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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 19, 2022 1:30pm-2:00pm GMT

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that is the in one respect, that is the compulsory vaccination of nhs workers. given that the advice to ministers has said that is neither rational nor proportionate given what we now know about omicron and its behaviour, well he think again before redundancy letters start going out from the 3rd of february. the argument has been well made by colleagues across the house today, i would remind him that this is something supported by the nhs themselves for patient safety, it is a very difficult point when it comes to patients you have contracted covid, people want the medical staff to be vaccinated. i would repeat what i have said throughout the
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afternoon, i think it is this possibility for health care professionals to be vaccinated and i hope that is a view he shares. parents and carers are concerned about their child safety and protection from the virus, ventilators are proven to work to reduce the spread of the virus and i am aware the government has provided am aware the government has provided a fraction of ventilators to schools but can the prime minister confirm and say when ventilators will be provided in schools up and down our country. provided in schools up and down our count . . ~ provided in schools up and down our count . ., ~ ,, provided in schools up and down our count . ., ~ i. ., provided in schools up and down our count . . ~' i” ., ., , country. thank you, from memory we have suwlied — country. thank you, from memory we have supplied 350,000 _ country. thank you, from memory we have supplied 350,000 coz - country. thank you, from memory we | have supplied 350,000 c02 detectors and also supplying 7000 ventilators. i realise that does not cover every school but not every school and the country does have a severe problem and many schools are dealing with it
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with practicality and common sense. i also welcome the statement. can he reassure my vulnerable constituents that the government approach to covid is based on the trends and data and that despite some still very high case rates the risk of serious disease faced by double vaccinated and boosted individuals is very low and they should continue to live their lives to the full along with the rest of us. yes, i think he is _ along with the rest of us. yes, i think he is completely - along with the rest of us. yes, i think he is completely correct i along with the rest of us. yes, i l think he is completely correct and along with the rest of us. yes, i . think he is completely correct and i think he is completely correct and i think covid has caused a great deal of apprehension across the country amongst vulnerable people in my experience and it is important as we go forward and recover our freedoms that they and particularly regain the confidence to live their lives to the full.
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the confidence to live their lives to the full-— to the full. following the department _ to the full. following the department of _ to the full. following the department of health . to the full. following the - department of health discussion to the full. following the _ department of health discussion with the information commissioner as the prime minister satisfied that nhs employers will have access to all the information they require in order to ensure that all their staff have indeed been vaccinated. he makes an extremely important point, the data at the moment as it is up to 94% of nhs staff who have been vaccinated, that is a great improvement but we have to make sure we can't all the data as fast as possible and work with all nhs trusts to get that data as fast as possible, one of the big things we have learned is that data needs to be much more accessible and faster to the department of health. had to the opposition _
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to the department of health. had to the opposition it _ to the department of health. had to the opposition it would _ to the department of health. had to the opposition it would have - to the department of health. had to the opposition it would have had - to the department of health. had to the opposition it would have had a i the opposition it would have had a catastrophic effect prior to christmas with the restrictions the shadow member was asking for, thank goodness we have this prime minister who has done the right thing. can i ask about the hospital and lutterworth, a few can help arrange an urgent meeting with his colleague secretary of state for health to discuss the important future of that hospital which is being used as a covid vaccination centre. you bit. -- ou covid vaccination centre. you bit. -- you bet- _ covid vaccination centre. you bit. -- you bet. when _ covid vaccination centre. you bit. -- you bet. when you _ covid vaccination centre. you bit. -- you bet. when you read - covid vaccination centre. you bit. -- you bet. when you read out i covid vaccination centre. you bit. l -- you bet. when you read out the line that the _ -- you bet. when you read out the line that the government - -- you bet. when you read out the line that the government will - -- you bet. when you read out the line that the government will no i line that the government will no longer mandate the wedding of facemasks a number of your backbenchers took off their masks and wave them. well he knowledge without a hint of either near that we have a deadly virus still at work in our communities and it falls on us all to behave any manner that
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encourages people to act responsibly and on communities. i encourages people to act responsibly and on communities.— encourages people to act responsibly and on communities. i thank him and i would elect — and on communities. i thank him and i would elect him _ and on communities. i thank him and i would elect him back— and on communities. i thank him and i would elect him back to _ and on communities. i thank him and i would elect him back to exactly - i would elect him back to exactly what i said in my earlier remarks which i am sure he was listening to. statement is very welcome and i thank him for referring to the investment and care taken with vaccine hesitant groups and these groups exist within the nhs and he is right to stress the need for health care workers to get the vaccine, however can i ask the prime minister to consider the consequence for our nhs and each of our constituencies if we cannot convince the demeaning 5% staff yet to have the demeaning 5% staff yet to have the vaccine. —— of the remaining 5% was. the vaccine. -- of the remaining 5% was. , ., ., ., ., ,,
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was. yes and i want to reassure the house that — was. yes and i want to reassure the house that is _ was. yes and i want to reassure the house that is complex _ was. yes and i want to reassure the house that is complex and - was. yes and i want to reassure the house that is complex and difficult | house that is complex and difficult but it is important we give nhs staff the strongest possible encouragement to get vaccinated and that requires a lot of work and effort and the risks of not being vaccinated are very real. i effort and the risks of not being vaccinated are very real.- effort and the risks of not being vaccinated are very real. i want to -a vaccinated are very real. i want to pay tribute _ vaccinated are very real. i want to pay tribute to _ vaccinated are very real. i want to pay tribute to our _ vaccinated are very real. i want to pay tribute to our fantastic - vaccinated are very real. i want to pay tribute to our fantastic nhs i pay tribute to our fantastic nhs staff and volunteers helping with the roll—out of the boosterjab. i speak regularly to staff at st thomas hospital in my constituency that the prime minister knows well, the hard—working staff that cared for him when he was sick last year but they tell me they are tired and stressed mentally and are burnt out. what is the prime minister going to do to address the staffing shortage across the nhs and the sheer mental health stress staff are facing
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everyday. i health stress staff are facing eve da . . ., health stress staff are facing everyday-— health stress staff are facing eve da. .,, health stress staff are facing eve da. .., ., , everyday. i echo what she said about the staff at st _ everyday. i echo what she said about the staff at st thomas _ everyday. i echo what she said about the staff at st thomas is _ everyday. i echo what she said about the staff at st thomas is to - everyday. i echo what she said about the staff at st thomas is to whom i l the staff at st thomas is to whom i though a massive personal debt, they are indeed wonderful people and i know the are tired but they have kept going and london hospitals went through a nasty wave of omicron and they got through it brilliantly. we have to make sure we continue to support them with investment and more stuff and i find talking to them and that is the thing that really helps, another pair of hands and the night to help you on the ward can make a huge difference so thatis ward can make a huge difference so that is why it is important that another a4,000 in the nhs this year than last year, and 2020i should say but we need to do more and that is the 36 billion we are putting in is
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hugely necessary and they wish her site had voted for it. i hugely necessary and they wish her site had voted for it.— site had voted for it. i welcome the statement. — site had voted for it. i welcome the statement. i _ site had voted for it. i welcome the statement, i think— site had voted for it. i welcome the statement, i think he _ site had voted for it. i welcome the statement, i think he has - site had voted for it. i welcome the statement, i think he has been - site had voted for it. i welcome the l statement, i think he has been right to highlight the sacrifices made by the british people and success of the british people and success of the vaccination programme. it will be welcome for those desperate to see loved ones professionals to be vaccinated and i hope that is should studio: we leave the house of commons. it's been a pretty too day for the prime minister. before that statement we had prime as those questions when he was repeatedly challenged by sir keir starmer about the various parties in downing street, including the party by mr himself has admitted attending in may 2020 all of that again will a dramatic backdrop, with some conservative mps putting in letters to the 1922 committee chairman sir graham brady, saying they had no confidence in borisjohnson, trying to trigger a leadership contest. we know 5a letters on the from tory mps
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to trigger that contest. whether that number has been received by graham brady as anybody�*s guests. the height of political dramas in some ways, just before pmqs we had at the tory mp christian wakeford for bury south crossing over from the conservative to the labour party. sir keir starmer are warmly welcomed him. our political correspondent, alex forsyth, is in parliament, in central lobby. i suppose the question is, has boris johnson done enough today to help his political survival? some would say it was a more combative performance at pmqs than last week. it has certainly felt like out pretty volatile 2a hours after what has been a pretty volatile week. many thought this would be a pivotal moment for the prime minister given that the pressure he is facing.
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there was a markedly different town. yesterday he gave a tv interview where he sounded very downbeat, to date there was much more fighting talk. the question remains as to whether that will save him and his career. i'm enjoying about the conservative mp for wolverhampton south—west, one of those who won his seatin south—west, one of those who won his seat in 2019. stuart anderson, thank you forjoining us. what did you make of it when you hit one of your colleagues defected to the labour party? it colleagues defected to the labour pa ? , , party? it is very disappointing, you don't want to _ party? it is very disappointing, you don't want to see _ party? it is very disappointing, you don't want to see that. _ party? it is very disappointing, you don't want to see that. people - party? it is very disappointing, you don't want to see that. people of l don't want to see that. people of bury— don't want to see that. people of bury south voted for a conservative mp under— bury south voted for a conservative mp under a — bury south voted for a conservative mp undera boris bury south voted for a conservative mp under a borisjohnson government and they— mp under a borisjohnson government and they will be very disappointed that he _ and they will be very disappointed that he has moved to labour because that he has moved to labour because that is— that he has moved to labour because that is not— that he has moved to labour because that is not what they voted for. rolled — that is not what they voted for. rolled should there be a by—election in that seat? i rolled should there be a by-election in that seat?— in that seat? i think we will win it back at the _ in that seat? i think we will win it back at the next _ in that seat? i think we will win it back at the next general - in that seat? i think we will win it | back at the next general election, and i_ back at the next general election, and i think— back at the next general election, and i think you should also give
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people — and i think you should also give peopte a — and i think you should also give people a say because someone has detected _ people a say because someone has defected. they will be worse off not having _ defected. they will be worse off not having a _ defected. they will be worse off not having a conservative mp because they voted for a conservative mp. you know — they voted for a conservative mp. you know that some of your colleagues elected in 2019 had been meeting to discuss the prime minister must make future with a real level of anger, some have written letters calling for a no—confidence vote even if they have not submitted them. have you been in any of those meetings? h0. not submitted them. have you been in any of those meetings? ha. i not submitted them. have you been in any of those meetings?— any of those meetings? no, i have not been in — any of those meetings? no, i have not been in this _ any of those meetings? no, i have not been in this meeting. - any of those meetings? no, i have not been in this meeting. i - any of those meetings? no, i have not been in this meeting. i am - any of those meetings? no, i have| not been in this meeting. i am very focused _ not been in this meeting. i am very focused on — not been in this meeting. i am very focused on supporting the pm. yesterday i call for unity across our party, _ yesterday i call for unity across our party, a _ yesterday i call for unity across our party, a level head, and move forward _ our party, a level head, and move forward. fighting amongst ourselves will not _ forward. fighting amongst ourselves will not get us anywhere. i don't know— will not get us anywhere. i don't know the — will not get us anywhere. i don't know the details of any of those meetings, but nobody wants to see that, _ meetings, but nobody wants to see that, we _ meetings, but nobody wants to see that, we should move forward behind the prime _ that, we should move forward behind the prime minister. you that, we should move forward behind the prime minister.— the prime minister. you think they will be a vote _ the prime minister. you think they will be a vote of _ the prime minister. you think they will be a vote of no _ the prime minister. you think they will be a vote of no confidence - the prime minister. you think they will be a vote of no confidence in l will be a vote of no confidence in the prime minister?— will be a vote of no confidence in the prime minister? there is never auoin to the prime minister? there is never going to be — the prime minister? there is never going to be any — the prime minister? there is never going to be any good _ the prime minister? there is never
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going to be any good for _ the prime minister? there is never going to be any good for us - the prime minister? there is never going to be any good for us with i the prime minister? there is never going to be any good for us with a | going to be any good for us with a vote for— going to be any good for us with a vote for no— going to be any good for us with a vote for no confidence, i don't agree — vote for no confidence, i don't agree with _ vote for no confidence, i don't agree with it and i don't think it's the way— agree with it and i don't think it's the way forward. we have got to wait for the _ the way forward. we have got to wait for the outcome of the inquiry, it would _ for the outcome of the inquiry, it would be — for the outcome of the inquiry, it would be daft to say what that would be because nobody knows at this time _ be because nobody knows at this time i_ be because nobody knows at this time. i certainly will not be putting _ time. i certainly will not be putting a _ time. i certainly will not be putting a letter in, all the colleagues i have spoken to this morning — colleagues i have spoken to this morning aren't either.— colleagues i have spoken to this morning aren't either. what about the level of _ morning aren't either. what about the level of frustration _ morning aren't either. what about the level of frustration from - morning aren't either. what about the level of frustration from your | the level of frustration from your qualities, but also from your constituents, what they see as one rule for them and one rule for us. we have not had a traditional role as an _ we have not had a traditional role as an mp— we have not had a traditional role as an mp because of all the conditions and how we have had to work— conditions and how we have had to work under— conditions and how we have had to work under pressure. i have had constituents in wolverhampton who have written to me very upset about this, they _ have written to me very upset about this, they have a right to be. we want _ this, they have a right to be. we want to— this, they have a right to be. we want to focus what is right for my constituents in wolverhampton, the prime _ constituents in wolverhampton, the prime minister has continually delivered for them and i want to see that continue to stop do you think boris _ that continue to stop do you think borisjohnson has been damaged for the long _ borisjohnson has been damaged for the long term, do you think you can
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come _ the long term, do you think you can come back— the long term, do you think you can come back to this? i was a candidate in the _ come back to this? i was a candidate in the general election, i knocked on doors — in the general election, i knocked on doors when we were not in favour. the polls— on doors when we were not in favour. the polls turned around because of the prime — the polls turned around because of the prime minister and the polls turned around because of the prime ministerand i the polls turned around because of the prime minister and i want seat. my colleagues, our seats were won because _ my colleagues, our seats were won because of— my colleagues, our seats were won because of the prime minister and his vision— because of the prime minister and his vision for the country. david davis, a his vision for the country. david davis. a very — his vision for the country. david davis, a very long _ his vision for the country. david davis, a very long serving - his vision for the country. david davis, a very long serving mp, l davis, a very long serving mp, essentially called for the prime minister to go. what did you make of that? do you think a borisjohnson will be and should be at the prime minister at the next general election? . , minister at the next general election? ., , , ._ ., election? last thursday i went out backin: election? last thursday i went out backing the _ election? last thursday i went out backing the primary _ election? last thursday i went out backing the primary site _ election? last thursday i went out backing the primary site for - election? last thursday i went out backing the primary site for the i backing the primary site for the next _ backing the primary site for the next general election. he has the i’ili'it next general election. he has the right person for this country, he has continued delivered. i want to take that — has continued delivered. i want to take that to the next election, knowing — take that to the next election, knowing we have a strong vision for our country— knowing we have a strong vision for our country and the prime minister is the _ our country and the prime minister is the only— our country and the prime minister is the only one that will deliver that vision.— that vision. given some of the thins that vision. given some of the things that — that vision. given some of the things that we _ that vision. given some of the things that we have _ that vision. given some of the things that we have heard, . that vision. given some of the things that we have heard, is | that vision. given some of the - things that we have heard, is there a danger that this just descends
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into conservative infighting act thatis into conservative infighting act that is even more damage? that would do massive damage. _ that is even more damage? that would do massive damage. i— that is even more damage? that would do massive damage. i have _ that is even more damage? that would do massive damage. i have asked - that is even more damage? that would| do massive damage. i have asked many of my— do massive damage. i have asked many of my colleagues for calm, lectures think— of my colleagues for calm, lectures think about — of my colleagues for calm, lectures think about this, have a clear plan forward _ think about this, have a clear plan forward, wait for the outcome of the inquiry— forward, wait for the outcome of the inquiry and _ forward, wait for the outcome of the inquiry and focus on delivering for our constituents and the country. is there our constituents and the country. there at the our constituents and the country. is there at the risk of any more defections? i there at the risk of any more defections?— there at the risk of any more defections? ., �* ., ., ., , defections? i haven't heard of any, i would be — defections? i haven't heard of any, i would be surprised, _ defections? i haven't heard of any, i would be surprised, but _ defections? i haven't heard of any, i would be surprised, but i - defections? i haven't heard of any, i would be surprised, but i have . i would be surprised, but i have learned — i would be surprised, but i have learned in — i would be surprised, but i have learned in politics do not second—guess anything. sol learned in politics do not second—guess anything. so i hope not, second—guess anything. so i hope not. its— second—guess anything. so i hope not. it's not— second—guess anything. so i hope not, it's not good for others, the constituents or that the mps. there is a huge _ constituents or that the mps. there is a huge pressure we are under and that would _ is a huge pressure we are under and that would be good for anyone. stuart — that would be good for anyone. stuart anderson, mp for wolverhampton, one of those elected in 2019, standing squarely behind the prime minister. but there is no consensus in the conservative party about the future of boris johnson or what should come next. it was a very volatile prime minister's questions. my volatile prime minister's questions. my colleague damian grammaticas has
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been going through all the detail. does he have your support? of course he does. backbenchers _ does he have your support? of course he does. backbenchers too _ does he have your support? of course he does. backbenchers too were - he does. backbenchers too were called to downing _ he does. backbenchers too were called to downing street - he does. backbenchers too were called to downing street today. | he does. backbenchers too were i called to downing street today. the atmosphere has been heightened by mr johnson's right hand man dominic cummings. he says that the prime minister was warned about the summer garden party and last week lied to parliament. yesterday a beleaguered mrjohnson denied that.— mrjohnson denied that. nobody told me, i am absolutely _ mrjohnson denied that. nobody told me, i am absolutely categorical- me, i am absolutely categorical about this, nobody said to me this is an event that is against the rules, that is in breach of what we
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are asking everybody else to do, that it should not go go ahead. but back in 2028 you could only meet one person outside. mrjohnson himself set those rules and ten days before the party urged everyone to follow them. ., , ., , , , the party urged everyone to follow them. ., , .,, , , ., them. you must obey the rules on social distancing. _ them. you must obey the rules on social distancing. to _ them. you must obey the rules on social distancing. to enforce - them. you must obey the rules on j social distancing. to enforce those rules, we will increase the findings of a small minority who break them. so mrjohnson and's denials have not placated some in his party. the country needs _ placated some in his party. the country needs leadership at this time _ country needs leadership at this time what it does not want is a governing _ time what it does not want is a governing party at war with itself. right _ governing party at war with itself. right now, i'm afraid, that is what many— right now, i'm afraid, that is what many people out there are seeing. i think— many people out there are seeing. i think the _ many people out there are seeing. i think the prime minister should be considering his position. my position— considering his position. my position is that we need to wait to see what— position is that we need to wait to see what the facts are. is position is that we need to wait to see what the facts are. is it position is that we need to wait to see what the facts are.— see what the facts are. is it all over, see what the facts are. is it all over. prime — see what the facts are. is it all over, prime minister? - see what the facts are. is it all over, prime minister? is - see what the facts are. is it all over, prime minister? is it- see what the facts are. is it all. over, prime minister? is it time see what the facts are. is it all- over, prime minister? is it time to resign? _ over, prime minister? is it time to resin? , , ., ., ., resign? just before he got to prime
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minister's questions, _ resign? just before he got to prime minister's questions, cheers - resign? just before he got to prime minister's questions, cheers from | minister's questions, cheers from labour benches. the conservative mp cristian whiteford had just crossed the floor to sit or not the opposition benches. flan the floor to sit or not the opposition benches. can i start by welcoming _ opposition benches. can i start by welcoming the — opposition benches. can i start by welcoming the honourable - opposition benches. can i start by i welcoming the honourable member opposition benches. can i start by - welcoming the honourable member from welcoming the honourable memberfrom bury south? like so many people up and down the country, he has concluded that the prime minister and the conservative party have shown themselves incapable of offering the leadership and government this country deserves. his government this country deserves. as for bury south, let me say to the right— for bury south, let me say to the right honourable gentleman that the conservative party won bury south for the _ conservative party won bury south for the first time in generations under— for the first time in generations under this— for the first time in generations under this prime minister with an agenda _ under this prime minister with an agenda of— under this prime minister with an agenda of uniting of levelling up and 11_ agenda of uniting of levelling up and it for— agenda of uniting of levelling up and 11 for the people of bury south. mr speaker, we will win again at bury— mr speaker, we will win again at bury south at the next election. n0
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bury south at the next election. no sin bury south at the next election. sign there of bury south at the next election. ida sign there of a prime minister thinking of resigning. but keir starmer was enjoying this. burr; starmer was en'oying this. bury south is starmer was en'oying this. bury south is now _ starmer was en'oying this. bury south is now a _ starmer was enjoying this. bury south is now a labour— starmer was enjoying this. el"; south is now a labour seat, mr speaker. south is now a labour seat, mr seaker. ., ., speaker. the labour leader then said mrjohnson's — speaker. the labour leader then said mrjohnson's defence _ speaker. the labour leader then said mrjohnson's defence did _ speaker. the labour leader then said mrjohnson's defence did not - speaker. the labour leader then said mrjohnson's defence did not sound l mrjohnson's defence did not sound credible. it mrjohnson's defence did not sound credible. ., , , ., ., credible. it also requires us to ask us to accept _ credible. it also requires us to ask us to accept that _ credible. it also requires us to ask us to accept that as _ credible. it also requires us to ask us to accept that as he _ credible. it also requires us to ask us to accept that as he lady - credible. it also requires us to ask i us to accept that as he lady through the empty bottles and platters of languages, he didn't realise it was a party. does the prime minister realise how ridiculous that sounds? throughout the pound is earning people _ throughout the pound is earning people across government had been working _ people across government had been working flat out to protect the british — working flat out to protect the british public, with huge quantities of the _ british public, with huge quantities of the pe _ british public, with huge quantities of the pe so we can make 80% in this country. _ of the pe so we can make 80% in this country. with— of the pe so we can make 80% in this country, with the biggest and most generous— country, with the biggest and most generous for a loose game of anywhere in the world. perhaps one ofthe anywhere in the world. perhaps one of the most — anywhere in the world. perhaps one of the most damaging _ anywhere in the world. perhaps one of the most damaging moments - anywhere in the world. perhaps one| of the most damaging moments was when one of the most senior tory mps stepped in. i when one of the most senior tory mps ste ed in. , . when one of the most senior tory mps steed in. , . , ., , ., stepped in. i expect my leaders to
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shoulder responsibility _ stepped in. i expect my leaders to shoulder responsibility for - stepped in. i expect my leaders to shoulder responsibility for the - shoulder responsibility for the actions — shoulder responsibility for the actions they— shoulder responsibility for the actions they take. _ shoulder responsibility for the actions they take. yesterday i shoulder responsibility for the i actions they take. yesterday he shoulder responsibility for the - actions they take. yesterday he did the opposite — actions they take. yesterday he did the opposite of— actions they take. yesterday he did the opposite of that. _ actions they take. yesterday he did the opposite of that. so— actions they take. yesterday he did the opposite of that. so i— actions they take. yesterday he did the opposite of that. so i will- the opposite of that. so i will remind — the opposite of that. so i will remind him _ the opposite of that. so i will remind him of— the opposite of that. so i will remind him of a _ the opposite of that. so i will remind him of a quotation i the opposite of that. so i will- remind him of a quotation altogether too familiar— remind him of a quotation altogether too familiar to — remind him of a quotation altogether too familiar to him _ remind him of a quotation altogether too familiar to him to— remind him of a quotation altogether too familiar to him to neville - too familiar to him to neville chamberlain. _ too familiar to him to neville chamberlain. you _ too familiar to him to neville chamberlain. you have i too familiar to him to neville chamberlain. you have sat i too familiar to him to neville i chamberlain. you have sat there too familiar to him to neville - chamberlain. you have sat there too lon- chamberlain. you have sat there too long for— chamberlain. you have sat there too long for the — chamberlain. you have sat there too long for the good _ chamberlain. you have sat there too long for the good that _ chamberlain. you have sat there too long for the good that you _ chamberlain. you have sat there too long for the good that you have i long for the good that you have done _ long for the good that you have done in — long for the good that you have done in the _ long for the good that you have done. in the name _ long for the good that you have done. in the name of— long for the good that you have done. in the name of god, i long for the good that you have done. in the name of god, go. i long for the good that you have i done. in the name of god, go. what matters now — done. in the name of god, go. what matters now is _ done. in the name of god, go. what matters now is how _ done. in the name of god, go. what matters now is how many _ done. in the name of god, go- matters now is how many conservative mps think the same and submit letters calling for that they to go. one senior conservative mp said to me that's perhaps that defection of christian wakeford will cause other conservative mps to rally behind the prime minister, but it does of course signify the level of unrest there is. the question for conservative mps is what they do next. we are watching, waiting to see what happens. but for now the prime minister's featured very much still hangs in the balance. it's been more than 20 years
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since a ban on lgbt+ personnel serving in the military was lifted, but its impact still remains for many who were dismissed, convicted and sometimes imprisoned before the policy came to end. now, an independent review set up by the government will try to establish how best to help those affected. josh parry reports. the year is 1995. john major is the prime minister. take that are topping the charts. david was sent to military prison. his crime — being a gay man. they discovered a copy of gay times in my room after a search of my room. this two—year investigation began. when david joined the royal air force as a medic, aged 17, he was still discovering his identity. i put my life on the line for the country going to the first gulf war, and so, yeah, i was proud of that achievement of helping keep my country safe and knowing they would do the best
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they could for me — promote me, get the best out of me. so when i was 21, i ended up finding out i'm gay. so then you've got to lead a double life. and when that double life was discovered, david realised it would be the end of his military career. from the moment i admitted to it, i was held in a cell, separate from everyone, and then the trial happened. and then you go... yeah, you're handcuffed, you're going into the cell, you're treated like any other prisoner as if i'd mugged or murdered someone. you're treated the same. offence — gross indecency under the sexual offences act 1956, section... and how has that impacted you when applying forjobs? certain offences are kept — you don't get rid of them. so, as a nurse, i had to go for a job. i had to do what's called enhanced disclosure, and that's where it came out. now, unless you actually know... it's listed as a sexual offence, so unless you actually know it's the offence of actually being gay, that's quite alarming. it's thought around 5,000 servicemen and women were affected by the ban on lgbt personnel in the military.
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it remained in place until the year 2000, when this group of veterans took their fight against the ban to the european court of human rights. with effect from today, homosexuality will no longer be a bar to service in britain's armed forces _ he...couldn't ever go i with me to a naval ball. the way we got round it was that we invited our best female friend. i you look like you're having the time of your life. but not everyone impacted by the policy was dismissed outright. some, like patrick, felt forced to resign — as they couldn't be fully open about their love lives at work. there was one time in '88 when i met a young man. | we fell in love, he was a lovely guy, he was called dennis. i but i learnt something else i the second year and that was that he was hiv positive. we knew that, one day — as was the case then — i that he would die and...
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i knew that, at some point, i there would be a fork in the road. unable to tell his bosses about the relationship, and terrified of being sent to the other side of the world while his partner was dying, patrick handed in his one—year's notice to leave the navy. dennis died just two days before he was due home for good. i got up there as fast as i could i after his mother had phoned me. he was still warm. you know, they'd sort of brushed his hair, i and...clean white sheet over him. he was in a little side room. i reflected on one thing —| that in the past 48 hours, the only two things that had ever mattered to me had gone. - while today's announcement is being cautiously welcomed by lgbt veterans, it's clear there's a long way to go for the military to fully regain their trust. josh parry, bbc news.
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a schoolboy has become the youngest british person to be convicted of terror offences. a boy aged 1a pleaded guilty at westminster magistrates' court of possessing material useful to a terrace. he was arrested last summer and sentencing is due to take place in april. fraggle rock is coming back. it's been remade for apple tv with 13 new episodes available to watch from friday. it's 33 years since the last episode of the british series was on our screens — but a new generation of children will be able to head into the fraggle caves once more with charaters such as gobo, boober and uncle travelling matt.
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it has a kind of innocence and just a delight fullness that isn't cynical, and it feels like a special for today because maybe we have been through a tough couple of years and parents and kids are dealing with stress and anxiety. you now, why not just revel in the joy and innocence of these characters?— of these characters? let's go over to the joyful _ of these characters? let's go over to the joyful and _ of these characters? let's go over to the joyful and innocent - of these characters? let's go over to the joyful and innocent nick i to the joyful and innocent nick miller. this quiet spell of weather has been interrupted bahrain in moving across the uk. the rain clears through and it brightens up, set on for scotland, northern ireland and northern england that has been sunshine today. other areas are going to break out into the
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sunshine. high—pressure beginning to move back in. before it comes established, a chilly airflow coming down across us. the strengthening wind brings a chill to think. no frost this morning, tomorrow morning will be a different matter. if few showers into northern ireland, north wales, but particularly across the northern half of scotland. beginning to turn showery on the hills. i strengthening northerly winds, average gusts speeds of 40—50 mph across northern scotland. under widespread frost with largely clear skies tonight. continue with a feed of showers running down north sea coastal areas. there could be some icy patches around in places as these temperatures dip. more of a
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rural frost these temperatures dip. more of a ruralfrost in northern ireland. perhaps avoiding a frost and at the far west of scotland and wales and into cornwall. still one or two showers clipping north sea coastal ports of england, especially lincolnshire and norfolk. the strong southerly winds easing across northern scotland. temperatures will feel chilly but there will be plenty of sunshine around for most places on through thursday. into the evening, largely clear skies, the frost setting in. could be one or two mist and fog patches, a more cloud western areas on a friday, leaving the best of the sunshine towards the east. temperatures edging up a little bit but it will stay close to average over the weekend. plenty of dry weather around. a chance of some fog at times and overnight frost.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown live in downing street. our headlines at 2: borisjohnson fights for his premiership over lockdown parties in downing street and defends his record to a packed house of commons. with support in his own party looking increasingly fragile, mrjohnson fought back. we have more people in employment, more employees on the payroll now than they were before the pandemic began. that is what my staff have been working on in downing street, mr speaker.

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