of pitch— in that there is an awful lot of pitch rolling, as the phrase goes, everybody tried to prepare —— trying to free position but the report— —— trying to free position but the report says _
11:37 pm
—— trying to free position but the report says. ten different tory mps have conversations with the labour party— have conversations with the labour party at some stage over the last few weeks about potentially following trish whitford into defecting — that is an awful lot. —— christian— defecting — that is an awful lot. —— christian wakeford. it could well be putting _ christian wakeford. it could well be putting out there that sucre's report — putting out there that sucre's report is— putting out there that sucre's report is going to be a lot note the... i think that reporter would only reported — i think that reporter would only reported if government sources are indeed _ reported if government sources are indeed fearing the report may not 'ust indeed fearing the report may not just be _ indeed fearing the report may not just be an — indeed fearing the report may not just be an anodyne civil servant narrative — just be an anodyne civil servant narrative and might be quite damning for the _ narrative and might be quite damning for the prime minister, and we are told that— for the prime minister, and we are told that is— for the prime minister, and we are told that is because she is really struggling to reconcile the departments are said that that was a work event _ departments are said that that was a work event on may 20. a lot will write _ work event on may 20. a lot will write on — work event on may 20. a lot will write on it. _ work event on may 20. a lot will write on it, and my personal view is even when — write on it, and my personal view is even when sucre reports and if she reports. _ even when sucre reports and if she reports. if — even when sucre reports and if she reports. if it— even when sucre reports and if she reports, if it is slightly
11:38 pm
anodyne... the fact is all written down _ anodyne... the fact is all written down in — anodyne... the fact is all written down in black—and—white and codified, _ down in black—and—white and codified, it's going to be a really painful— codified, it's going to be a really painful moments to the prime minister _ painful moments to the prime minister. my view is an awful lot does _ minister. my view is an awful lot does hang — minister. my view is an awful lot does hang with it, especially if she points— does hang with it, especially if she points to _ does hang with it, especially if she points to inconsistencies, she doesn't — points to inconsistencies, she doesn't quite believe what the prime minister is _ doesn't quite believe what the prime minister is either told horror the house _ minister is either told horror the house of— minister is either told horror the house of commons —— her or the house of commons _ house of commons —— her or the house of commons |f— house of commons —— her or the house of commons. if it house of commons -- her or the house of commons-— of commons. if it is damning, that re ort of commons. if it is damning, that report could _ of commons. if it is damning, that report could potentially _ of commons. if it is damning, that report could potentially galvanise l report could potentially galvanise more tory mps to put in more letters of no confidence, and all eyes on the i922 of no confidence, and all eyes on the 1922 committee, sir graham brady there, the chairman, if he receives 54 there, the chairman, if he receives 5a letters, then a trigger of a vote of no—confidence. we don�*t know how close we are to that number, but thatis close we are to that number, but that is why so many eyes are on that report, but ijust want that is why so many eyes are on that report, but i just want to that is why so many eyes are on that report, but ijust want to draw that is why so many eyes are on that report, but i just want to draw your attention to other story that is managed to sneak its way onto the front page of the times, the government winding down plan b covid
11:39 pm
restrictions. what do you make of the timing of this? this restrictions. what do you make of the timing of this?— the timing of this? this is part of what is being _ the timing of this? this is part of what is being called _ the timing of this? this is part of what is being called operation i the timing of this? this is part of. what is being called operation red meat, to try and reassure particular those tory backbenchers that this is a government that is on their side, thatis a government that is on their side, that is doing good things that they like, and we know that there has been rising scepticism among those conservative members of parliament about covid restrictions at all, real hatred of mask wearing, hatred of vaccine passports, lots of rebels in that crucial vote before christmas on introducing plan b at all, so making these announcements today, even on a day where more than 300 deaths were announced and where the health secretary sajid javid had remind us that it does not mean that it is over in just means that we are moving into a new phase, but they of moved immediately to remove work from home guidance. they have moved immediately to remove requirements
11:40 pm
on schools, kids on to wear masks in schools, and so these are really quite big changes, which we can hope will boost the economy and provide some kind of positive narrative as we go through what is likely to be a very difficult spring, in terms of people�*s cost—of—living, this rising inflation, rising energy bills and the big upcoming tax rate from the government. yes the big upcoming tax rate from the government-— government. yes indeed. this is a ma'or government. yes indeed. this is a major announcement. _ government. yes indeed. this is a major announcement. facemasks| government. yes indeed. this is a i major announcement. facemasks are no longer compulsory in public spaces from the 27th of january, secondary schools from the 20th of january, working from home, covid passes no longer required for large—scale events, but this on a day that, as you said, the ons said they were 108,000 new infections recorded in the last one if i repeat it. a scientist in the previous hour saying, yes, the signs are positive,
11:41 pm
but is this perhaps too soon, is sajid javid perhapsjumping but is this perhaps too soon, is sajid javid perhaps jumping the gun and say now is the time to approach and say now is the time to approach a covid like the flu? what do you make of the timing of this? mi? a covid like the flu? what do you make of the timing of this? only a silly callous _ make of the timing of this? only a silly callous could _ make of the timing of this? only a silly callous could suggest - make of the timing of this? only a silly callous could suggest the i silly callous could suggest the timing — silly callous could suggest the timing of this could be working pretty— timing of this could be working pretty to — timing of this could be working pretty to win the prime minister favour— pretty to win the prime minister favour with his own backbenchers without _ favour with his own backbenchers without a — favour with his own backbenchers without a care what the virus actuallv _ without a care what the virus actually does. we don't know. but we do know _ actually does. we don't know. but we do know so _ actually does. we don't know. but we do know so far as the government has taken _ do know so far as the government has taken some _ do know so far as the government has taken some risk in terms of only sticking — taken some risk in terms of only sticking with plan b. the risk paid off, and _ sticking with plan b. the risk paid off, and it — sticking with plan b. the risk paid off, and it could be that boris johnson — off, and it could be that boris johnson is _ off, and it could be that boris johnson is now confident that, a, that risk— johnson is now confident that, a, that risk will pay off again, and also, _ that risk will pay off again, and also, chris— that risk will pay off again, and also, chris whitty and sue patrick vallance — also, chris whitty and sue patrick vallance will not stand up and say, you are _ vallance will not stand up and say, you are being utterly reckless to save _ you are being utterly reckless to save your — you are being utterly reckless to save your own skin. he might be
11:42 pm
right— save your own skin. he might be right again _ save your own skin. he might be right again. it does feel slightly scarv— right again. it does feel slightly scary for— right again. it does feel slightly scary for all of us, to be brutally honest. — scary for all of us, to be brutally honest, and i'm not sure i want to be sitting — honest, and i'm not sure i want to be sitting on— honest, and i'm not sure i want to be sitting on a train next to people who might — be sitting on a train next to people who might have covid from march onwards _ who might have covid from march onwards and not give a dam about giving _ onwards and not give a dam about giving it— onwards and not give a dam about giving it to — onwards and not give a dam about giving it to me when they are commuting even though i am all jahhed _ commuting even though i am all jahhed up— commuting even though i am all jabbed up and boosted and the like, so we _ jabbed up and boosted and the like, so we don't — jabbed up and boosted and the like, so we don't know. i think we are all going _ so we don't know. i think we are all going to have to take the payment of's word — going to have to take the payment of's word for it.— of's word for it. let's take a look now at the _ of's word for it. let's take a look now at the mirror, _ of's word for it. let's take a look now at the mirror, begin - of's word for it. let's take a look now at the mirror, begin with i of's word for it. let's take a look. now at the mirror, begin with that very powerful quotation that david davis i toured today —— prime minister�*s word for it. in the last dying moments of pmqs this morning, when he said to borisjohnson, in the name of god, go — quoting cromwell, no less, a quote made to neville champlin in 1940. and then as we contrast that to the daily
11:43 pm
mail, sad story about, barely boris johnson�*s six—week—old daughter was very sick with covid, but also interestingly, the top half of the paper is entirely given to an editorial, very much in favour of borisjohnson, misquoting david davis, saying in the name of god, grow up! who are they speaking to? it is aimed at those conservative rebels who have been organising to oust the prime minister for some rebels who have been organising to oust the prime ministerfor some it is clear with these two stories together that the mail has decided together that the mail has decided to back borisjohnson. with the sun and the express also essentially backing borisjohnson and the express also essentially backing boris johnson for the moment, i think is press team will be feeling pretty pleased with what they have accomplished today. of course, you would have to have a heart of stone not to feel massive empathy for both carrie symonds
11:44 pm
and her daughter and boris going through that, horrible, having an ill baby, and is not really a front—page story, and that is what you�*re trying to do, build empathy with the prime minister in this difficult time. and i understand why the mail is doing that, but it is interesting to see the papers getting into their trenches will stub the mirror pertains —— the mirroruns —— the mirror uns presently taking a stance against the promised or... the are taking a different view. really out there defending his record, such as it is, and he has got his from the papers on his side. the question for me is, will that last? will it last through the sucre report? will it last through a spring of awful cost—of—living pressures? we heard in the box pops
11:45 pm
you had earlier. the pressures? we heard in the box pops you had earlier.— you had earlier. the other story toda , you had earlier. the other story today, inflation _ you had earlier. the other story today, inflation coming - you had earlier. the other story today, inflation coming up- you had earlier. the other story. today, inflation coming up 5.4%, double the bank of england�*s target of 2%, the energy price cap do to be lifted in april, so hard times and still to come. tom, your thoughts? what do you make of those three front pages? it what do you make of those three front pages?— front pages? it is interesting, isn't it? where _ front pages? it is interesting, isn't it? where most - front pages? it is interesting, isn't it? where most papers l front pages? it is interesting, i isn't it? where most papers running up isn't it? where most papers running up to— isn't it? where most papers running up to now. — isn't it? where most papers running up to now, delest left—leaning anti-torv— up to now, delest left—leaning anti—tory papers held their hearts on their— anti—tory papers held their hearts on their troops throughout, making quite _ on their troops throughout, making quite clear— on their troops throughout, making quite clear they singapore should no, quite clear they singapore should go. but _ quite clear they singapore should go. but i — quite clear they singapore should go, but i do not think the times has pretty— go, but i do not think the times has pretty much, — go, but i do not think the times has pretty much, but the other ones saving _ pretty much, but the other ones saying he — pretty much, but the other ones saying he should go —— the prime minister— saying he should go —— the prime minister to— saying he should go —— the prime minister to go. it is an interesting
11:46 pm
position— minister to go. it is an interesting position to — minister to go. it is an interesting position to be on, because you don't want _ position to be on, because you don't want to— position to be on, because you don't want to he _ position to be on, because you don't want to be on the other side of the facts _ want to be on the other side of the facts the — want to be on the other side of the facts. the great thing about newspaper is the next day, you can say something different and most people _ say something different and most people throw away the day before paper _ people throw away the day before paper. one thing up the daily mail front—page. it is interesting editorial. _ front—page. it is interesting editorial, and when the mail do something, they do it with full heart — something, they do it with full heart. that story about terry —— carrie symonds and boris's daughter, _ —— carrie symonds and boris's daughter, it is a sad story, the baby has— daughter, it is a sad story, the baby has been quite unwell with covid _ baby has been quite unwell with covid i— baby has been quite unwell with covid. i would baby has been quite unwell with covid. iwould make baby has been quite unwell with covid. i would make one fact we cannot— covid. i would make one fact we cannot report on the prime minister's children without permission, there are very strong rules— permission, there are very strong rules we — permission, there are very strong rules we abide byjessee b cannot go there. _ rules we abide byjessee b cannot go there. it _ rules we abide byjessee b cannot go there. it is _ rules we abide byjessee b cannot go there, it is against our code of conduct — there, it is against our code of conduct. the daily mail will have had boris —
11:47 pm
conduct. the daily mail will have had borisjohnson's permission to write _ had borisjohnson's permission to write that — had borisjohnson's permission to write that story. had boris johnson's permission to write that story.— write that story. interesting insi . ht write that story. interesting insight there. _ write that story. interesting insight there. let's - write that story. interesting insight there. let's move i write that story. interesting i insight there. let's move onto the insight there. let�*s move onto the daily telegraph, david davis, quoting him as saying that the pm will have to be dragged kicking and screaming from office. very emotive words there. and just talk us through how significant a figure you still feel that david amess is, obviously a —— david davis is. how symbolic were his words today? -- david davis is. how symbolic were his words today?— his words today? they certainly took the chamber — his words today? they certainly took the chamber by _ his words today? they certainly took the chamber by surprise, _ his words today? they certainly took the chamber by surprise, took- his words today? they certainly took the chamber by surprise, took me i his words today? they certainly took| the chamber by surprise, took me by surprise. you could feel, as he spoke slowly and calmly, you could feel something brewing, something ready to happen, and then he came out with those words quoting cromwell, though i understand cromwell, though i understand cromwell probably never said them, it is apocryphal, like all of the best quotations. and it was a brutal
11:48 pm
attack, but i don�*t get landed with 24 c anticipated, and david amess is kind of that guy. i don�*t know if you remember, long ago, when i was working for the liberal democrats, he resigned... —— david davis. he does these big initiatives, and sometimes they are absolutely transformative and have a blistering impact on politics and sometimes theyjust impact on politics and sometimes they just fall like a impact on politics and sometimes theyjust fall like a dam squib? i think that maybe what is happening today, because somehow the blow he landed on borisjohnson, the slight humiliation he inflicted, actually created a bit of sympathy among the tory backbenchers and they rallied around him as a result of that and the detection. this around him as a result of that and the detection.— the detection. as ever, time is a . ainst the detection. as ever, time is against us- _ the detection. as ever, time is against us. do _ the detection. as ever, time is against us. do you _ the detection. as ever, time is against us. do you agree i the detection. as ever, time is against us. do you agree that. against us. do you agree that david davis and also christian wakeford,
11:49 pm
mp4 bury south, just misread the mood music? i mp4 bury south, 'ust misread the mood music?— mp4 bury south, 'ust misread the mood music? i am not sure if they misread anything to _ mood music? i am not sure if they misread anything to stop - mood music? i am not sure if they misread anything to stop it - mood music? i am not sure if they misread anything to stop it really i misread anything to stop it really depends— misread anything to stop it really depends what they were trying to achieve — depends what they were trying to achieve i— depends what they were trying to achieve. i think they achieved their objectives — achieve. i think they achieved their objectives. whether or not they were trained _ objectives. whether or not they were trained to— objectives. whether or not they were trained to persuade her colleagues was another matter. both of their actions _ was another matter. both of their actions ended up changing the conservative party. i was told fascinatingly, as christian wakeford walked _ fascinatingly, as christian wakeford walked into the chamber, to the labour— walked into the chamber, to the labour benches, opposite all of his friends, _ labour benches, opposite all of his friends, who i am told spent a lot of time _ friends, who i am told spent a lot of time trying to make and happy about— of time trying to make and happy about life. — of time trying to make and happy about life, remaining in the conservative party, they saw their friend _ conservative party, they saw their friend defects and stick a knife in their— friend defects and stick a knife in their front, — friend defects and stick a knife in theirfront, several friend defects and stick a knife in their front, several conservative mps _ their front, several conservative mps left — their front, several conservative mps left the chamber and burst into tears in _ mps left the chamber and burst into tears in the — mps left the chamber and burst into tears in the lobby, and spent much of pmos— tears in the lobby, and spent much
11:50 pm
of pmqs there. and that did have the effect _ of pmqs there. and that did have the effect of— of pmqs there. and that did have the effect of a _ of pmqs there. and that did have the effect of a lot of tory mps circling the wagons, thinking, wow, we are under— the wagons, thinking, wow, we are under real— the wagons, thinking, wow, we are under real threat now. our numbers in the _ under real threat now. our numbers in the house — under real threat now. our numbers in the house of commons are dwindling in front of our eyes as our colleagues defect. all i would say, this— our colleagues defect. all i would say, this is— our colleagues defect. all i would say, this is time the prime minister has bought, — say, this is time the prime minister has bought, not a reprieve. eventually, their feelings will dissipate and they will be sadly lost a _ dissipate and they will be sadly lost a colleague, and all those problems they have got, all the questions the finest or has not answered _ questions the finest or has not answered yet, they will still be there — answered yet, they will still be there. . , . , answered yet, they will still be there. ., , ., ., ., there. clearly a very emotional day -- the prime _ there. clearly a very emotional day -- the prime minister _ there. clearly a very emotional day -- the prime minister has - there. clearly a very emotional day -- the prime minister has not i there. clearly a very emotional day -- the prime minister has not yet i —— the prime minister has not yet answered. tom newton—dunn, polly mackenzie, many thanks for all your thoughts this evening. ok, that is it, that is all we have got time for. big thanks to polly mackenzie and tom newton—dunn. from all of us
11:51 pm
here at the bbc, good night. good evening. this is your update from the bbc sport centre. there was a sensational finish in the match at the king power stadium in tonight�*s premier league action, with tottenham moving into the top five with a late turnaround win over leicester. the home side had looked on course for the three points — james maddison put them 2—1 up with 75 minutes played and they held that lead right up until the last minute of stoppage time. but with just a few seconds left, stephen bergwijn equalised for spurs. and they still somehow got time to steal the ball straight from the leicester kick—off, and in the 97th minute, bergwijn squeezed it in again to win the match for spurs, 3—2 in the most dramatic circumstances. in the other match, there was finally a more routine winning scoreline for manchester united —
11:52 pm
they beat brentford 3—1. 19—year—old anthony elanga scored the opener when united had been under pressure for much of the game, and it wasn�*t all smiles for them off the pitch either — cristiano ronaldo visibly unhappy with being substituted late on. the premier league is looking into a yellow card received by an arsenal player following reports of irregular betting patterns. the player in question hasn�*t been named and neither the club or the premier league are commenting. it�*s been reported that bookmakers flagged the unusual patterns to the football authorities. away from that issue, but staying with arsenal, their manager mikel arteta has said he will defend his club tooth and nail, following criticism of their request to postpone the north london derby at the weekend. it comes as the premier league say they may change the criteria around postponement of matches, after allegations that some clubs may have been manipulating the rules. arsenal said they didn�*t have enough players to compete against tottenham last weekend and were granted a postponement by the premier league. it allows games to be re—scheduled when clubs report a number of covid cases that stops them being able to field a competitive team.
11:53 pm
however, injuries and, controversially, international call—ups have been considered too, and with 22 games called off so far, the premier league will consider amending the guidance. arteta says arsenal have done nothing wrong. we will defend our club with teeth and nails and we�*re not going to have anybody damaging our name or trying to lie about things that did not occur. if we make mistakes, we will put our hand up, but we will defend our club in a really strong way. at the africa cup of nations, nigeria ensured they finished top of group d by beating guinea bissau 2—0. umar sadiq finished off this well—worked move to put the super eagles into the lead. william troost ekong sealed victory with a tap—in. it means egypt finish second in the group and also reach the last 16. mohamed abdelmonem scored the game�*s only goal, heading home from a corner in the first half to send the pharoahs through. and there were four ties
11:54 pm
in the women�*s league cup tonight. manchester city�*s sixth win in a row saw them come from behind to beat last year�*s finalists bristol city 3—1. alessia russo�*s goal gave manchester united a 1—0 win at arsenal. tottenham beat championship leaders liverpool. and chelsea completed the semifinal line—up with a 4—2 victory at west ham. in the championship, hull city marked new ownership with a 2—0 win over high—flying blackburn. the club�*s takeover by the turkey—based acun medya group was announced 90 minutes before kick—off and new owner acun ilicali was at the game, where george honeyman scored after eight minutes to set hull on their way to ending the visitors�* 10—match unbeaten run. a tom eaves header sealed victory. the takeover ends assem and ehab allam�*s 12—year spell in charge of the club. it wasn�*t to be for england�*s red roses in the final of netball�*s quad series. they were on top for three of the four quarters against their old rivals australia at the copper box. england were one point ahead with that last
11:55 pm
15—minute period to go. but a remarkable finish from the aussies saw them turn it round and win comfortably by 58—46. these two may well next meet at the commonwealth games in birmingham in the summer. day four of the australian open gets under way shortly with plenty of british interest. andy murray and emma raducanu both in action later, but before that, we�*ll see british number one dan evans face arthur rinderknech of france and heather watson against seeded slovenian tamara zidansek. scotland have announced their squad for next month�*s six nations. gregor townsend has named five uncapped players, including saracens back—rower andy christie and london irish scrum—half ben white. once again, stuart hogg will captain the side as they hope to repeat last year�*s victories over england and france and improve on their fourth place finish. rory darge, ben vellacott and kyle rowe are also rewarded with call—ups ahead of scotland�*s first game against england. veteran fly—halfjohnny sexton will captain ireland for the third successive championship after overcoming ankle and knee issues suffered in november. uncapped backs michael lowry
11:56 pm
and mack hansen have been named in andy farrell�*s 37—man squad. ireland�*s campaign gets under way against wales in dublin. and preparations ahead of the women�*s ashes have been less than perfect for england, as they count down to their first t2o game tomorrow at the adelaide oval. the series is beginning a week earlier than originally planned to allow both teams to travel to new zealand and quarantine before the world cup. it�*s meant the build—up to the multi—format ashes hasn�*t been ideal. but as batter tammy beaumont acknowledges, covid has affected everything. it�*s been crazy, not ideal preparation, a little bit different to normal, but we�*ve made do. and then once we got to canberra, there was a couple of days�* isolation when we had pcr test results and lots of social distancing, no mixing, no kind of going anywhere too indoors or too overcrowded. so, yeah, it�*s been pretty tough, but now we�*ve got to adelaide, it�*s all about the business end. and that is all the sport for now. we will see you soon.
11:57 pm
hello there. we�*ve got a much colder day of weather coming up today. it was yesterday that we had a cold front bring a bit of patchy rain southwards. as that cleared, we had a fine end to the day in hampshire — a lovely sunset here. for northern scotland, though, it was quite a turbulent day, gusty winds. and those winds have been bringing in some snow showers to shetland, we�*ve seen some in orkney and more recently across the north of the mainland as well. that will leave a risk of some icy patches here as we get into the first part of thursday morning, with the frost otherwise pretty widespread. for many of us, though, the skies will be clear. now, any showers in northern scotland very quickly will lose their wintriness and turn back to rain. some very slightly less
11:58 pm
cold air works in here. and for most of the uk, although a cold and frosty start, there will be sunshine pretty much from dawn till dusk. it�*s going to be a lovely, if somewhat chilly winter�*s day. now, there will be some showers coming down the north sea. they�*ll be affecting eastern parts of scotland. and with the winds blowing more or less parallel to the eastern coasts of england, most of the showers will stay offshore. the greatest risk of a shower will be across norfolk. you might see one or two coming into the north york moors as well. another cold night to come on thursday night, if anything, even colder across parts of england and wales, plumbing the depths. temperatures could get down to about —5, —6 degrees in the coldest spots, but it will be turning milder in the northwest. that�*s because we�*ve got some thicker cloud here. that�*ll probably give us quite a nice sunrise for some, but the best of the sunshine through the day will be across eastern wales, central and eastern england, eastern scotland, probably eastern counties of northern ireland. whereas in the west, you�*re likely to see some of the higher temperatures, but you will also see the thickest of the cloud, perhaps with some mist and fog patches developing around the coasts and hills at times. little overall change, really, into the weekend. high pressure stays firmly with us, the same one that�*s been with us for ages now.
11:59 pm
and for the most part, that will keep weather fronts at bay, this one just skirting into northern scotland, but it will be a weak affair. so, for saturday, mist and fog and some frost patches around first thing in the morning. again, it�*s western areas that will keep the thickest cloud. and here�*s our weak weather front bringing a little bit of light rain or drizzle, no great amounts. for the western isles and the highlands, temperatures could reach double figures here, but otherwise still quite chilly across the southeast — 5 or 6 celsius here. and to be honest, looking at the long—range forecast through the rest of the week and most of next week, the weather just stays dry thanks to that same area of high pressure.
12:00 am
�*welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i�*m karishma vaswani. the headlines. britain�*s prime minister is battling for his future, facing calls to resign, because of parties at downing street during lockdown dramatic scenes in parliament, as a conservative mp defects to labour, and a former minister joins the calls to quit. also in the programme: us presidentjoe biden marks his first year in office with a press conference — defending his record and warning president putin of the costs of invading ukraine. and making formula one history — 22—year—old guanyu zhou will become
12:01 am
the first ever chinese

20 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on