Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 19, 2022 6:00am-9:01am GMT

6:00 am
good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. the prime minister will set out the next steps to ease england's coronavirus restrictions later today. but first he'll first face mps in the commons as pressure on him to resign over downing street parties intensifies. good morning. here at skipton market they are getting ready for the day ahead as we wait to find out how much average prices the uk for the goods and services we all buy. i will explain what it all means for your of living. veterans who were forced out of the military because of their sexuality have welcomed a review into their treatment. rafa nadal is through at the australian open.
6:01 am
could he be the one to stand alone with the most grand slams wins? victory in melbourne would do it. good morning. we have a weak weather front singing south, taking its cloud and patchy rain with it. behind it, brighterskies, lots of sunshine and a few showers, some of which will be wintry. all the detail throughout the programme. it's wednesday 19th january. our main story. the prime minister is expected to set out plans for easing england's coronavirus restrictions when he addresses parliament later today. the health secretary, sajid javid, has said he's cautiously optimistic that the so—called plan b measures — due to expire next week — can be "substantially reduced". gareth barlow reports. hi, there, good morning. how are you doing? very good morning. against the backdrop of allegations of lockdown parties in downing street, and rumours of a vote of no confidence, the prime minister still has big decisions to make as england's plan b restrictions are due to end in a week's time.
6:02 am
facemasks in schools and public settings, and covid passes for large venues were introduced in december to slow the spread of the omicron variant. but those restrictions could be gone within days, according to the health secretary, sajid javid. government officials say the decision remains finely balanced, as 17,000 patients remain in english hospitals with covid. but there is growing optimism the data is now moving in the right direction. in scotland, covid—i9 restrictions are to be eased from monday, with nightclubs reopening, large indoor events resuming, and social—distancing rules being dropped. the cases that we have had — and still have — with 0micron are of a completely different magnitude to anything that we have experienced in relation to previous waves of the virus. so the measures were proportionate, but we obviously have taken steps to remove those measures and restrictions when the time has
6:03 am
been appropriate to do so. not everyone will welcome a loosening of restrictions — many hospitals have struggled to cope with staffing shortages, or problems discharging older patients into care homes. it's possible, therefore, that some restrictions — such as facemasks — will be retained. the prime minister will discuss the options with his cabinet this morning, and then tell parliament and the public his plan. gareth barlow, bbc news. boris johnson will face further scrutiny surrounding his leadership today, when he returns to the house of commons for prime minister's questions later. mrjohnson is under growing pressure as speculation grows about a backbench rebellion against him, as a number of his own mps are believed to be preparing letters of no confidence. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake reports. late night talks in a private members�* club — a small group of conservative mps met here last night with talk of removing borisjohnson from office on the agenda.
6:04 am
after a day of intense speculation, there was confidence among some backbenchers that enough were ready to submit a letter of no confidence in the prime minister, triggering a vote on his position. the meetings came after the prime minister again denied that he was warned a drinks party in the downing street garden was against lockdown restrictions in place at the time. on a hospital visit yesterday, borisjohnson again apologised for parties in downing street on the eve of the duke of edinburgh's funeral, saying he deeply and bitterly regretted that it happened. if the best argument that you have got to the accusation that you broke the rules was that, "well, nobody had told me that the rules that i had imposed on everyone else were being broken," then i think that reveals you are in a difficult position, and i think the prime minister is in a difficult position because of his behaviour, because of the constant set of allegations that are being made.
6:05 am
and i think conservative mps are increasingly uncomfortable with this, and it does appear that quite a number are now taking action. others are reserving judgement, and ministers offering qualified support. the prime minister was very clear last week in his statement that mistakes had been made. he's set up an inquiry and i think it's important that we let that inquiry run its progress. i hope it's going to report very soon, but i hope that we can therefore get all of these stories out there that have been really distressing, and then we can decide on what next steps to take. some insist borisjohnson can survive — dismissing talk of plots against him as overblown. but in the house of commons at prime minister's questions this lunchtime, he'll again have to try to shore up support that he badly needs. jonathan blake, bbc news. 0ur chief political correspondent adam fleming joins us now from westminster.
6:06 am
good morning. good to see you. could this be a very decisive day for the prime minister? i this be a very decisive day for the prime minister?— this be a very decisive day for the prime minister? i think it will be a chaotic day _ prime minister? i think it will be a chaotic day if _ prime minister? i think it will be a chaotic day if anything. _ prime minister? i think it will be a chaotic day if anything. if - chaotic day if anything. if yesterday was anything to go by. what is happening now is lots of individual mps who had concerns about borisjohnson are now starting to formulate into what looks like a plot against him, which is always a much more dangerous situation for a prime minister to face. we saw about 20 fairly new mps elected at the last election meeting yesterday, talking about what they were going to do and a majority thinking they might submit letters of no confidence in the prime minister. that prompted a backlash from boris johnson's friends, old mps and some ministers saying they need to grow up ministers saying they need to grow up and realise they are only mps, a lot of them, because of boris johnson's appeal at the last election. while we survey all the chaos today and watch it unfold, there are only really three things that matter. does the new evidence
6:07 am
emerged about the downing street party is that cast doubt on the prime minister's account? how do mps feel he does at pmqs in the commons at noon? and do we reach the magic number of 54? that is the number of letters that would have to be submitted for a leadership contest to take place. until that is announced it is alljust guesswork, by basically everybody. we announced it is alljust guesswork, by basically everybody.— announced it is alljust guesswork, by basically everybody. we will wait and see what _ by basically everybody. we will wait and see what happens. _ by basically everybody. we will wait and see what happens. thank - by basically everybody. we will wait and see what happens. thank you l by basically everybody. we will wait i and see what happens. thank you very much indeed, adam. the latest inflation figures will be released in the next hour, and will give an indication of the cost of living and how fast prices are rising. ben is at a market in skipton this morning, where he's taking a look at what this all means for us. good morning, ben. 0h, sadly... i don't think you can hear us. 0h, sadly... i don't think you can hear us- it _ 0h, sadly... i don't think you can hear us. it looks _ 0h, sadly... i don't think you can hear us. it looks great, - 0h, sadly... i don't think you can hear us. it looks great, some - 0h, sadly... i don't think you can i hear us. it looks great, some early mornin: hear us. it looks great, some early morning cheese _ hear us. it looks great, some early morning cheese chocolate - hear us. it looks great, some early morning cheese chocolate there i hear us. it looks great, some early
6:08 am
morning cheese chocolate there is| hear us. it looks great, some earlyl morning cheese chocolate there is a huge amount of appealing cheese. we will definitely be speaking to him through the morning. what ben was going to do is talk about how inflation might affect us all and tell us about a piece we have, so we can do that for him. this is a lot of windows. a lot of windows, yes. and a huge, huge ceiling. yeah. the things that give this hotel its charm and character are the very things now causing the nightmares. put, like, a secondary glazing on this side, it spoils the view on what is the period windows, as well. right now, obviously a modern building with lower ceilings and lots of insulation would be much easier to to heat. it might look sunny, but there's an icy wind from the north sea, and heating this placejumped up in november — from £2,000 a month to £10,000 a month. we've got to increase our prices. i mean, we've got no choice about it — we've got to offset some of the cost. usually in the winter months, hotels drop their prices
6:09 am
quite significantly, but we just can't do that because there wouldn't be any point having the hotel open. but trying to explain that to her customers isn't something sadie's looking forward to. there's only a certain price limit to what people will pay for a hotel room, so you can't put your prices up too much, otherwise peoplejust aren't going to come — and particularly if they're all feeling the squeeze, too, with their own energy prices. from light, to heat, to shopping bills, staff are feeling the pain of those expensive prices at home, as well. i know that everything — fuel, you know, heating, everything — is going up, so it's got to be passed on to us. but if we're not earning — which were not, because you can't when you're not... you know, when it's quiet like this, i'm not in as much as i would normally be. so i can't earn. as wages aren't rising as much as prices, pay packets aren't stretching as far. these inflation figures are the first we have
6:10 am
of the new year, and i'd love to be able to give more positive news for 2022 — but with businesses passing on those extra costs to us, there are lots more price rises on the horizon. for anyone likejoanne, reassessing the annual finances, plans might have to change. we were hoping that this year was going to be the year when we can, you know, get back out and go on holiday and stuff, and if these price hikes are going to continue, i don't think that's going to be an option, unfortunately! covering the cost of keeping warm, whatever the weather throws at us, has become the new priority. colletta smith, bbc news, in scarborough. well, here at skipton markets they are getting ready, set up for the day. we all wait to find out the change in average prices. the last figures we had four november showed they stood at 5.1%, around the
6:11 am
highest level for ten years. when we get the figure at latex, a lot of experts are expecting it will rise, reflecting the higher prices we pay for all sorts of things from groceries to clothing to cinema tickets to fuel to go in the kies. let me explain why high energy and fuel costs. a simple lemon drizzle cake. to make this cake the factory is having to pay more for the electricity and gas to light the factory, heat the oven, bake the cakes. in order to keep their business going and pay their staff wages they have to pass the costs on to dave and his colleagues here at the stall. for dave to keep the lights on and the van to pay for their high electricity and fuel costs, he has to pass those on to us as customers which is why we are seeing that rise in electricity and gas prices and fuel prices for the delivery drivers who are bringing
6:12 am
the goods stall, as well, really pushing prices up that we pay for the goods, as well. and this all contributes to the pinch on the cost of living for households. we are seeing energy bills go up for households themselves, people will also be paying more in national insurance contributions in april, and railfares are due insurance contributions in april, and rail fares are due to insurance contributions in april, and railfares are due to go up in march, as well. so all of this contributes to a real squeeze, a real feel of pressure on everyone's monthly budgets.— real feel of pressure on everyone's monthly budgets. thank you for that, ben. we monthly budgets. thank you for that, item we will — monthly budgets. thank you for that, ben. we will speak _ monthly budgets. thank you for that, ben. we will speak to _ monthly budgets. thank you for that, ben. we will speak to you _ monthly budgets. thank you for that, ben. we will speak to you later - monthly budgets. thank you for that, ben. we will speak to you later on i ben. we will speak to you later on in the programme. a man in his 30s has been arrested on suspicion of the murder of primary school teacher ashling murphy in ireland. it comes after hundreds of mourners lined the streets in rural county 0ffaly outside her funeral mass, which was attended by the irish president and taoiseach. ashling was attacked while out exercising last wednesday. the care regulator, the care quality commission, says the number of staff vacancies
6:13 am
in care homes in england has nearly doubled in the past nine months. it's collected data that shows, by the end of last year, the number of unfilled posts had risen to more than one in ten jobs. here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. care homes supporting people who are older and disabled have found it increasingly tough to find enough staff. burn—out from coping with covid, low pay, and compulsory vaccinations have increased existing recruitment problems. the regulator, the care quality commission, has gathered data from more than 8,200 homes. in april of last year, on average, 6% of care—homejobs in england were unfilled. by the end of december, vacancies had nearly doubled — reaching ii.5%. a survey for the regulator of 2,000 family carers also suggests that more than half believe the dignity and independence of the person they care for was undermined during lockdowns. and nearly three quarters say the individual�*s mental health has deteriorated.
6:14 am
the regulator wants to hear more from families about the services they're getting. we're specifically keen to hear from everyone, but also people who have loved ones in care homes. it's been a really challenging time — particularly for residents of care homes — through the pandemic, where social—care providers have strove to keep people safe. but also there's been challenges around people being able to see their loved ones and to see visits. there are local recruitment campaigns, and extra money has been put in by government — but at the moment, the pressures on care services remain acute. alison holt, bbc news. the department for health say they are providing £4625 million for recruitment and retention — and that care staff are working incredibly hard. lots of news around this morning. thankfully carol is also here to tell us all about the weather. goad tell us all about the weather. good morninu. tell us all about the weather. good morning- lots _ tell us all about the weather. good morning. lots of— tell us all about the weather. good morning. lots of weather - tell us all about the weather. (13mm morning. lots of weather around, as well, today. we have a chilly day
6:15 am
ahead, a chilly site for some, breezy, sunshine and a few showers are the order of the day but we also have two weather fronts slipping steadily southwards, we all the time but bringing cloud, listing us in the hills and patchy rain. behind then we see some sunshine, shows across scotland at a lower level will be rain, it may be winteriness on higher ground buts in between. few showers in northern ireland, some sunshine for you, as they will be when the rain clears from northern england. then we run into both weather fronts producing the cloud and patchy rain. heading southwards, they will eventually clear. through the day, temperatures will slip because they are cold fronts so, once again, some winteriness, even down to sea level across the northern isles and the final of mainland scotland, and here particularly gusty winds, though it will feel colder than at these temperatures suggest. 0nly will feel colder than at these temperatures suggest. only one in lerwick, which will feel below freezing, but 9 or 10 further south
6:16 am
where the winds are much lighter. into the evening and overnight we hang on to some of those showers. still gusty winds but, as you can see, a lot of clear skies. so we will have a widespread frost. probably no issues with fog tonight, too windy for some, and also fairly dry air. into tomorrow, still a peppering of showers across the north, the east for a time, we could see some across south—west england and also south—west wales, but a lot of dry weather and also a fair bit of dry weather and also a fair bit of sunshine. these are our temperatures. for in lerwick and aberdeen, only three in birmingham and sweep towards plymouth, top temperature here of 8 degrees. lots about this morning, thank you for that, see you later on. it's been more than 20 years since a ban on lgbt+ personnel serving in the military was lifted, but its impact still remains for many who were dismissed, convicted and sometimes imprisoned before the policy came to end. now, an independent review set up by the government will try to establish how best
6:17 am
to help those affected. josh parry reports. the year is 1995. john major is the prime minister. take that are topping the charts. david was sent to military prison. his crime — being a gay man. they discovered a copy of gay times in my room after a search of my room. its two—year investigation began. when david joined the royal air force as a medic, aged 17, he was still discovering his identity. i put my life on the line for the country going to the first gulf war, and so, yeah, i was proud of that achievement of helping keep the country safe and knowing they would do the best they could for me — promote me, get the best out of me. so when i was 21, i ended up finding out i'm gay. so then you've got to lead a double life. and when that double life was discovered, david realised it would be the end of his military career. from the moment i admitted to it,
6:18 am
i was held in a cell, separate from everyone, and then the trial happened. and then you go... yeah, you're handcuffed, you're going into the cell, you're treated like any other prisoner as if i'd mugged or murdered someone. you're treated the same. offence — gross indecency under the sexual offences act 1956, section... and how has that impacted you when applying forjobs? certain offences are kept — you don't get rid of them. so as a nurse, i had to go for a job. i had to do what's called enhanced disclosure, and that's where it came out. now, unless you actually know... it's listed as a sexual offence, so unless you actually know it's the offence of actually being gay, that's quite alarming. it's thought around 5,000 servicemen and women were affected by the ban on lgbt personnel in the military. it remained in place until the year 2000, when this group of veterans took their fight against the ban to the european court of human rights. with effect from today, homosexuality will no longer be a bar to service in britain's armed
6:19 am
forces _ he...couldn't ever go . with me to a naval ball. the way we got round it was that we invited our best female friend. i you look like you're having the time of your life. but not everyone impacted by the policy was dismissed outright. some, like patrick, felt forced to resign — as they couldn't be fully open about their love lives at work. there was one time in '88 when i met a young man. | we fell in love, he was a lovely guy, he was called dennis. i but i learnt something else the second year l and that was that he was hiv positive. i we knew that, one day — as was the case, then — i that he would die and... i knew that, at some point, - there would be a fork in the road. unable to tell his bosses about the relationship, and terrified of being sent to the other side of the world
6:20 am
while his partner was dying, patrick handed in his one—year's notice to leave the navy. dennis died just two days before he was due home for good. i got up there as fast as i could . after his mother had phoned me. he was still warm. you know, they'd sort of brushed his hair, i and...clean white sheet over him. he was in a little side room. i reflected on one thing —| that in the past 48 hours, the only two things that had ever mattered to me had gone. - while today's announcement is being cautiously welcomed by lgbt veterans, it's clear there's a long way to go for the military to fully regain their trust. josh parry, bbc news. let's take a look at today's papers... the uproar over the number 10 lockdown parties leads most front pages again today. the daily mirror is one of several papers to report on a group of tory mps who they claim are plotting borisjohnson's downfall.
6:21 am
the rebellion — nicknamed the "pork pie plot" because one of the tories involved is the mp for melton mowbray — means mrjohnson's premiership is "in the balance", according to the paper. get it? yeah. great name for a plot. the daily mail also leads on the "pork pie plot" and accuses some tory mps of "panicking" and turning on the man who got them elected. the daily telegraph is looking ahead to today's announcement on covid rules. it says the prime minister is set to lift plan b measures — including the guidance to work from home — but it says mask—wearing could remain. the guardian also has that story alongside a great picture of emma raducanu, who's through to the second round of the australian open, after her win in melbourne. she was cool as you like. that is her back to _ she was cool as you like. that is her back to her _ she was cool as you like. that is her back to her best. _ she was cool as you like. that is her back to her best. don't i she was cool as you like. that is her back to her best. don't get i her back to her best. don't get overexcited, though. i her back to her best. don't get overexcited, though.— her back to her best. don't get overexcited, though. i have got -len overexcited, though. i have got plenty here- — overexcited, though. i have got plenty here- i — overexcited, though. i have got plenty here. i will— overexcited, though. i have got plenty here. i will start -
6:22 am
overexcited, though. i have got plenty here. i will start with i overexcited, though. i have gotj plenty here. i will start with the big cat. plenty here. i will start with the bi cat. . plenty here. i will start with the big cat—just - plenty here. i will start with the big cat._ just literally j plenty here. i will start with the i big cat._just literally a big cat. yeah!, en! just literally a big cat. yeah!, en! just literally a bi cat. a big cat. yeah!, en! just literally a big cat. a massive _ big cat. yeah!, en! just literally a big cat. a massive cat. _ big cat. yeah!, en! just literally a big cat. a massive cat. look i big cat. yeah!, en! just literally a big cat. a massive cat. look at i big cat. yeah!, en! just literally a. big cat. a massive cat. look at the size, it's big cat. a massive cat. look at the size. its like _ big cat. a massive cat. look at the size, it's like a _ big cat. a massive cat. look at the size, it's like a wolf. _ big cat. a massive cat. look at the size, it's like a wolf. the _ big cat. a massive cat. look at the size, it's like a wolf. the only i size, its like a wolf. the only julia, the first thing she says when everyone meets is, i don't use photoshop, my cat is really this big, and the cat is a maine coon. it is not quite two and it weighs two stone. ., ., ~' is not quite two and it weighs two stone. ., ., ~ . is not quite two and it weighs two stone. ., ., 4' . , is not quite two and it weighs two stone. ., ., ~ ., , ., is not quite two and it weighs two stone. ., ., ~ . , ., ,., ., stone. look at the size of the poor, as bi as stone. look at the size of the poor, as big as her— stone. look at the size of the poor, as big as her head _ stone. look at the size of the poor, as big as her head white _ stone. look at the size of the poor, as big as her head white when i stone. look at the size of the poor, l as big as her head white when people come to visit they are very often think it is a dog. it come to visit they are very often think it is a dog.— think it is a dog. it is in fact a cat. a think it is a dog. it is in fact a cat- a huge _ think it is a dog. it is in fact a cat. a huge unit— think it is a dog. it is in fact a cat. a huge unit of— think it is a dog. it is in fact a cat. a huge unit of account. | think it is a dog. it is in fact a i cat. a huge unit of account. bono sa s u2 cat. a huge unit of account. bono says u2 songs — cat. a huge unit of account. bono says u2 songs make _ cat. a huge unit of account. bono says u2 songs make me - cat. a huge unit of account. bono says u2 songs make me cringe. l cat. a huge unit of account. bono i says u2 songs make me cringe. he has done an interview. he doesn't like the sound of his own voice. he said most of u2 sounds cringeworthy and he switches off the radio when they play because he doesn't like it. he
6:23 am
has only recently learned to sing, he says. i has only recently learned to sing, he sa s. ., �* , ., has only recently learned to sing, hesas. , ., �* he says. i don't believe that. i'm auoin to he says. i don't believe that. i'm going to share — he says. i don't believe that. i'm going to share this. _ he says. i don't believe that. i'm going to share this. just - he says. i don't believe that. i'm going to share this. just did i he says. i don't believe that. i'm| going to share this. just did miss -- dismissing — going to share this. just did miss -- dismissing that. _ going to share this. just did miss -- dismissing that. this - going to share this. just did miss -- dismissing that. this is i going to share this. just did miss -- dismissing that. this is matt i -- dismissing that. this is matt hancock- _ -- dismissing that. this is matt hancock- why _ -- dismissing that. this is matt hancock. why are _ -- dismissing that. this is matt hancock. why are you - -- dismissing that. this is matt hancock. why are you sharing i -- dismissing that. this is matt i hancock. why are you sharing that? you are only — hancock. why are you sharing that? you are only allowed _ hancock. why are you sharing that? you are only allowed to _ hancock. why are you sharing that? you are only allowed to swim i hancock. why are you sharing that? you are only allowed to swim in i hancock. why are you sharing that? you are only allowed to swim in the | you are only allowed to swim in the seven time if you have a membership so we got into a spot of bother. aha, so we got into a spot of bother. a bit of real braking, someone was there with a camera. the winter olympics starts in china in two weeks — but the event has already been overshadowed by ongoing claims beijing is committing genocide against some of its people. the western region of xinjiang has proven to be contentious for human rights violations — but is hoping to benefit from these controversial games. our china correspondent robin brant reports. this is the image of china you'll be seeing over the next few weeks. beautiful snow—covered slopes. china's communist party leaders hope it will persuade millions to grab a board or boots and come here. like yao.
6:24 am
but he isn't near the host city of beijing. this is xinjiang. it's a troubled region, hoping for a major boom off the back of these olympic games. what's that going to be like in 20 years' time where you are? translation: simply _ because of president xi's one call to get 300 million chinese people skiing — that's why the ski industry has taken off. as china's second olympics approaches, these images have been part of state media reporting on xinjiang — almost as if it's part of the games. it's very different to these images from the bbc�*s reporting in xinjiang over recent years — of mass indoctrination and incarceration of chinese ethnic muslims. inside places that china used to deny even existed. china's leaders call it anti—terror re—education. the us and others say it's part of a genocide.
6:25 am
there are numerous foreign firms lining up to sell you part of the alternative xinjiang — the american snowboard pioneers burton is one of them. we've already seen in the last couple of years — we've seen, you know, triple—digit growth. so we are... we're very excited about that. burton has signed up a world—class chinese boarder, and she isn't even a teenager yet. the company is planning dozens more stores here. but how does its presence in xinjiang sit with an ethos that's about more than being just a business? we have two choices — we can either, you know, divorce ourselves from xinjiang and just say, "no, we're not going to do anything out there," or what we can do is we can try to understand what's going on in xinjiang better. and, you know — yes, there may be some, you know... again, factually, i don't know. i'm not a politician, i've never studied any type of aspect of that. have you seen the media reports over the last couple of years? yeah, yeah, of course —
6:26 am
everyone has, i believe so. but, again, i divorce myself. what i mean by that is, i can't change that and we focus on what we can change. some would say maybe you can, actually. let's just go back to your statement here on the website — we want to effect positive change for our people, our factories and create ripples. yeah. maybe you can change things. yeah, i hope so, for the better. again, that's what i'm saying is — what we'll focus on is what we can change for the better. burton is just one of numerous foreign firms who've decided xinjiang — the china market as a whole — is irresistible. president xijinping thinks his critics are politicising his big sporting moment. his government says the olympics should rise above politics. it's a distinction some of the businesses looking to ride the olympic wave want you to make, as well. robin brant, bbc news, shanghai. we will be live at skipton market in the next few minutes. cannot wait. time now to get the news,
6:27 am
travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a new report's hilighted how more than two billion litres of raw sewage was dumped in the river thames over two days. thames water's mogden waste water treatment works in isleworth, discharged enough sewage to fill 400 olympic—sized swimming pools in october 2020. the figures were published in a report by the environmental audit select committee. thames water said any discharges of untreated sewage were unacceptable. two london universities have signed up to a pledge against using so called gagging clauses to silence victims of sexual misconduct, bullying and harassment. a bbc news investigation in 2020 found nearly a third of uk universities uk had used non—disclosure agreements, known as ndas. now, the government is asking universities not to use them. so far, university college london and goldsmiths have signed the pledge.
6:28 am
a london council is training people to become lorry drivers to tackle the uk—wide shortage of hgv drivers. the road haulage association estimates there is a shortage of more than 100,000 qualified drivers in the uk. the scheme run by waltham forest council will support 20 trainee drivers. learning lots of different new skills. first and foremost, safety, how the vehicle works, and then obviously, the skill set of driving a vehicle. doing something new, especially at my age, has been fantastic. more importantly, it's to be able to help the local community out for me, really, and drive that. so i'm looking forward to it. i'm going to do a good job. well, let's see what's on the tubes. there are minor delays on the metropolitan line due to a signal failure. and the northern line is part closed. those major upgrade works meaning there's no service between moorgate and kennington until mid—may. for all other travel updates, tune into your local bbc radio station.
6:29 am
onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. temperatures widely above zero this morning. quite a bit of cloud overnight has helped to lift those temperatures. that cloud brought to you by these fronts. now they are sinking south through this morning, brightening up for the afternoon. the cloud — there are a few breaks in there, so some bright spells, a few splashes of rain in there as well, but once they clear, drier and brighter. sunshine through the afternoon. the north—westerlyjust starting to dig in. 10 celsius the maximum. but once that sun comes out it is likely to feel chillier. overnight it is going to be quite cold. the wind drops out and the temperature, therefore, dropping down to zero, if not below. so, a widespread frost first thing on thursday morning. the risk of maybe one or two mist and fog patches. for thursday, plenty of winter sunshine. it is going to feel quite chilly, a north—westerly breeze. but you can see high pressure starts to edge east, so the fronts veering around the outside.
6:30 am
settled conditions really for the rest of this week and into the weekend. plenty of fine weather, some sunshine for the next couple of days, a bit more cloud by the end of the weekend, but night—time temperatures cold, so frost and fog. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. coming up on breakfast this morning... the show must go on — we'll meet the understudies stepping on to centre stage, as covid isolation leaves theatres short of their leading stars. it's the letters game taking the internet by storm — we'll give you a step—by—step guide to playing wordle, and we'll even have countdown's susie dent on hand to help. # dance your cares away. # worries for another day. # let the music play. # down in fraggle rock...#
6:31 am
and a trip down memory lane — fraggle rock is back for us to dance our cares away to. and we'll hear all about the new series just before eight this morning. and that tune will be in your head all day. it and that tune will be in your head all da . , and that tune will be in your head allda. , . all day. it is always in my head. they have _ all day. it is always in my head. they have kept _ all day. it is always in my head. they have kept the _ all day. it is always in my head. they have kept the original- all day. it is always in my head. i they have kept the original puppets as well. amazing. some important things to talk about this morning. the increasing cost of living is something we've been hearing a lot about over recent weeks, and we'll get an official update on how fast prices are rising in the next half hour. ben's looking at this for us this morning — and he's at the market in skipton. morning. good morning. here at skipton market they are getting ready for the day ahead. we are
6:32 am
going to find out how much prices have gone up in the last 12 months. you have probably noticed, whether you're buying cakes, cheese, biscuits or chutney, the prices have gone up. in fact, inflation is at its highest rate for ten years, reaching 5.1% in the 12 months to november. economists think it'll go even higher. the bank of england expects inflation to hit 6% by the spring — way above its target of 2%. it's causing a jump in the cost of living, which is being driven mainly by rising fuel and energy costs, which in turn has been the consequence of various factors, including shortages of labour and materials.
6:33 am
that all gets passed on to us as customers, which is why prices go up. that comes on top of higher energy prices. and here's the big problem — average pay rises aren't keeping up with the rise in the cost of living. weekly earnings rose 3.8% in the three months to november — well below the rate of inflation. if your wages are rising more slowly than the things you buy, that means you feel a pinch in the cost of living. it means your money, your pay packet, is not going as far as it once did. let's talk about this in detail. we have god with us catherine shuttleworth, a retail analyst. good morning. just how much pressure is this putting on business? we know the pressure it is
6:34 am
putting on households. what affects business? , , , , putting on households. what affects business? , ,, , ~ business? huge pressures. all those cost increases, _ business? huge pressures. all those cost increases, particularly _ business? huge pressures. all those cost increases, particularly in - cost increases, particularly in energy, are really driving prices up for businesses. they have to pass those on through the supply chain. ultimately the last person in that chain is also, the customer. those prices are going up. there are still shortages in certain parts of employment, some things like drivers, things you talked about, their wages have gone up massively over the last 12 months. all those little increases along the supply chain means the things we want to buy are going up and we are starting to notice it in our purses as we go shopping. if to notice it in our purses as we go shouina. , , ,, , �* to notice it in our purses as we go shoutin. ,, ,,, �* , shopping. if businesses didn't put rices u - , shopping. if businesses didn't put prices op. what — shopping. if businesses didn't put prices up, what would _ shopping. if businesses didn't put prices up, what would happen? i shopping. if businesses didn't put i prices up, what would happen? they would have to _ prices up, what would happen? they would have to lay _ prices up, what would happen? tie: would have to lay people off prices up, what would happen? tiez1 would have to lay people off because they can't keep up on the speed of increase. they won't make any money. if they don't make money, they can't pay its staff, it is that simple. we are not used to this level of
6:35 am
inflation in the uk, particularly in the food we buy. this will come as a nasty surprise to many.— nasty surprise to many. would it be an 0 tion nasty surprise to many. would it be an option for _ nasty surprise to many. would it be an option for companies, _ nasty surprise to many. would it be | an option for companies, businesses and shops, to pay their employees more? , , ., , , ., more? they will try to but they have to kee a more? they will try to but they have to keep a hold _ more? they will try to but they have to keep a hold on _ more? they will try to but they have to keep a hold on the _ more? they will try to but they have to keep a hold on the cost. - more? they will try to but they have to keep a hold on the cost. as i more? they will try to but they have to keep a hold on the cost. as these prices spiral, even if you have given your workers a pay rise of 3%, 4%, maybe that will be —— that will be enough. the increases in their salaries are being adjusted back when they go shopping and paying bills. businesses do want to give pay rises but obviously they have to manage those to manage their own costs and remain profitable and keep on giving outjobs. what costs and remain profitable and keep on giving outjobs— on giving out 'obs. what would help businesses on giving out jobs. what would help businesses at _ on giving out jobs. what would help businesses at a _ on giving out jobs. what would help businesses at a time _ on giving out jobs. what would help businesses at a time like _ on giving out jobs. what would help businesses at a time like this? i businesses at a time like this? there is a huge crisis around fuel. we talk about it from a domestic perspective. it is even worse if you have got a business because there are no caps on that. the energy companies and the government going to have to think about how those costs are smoothed out. instead of
6:36 am
paying for it all up front, pay for it over a period of time. they are the sort of things that would make a difference. . ~ the sort of things that would make a difference. ., ~ , ., the sort of things that would make a difference. . ~' , ., , . the sort of things that would make a difference. ., ~ , ., , . ., , difference. thank you very much, as ever. catherine _ difference. thank you very much, as ever. catherine shuttleworth, - difference. thank you very much, as ever. catherine shuttleworth, retail| ever. catherine shuttleworth, retail analyst. let's go back to dave. he has promised me a good deal on whatever you want. so pick something and i will bring it back for you as and i will bring it back for you as a little treat. ben, thank you. look at all that fabulous cheese. that is your heaven, isn't it? i fabulous cheese. that is your heaven, isn't it?— heaven, isn't it? i get lost in there. heaven, isn't it? i get lost in there- you — heaven, isn't it? i get lost in there. you could _ heaven, isn't it? i get lost in there. you could make - heaven, isn't it? i get lost in there. you could make a - heaven, isn't it? i get lost in - there. you could make a serious cheeseboard out of that. little crackers behind him as well. the full set. john is here. day three of the australian open. yes, with novak djokovic not been there. _ yes, with novak djokovic not been there. a _ yes, with novak djokovic not been there. a lot — yes, with novak djokovic not been there, a lot of talk about who will win the _ there, a lot of talk about who will win the men's. with nadal, federer and djokovic are locked on 20 grand slams, _ and djokovic are locked on 20 grand slams, federer is not there because he is _ slams, federer is not there because he is injured, he might not play at wimbledon. djokovic, you don't know when _ wimbledon. djokovic, you don't know when he _ wimbledon. djokovic, you don't know when he will— wimbledon. djokovic, you don't know when he will be playing again. so the door— when he will be playing again. so the door is— when he will be playing again. so the door is open for an adult. it is
6:37 am
the door is open for an adult. it is the french— the door is open for an adult. it is the french -- _ the door is open for an adult. it is the french —— it's the french open atter— the french —— it's the french open after this — the french —— it's the french open afterthis is— the french —— it's the french open after this. is this rafael nadal's opportunity? it would be very interesting. in the absence of novak djokovic, who will win the men's title? the 20—time grand slam champion nadal into the third round after another straight sets win — this time against the german qualifier yannick hanfmann. his side of the draw opening up after the deportation of the nine—time champion novak djokovic. daniil medvedev is the top—ranked male player in the absence of the world number one. home favourite ash barty is through. the wimbledon champion is the top ranked player in melbourne. she's not lost this year, and will be many people's pick to go all the way at a tournament she's never won. she only dropped two games against lucia bronzetti. is it over for big spending chelsea in the title race? a draw against brighton last night, leaves them 12 points adrift of leaders manchester city, who look uncatchable now.
6:38 am
hakim ziyech scored first for chelsea. but adam webster equalised for brighton. tuchel said his side was weary. of course we are tired — mentally tired and physically tired — and you can see it in our performance. er... it's as easy as that. look at our last week and then you know what we are talking about — in seven days, three away games — and, you know, it's not only about playing, it's about travelling, it's about not sleeping. so we arrive in a game where we don't reach our full potential — ok, welcome to reality! that has been the story for the last few games — that has been the story for the last few games for chelsea. rangers saw their lead in the scottish premiership cut to four points, after a 1—1 draw with aberdeen. a brilliant delivery from ryan kent left iannis hagi with a tap—in to put rangers ahead. they were on their way to extending their winning run to ten games when lewis ferguson.
6:39 am
it is almost that time of year again. after every match went on behind closed doors last year, we're all hoping for a much louder six nations when it starts next month. england have named their squad, eddie jones with an eye on that world cup to come next year. they've named six uncapped players, with owen farrell staying on as captain, having finished fifth last time out. wales will have dan biggar as their captain for the tournament, with alun wyn jones out injured. wayne pivac's side have a number of players missing, but will undoubtedly get a boost from their home crowd. can you imagine the atmosphere at a full house in cardiff for the first fixture there, now that the welsh government is lifting covid restrictions? we would have been very definitely . disappointed not to have had crowds, but certainly happy. i know that the public are very excited, - the people that i bump into. look, it'sjust everyone's dream to play for his country, - and then to play in front of 75,000 welsh supporters in that stadium, | it'sjust — it's like a drug. it'sjust you're on a high, i and it'sjust something that
6:40 am
you want to get more and more of. and these boys are no different. always great drama in the six nations _ there was incredible drama in netball's quad series in london, with england snatching a very late draw with australia in their first meeting for nearly three years. helen housby levelled with seconds left. she's got the famous goal against — left. she's got the famous goal against australia that won them commonwealth gold in 2018. it finished — commonwealth gold in 2018. it finished 48 all. they meet again tonight— finished 48 all. they meet again tonight in— finished 48 all. they meet again tonight in the grand final. which will be interesting, having played _ which will be interesting, having played so — which will be interesting, having played so soon, to go back out there and give _ played so soon, to go back out there and give it— played so soon, to go back out there and give it another go. fascinating. heten— and give it another go. fascinating. helen housby, super cool. thank— helen housby, super cool. thank you, john. thank you for building up emma raducanu yesterday. i very much enjoyed it.— i very much en'oyed it. brilliant, wasn't i very much en'oyed it. brilliant, want in — i very much en'oyed it. brilliant, want in n— i very much enjoyed it. brilliant, wasn't it? it takes _ i very much enjoyed it. brilliant, wasn't it? it takes pressure - i very much enjoyed it. brilliant, wasn't it? it takes pressure off. | wasn't it? it takes pressure off. she needed that. no
6:41 am
wasn't it? it takes pressure off. she needed that. wasn't it? it takes pressure off. she neededthat. ., , ., , ., she needed that. no expectations go straiaht she needed that. no expectations go straight back— she needed that. no expectations go straight back up. _ she needed that. no expectations go straight back up. we _ she needed that. no expectations go straight back up. we are _ she needed that. no expectations go straight back up. we are going - she needed that. no expectations go straight back up. we are going to - straight back up. we are going to have to manage _ straight back up. we are going to have to manage them _ straight back up. we are going to have to manage them a - straight back up. we are going to have to manage them a little - straight back up. we are going to have to manage them a little bit| have to manage them a little bit more. thank you. they're reminders of one of the worst tragedies in welsh history: artefacts from the aberfan disaster, in which 116 children and 28 adults were killed in 1966. over the years they've been kept in various attics and cupboards, but their owners now feel there's a danger they'll be lost forever, unless a permanent home is found for them. steve fairclough reports. a broken clock is among the most enduring images of the aberfan disaster. it stopped at precisely the moment it was struck by millions of tonnes of coal spoil that had spilled down the mountainside, engulfing pantglass junior school and the pupils and staff inside, as well as nearby homes. 116 children and 28 adults lost their lives. parents and teachers join police, firemen, civil defence workers and mine rescue teams at the school. some of the helpers tore at the rubble with bare hands in their desperate efforts to get
6:42 am
out of the children. the last time that clock ticked all those children were still alive, and the adults as well. it's a very strange feeling. it brings back, it brings back a lot of emotions and a lot of memories for me. mike flynn's father was one of those who rescued people from aberfan. he found the clock. it's now stored in a box in his home. i would like to see it kept somewhere in a location where it is on permanent display. there's a lot of people, if they went to see it, would get some strength from it. there's a lot of people that would like to see it because it is such a significant piece of work history. this now, little boy, is myself. garethjones survived the disaster. at six years old, pulled from the window of his classroom and told to run home to safety, visited by the duke of edinburgh. his family collection of artefacts were nearly thrown
6:43 am
away in a clear out. he fears the same could happen in the future. my grandchildren are interested, i but my children are not interested in actually the stuff itself. what they told me, if — - god forbid — if i died tomorrow they'd chuck it all away. oh, that would break my heart. i'd like some of it to go to a place where people can look— at it and treasure it. i've treasured it in my life. the scene is one of the most tragic in the history of welsh mining valleys, which are so used to the horrors of pit disasters. this memorial garden is on the site of pantglasjunior school, where so many people lost their lives in the aberfan disaster. the aim is that the artefacts could be kept somewhere safe and secure outside of aberfan. it's clear that of the community in aberfan have been quite careful about how memorialisation works,
6:44 am
and that they have wanted to be able to hold their own space for it and not let it be overwhelmed. as one observer commented, "we're prepared for it if it's a smash underground. it's what we call part of the price of coal, men getting killed underground. but when it's kids, my god, you just aren't prepared for it." the national museums and galleries of wales say they do have items associated with aberfan, and they are seeking to collect more iconic artefacts. for survivors like gareth, what happened to them and their school will never leave them. but they would like the artefacts they have to be saved forfuture generations. steve fairclough with that report. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. carol told us earlier it is a busy day. good morning. day. good morninu. _, ., day. good morninu. ., ,
6:45 am
good morning. good morning. there is uuite a lot good morning. good morning. there is quite a lot going _ good morning. good morning. there is quite a lot going on — good morning. good morning. there is quite a lot going on with _ good morning. good morning. there is quite a lot going on with the _ quite a lot going on with the weather. bits and pieces of this and that. a chilly breeze. sunshine and a few showers. we also have two weather fronts sinking south. the first is weak, the second has brought rain overnight. it will weaken as it moves south. behind it, a north, north westerly airflow. the blues pushing away the milder colour two. today, progressively it is going to turn golden. the week where the front continues to move south. the second one bringing the heavy rain is also doing the same thing. together they will slowly move down towards the south of england. eventually clearing kent, probably about mid afternoon. behind, a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine. but some showers. the showers in the north of scotland tending to be rain at lower levels. increasingly we will see some of them falling as snow in the far north of scotland and the northern isles. for most of us not a particularly windy day. it
6:46 am
will be gusty across northern england and especially northern and western scotland. these wide circles represent the average wind speeds. the cost will be that a bit higher. temperature wise today, nothing to write home about. one in their wake. it will feel colder than that because of the strength of the winter. we are looking at six in birmingham to nine in plymouth, ten in st helier. as we head through the evening and overnight we still have a few showers around the coasts. other that of dry weather. a lot of clear sky. that means we are looking at a widespread frost first thing tomorrow morning. we shouldn't have anyissues tomorrow morning. we shouldn't have any issues with fog. the air is too dry and it is on the breezy side. particularly down the east coast, where tomorrow we see further wintry showers. they shouldn't be problematic. more likely to be rain and sleet. a lot of dry weather. plenty of winter sunshine. it will steal food cold.
6:47 am
plenty of winter sunshine. it will stealfood cold. —— it will still feel cold. the winds will slowly ease as we go through the course of the day. from thursday into friday, and even into the weekend, this area of high pressure starts to exert its influence. we have got weather fronts toppling over the top of it. the salient thing about that is air around an area of high pressure moves in a clockwise direction, so you can see the milder conditions coming in around the west and the north. on friday itself, there is a lot of clout in the north and west. that will be thick enough to produce drizzle here and there. any fog formed in the centre of that area of high pressure over night will be slow to clear. some may linger for most of the day. if that happens, it will suppress the temperatures. roughly six to eight in the south, ten as we push towards stornoway. as we head into the weekend it is the northern half of the country that will see more cloud, drizzle. and also some rain. here we are likely
6:48 am
to have the highest temperatures. further south it will be cooler with some mist and fog bike night, and also frost. lots to think about. thank you. see you just after seven. the prime minister is expected to lay out the next steps for england's plan b measures later — they're the restrictions that came in last month, and included the mandatory wearing of face coverings and use of covid passes. the government has said the latest covid data is looking positive. but with 17,000 patients still in hospital, the decision to ease the rules needs to be finely balanced. we'rejoined now by gp dr nighat arif. good morning. let's start with the planned beat measures and what we expect to hear from the prime minister later. how do you feel about now being the right time to merely relax things?— about now being the right time to merely relax things? well, remember a [an b merely relax things? well, remember a plan b measures _ merely relax things? well, remember a plan b measures weren't— merely relax things? well, remember a plan b measures weren't going - merely relax things? well, remember a plan b measures weren't going to i a plan b measures weren't going to be always— a plan b measures weren't going to be always in place. there was a contingency that on january 26 they would _
6:49 am
contingency that on january 26 they would be _ contingency that on january 26 they would be reviewed. face coverings in public— would be reviewed. face coverings in public spaces, covid passes in indoor— public spaces, covid passes in indoor spaces, nightclubs, for example. _ indoor spaces, nightclubs, for example, if you go to a venue with lots of— example, if you go to a venue with lots of people, lateral flow test if you have — lots of people, lateral flow test if you have no symptoms, pcr test if you have no symptoms, pcr test if you have, — you have no symptoms, pcr test if you have, try and trace. we knew these _ you have, try and trace. we knew these plans— you have, try and trace. we knew these plans were going to be reviewed mainly because the omicron variant— reviewed mainly because the omicron variant was— reviewed mainly because the omicron variant was so transmissible, and making _ variant was so transmissible, and making sure people are getting their hooster— making sure people are getting their booster vaccines. we have had 36 million _ booster vaccines. we have had 36 million people have the covid trooster— million people have the covid booster vaccination. and so, i think reviewing _ booster vaccination. and so, i think reviewing them is ok. but i am still slightly— reviewing them is ok. but i am still slightly cautious, i don't think we should _ slightly cautious, i don't think we should be — slightly cautious, i don't think we should be lifting all of the rules, in particular i would say facemasks, because _ in particular i would say facemasks, because we — in particular i would say facemasks, because we know covid is an airborne virus. _ because we know covid is an airborne virus. making— because we know covid is an airborne virus, making sure that we are keeping — virus, making sure that we are keeping people sticking to the rules of physical distancing and having places— of physical distancing and having places that are ventilated really well _ places that are ventilated really well. and covid passes, well, they have _ well. and covid passes, well, they have always been a bit of, they have always _ have always been a bit of, they have always caused upset, and people have always— always caused upset, and people have always been anxious of covid passes, but i always been anxious of covid passes, but i have _ always been anxious of covid passes, but i have gone to venues, cinemas,
6:50 am
theatres, _ but i have gone to venues, cinemas, theatres, over christmas, and i have happily— theatres, over christmas, and i have happily shone my pass without any issues _ happily shone my pass without any issues but— happily shone my pass without any issues. but i do feel that getting rid of— issues. but i do feel that getting rid of all— issues. but i do feel that getting rid of all measures, all of the other— rid of all measures, all of the other measures, one of the other nteasures— other measures, one of the other measures is— other measures, one of the other measures is working from home, either— measures is working from home, either still — measures is working from home, either still think we should play at a tcautiously because the virus numbers— a tcautiously because the virus numbers are still high. so a tcautiously because the virus numbers are still high. so from your perspective. — numbers are still high. so from your perspective. what — numbers are still high. so from your perspective, what is _ numbers are still high. so from your perspective, what is the _ numbers are still high. so from your perspective, what is the best - numbers are still high. so from your perspective, what is the best thing l perspective, what is the best thing to try to ease that pressure on the nhs, to maintain them for the moment, do you think?- nhs, to maintain them for the moment, do you think? well, i think we have to — moment, do you think? well, i think we have to watch _ moment, do you think? well, i think we have to watch numbers. - moment, do you think? well, i think we have to watch numbers. there i moment, do you think? well, i think| we have to watch numbers. there are some _ we have to watch numbers. there are some studies— we have to watch numbers. there are some studies showing that actually this is— some studies showing that actually this is day— some studies showing that actually this is day 13 where the cases are slightly— this is day 13 where the cases are slightly decreasing. but remember, the virus _ slightly decreasing. but remember, the virus can very quickly increase again _ the virus can very quickly increase again this— the virus can very quickly increase again. this is a global pandemic. we need _ again. this is a global pandemic. we need to— again. this is a global pandemic. we need to be _ again. this is a global pandemic. we need to be thinking about vaccinations across the world. the other— vaccinations across the world. the other thing — vaccinations across the world. the other thing is that we are in the middle — other thing is that we are in the middle of— other thing is that we are in the middle of winter in the nhs.17,000 patients— middle of winter in the nhs.17,000 patients are still in hospital who are testing covid positive. we are trying _ are testing covid positive. we are trying to— are testing covid positive. we are trying to do the best we can. so, 16
6:51 am
and 17—year—olds are now being invited — and17—year—olds are now being invited for— and 17—year—olds are now being invited for their third boosterjab invited for their third booster jab and 12_ invited for their third booster jab and 12 to — invited for their third boosterjab and 12 to 15—year—olds, who are in the clinically— and 12 to 15—year—olds, who are in the clinically vulnerable group, are also being — the clinically vulnerable group, are also being offered at the booster 'ab. also being offered at the booster iab~ self — also being offered at the booster jab. self isolation dates have been adjusted — jab. self isolation dates have been adjusted. on monday the new rules came _ adjusted. on monday the new rules came in _ adjusted. on monday the new rules came in it — adjusted. on monday the new rules came in. it is still telling days of self isolation. —— ten days. on day five you _ self isolation. —— ten days. on day five you can — self isolation. —— ten days. on day five you can consider doing a lateral— five you can consider doing a lateral flow test, so you have to test negative for two consecutive days _ test negative for two consecutive days. then you can go back to work. it is days. then you can go back to work. it is always — days. then you can go back to work. it is always trying to find that balance — it is always trying to find that balance of trying to get people into work, _ balance of trying to get people into work. as— balance of trying to get people into work, as we heard earlier, cost of living, _ work, as we heard earlier, cost of living, people back to work, businesses are really struggling at the moment. we want colleagues back in work— the moment. we want colleagues back in work at _ the moment. we want colleagues back in work at the nhs because work staff is— in work at the nhs because work staff is causing delays. it literally is a very difficult decision but i would hold on things like getting people to still work from _ like getting people to still work from home, if they possibly can, and
6:52 am
facemask— from home, if they possibly can, and facemask wearing, making sure that we are _ facemask wearing, making sure that we are physically distancing as much as possible. we are physically distancing as much as ossible. ., ., , ., we are physically distancing as much as possible-— as possible. how have those plan b measures. — as possible. how have those plan b measures, how _ as possible. how have those plan b measures, how have _ as possible. how have those plan b measures, how have they - as possible. how have those plan b measures, how have they affected | measures, how have they affected life and work at your own surgery? actually, a lot of the work that has gone _ actually, a lot of the work that has gone on. _ actually, a lot of the work that has gone on, especially with the booster vaccine, _ gone on, especially with the booster vaccine, has— gone on, especially with the booster vaccine, has been received really well _ vaccine, has been received really well and — vaccine, has been received really well. and patients are happy wearing masks~ _ well. and patients are happy wearing masks~ we _ well. and patients are happy wearing masks. we have got used to wearing masks~ _ masks. we have got used to wearing masks~ the — masks. we have got used to wearing masks. the public feel safer in public— masks. the public feel safer in public spaces wearing masks. the adherence — public spaces wearing masks. the adherence has been great. yes, of course, _ adherence has been great. yes, of course, there are those who want to id course, there are those who want to go back— course, there are those who want to go back to _ course, there are those who want to go back to normal. what is the new normal— go back to normal. what is the new normal now? i think that it's really tricky~ _ normal now? i think that it's really tricky~ we — normal now? i think that it's really tricky. we want as much normality as possible _ tricky. we want as much normality as possible by— tricky. we want as much normality as possible by making sure we keep the majority _ possible by making sure we keep the majority of _ possible by making sure we keep the majority of the population safe, and not have _ majority of the population safe, and not have another variant of concern as we _ not have another variant of concern as we did _ not have another variant of concern as we did with omicron. the decision still needs— as we did with omicron. the decision still needs to be made by the jcvi about— still needs to be made by the jcvi about getting children vaccinated. in about getting children vaccinated. ln other— about getting children vaccinated. in other countries, five—year—olds and above — in other countries, five—year—olds and above are being vaccinated. we still have _ and above are being vaccinated. we still have not had that decision. when _ still have not had that decision. when we — still have not had that decision. when we hear about unvaccinated
6:53 am
people _ when we hear about unvaccinated people in — when we hear about unvaccinated people in hospital, we have to consider— people in hospital, we have to consider that they were children... ithink— consider that they were children... i think there — consider that they were children... i think there are still things we need _ i think there are still things we need to— i think there are still things we need to plan out a bit more about this is— need to plan out a bit more about this is an — need to plan out a bit more about this is an unpredictable virus. but are trying — this is an unpredictable virus. but are trying to keep everybody safer, with the _ are trying to keep everybody safer, with the struggle of the economy, is a sticky— with the struggle of the economy, is a sticky balance. gne with the struggle of the economy, is a sticky balance.— a sticky balance. one quick one. -- tricky balance- _ a sticky balance. one quick one. -- tricky balance. an _ a sticky balance. one quick one. -- tricky balance. an oxford _ a sticky balance. one quick one. --| tricky balance. an oxford university study talks about mild covid causing memory problems for 12 months afterwards. is that something you have come across? hate afterwards. is that something you have come across?— afterwards. is that something you have come across? we already know that with long _ have come across? we already know that with long covid _ have come across? we already know that with long covid you _ have come across? we already know that with long covid you can - have come across? we already know that with long covid you can get - that with long covid you can get symptoms of fatigue and memory fog, headaches _ symptoms of fatigue and memory fog, headaches that can go on for a while, — headaches that can go on for a while, shortness of breath, a cough that goes— while, shortness of breath, a cough that goes on. we are still learning about— that goes on. we are still learning about long — that goes on. we are still learning about long covid. that does not surprise — about long covid. that does not surprise me. remember, omicron is 'ust surprise me. remember, omicron is just another— surprise me. remember, omicron is just another variant. but we don't actually, — just another variant. but we don't actually, we still need to learn far more _ actually, we still need to learn far more about the long—term complications of covid itself.
6:54 am
that's — complications of covid itself. that's why making sure that you are getting _ that's why making sure that you are getting the — that's why making sure that you are getting the vaccine, the covid seeing — getting the vaccine, the covid seeing -- _ getting the vaccine, the covid seeing —— vaccine, is so important. we are _ seeing —— vaccine, is so important. we are still— seeing —— vaccine, is so important. we are still asking pregnant mums to come _ we are still asking pregnant mums to come forward and please have the vaccine _ come forward and please have the vaccine lf — come forward and please have the vaccine. if you have not had the first— vaccine. if you have not had the first and — vaccine. if you have not had the first and second dose, it is still available _ first and second dose, it is still available. please, it is never too late _ available. please, it is never too late we — available. please, it is never too late. we don't want people to get postviral— late. we don't want people to get postviral complications. is trying to make — postviral complications. is trying to make sure that those numbers we are starting — to make sure that those numbers we are starting to log a lot of patience far more but we need more research _ patience far more but we need more research into the effects of long covid _ research into the effects of long covid itself.— research into the effects of long covid itself. ., ,, , ., , . covid itself. thank you very much. dr ni . hat covid itself. thank you very much. dr nighat arif. _ covid itself. thank you very much. dr nighat arif. always _ covid itself. thank you very much. dr nighat arif. always great - covid itself. thank you very much. dr nighat arif. always great to - covid itself. thank you very much. | dr nighat arif. always great to hear from her. great advice. many of us have been trying to go green, as we've become more aware of climate change and the environment. and something else that could help is public transport. switching to electric buses can help reduce carbon emissions, and now one company has designed a double decker with the longest battery range in the uk. our science correspondent richard westcott reports. if we're going to clean up the air in our towns and cities, we've got to attract more people
6:55 am
onto public transport. and that means getting rid of all those diesel buses chugging around. and that is where this new piece of technology comes in. designed by an ex—formula one engineer and his team, it looks like a normal double decker, but they say they found a way of boosting how far it can go on one charge. it's got five batteries, like this one, secreted around the vehicle, but that's not the clever bit. the clever bit is at the back, because apparently with electric buses, they can use as much energy just heating and cooling the cabin, as they do physically driving along. so they've developed much more efficient air conditioning. and that means overall it's got a much longer range. ian foley used to work for williams and lotus, until he decided to turn his skills to something a bit less racy. it's still a big challenge. interestingly, weight is an issue just like in formula one,
6:56 am
because the batteries we need for the electric bus are very heavy. we still need to be able to carry 87 passengers. and so it's quite a big challenge to get the weight distribution right on the vehicle for the electric bus. so some of that learning from your earlier career has helped you with this? absolutely. and we've got quite a few of the guys who i worked with early on in my career here, kind of working on weight saving and very efficient mechanical design. the key technology has been designed at a factory near norwich. long term, they want to make 200 vehicles a year to be sold all over the world, but still built locally. we've got the resources here, we've got the people here. our batteries are made locally here, so it was really important for us to make everything here in the uk. 90% of our product is actually made on this site. bus giant go—ahead is trialling one on a london route, so the vehicle is going to be taking its first passengers later in the spring. richard westcott, bbc news, norwich.
6:57 am
there you go. that is what is happening in norwich. beautiful day in norwich. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a new report's highlighted how more than two billion litres of raw sewage was dumped in the river thames over two days. thames water's mogden wastewater treatment works in isleworth, discharged enough sewage to fill 400 olympic—sized swimming pools in october 2020. the figures were published in a report by the environmental audit committee. thames water said any discharges of untreated sewage were "unacceptable". two london universities have signed up to a pledge against using so called "gagging" clauses — to silence victims of sexual misconduct, bullying and harassment. a bbc news investigation in 2020 found nearly a third of uk
6:58 am
universities had used non—disclosure agreements, known as ndas. now, the government is asking universities not to. so far, university college london and goldsmiths have signed up. a london council is training people to become lorry drivers to tackle the uk—wide shortage of hgv drivers. the road haulage association estimates there's a shortage of more than 100,000 qualified drivers in the uk. the new scheme run by waltham forest council will support 20 trainees. learning lots of different new skills. first and foremost, safety, how the vehicle works, and then obviously, the skill set of driving a vehicle. doing something new, especially at my age, has been fantastic. more importantly, it's to be able to help the local community out for me, really, and drive that. so i'm looking forward to it. i'm going to do a good job. well, lets see what's on the tubes. a good service apart from the northern line, which is part closed — those major upgrade works — meaning there's no service between moorgate and kennington until mid—may.
6:59 am
for all other travel updates, tune in to your local bbc radio station. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. temperatures widely above zero this morning. quite a bit of cloud overnight has helped to lift those temperatures. that cloud brought to you by these fronts. now they are sinking south through this morning, brightening up for the afternoon. the cloud — there are a few breaks in there, so some bright spells, a few splashes of rain in there as well, but once they clear, drier and brighter. sunshine through the afternoon. the north—westerlyjust starting to dig in. 10 celsius the maximum. but once that sun comes out it is likely to feel chillier. overnight it is going to be quite cold. the wind drops out and the temperature, therefore, dropping down to zero, if not below. so, a widespread frost first thing on thursday morning. the risk of maybe one or two mist and fog patches. for thursday, plenty of winter sunshine. it is going to feel quite chilly, a north—westerly breeze. but you can see high pressure starts to edge east, so the fronts veering
7:00 am
around the outside. settled conditions really for the rest of this week and into the weekend. plenty of fine weather, some sunshine for the next couple of days, a bit more cloud by the end of the weekend, but night—time temperatures cold, so frost and fog. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address, facebook and instagram. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. the latest inflation figures are being released in the next few minutes, giving us an indication of how expensive the cost of living has become. good morning from skipton market, where i will get a reaction to those
7:01 am
latest inflation figures and explaining what it all means your cost of living. the prime minister will set out the next steps to ease england's coronavirus restrictions later today. but first he'll first face mps in the commons as pressure on him to resign over downing street parties intensifies. rafa nadal is through at the australian open — could he be the one to stand alone with the most grand slam wins? victory in melbourne would do it. # dance your cares away. # worries for another day. # let the music play. # down in fraggle rock...# and dance your cares away — fraggle rock is back for a new generation, with all the old familiar faces. good morning. we have a couple of weather fronts sinking south. the rain increasingly turning patchy. behind them, lots of sunshine, some showers and gusty winds. all the details later in the programme.
7:02 am
it's wednesday 19th january. in the next few minutes we'll bring you the latest inflation figures — which tell us how fast prices for goods and services are rising and will give us an idea of the current cost of living. at the moment it's on the rise, mainly because of energy prices — and now many businesses are being forced to pass some of their costs onto customers. our current affairs correspondent, colletta smith, has been to one hotel in scarborough where the owners have had no choice but to increase their prices. this is a lot of windows. a lot of windows, yes. and a huge, huge ceiling. yeah. the things that give this hotel its charm and character are the very things now causing the nightmares. put, like, a secondary glazing on this side, it spoils the view on what is the period windows, as well. right now, obviously a modern building with lower ceilings and lots of insulation would be much easier to heat. it might look sunny, but there's an icy wind from the north sea,
7:03 am
and heating this placejumped up in november — from £2,000 a month to £10,000 a month. we've got to increase our prices. i mean, we've got no choice about it — we've got to offset some of the cost. usually in the winter months, hotels drop their prices quite significantly, but we just can't do that because there wouldn't be any point having the hotel open. but trying to explain that to her customers isn't something sadie's looking forward to. there's only a certain price limit to what people will pay for a hotel room, so you can't put your prices up too much, otherwise peoplejust aren't going to come — and particularly if they're all feeling the squeeze, too, with their own energy prices. from light, to heat, to shopping bills, staff are feeling the pain of those expensive prices at home, as well. i know that everything — fuel, you know, heating, everything — is going up, so it's got to be passed on to us. but if we're not earning — which were not, because you can't
7:04 am
when you're not... you know, when it's quiet like this, i'm not in as much as i would normally be. so i can't earn. as wages aren't rising as much as prices, pay packets aren't stretching as far. these inflation figures are the first we have of the new year, and i'd love to be able to give more positive news for 2022 — but with businesses passing on those extra costs to us, there are lots more price rises on the horizon. for anyone likejoanne, reassessing the annual finances, plans might have to change. we were hoping that this year was going to be the year when we can, you know, get back out and go on holiday and stuff, and if these price hikes are going to continue, i don't think that's going to be an option, unfortunately! covering the cost of keeping warm, whatever the weather throws at us, has become the new priority. colletta smith, bbc news, in scarborough. within the past few moments,
7:05 am
we've had official confirmation of the scale of those price rises. inflation was 5.4% in december, the highest rate since 1992. that's more than double the target set by the bank of england and shows just how serious the squeeze is on people's cost of living. ben's in skipton for us this morning and has more on this breaking news. ben. yes, good morning from skipton market where — ben. yes, good morning from skipton market where the _ ben. yes, good morning from skipton market where the traders _ ben. yes, good morning from skipton market where the traders are - ben. yes, good morning from skipton market where the traders are getting | market where the traders are getting ready for the day ahead, including at this fruit and veg stall and that figure will resonate with so many of them, with the traders and the people coming here to buy their goods. 5.4% inflation stands at, thatis goods. 5.4% inflation stands at, that is a figure for december, that is how much average prices have gone up is how much average prices have gone up compared with 12 months before. it covers all sorts of things from fresh fruit and veg clothing, to cinema tickets, to fuel, and that
7:06 am
really is being felt by households already. it is being driven by the increase in costs of electricity and gas. of course businesses are facing those higher cost, as well, as well as a shortage of drivers, so they are having to pay more to attract people to take on that work. all of that gets passed on to us as customers. chats to dominic. are you noticing prices go up for the stuff you buy? noticing prices go up for the stuff ou bu ? , , ~ you buy? definitely. at the minute it is very seasonal, _ you buy? definitely. at the minute it is very seasonal, your _ you buy? definitely. at the minute it is very seasonal, your berries, . it is very seasonal, your berries, strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, they are coming from overseas — raspberries, they are coming from overseas. with the hgv driver is the cost is _ overseas. with the hgv driver is the cost is going — overseas. with the hgv driver is the cost is going up because everything is being _ cost is going up because everything is being driven in. you cost is going up because everything is being driven in.— is being driven in. you absorbing it b -aassin is being driven in. you absorbing it by passing it _ is being driven in. you absorbing it by passing it on — is being driven in. you absorbing it by passing it on and _ is being driven in. you absorbing it by passing it on and charging - is being driven in. you absorbing it by passing it on and charging your| by passing it on and charging your customers more? bath by passing it on and charging your customers more?— by passing it on and charging your customers more? both because i have to t customers more? both because i have tot to customers more? both because i have to try to price — customers more? both because i have to try to price match _ customers more? both because i have to try to price match the _ customers more? both because i have to try to price match the best - customers more? both because i have to try to price match the best i - customers more? both because i have to try to price match the best i can - to try to price match the best i can to try to price match the best i can to supermarkets, with aldi and lidl being _ to supermarkets, with aldi and lidl being the _ to supermarkets, with aldi and lidl being the cheapest. a little bit false _ being the cheapest. a little bit false on — being the cheapest. a little bit false on me but my customers are very understanding at the minute.
7:07 am
dominic. — very understanding at the minute. dominic, thank you. inflation, the figure we have had in the last few minutes, stands at 5.1% for december, the highest it has been —— 5.4%, the highest since 1992 you. 5.4%, the highest since 1992 you, ben. let's get more reaction now on those latest inflation figures. we're joined by the shadow business secretary, jonathan reynolds. good morning. your reaction to that news of 5.4%. it good morning. your reaction to that news of 5496-— good morning. your reaction to that news of 5.4%. it reveals how serious the situation — news of 5.4%. it reveals how serious the situation is. _ news of 5.4%. it reveals how serious the situation is. it _ news of 5.4%. it reveals how serious the situation is. it is _ news of 5.4%. it reveals how serious the situation is. it is the _ news of 5.4%. it reveals how serious the situation is. it is the return - the situation is. it is the return to the early 19905 in terms of inflation figures. what is most concerning, that is a real terms pay cut for workers and a real terms squeeze on incomes for pensioners because of the suspension of the triple lock for this year. this comes before we have got the decision next month for the retail energy price cap, where we might see, unless the government intervenes, some unprecedented rises intervenes, some unprecedented rises in energy costs, which will then put up in energy costs, which will then put up inflation further. this is a very
7:08 am
serious situation indeed, and frankly this is what we should be talking about in british politics, in parliament and instead we are talking about downing street parties and the future of the prime minister. this is what matters to people, the cost of living crisis and how the government should respond. and how the government should resond. , _, ., and how the government should resond. , ., ., ,, ., respond. lets continue to talk about inflation. respond. lets continue to talk about inflation- lf — respond. lets continue to talk about inflation. if you _ respond. lets continue to talk about inflation. if you were _ respond. lets continue to talk about inflation. if you were in _ respond. lets continue to talk about inflation. if you were in office, - inflation. if you were in office, what would you do to improve the cost of lincoln people?— what would you do to improve the cost of lincoln people? those rises ener: cost of lincoln people? those rises energy prices. _ cost of lincoln people? those rises energy prices, which _ cost of lincoln people? those rises energy prices, which people - cost of lincoln people? those rises energy prices, which people are - energy prices, which people are facing, we have set out a plan that would give everyone at least £200 off their energy bill and for those who are the highest hit up to £600 and we would fund that to the revenue coming to the exchequer from those prices is a one—off windfall tax on the oil and gas producers. we cannot allow people to see rises of maybe £1000 a year in their energy bills. clearly that is a terrible situation for households but also that will make the inflation picture worse deal. it requires action from
7:09 am
government and i'm afraid we are not getting it, the government have rejected our plan, so let's see a plan from them to address these real worries. ., . ~' plan from them to address these real worries. ., ., ,, ., ., plan from them to address these real worries. ., . ,, ., ., ., worries. you talk about that one-off windfall tax- — worries. you talk about that one-off windfall tax. we _ worries. you talk about that one-off windfall tax. we have _ worries. you talk about that one-off windfall tax. we have had _ worries. you talk about that one-off windfall tax. we have had reaction l windfall tax. we have had reaction to that from the energy industry, who say that a one—off windfall tax on uk offshore oil and gas operators would cause irreparable damage to the sector and leave consumers even more exposed to shortages. how would that fix, that one—off windfall tax, how would that fix what is a global problem? i how would that fix what is a global roblem? ., , , . , problem? i would respectfully disa . ree problem? i would respectfully disagree with _ problem? i would respectfully disagree with that _ problem? i would respectfully disagree with that position. i problem? i would respectfully. disagree with that position. the north sea oil and gas basin is one of the most profitable places in the world to extract oil and gas and would remain so in our plans. the unprecedented revenue that is flowing to the companies operating though at the moment, because of this global rise in energy prices, means it is a cash machine for them. all we are saying is we would modestly take a portion and use it for the benefit of the economy as a
7:10 am
whole. i don't think it will calls irreparable damage, it has been done before and the position is still a strong one. you have to look at how to help people for household budgets but also the economy as a whole, the squeeze from higher prices and hit to domestic budgets, it is the right decision, the right proportionality to take that action, to give people some benefit. if the governor to reject our plan, let's see a plan from them because we cannot simply accept the picture we are looking at now. ~ . w' accept the picture we are looking at now. ~ . ., .,, ., ., now. when asked about the option of cuttin: vat now. when asked about the option of cutting vat on _ now. when asked about the option of cutting vat on energy _ now. when asked about the option of cutting vat on energy bills _ now. when asked about the option of cutting vat on energy bills the - cutting vat on energy bills the prime minister said it is a blunt instrument that would give the biggest savings to richer people. do you accept it would disproportionately benefit wealthier people? the disproportionately benefit wealthier -eo - le? . , ., disproportionately benefit wealthier --eole? ., disproportionately benefit wealthier n-eole? . ., .~' people? the reason you want to take vat off energy _ people? the reason you want to take vat off energy bills, _ people? the reason you want to take vat off energy bills, it _ people? the reason you want to take vat off energy bills, it is _ people? the reason you want to take vat off energy bills, it is an - vat off energy bills, it is an immediate thing the government can do to get relief to people. we would like a progressive package that gives most of what the people who need it, which is why our proposals combine that with other plans to
7:11 am
improve the scope of warm homes discount, making sure there is more money, up to £400 but we would also increase the eligibility it took 9 million household so it is a package we are putting forward through that revenue that we would raise that would give help to everybody because even a middle income households will struggle the energy rises we are looking at right now. we would give more support to the people who need it most, that is the right approach. big day in parliament. i know you want to talk about inflation but lets talk about what is happening in westminster. will your leader, sir keir starmer, call on the prime minister to resign as pmqs? he will re are minister to resign as pmqs? he will --reare his minister to resign as pmqs? he will prepare his questions _ minister to resign as pmqs? he will prepare his questions in _ minister to resign as pmqs? he will prepare his questions in the - minister to resign as pmqs? he will prepare his questions in the usual l prepare his questions in the usual way but we have already called on the premises to resign because he hasn't got the authority to lead. he hasn't got the authority to lead. he has demeaned the office of prime minister and i think everyone knows, whether it is before you create reports or after it, the threshold is likely to be hit for that vote of no confidence —— the sue gray report. i reject the way the people in public office and the role of the
7:12 am
government is being demeaned in this weight that i resent the fact this is taking up time that should be spent on addressing issues like the cost of living crisis, the impact of that inflation announcement this morning and decided that ligament can not respond at all because the prime minister is replying to this crisis of his own making. i5 prime minister is replying to this crisis of his own making. is it sli . htl crisis of his own making. is it slightly awkward _ crisis of his own making. is it slightly awkward when you have had to hide your own leader, keir starmer address the image of himself in a work situation but eating a takeaway, drinking a beer during the height by—election, saying he has nothing to apologise for at a time when most people at home, not mixing in work environments or seeing their friends and family? —— out the hartlepool by—election. ihe friends and family? -- out the hartlepool by-election. he was workin: hartlepool by-election. he was working in _ hartlepool by-election. he was working in an — hartlepool by-election. he was working in an mp's _ hartlepool by-election. he was | working in an mp's constituency office. i am angry at the way the conservative party cannot defend the premise of�*s trying to suggest we
7:13 am
are all the same. there is no comparison to what keir starmer was doing that day, with the systematic breaching of the rules, up to 17 parties we are now talking about downing street and the lack of any basic professionalism or ability to follow the rules. there is no comparison and we are not on the same. this is on the government, the prime minister and they should stop trying to besmirch the reputation of others because they cannot defend their own actions. [10 others because they cannot defend their own actions.— their own actions. do you think the icture their own actions. do you think the picture doesn't _ their own actions. do you think the picture doesn't look _ their own actions. do you think the picture doesn't look good? - their own actions. do you think the picture doesn't look good? the - picture doesn't look good? the icture picture doesn't look good? the picture has _ picture doesn't look good? tue: picture has been in picture doesn't look good? tie: picture has been in the public domain for many, many months. people should ask themselves why people are desperately trying to associate that with the events we have seen in downing street. there is no comparison, there is nothing to apologise for. this is clearly about the prime minister and the actions he and his staff have taken which have flagrantly breached the rules at every stage and the excuses have come from the fact that no parties existed they existed but no one told him about his own rules. it stretches credulity that we can be in a position where we are having a
7:14 am
different answerfrom in a position where we are having a different answer from the prime minister every time he does a press conference and that is the problem here. , ., . . conference and that is the problem here. ., ., , ., , conference and that is the problem here. �* ., . . , ., , . ~' conference and that is the problem here. . ., , ., , ., here. jonathan reynolds, thank you ve much here. jonathan reynolds, thank you very much indeed. _ the prime minister is expected to set out plans for easing england's coronavirus restrictions when he addresses parliament later today. the health secretary, sajid javid, has said he's cautiously optimistic that the so—called plan b measures — due to expire next week — can be "substantially reduced". gareth barlow reports. hi, there, good morning. how are you doing? hello, good morning. against the backdrop of allegations of lockdown parties in downing street, and rumours of a vote of no confidence, the prime minister still has big decisions to make a5 england's plan b restrictions are due to end in a week's time. facemasks in schools and public settings, and covid passes for large venues were introduced in december to slow the spread of the omicron variant. but those restrictions could be gone within days, according to the health secretary, sajid javid. government officials say the decision remains finely balanced, a517,000 patients remain
7:15 am
in english hospitals with covid. but there is growing optimism the data is now moving in the right direction. in scotland, covid—19 restrictions are to be eased from monday, with nightclubs reopening, large indoor events resuming, and social—distancing rules being dropped. the cases that we have had — and still have — with omicron are of a completely different magnitude to anything that we have experienced in relation to previous waves of the virus. so the measures were proportionate, but we obviously have taken steps to remove those measures and restrictions when the time has been appropriate to do so. not everyone will welcome a loosening of restrictions — many hospitals have struggled to cope with staffing shortages, or problems discharging older patients into care homes. it's possible, therefore, that some restrictions — such as facemasks — will be retained. the prime minister will discuss the options with his cabinet this
7:16 am
morning, and then tell parliament and the public his plan. gareth barlow, bbc news. boris johnson will face further scrutiny surrounding his leadership today, when he returns to the house of commons for prime minister's questions later. mrjohnson is under growing pressure as speculation grows about a backbench rebellion against him, as a number of his own mp5 are believed to be preparing letters of no confidence. our political correspondent jonathan blake reports. late—night talks in a private members' club — a small group of conservative mp5 met here last night with talk of removing borisjohnson from office on the agenda. after a day of intense speculation, there was confidence among some backbenchers that enough were ready to submit a letter of no confidence in the prime minister, triggering a vote on his position. the meetings came after the prime minister again denied that he was warned a drinks party in the downing street garden was against lockdown restrictions in place at the time.
7:17 am
on a hospital visit yesterday, borisjohnson again apologised for parties in downing street on the eve of the duke of edinburgh's funeral, saying he deeply and bitterly regretted that it happened. if the best argument that you have got to the accusation that you broke the rules was that, "well, nobody had told me that the rules that i had imposed on everyone else were being broken," then i think that reveals you are in a difficult position, and i think the prime minister is in a difficult position because of his behaviour, because of the constant set of allegations that are being made. and i think conservative mp5 are increasingly uncomfortable with this, and it does appear that quite a number are now taking action. others are reserving judgement, and ministers offering qualified support. the prime minister was very clear last week in his statement that mistakes had been made. he's set up an inquiry and i think it's important that we let that
7:18 am
inquiry run its progress. i hope it's going to report very soon, but i hope that we can therefore get all of these stories out there that have been really distressing, and then we can decide on what next steps to take. some insist borisjohnson can survive — dismissing talk of plots against him as overblown. but in the house of commons at prime minister's questions this lunchtime, he'll again have to try to shore up support that he badly needs. jonathan blake, bbc news. our chief political correspondent adam fleming joins us now from westminster. it will be one of those big days for the prime minister, a5 it will be one of those big days for the prime minister, asjonathan blake was saying in that report, it is about how much support there is for him out there. it is about how much support there is for him out there.— for him out there. it will be a big day because _ for him out there. it will be a big day because it — for him out there. it will be a big day because it was _ for him out there. it will be a big day because it was a _ for him out there. it will be a big day because it was a big - for him out there. it will be a big day because it was a big day - day because it was a big day yesterday. a group of 20 mp5 who were elected in the 2019 election from all different bits of the
7:19 am
country had a meeting and it was in the office of the mp whose constituency has melton mowbray in it so it is now being dubbed the porkpie plot because of that geographical association quite a lot of people at that meeting i'm told had decided they would submit letters of no confidence in boris johnson to graham brady, the chair of the backbench conservative committee. if graham brady gets 54 letters then that means there will be a vote of confidence in the prime minister pretty soon after that. the problem is this is a very secretive process so we are all guessing about how many lectures may have been submitted, when they were submitted and by whom and who may be about to sendin and by whom and who may be about to send in a new one. that is creating a very chaotic and unpredictable atmosphere here at westminster which you are right, it means a lot will ride on prime minister's questions today because a lot of conservative mp5 will be looking at the prime minister's demeanour, what he says, how he handles the situation, and i think some of them may be prepared
7:20 am
to move quicker than waiting for the report into all the downing street party is being prepared by the senior civil servant to —— sue gray. there are a lot of conservative mp5 waiting for that report and we still don't know when that will come, so this could ramble on, this sense of crisis, for a few days yet.— crisis, for a few days yet. adam, thank you _ crisis, for a few days yet. adam, thank you for — crisis, for a few days yet. adam, thank you for the _ crisis, for a few days yet. adam, thank you for the moment. - crisis, for a few days yet. adam, thank you for the moment. we l crisis, for a few days yet. adam, i thank you for the moment. we will speak to someone from the government in about ten minutes and you can of course what prime minister's questions on the bbc news channel later and listen to it on radio 5 live. lots of news around and also lots of weather. , ., ., lots of news around and also lots of weather. ,., ., ., , ., weather. good morning. if you haven't yet— weather. good morning. if you haven't yet stepped _ weather. good morning. if you haven't yet stepped out - weather. good morning. if you haven't yet stepped out it - weather. good morning. if you haven't yet stepped out it is i weather. good morning. if you. haven't yet stepped out it is not weather. good morning. if you - haven't yet stepped out it is not as cold start — haven't yet stepped out it is not as cold start to the yesterday. in parts — cold start to the yesterday. in parts of — cold start to the yesterday. in parts of oxygen the temperatures 10 degrees _ parts of oxygen the temperatures 10 degrees higher than yesterday at this time — degrees higher than yesterday at this time. no heatwave, it will still feel— this time. no heatwave, it will still feel quite chilly if you are up still feel quite chilly if you are up and — still feel quite chilly if you are up and out quite early on. what is
7:21 am
happening — up and out quite early on. what is happening is we have two weather fronts _ happening is we have two weather fronts sinking southwards. the first is a weak— fronts sinking southwards. the first is a weak affair with klavan patchy rain _ is a weak affair with klavan patchy rain the — is a weak affair with klavan patchy rain. the second coming in behind it has produced heavier rain as it moved — has produced heavier rain as it moved across scotland and northern england _ moved across scotland and northern england but will fizzle as it moved south _ england but will fizzle as it moved south and — england but will fizzle as it moved south and most will have a dry and sunny— south and most will have a dry and sunny day — south and most will have a dry and sunny day. some showers in the north, _ sunny day. some showers in the north, initially rain showers but increasingly will turn wintry, even at lower _ increasingly will turn wintry, even at lower levels across the northern isles at lower levels across the northern lsles and _ at lower levels across the northern isles and the final in scotland, and a few— isles and the final in scotland, and a few showers down the north sea coastline, — a few showers down the north sea coastline, as well. possibly one or two in _ coastline, as well. possibly one or two in west— coastline, as well. possibly one or two in west wales and south—west england _ two in west wales and south—west england. black circles represent the wind gusts, so the strongest winds today— wind gusts, so the strongest winds today will— wind gusts, so the strongest winds today will be in the north and west but the _ today will be in the north and west but the wind will pick up across northern— but the wind will pick up across northern england and temperatures ranging _ northern england and temperatures ranging from about one in lerwick 29 or ten— ranging from about one in lerwick 29 or ten as _ ranging from about one in lerwick 29 or ten as we — ranging from about one in lerwick 29 or ten as we push down to the south—west the channel islands. out of the _ south—west the channel islands. out of the strength of the wind and it will be _ of the strength of the wind and it will be colder in the latter part of the day — will be colder in the latter part of the day. for the evening and overnight— the day. for the evening and
7:22 am
overnight we hang onto a few showers but under— overnight we hang onto a few showers but under clear sky is the temperature will fall away quite rapidly, — temperature will fall away quite rapidly, looking at a widespread frost~ _ rapidly, looking at a widespread host if— rapidly, looking at a widespread frost. if you have had a few showers there _ frost. if you have had a few showers there may— frost. if you have had a few showers there may be some icy stretches to watch _ there may be some icy stretches to watch out _ there may be some icy stretches to watch out for. tomorrow morning after _ watch out for. tomorrow morning after that — watch out for. tomorrow morning after that cold start, for most it will be — after that cold start, for most it will be dry, peppering of showers in the north— will be dry, peppering of showers in the north and east, if you across west— the north and east, if you across west wales and south—west england, and temperatures once again cold. wherever— and temperatures once again cold. wherever you are, it is another day for wrapping up warm. gk, wherever you are, it is another day for wrapping up warm.— wherever you are, it is another day for wrapping up warm. ok, going to net the for wrapping up warm. ok, going to get the woolly _ for wrapping up warm. ok, going to get the woolly hat _ for wrapping up warm. ok, going to get the woolly hat out. _ for wrapping up warm. ok, going to get the woolly hat out. not - for wrapping up warm. ok, going to get the woolly hat out. not out - get the woolly hat out. not out alread ? get the woolly hat out. not out already? i _ get the woolly hat out. not out already? i have _ get the woolly hat out. not out already? i have the _ get the woolly hat out. not out already? i have the big - get the woolly hat out. not out already? i have the big coat. get the woolly hat out. not out i already? i have the big coat out, i ma have already? i have the big coat out, i may have to _ already? i have the big coat out, i may have to ally _ already? i have the big coat out, i may have to ally it _ already? i have the big coat out, i may have to ally it with _ already? i have the big coat out, i may have to ally it with that - already? i have the big coat out, i may have to ally it with that hat. i may have to ally it with that hat. deploy the big coat.— may have to ally it with that hat. deploy the big coat. deploy the big coat! the care regulator, the care quality commission, says the number of staff vacancies in care homes in england has nearly doubled in the past nine months. it's collected data that shows by the end of last year, the number of unfilled posts had risen to more than one in ten jobs. here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. care homes supporting people
7:23 am
who are older and disabled have found it increasingly tough to find enough staff. burn—out from coping with covid, low pay, and compulsory vaccinations have increased existing recruitment problems. the regulator, the care quality commission, has gathered data from more than 8,200 homes. in april of last year, on average, 6% of care—homejobs in england were unfilled. by the end of december, vacancies had nearly doubled — reaching 11.5%. a survey for the regulator of 2,000 family carers also suggests that more than half believe the dignity and independence of the person they care for was undermined during lockdowns. and nearly three quarters say the individual�*s mental health has deteriorated. the regulator wants to hear more from families about the services they're getting. we're specifically keen to hear from everyone, but also people who have loved ones in care homes. it's been a really challenging time — particularly for residents of care homes — through the pandemic, where social—care providers have strove to keep people safe. but also there's been challenges around people being able to see their loved ones
7:24 am
and to see visits. there are local recruitment campaigns, and extra money has been put in by government — but at the moment, the pressures on care services remain acute. alison holt, bbc news. the department for health say they are providing £462.5 million for recruitment and retention — and that care staff are working incredibly hard. as the issue of staff shortages continue, karen rogers has been able to help her mum, marion, by becoming an essential care giver — allowing her to go into the care home to provide support. the role was first introduced last year, when tough restrictions were in place. karenjoins us now. good morning. thank you for talking to us this morning. first of all, your mum went into care in february 2020, initially only as a temporary measure. what happened since then? yeah, so it was for respite. she
7:25 am
wasn't safe living on her own any more. normalvisiting in wasn't safe living on her own any more. normal visiting in february. in might relent into lockdown, she didn't handle it very well. she declined so bad she then had to get moved from that care home to another one, they were not dealing with her behaviour very well. we could speak through the window, then garden visits from a distance and she was declining so much and they brought her out in a wheelchair, we were not sure what was wrong with her because she was walking up to that point. then she went into hospital and she was in there for two and a half weeks, she had sepsis and pneumonia. she had physio in there, she overcame it, but the second care home would no longer take her back.
7:26 am
hard work, we found another care home. she needed physio to get walking again and because of lockdown we couldn't get the physio in. now she can't walk, she has declined so much. it in. now she can't walk, she has declined so much.— declined so much. it must be incredibly _ declined so much. it must be incredibly difficult _ declined so much. it must be incredibly difficult for - declined so much. it must be incredibly difficult for you - declined so much. it must be| incredibly difficult for you and your family with everything that has been going on at the moment, and really frustrating finding ways to deal with this. what did you do, and how have you been able to help? well, i belong to a campaign rights for residents, who are looking to get essential caregivers made law. a lot of carers are going off sick so it helps a relative in need, we are essential, part of their care. we
7:27 am
managed to get essential caregiver lifeline but we actually... t managed to get essential caregiver lifeline but we actually. . ._ lifeline but we actually... i think we have just _ lifeline but we actually... i think we have just lost _ lifeline but we actually... i think we have just lost you _ lifeline but we actually... i think we have just lost you for - lifeline but we actually... i think we have just lost you for a - lifeline but we actually... i think - we have just lost you for a moment, let's see if we can get karen back. she is talking about what she did, she became an essential caregiver for her mum to be able to help the care staff with him during difficult time. she thinks it is a really important thing to be designated as an essential caregiver to go in and support your stuff and relative living in a care home. i don't think we can get her back, we have a technical problem.— we can get her back, we have a technical problem. which we are very much used to — technical problem. which we are very much used to in _ technical problem. which we are very much used to in this _ technical problem. which we are very much used to in this current - technical problem. which we are very much used to in this current age. - much used to in this current age. later on the programme we will be talking about fraggle rock which, if you are obsessed with fraggle rock, as i was... where you? hot you are obsessed with fraggle rock, as i was. .. where you?— as i was... where you? not as much as i was... where you? not as much as ou. as i was... where you? not as much as you- dance _ as i was. .. where you? not as much as you. dance your— as i was... where you? not as much as you. dance your cares _ as i was... where you? not as much as you. dance your cares away - as i was... where you? not as much as you. dance your cares away and l as you. dance your cares away and all that.
7:28 am
as you. dance your cares away and all that- they — as you. dance your cares away and all that. they are _ as you. dance your cares away and all that. they are bringing - as you. dance your cares away and all that. they are bringing it - as you. dance your cares away and all that. they are bringing it back. all that. they are bringing it back and we will speak to the daughter of jim henson, who came up with it all, and also one of the original puppeteers. igrate and also one of the original puppeteers— and also one of the original puppeteers. and also one of the original -u- eteers. ~ . . ~' puppeteers. we have fraggle rock ro al . puppeteers. we have fraggle rock royalty. definitely. _ puppeteers. we have fraggle rock royalty. definitely. the _ puppeteers. we have fraggle rock royalty. definitely. the other - puppeteers. we have fraggle rock royalty. definitely. the other thing to talk about. _ royalty. definitely. the other thing to talk about, are _ royalty. definitely. the other thing to talk about, are you _ royalty. definitely. the other thing to talk about, are you one - royalty. definitely. the other thing to talk about, are you one of- royalty. definitely. the other thing j to talk about, are you one of these people who is obsessed with wordle? lots of people player millions of people and you have to get a five letter word and essentially if you have six chances to guess this five letter word and quite a few people are obsessed with it and we are quite proud because we brought our minds together today and got the six letter word in three goals. igrate minds together today and got the six letter word in three goals.— letter word in three goals. we did well. i wasn't _ letter word in three goals. we did well. i wasn't as _ letter word in three goals. we did well. i wasn't as obsessed... - letter word in three goals. we did well. i wasn't as obsessed... fivej well. i wasn't as obsessed... five letter word- _ well. i wasn't as obsessed... five letter word. why _ well. i wasn't as obsessed... five letter word. why do _ well. i wasn't as obsessed... five letter word. why do you - well. i wasn't as obsessed... f a: letter word. why do you show me what it was and i am now obsessed. igrate letter word. why do you show me what it was and i am now obsessed.- it was and i am now obsessed. we are s-ueakin it was and i am now obsessed. we are speaking to — it was and i am now obsessed. we are speaking to susie _ it was and i am now obsessed. we are speaking to susie dent _ it was and i am now obsessed. we are speaking to susie dent later _ it was and i am now obsessed. we are speaking to susie dent later because i speaking to susie dent later because if you can't get it one day it books you until the next one. a lot of brains around the nation are on it at the moment and if you don't know anything about it, steer clear! it
7:29 am
anything about it, steer clear! it is addictive, don't even start. plenty more to still come on the programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a new report's highlighted how more than two billion litres of raw sewage was dumped in the river thames over two days. thames water's mogden waste water treatment works in isleworth, discharged enough sewage to fill 400 olympic—sized swimming pools in october 2020. the figures were published in a report by the environmental audit committee. thames water said any discharges of untreated sewage were "unacceptable". two london universities have signed up to a pledge against using so called gagging clauses, to silence victims of sexual misconduct, bullying and harassment. a bbc news investigation in 2020 found nearly a third of uk universities had used non—disclosure agreements, known as nda5. now, the government is asking
7:30 am
universities not to. so far, university college london and goldsmiths have signed up. a london council is training people to become lorry drivers to tackle the uk—wide shortage of hgv drivers. the road haulage association estimates there's a shortage of more than 100,000 qualified drivers. the new scheme run by waltham forest council will support 20 trainees. learning lots of different new skills. first and foremost, safety, how the vehicle works, and then obviously, the skill set of driving a vehicle. doing something new, especially at my age, has been fantastic. more importantly, it's to be able to help the local community out for me, really, and drive that. so i'm looking forward to it. i'm going to do a good job. let's see what's happening on the tubes. let's see what's a good service apart from the northern line, which is part closed for major upgrade works, meaning there's no service between moorgate and kennington until mid—may.
7:31 am
for all other travel updates, tune in to your local bbc radio station. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. temperatures widely above zero this morning. quite a bit of cloud overnight has helped to lift those temperatures. that cloud brought to you by these fronts. now they are sinking south through this morning, brightening up for the afternoon. the cloud — there are a few breaks in there, so some bright spells, a few splashes of rain in there as well, but once they clear, drier and brighter. sunshine through the afternoon. the north—westerlyjust starting to dig in. 10 celsius the maximum. but once that sun comes out it is likely to feel chillier. overnight it is going to be quite cold. the wind drops out and the temperature, therefore, dropping down to zero, if not below. so, a widespread frost first thing on thursday morning. the risk of maybe one or two mist and fog patches. for thursday, plenty of winter sunshine. it is going to feel quite chilly, a north—westerly breeze. but you can see high pressure
7:32 am
starts to edge east, so the fronts veering around the outside. settled conditions really for the rest of this week and into the weekend. plenty of fine weather, some sunshine for the next couple of days, a bit more cloud by the end of the weekend, but night—time temperatures cold, so frost and fog. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in hour. now it's back to dan and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. the time is 7:32am. the uk's cost of living surged to 5.4% in the 12 months to december — the highest rate of increase the consumer prices index measure of inflation rose from 5.1% in november, driven by housing and transport. separate figures issued today showed that average pay rises are failing to keep up
7:33 am
with the rise in the cost of living. borisjohnson will meet his cabinet in the morning to discuss whether to ease plan b covid measures in england. the health secretary, sajid javid, has said he's cautiously optimistic that controls — due to expire next week — can be "substantially reduced". the measures, like wearing masks in some public spaces and the use of covid passes, were introduced last month. the prime minister will face further scrutiny surrounding his leadership at prime minister's questions later, as the row over lockdown parties at number 10 continues. mrjohnson is under growing pressure following claims more of his own mp5 are set to submit letters of no confidence in him, adding to the seven who are already known to have done so. covid restrictions introduced to curb the spread of the omicron variant in scotland will be lifted from monday. this means nightclubs can reopen,
7:34 am
attendance limits at indoor events will be removed and social distancing rules will be dropped. non—professional indoor contact sports will also resume — but people are still being asked to work from home and to take lateral flow tests before meeting with others. a man in his 305 has been arrested on suspicion of the murder of primary school teacher ashling murphy in ireland. it comes after hundreds of mourners lined the streets in rural county 0ffaly outside her funeral mass, which was attended by the irish president and taoiseach. ashling was attacked while out exercising last wednesday. there's plenty to talk to the government about this morning, from the growing pressure on the prime minister, to england's plan b measures, and the latest inflation figures. we're joined now by the armed forces minister, james heappey. thank you for being with us. good to talk to you. as we were saying, loves to get through. can we start
7:35 am
with the breaking news this morning about the inflation figures? for those just tuning about the inflation figures? for thosejust tuning in, 5.4%, the highest since 1992. how worried are you about those figures? idem. you about those figures? very, althouah you about those figures? very, although it _ you about those figures? very, although it is _ you about those figures? very, although it is worth _ you about those figures? very, although it is worth noting - you about those figures? very, although it is worth noting thatj although it is worth noting that actually, — although it is worth noting that actually, most people won't need to see the _ actually, most people won't need to see the figures this morning to know that their— see the figures this morning to know that their energy bills, their shopping bills, have been going up. and that _ shopping bills, have been going up. and that is — shopping bills, have been going up. and that is a cause for real concern _ and that is a cause for real concern. it is something the government is seeking to intervene over. _ government is seeking to intervene over. to _ government is seeking to intervene over, to help those who will be struggling the most to deal with this _ struggling the most to deal with this. £500 million in the household support— this. £500 million in the household support fund administered by local authorities to help those families that struggled most with their food and utility bills is a necessary measure _ and utility bills is a necessary measure and the government is looking — measure and the government is looking at— measure and the government is looking at what more could and should — looking at what more could and should be — looking at what more could and should be done.— looking at what more could and should be done. ., _, . , ., should be done. how concerned should viewers be this — should be done. how concerned should viewers be this morning, _ should be done. how concerned should viewers be this morning, given - should be done. how concerned should viewers be this morning, given that - viewers be this morning, given that this is well over double what the bank of england predicted? foretell.
7:36 am
bank of england predicted? well, like i said, bank of england predicted? well, like i said. i— bank of england predicted? well, like i said, i don't _ bank of england predicted? well, like i said, i don't know _ bank of england predicted? well, like i said, i don't know that - like i said, i don't know that viewers _ like i said, i don't know that viewers are necessarily learning anything — viewers are necessarily learning anything new this morning because they will— anything new this morning because they will have seen the cost of their— they will have seen the cost of their bills _ they will have seen the cost of their bills increasing over the course — their bills increasing over the course of— their bills increasing over the course of the last few months. but it is a _ course of the last few months. but it is a headline that reminds all of us in _ it is a headline that reminds all of us in government that there are millions— us in government that there are millions of— us in government that there are millions of people out there who are concerned _ millions of people out there who are concerned about their ability to heat _ concerned about their ability to heat their home, feed their families, _ heat their home, feed their families, and that is why the chancellor, the business secretary and the _ chancellor, the business secretary and the prime minister are looking at what _ and the prime minister are looking at what the government could and should _ at what the government could and should be — at what the government could and should be doing to help them. we have should be doing to help them. - have spoken to the labour party in the last half an hour, and they are talking about the cut to vt to provide immediate relief. are you looking at that measure? t provide immediate relief. are you looking at that measure?- looking at that measure? i think actually that _ looking at that measure? i think actually that has _ looking at that measure? i think actually that has already - looking at that measure? i think actually that has already been i actually that has already been discounted and i would argue rightly so. because that would be a universal— so. because that would be a universal intervention. very obviously, because vat is a value added _ obviously, because vat is a value added tax — obviously, because vat is a value added tax. those who have the biggest — added tax. those who have the biggest heating bills, also the biggest heating bills, also the
7:37 am
biggest homes, would make the biggest — biggest homes, would make the biggest saving by the deletion of vat _ biggest saving by the deletion of vat i_ biggest saving by the deletion of vat. i would far rather see the government do as it is looking at, which _ government do as it is looking at, which is _ government do as it is looking at, which is a — government do as it is looking at, which is a more focused intervention to help _ which is a more focused intervention to help those who are actually struggling to pay the most. that is one of the things _ struggling to pay the most. that is one of the things i _ struggling to pay the most. that is one of the things i am _ struggling to pay the most. that is one of the things i am sure - struggling to pay the most. that is one of the things i am sure the - one of the things i am sure the prime minister will be speaking about at prime minister's questions today. but there remains this party problem within your party. do you think that your leader, boris johnson, did he knowingly mislead parliament when he was speaking about that event that took place in downing street in may of 2020? t downing street in may of 2020? i think that all of us who serve in her majesty's government and to sign at the _ her majesty's government and to sign at the ministerial code know that when _ at the ministerial code know that when we — at the ministerial code know that when we stand up at the dispatch box we have _ when we stand up at the dispatch box we have a _ when we stand up at the dispatch box we have a responsibility to be very accurate _ we have a responsibility to be very accurate in — we have a responsibility to be very accurate in what we say. and that is accurate in what we say. and that is a responsibility that no minister where _ a responsibility that no minister where is — a responsibility that no minister where is likely. 50 when the prime minister— where is likely. 50 when the prime minister stood up at the dispatch box the — minister stood up at the dispatch box the other week and he gave his account— box the other week and he gave his account of— box the other week and he gave his account of things, and he offered the most — account of things, and he offered the most sincere of apologies to
7:38 am
people _ the most sincere of apologies to people across the country who are furious _ people across the country who are furious with what they have heard and seen. — furious with what they have heard and seen. i— furious with what they have heard and seen, i have chosen to believe the prime — and seen, i have chosen to believe the prime minister. i hope colleagues do likewise. but i understand there are very many people — understand there are very many people out there who don't want to -ive people out there who don't want to give him _ people out there who don't want to give him the benefit of the doubt. that is— give him the benefit of the doubt. that is why it is right there is an investigation. and that sue gray takes _ investigation. and that sue gray takes evidence from everybody who she needs _ takes evidence from everybody who she needs to. just yesterday, we were _ she needs to. just yesterday, we were hearing people saying they were lloii'i were hearing people saying they were going to _ were hearing people saying they were going to give evidence on oath. well, _ going to give evidence on oath. well, i— going to give evidence on oath. well, i hope they do. i hope she considers— well, i hope they do. i hope she considers all of it. and we all look forward _ considers all of it. and we all look forward to— considers all of it. and we all look forward to hearing what she comes back with — forward to hearing what she comes back with. ., , , ., back with. one of the things you wanted to talk _ back with. one of the things you wanted to talk about _ back with. one of the things you wanted to talk about today - back with. one of the things you wanted to talk about today was. back with. one of the things you i wanted to talk about today was this new medal awarded to service personal involved in the evacuation of afghanistan. that is the last time i spoke to you on this programme. when we spoke about that issue, you talk about the importance of integrity during a military career. you talked about the importance of trusting leadership.
7:39 am
can we bring that forward to today? do you trust your leader? do you trust the prime minister at the moment? , , ., ., ., moment? yes, but i am in a position that so few — moment? yes, but i am in a position that so few people _ moment? yes, but i am in a position that so few people in _ moment? yes, but i am in a position that so few people in the _ moment? yes, but i am in a position that so few people in the country - that so few people in the country are in. _ that so few people in the country are in, because i don'tjust see the prime _ are in, because i don'tjust see the prime minister on tv, i don'tjust see him _ prime minister on tv, i don'tjust see him in— prime minister on tv, i don'tjust see him in the context of the knock—about of house of commons politics~ _ knock—about of house of commons politics i_ knock—about of house of commons politics. i see him in national security— politics. i see him in national security council meetings, cobra meetings, — security council meetings, cobra meetings, meetings in which we discuss — meetings, meetings in which we discuss the government's response to cobra _ discuss the government's response to cobra and _ discuss the government's response to cobra. and so what i see is a prime minister— cobra. and so what i see is a prime minister that— cobra. and so what i see is a prime minister that is in the detail he needs— minister that is in the detail he needs to — minister that is in the detail he needs to be in, that is making decisions _ needs to be in, that is making decisions that are truly life and death — decisions that are truly life and death. and he is making the right calls again — death. and he is making the right calls again and again and again. that— calls again and again and again. that makes it relatively easy for me to sit— that makes it relatively easy for me to sit here _ that makes it relatively easy for me to sit here and reflect on the prime minister— to sit here and reflect on the prime minister in — to sit here and reflect on the prime minister in a — to sit here and reflect on the prime minister in a way that is very different— minister in a way that is very different to how most of your viewers — different to how most of your viewers will be reflecting on right now _ viewers will be reflecting on right now and — viewers will be reflecting on right now and i— viewers will be reflecting on right now. and i don't expect them to be set over— now. and i don't expect them to be set over their breakfast during my testimony— set over their breakfast during my testimony and to be changing their minds _ testimony and to be changing their minds straightaway, but i do hope
7:40 am
that colleagues around westminster williust_ that colleagues around westminster willjust have cool heads, because what _ willjust have cool heads, because what is _ willjust have cool heads, because what is going on in the world right now, _ what is going on in the world right now, whether it be from a security perspective? instability in a number of reasons— perspective? instability in a number of reasons in the world where the uk has great _ of reasons in the world where the uk has great interest, or economically, were _ has great interest, or economically, were as _ has great interest, or economically, were as we — has great interest, or economically, were as we have discussed, inflation is rising _ were as we have discussed, inflation is rising as _ were as we have discussed, inflation is rising as the global economy recovers— is rising as the global economy recovers from the pandemic, or from the pandemic itself, which, whilst i think— the pandemic itself, which, whilst i think the _ the pandemic itself, which, whilst i think the uk has weathered the omicron — think the uk has weathered the omicron surge well — by the way, that is— omicron surge well — by the way, that is in— omicron surge well — by the way, that is in no— omicron surge well — by the way, that is in no small measure thanks to the _ that is in no small measure thanks to the decisions the prime minister is taken _ to the decisions the prime minister is taken and there is still work to be done — is taken and there is still work to be done. this doesn't feel like the time _ be done. this doesn't feel like the time to— be done. this doesn't feel like the time to be — be done. this doesn't feel like the time to be changing prime minister for me _ time to be changing prime minister for me i— time to be changing prime minister for me. . ,, .. time to be changing prime minister forme. .. time to be changing prime minister forme. . ,, .. ., , for me. i appreciate your honest assessment _ for me. i appreciate your honest assessment of _ for me. i appreciate your honest assessment of what _ for me. i appreciate your honest assessment of what you - for me. i appreciate your honest assessment of what you have i for me. i appreciate your honest i assessment of what you have seen primarily from the prime minister. of the vast majority of the population are judging of the vast majority of the population arejudging him on of the vast majority of the population are judging him on what they have seen from him in public because that is the only opportunity they get. yesterday they did see him speak in public. you havejust said he is a man who has his head in the detail and a he is a man who has his head in the detailand a man he is a man who has his head in the detail and a man who has his hand on the tiller, i5 detail and a man who has his hand on the tiller, is the way that you were describing it. and yet yesterday,
7:41 am
our viewers and many other people saw the prime minister say that no one warned him that what he saw in may 2020 at downing street was against the rules. and you havejust told us he's the man the rules. that is what we see. we see the prime minister, the man who has made those rules that all of us have had to follow, and yet here he is saying that nobody explained to him that what he saw in the downing street garden was against the rules. how can that be the man in charge? dan. can that be the man in charge? dan, i completely — can that be the man in charge? dan, i completely get _ can that be the man in charge? dan, i completely get your _ can that be the man in charge? dan, i completely get your anger, your take on— i completely get your anger, your take on things. it's the same as i have _ take on things. it's the same as i have had — take on things. it's the same as i have had from hundreds upon hundreds of my— have had from hundreds upon hundreds of my constituents. i worked in downing — of my constituents. i worked in downing street. i was the prime minister's — downing street. i was the prime minister's private parliamentary secretary. i have seen the way his days _ secretary. i have seen the way his days are _ secretary. i have seen the way his days are put together. in my previous _ days are put together. in my previous answer, they don't want to be pedantic, i have said he is in the detail— be pedantic, i have said he is in the detail he needs to be in, no pmi, _ the detail he needs to be in, no pm not— the detail he needs to be in, no pmi, not boris, not any other... forgive — pmi, not boris, not any other... forgive me. _ pmi, not boris, not any other... forgive me, surely the rules that
7:42 am
everyone in the country is having to follow are precisely the details he needs to be in, won easily man standing at the box that we saw day after day, saying, this is what you need to do?— after day, saying, this is what you need to do? that is not the point i was about to _ need to do? that is not the point i was about to make. _ need to do? that is not the point i was about to make. please - need to do? that is not the point i was about to make. please let - need to do? that is not the point i was about to make. please let mej was about to make. please let me answer _ was about to make. please let me answer your question. was about to make. please let me answeryour question. no prime answer your question. no prime minister— answer your question. no prime minister can answeryour question. no prime minister can possibly own every single _ minister can possibly own every single thing that is put into their diary~ _ single thing that is put into their diary. they do dozens upon dozens of things— diary. they do dozens upon dozens of things a _ diary. they do dozens upon dozens of things a day — diary. they do dozens upon dozens of things a day. they rely entirely on those _ things a day. they rely entirely on those around them to brief them well on the _ those around them to brief them well on the things they are going into and to— on the things they are going into and to have their back when it comes to what— and to have their back when it comes to what goes into the diary in the first place — to what goes into the diary in the first place. i personally think it is on _ first place. i personally think it is on edifying to have to reflect on the role _ is on edifying to have to reflect on the role of — is on edifying to have to reflect on the role of people who don't have this platform to respond. but my take, _ this platform to respond. but my take, someone who has worked in downing _ take, someone who has worked in downing street, is that the prime minister— downing street, is that the prime minister doesn't really own his own diary and _ minister doesn't really own his own diary and it — minister doesn't really own his own diary and it really is for his team to have — diary and it really is for his team
7:43 am
to have had _ diary and it really is for his team to have had his back. and i think, as he _ to have had his back. and i think, as he reflected in the commons, he should _ as he reflected in the commons, he should have — as he reflected in the commons, he should have shut down that event straightaway. we apologise profusely for not _ straightaway. we apologise profusely for not having done so. but the fact the event _ for not having done so. but the fact the event ever happened reflects on fairly on— the event ever happened reflects on fairly on those who put it in the prime — fairly on those who put it in the prime minister's diary. touching on what ou prime minister's diary. touching on what you have _ prime minister's diary. touching on what you have told _ prime minister's diary. touching on what you have told us, _ prime minister's diary. touching on what you have told us, you - prime minister's diary. touching on what you have told us, you have i prime minister's diary. touching on i what you have told us, you have been an mp since 2015. regularly we see these leaks now about these parties that took place. there is drink involved at every single one of them. wine and cheese and whatever you want to talk about. is there a drinking culture at westminster? is there a drinking problem at westminster and have you experienced that since you started in 2015? 50. that since you started in 2015? so, i think it's quite hard to answer that— i think it's quite hard to answer that in— i think it's quite hard to answer that in a — i think it's quite hard to answer that in a straight way. what i reflect — that in a straight way. what i reflect on, having worked both in downing — reflect on, having worked both in downing street and in the mod, both departments where an off a lot of people _ departments where an off a lot of people have to work extraordinarily
7:44 am
lon- people have to work extraordinarily long hours — people have to work extraordinarily long hours because they are dealing with real—time operational issues, and i_ with real—time operational issues, and i don't — with real—time operational issues, and i don't know that colleagues who -et and i don't know that colleagues who get to— and i don't know that colleagues who get to the _ and i don't know that colleagues who get to the end of a very, very long day, _ get to the end of a very, very long day, and _ get to the end of a very, very long day, and maybe have a glass of wine at their— day, and maybe have a glass of wine at their desk— day, and maybe have a glass of wine at their desk before they go home, is that— at their desk before they go home, is that a _ at their desk before they go home, is that a drinking culture different to those — is that a drinking culture different to those who finish work earlier in the evening and go for a drink with friends _ the evening and go for a drink with friends outside work? the fact is that i_ friends outside work? the fact is that i haven't reflected that there is a drinking culture. i see people who work— is a drinking culture. i see people who work very hard and work very lon- who work very hard and work very long hours — who work very hard and work very long hours and very occasionally have _ long hours and very occasionally have a _ long hours and very occasionally have a glass of wine together at the end of— have a glass of wine together at the end of work. but i think that there does _ end of work. but i think that there does need — end of work. but i think that there does need to be some reflection about— does need to be some reflection about the — does need to be some reflection about the amount of alcohol that appears — about the amount of alcohol that appears to be consumed and how regularly, — appears to be consumed and how regularly, notjust in number 10, but in _ regularly, notjust in number 10, but in a _ regularly, notjust in number 10, but in a number of departments of state, _ but in a number of departments of state, and — but in a number of departments of state, and i— but in a number of departments of state, and i know that the prime minister— state, and i know that the prime minister and state, and i know that the prime ministerand he state, and i know that the prime minister and he senior civil service
7:45 am
recognise — minister and he senior civil service recognise this needs to change. | recognise this needs to change. i need recognise this needs to change. need to recognise this needs to change. i need to ask you what is going recognise this needs to change. t need to ask you what is going on in the ukraine mode. the russians are amassing troops and heavy weapons on the ukrainian border. what is the british position on that today? well, we are gravely concerned. i was in _ well, we are gravely concerned. i was in kyiv— well, we are gravely concerned. i was in kyiv last thursday. and it's a concern — was in kyiv last thursday. and it's a concern. it's sad. there are millions— a concern. it's sad. there are millions of— a concern. it's sad. there are millions of ukrainians going about their lives— millions of ukrainians going about their lives and yet we are weeks, perhaps— their lives and yet we are weeks, perhaps even days away from something happening that would be the first— something happening that would be the first major peer on peer tier1 military— the first major peer on peer tier1 military against tier1 the first major peer on peer tier1 military against tier 1 military war on the _ military against tier 1 military war on the european continent for generations. the uk has this week given— generations. the uk has this week given thousands of defensive anti—tank missiles to the ukrainians, which they have very gratefully— ukrainians, which they have very gratefully received. but i think if you got— gratefully received. but i think if you got the time, 20 secondsjust to
7:46 am
say this— you got the time, 20 secondsjust to say this is— you got the time, 20 secondsjust to say this is a — you got the time, 20 secondsjust to say this is a war in which tens of thousands— say this is a war in which tens of thousands of people are going to die. thousands of people are going to die and — thousands of people are going to die and if— thousands of people are going to die. and if putin is being briefed in moscow— die. and if putin is being briefed in moscow that this can be bloodless, he is being lied to. thousands of russians, thousands of ukrainians, _ thousands of russians, thousands of ukrainians, are going to die. and all of— ukrainians, are going to die. and all of us— ukrainians, are going to die. and all of us in— ukrainians, are going to die. and all of us in the west need to be very— all of us in the west need to be very clear— all of us in the west need to be very clear that the route out of this is— very clear that the route out of this is through diplomacy, caution and cool— this is through diplomacy, caution and cool heads, not the absolute horror— and cool heads, not the absolute horror that — and cool heads, not the absolute horror that could be just days or weeks _ horror that could be just days or weeks away. james heappey, thank you for your time. p, james heappey, thank you for your time-- john _ james heappey, thank you for your time-- john is _ james heappey, thank you for your time.- john is here - james heappey, thank you for your time.- john is here with - james heappey, thank you for yourj time.- john is here with the time. thanks. john is here with the sort. the australian open has got more interesting. it has. with the way men's tennis is at the moment, a notable absentee in the shape of novak djokovic. roger federer i5 notable absentee in the shape of novak djokovic. roger federer is not there either. you wonder with rafa nadal, all three of them level on 20 titles, is nadal eyeing a potential
7:47 am
opportunities to stand—alone with 21? we don't know if federal will play again. djokovic, we don't how his unvaccinated status will affect him. you kind of thing maybe rafa nadal might be feeling positive. a window of opportunity. in the absence of novak djokovic, who will win the men's title? the 20 time grand slam champion nadal into the third round after another straight sets win, this time against the german qualifier yannick hanfmann. his side of the draw opening up after the deportation of the nine time champion novak djokovic. danil medvedev is the top ranked male player in the absence of the world number one. home favourite ash barty is through. the wimbledon champion is the top ranked player in melbourne. she's not lost this year, and will be many people's pick to go all the way at a tournament she's never won. she only dropped two games against lucia bronzetti, and she's been keeping things simple. my routine, i'm a hermit. so it doesn't affect me too much.
7:48 am
yeah, i mean, for us it's pretty lucky. we come and practise, we do what we need to do, but otherwise, a good book and a coffee, and i'm set. i'm sure we were all gripped by emma raducanu's opening match yesterday. her three set victory over sloane stephens, her first ever at the australian open. and she is clearly revelling in the experience of playing in the main draw in melbourne for the first time as she gears up for her second round match tomorrow morning. i think 2022 is all about learning for me — i think 2022 is all about learning for me so. _ i think 2022 is all about learning for me. so, being in those situations— for me. so, being in those situations of, you know, winning a set and _ situations of, you know, winning a set and having to fight in a decider, _ set and having to fight in a decider, is definitely alljust accumulating into a bank of experience that i can tap into it later— experience that i can tap into it later on— experience that i can tap into it later on down the line. something that i_ later on down the line. something that i am — later on down the line. something that i am also learning about, myself— that i am also learning about, myself and what works for me. dealing — myself and what works for me. dealing with those late finishes and
7:49 am
of the _ dealing with those late finishes and of the night matches and may be not being _ of the night matches and may be not being able _ of the night matches and may be not being able to get to sleep as early because _ being able to get to sleep as early because of the adrenaline you are running _ because of the adrenaline you are running on — because of the adrenaline you are running on. so, i think it will be a good _ running on. so, i think it will be a good experience learning from that. you forget those late finishes they have to contend with in melbourne. are chelsea out of the title race? manager thomas tuchel says his team are mentally and physically tired. perhaps they need a lie down. a book and a coffee! their 1—1 draw at brighton leaving them 12 points behind leaders manchester city. he said they'd had a tough schedule, with seven matches in 21 days, but have taken just three points from a possible 12. hakim ziyech scored first for chelsea last night. but adam webster equalised for brighton, who are ninth. rangers saw their lead in the scottish premiership cut to four points, after a 1—1 draw with aberdeen. a fantastic delivery from ryan kent left iannis hagi with a tap—in, to put rangers ahead. and they were on their way to extending their winning run to ten games, when lewis ferguson equalised from the penalty spot in the 73rd minute.
7:50 am
there was incredible drama in netball�*s quad series in london, with england snatching a late draw with australia in their first meeting for nearly three years. how about this for keeping cool? helen housby levelled with seconds left. you may remember the name — it was housby who scored the goal against australia that won them commonwealth gold in 2018. it finished 48—all, and they won't have long to wait for another crack at each other — they meet again tonight in the grand final. it was interesting hearing from raffin adele. he was asked how he manages to keep in perfect shape at his age and he said playing golf. —— rafa nadal. he says he is not a gym quy- rafa nadal. he says he is not a gym guy. there is hope for us all. he thinks it a great way to relax. t thinks it a great way to relax. i don't believe him for a thinks it a great way to relax. t don't believe him for a minute. i think they are all in the gym a lot.
7:51 am
he has got quite an agricultural golf swing as well. t he has got quite an agricultural golf swing as well.— golf swing as well. i love that. agricultural. _ golf swing as well. i love that. agricultural. are _ golf swing as well. i love that. agricultural. are you - golf swing as well. i love that. agricultural. are you ready i golf swing as well. i love that. agricultural. are you ready for possibly the most exciting part of the morning? it was probably a big part of your childhood if you grew up in the 805. and if you want to relive some of that nostalgia, then good news — because fraggle rock is coming back. we can head deep into the fraggle caves once more, and reunite with old favourites like gobo, boober, and uncle travelling matt. let's take a look back at how they earned themselves a spot in puppetry history. dance your ca res dance your cares away, worries for another day. # donnae fraggle rock. # donnae fraggle rock. # dance your cares away. # dance your cares away. # worries for another day... t’ee
7:52 am
# worries for another day... i've not a # worries for another day... i've got a fraggle! — # worries for another day. .. i've got a fraggle! l— # worries for another day... i've got a fraggle! i swear. _ # worries for another day... i've got a fraggle! i swear. be - # worries for another day... i've got a fraggle! i swear. be fair. i got a fraggle! i swear. be fair. # and treat — got a fraggle! i swear. be fair. # and treat everybody - got a fraggle! i swear. be fair. # and treat everybody as - got a fraggle! i swear. be fair. # and treat everybody as if. got a fraggle! i swear. be fair. i # and treat everybody as if they were me. # let the music play down at fraggle rock. # down at fraggle rock. because i know exactly where we should go. # a perfect kind of day. # a perfect kind of day. # a perfect kind of day. # a party down at fraggle rock today. as mike let's party down today. # lets party down today. today. # lets -a down toda . �* p, # lets party down today. behold. it looks like a — # lets party down today. behold. it looks like a hole. _ # lets party down today. behold. it looks like a hole. i— # lets party down today. behold. it looks like a hole. i am _ # lets party down today. behold. it looks like a hole. i am going - # lets party down today. behold. it looks like a hole. i am going to - looks like a hole. i am going to assume — looks like a hole. i am going to assume it's— looks like a hole. i am going to assume it's more than that based on how you _ assume it's more than that based on how you set — assume it's more than that based on how you set it up. this assume it's more than that based on how you set it up— joining us now from la is producer lisa henson, the daughter of fraggle rock and muppets creatorjim henson, and dave goelz, the voice of boober,
7:53 am
joins us from northern california. it is great to see you both. thank you so much for talking to us this morning. we are very excited. lisa, first of all, what made you decide to bring it back?— to bring it back? well, we've actually always _ to bring it back? well, we've actually always wanted - to bring it back? well, we've actually always wanted to i to bring it back? well, we've actually always wanted to do j to bring it back? well, we've - actually always wanted to do more fraggle _ actually always wanted to do more fraggle rock, but it felt like it was almost a little too hard to do it, was almost a little too hard to do it. because — was almost a little too hard to do it, because it was a very ambitious production— it, because it was a very ambitious production when it was first made. it production when it was first made. it was _ production when it was first made. it was really thanks to apple tv plus who — it was really thanks to apple tv plus who gave us the resources to do it right _ plus who gave us the resources to do it right we _ plus who gave us the resources to do it right. we are excited. we have been _ it right. we are excited. we have been working on this for a couple of years— been working on this for a couple of years and _ been working on this for a couple of years and friday is a big day for us. �* years and friday is a big day for us. . ., years and friday is a big day for us. and dave, also the voice of conzo us. and dave, also the voice of gonzo in _ us. and dave, also the voice of gonzo in the — us. and dave, also the voice of gonzo in the muppets, - us. and dave, also the voice of gonzo in the muppets, which i us. and dave, also the voice of- gonzo in the muppets, which many people know, you were there right from the beginning. how do you feel about fraggle rock coming back? well, the whole tone of this production— well, the whole tone of this production was— well, the whole tone of this production was the - well, the whole tone of this production was the same i well, the whole tone of this production was the same asj well, the whole tone of this - production was the same as the original — production was the same as the
7:54 am
original. everybody— production was the same as the original. everybody had - production was the same as the original. everybody had respectj production was the same as the i original. everybody had respect for the intention— original. everybody had respect for the intention of— original. everybody had respect for the intention of the _ original. everybody had respect for the intention of the shell. - original. everybody had respect for the intention of the shell. there i the intention of the shell. there was tremendous— the intention of the shell. there was tremendous excitement - the intention of the shell. there i was tremendous excitement about the intention of the shell. there - was tremendous excitement about this internally~ _ was tremendous excitement about this internally~ we — was tremendous excitement about this internally~ we just _ was tremendous excitement about this internally. we just had _ was tremendous excitement about this internally. we just had a _ was tremendous excitement about this internally. we just had a lot _ was tremendous excitement about this internally. we just had a lot of- was tremendous excitement about this internally. we just had a lot of fun - internally. we just had a lot of fun working _ internally. we just had a lot of fun working on— internally. we just had a lot of fun working on it _ internally. we 'ust had a lot of fun working on it.— internally. we 'ust had a lot of fun workin: on it. ., . . working on it. dave, how challenging was it to bring _ working on it. dave, how challenging was it to bring back— working on it. dave, how challenging was it to bring back these _ was it to bring back these characters?— was it to bring back these characters? ~ �*, , , ., _ characters? well, it's pretty easy. the are characters? well, it's pretty easy. they are just _ characters? well, it's pretty easy. they are just built _ characters? well, it's pretty easy. they are just built in. _ characters? well, it's pretty easy. they are just built in. karen - characters? well, it's pretty easy. they are just built in. karen and i | they are just built in. karen and i were _ they are just built in. karen and i were the — they are just built in. karen and i were the original— they are just built in. karen and i were the original performers - they are just built in. karen and i were the original performers of i they are just built in. karen and ii were the original performers of our characters — were the original performers of our characters we _ were the original performers of our characters. we have _ were the original performers of our characters. we have new— were the original performers of our characters. we have new people i were the original performers of our. characters. we have new people now. it is characters. we have new people now. it is a _ characters. we have new people now. it is a new— characters. we have new people now. it is a new generation _ characters. we have new people now. it is a new generation of _ characters. we have new people now. it is a new generation of people - characters. we have new people now. it is a new generation of people who i it is a new generation of people who have come _ it is a new generation of people who have come in— it is a new generation of people who have come in to _ it is a new generation of people who have come in to do _ it is a new generation of people who have come in to do the _ it is a new generation of people who have come in to do the other- have come in to do the other characters _ have come in to do the other characters. it's _ have come in to do the other characters. it's very- have come in to do the otherj characters. it's very exciting. have come in to do the other- characters. it's very exciting. they are so _ characters. it's very exciting. they are so dedicated. _ characters. it's very exciting. they are so dedicated. these _ characters. it's very exciting. they are so dedicated. these people i characters. it's very exciting. they i are so dedicated. these people were kids when— are so dedicated. these people were kids when the — are so dedicated. these people were kids when the original _ are so dedicated. these people were kids when the original show - are so dedicated. these people were kids when the original show came . kids when the original show came out. kids when the original show came out they— kids when the original show came out. they somehow _ kids when the original show came out. they somehow got _ kids when the original show came out. they somehow got the - kids when the original show came out. they somehow got the spirit| kids when the original show came i out. they somehow got the spirit of it. out. they somehow got the spirit of it they— out. they somehow got the spirit of it theyiust — out. they somehow got the spirit of it theyiust do _ out. they somehow got the spirit of it theyiust do a _ out. they somehow got the spirit of it. theyjust do a fantastic - out. they somehow got the spirit of it. theyjust do a fantasticjob - out. they somehow got the spirit of it. theyjust do a fantasticjob of. it. theyjust do a fantasticjob of capturing — it. theyjust do a fantasticjob of capturing the _ it. theyjust do a fantasticjob of capturing the characters. - it. theyjust do a fantastic 'ob of capturing the charactersh capturing the characters. lisa, sally was _ capturing the characters. lisa, sally was remarking _ capturing the characters. lisa, sally was remarking about - capturing the characters. lisa, | sally was remarking about how capturing the characters.“ sally was remarking about how much she loved for her. there is so much more to this than the hair. i remember watching as a kid. it felt like a beautiful, exciting and musical experience to be part. what you think it is about fraggle rock
7:55 am
that made it so loved by so many viewers? ., ,, ., ., ., , that made it so loved by so many viewers? ., ,, ., ., ., viewers? you know what? it has a kind of innocence _ viewers? you know what? it has a kind of innocence and _ viewers? you know what? it has a kind of innocence and a _ viewers? you know what? it has a kind of innocence and a joy - viewers? you know what? it has a kind of innocence and a joy and i viewers? you know what? it has a. kind of innocence and a joy and just a delightful— kind of innocence and a joy and just a delightful nurse —— just a delight that is— a delightful nurse —— just a delight that is not— a delightful nurse —— just a delight that is not cynical. it is special for today— that is not cynical. it is special for today because, you know, maybe, i for today because, you know, maybe, ldon't _ for today because, you know, maybe, ldon't know. — for today because, you know, maybe, i don't know, we have been through a tough _ i don't know, we have been through a tough couple of years. parents and kids dealing with stress and anxiety _ kids dealing with stress and anxiety. why notjust revel in kids dealing with stress and anxiety. why not just revel in the by anxiety. why not just revel in the joy and _ anxiety. why not just revel in the joy and innocence of these characters?— joy and innocence of these characters? . ., . ., joy and innocence of these characters? ., . ., ., characters? and lisa, how much of an im act as characters? and lisa, how much of an impact as the — characters? and lisa, how much of an impact as the pandemic _ characters? and lisa, how much of an impact as the pandemic had _ characters? and lisa, how much of an impact as the pandemic had on - impact as the pandemic had on bringing the show back? it must have been incredibly difficult at times? well, the whole industry, we'll do everything very, very safe with covid _ everything very, very safe with covid protocols and the crew was always _ covid protocols and the crew was always completely safe. maybe people felt a little bit more dedicated to it in their— felt a little bit more dedicated to it in theirway
7:56 am
felt a little bit more dedicated to it in their way because a crew goes on location — it in their way because a crew goes on location and they have to stay there _ on location and they have to stay there. there are no hiatus is. they can't _ there. there are no hiatus is. they can't see _ there. there are no hiatus is. they can't see their family. this was a production— can't see their family. this was a production that every body wanted to in there _ production that every body wanted to in there. maybe they didn't want to leave _ in there. maybe they didn't want to leave it _ in there. maybe they didn't want to leave it was done.— in there. maybe they didn't want to leave it was done. dave, how do you look after the _ leave it was done. dave, how do you look after the puppets _ leave it was done. dave, how do you look after the puppets for _ leave it was done. dave, how do you look after the puppets for such - leave it was done. dave, how do you look after the puppets for such a - look after the puppets for such a longtime? how much of the original puppets will be back and where do you store a fraggle rock profit and keep it safe?— keep it safe? that's really a lisa question- _ keep it safe? that's really a lisa question. the _ keep it safe? that's really a lisa question. the company - keep it safe? that's really a lisa question. the company handles| keep it safe? that's really a lisa i question. the company handles the characters — question. the company handles the characters we _ question. the company handles the characters. we don't _ question. the company handles the characters. we don't take _ question. the company handles the characters. we don't take them - question. the company handles the i characters. we don't take them home ourselves _ characters. we don't take them home ourselves l— characters. we don't take them home ourselves. . , ~ ourselves. i was thinking it might be in one of— ourselves. i was thinking it might be in one of your _ ourselves. i was thinking it might be in one of your wardrobes! - ourselves. i was thinking it might be in one of your wardrobes! no. | be in one of your wardrobes! no. they have _ be in one of your wardrobes! no. they have been _ be in one of your wardrobes! no. they have been languishing. it's amazing — they have been languishing. it's amazing that _ they have been languishing. it's amazing that a _ they have been languishing. it's amazing that a lot _ they have been languishing. it's amazing that a lot of— they have been languishing. it's amazing that a lot of the - they have been languishing. it's amazing that a lot of the fabric i amazing that a lot of the fabric parts _ amazing that a lot of the fabric parts of— amazing that a lot of the fabric parts of them _ amazing that a lot of the fabric parts of them were _ amazing that a lot of the fabric parts of them were able - amazing that a lot of the fabric parts of them were able to - amazing that a lot of the fabric parts of them were able to be i parts of them were able to be reused — parts of them were able to be reused. ~ �* ~' ., reused. we didn't think we would reused. we didn't think we would reuse anything — reused. we didn't think we would reuse anything but _ reused. we didn't think we would reuse anything but we _ reused. we didn't think we would reuse anything but we actually i reused. we didn't think we would i reuse anything but we actually were able to _ reuse anything but we actually were able to find a few tidbits from the original— able to find a few tidbits from the original show and use them again. but mostly, it is all refreshed. it
7:57 am
is all. _ but mostly, it is all refreshed. it is all. you — but mostly, it is all refreshed. it is all, you know, it is alljust taken — is all, you know, it is alljust taken up _ is all, you know, it is alljust taken up to— is all, you know, it is alljust taken up to a slightly newer, modern level~ _ taken up to a slightly newer, modern level a_ taken up to a slightly newer, modern level. a little bit more visual effects _ level. a little bit more visual effects. more scope. but a few old tidbits— effects. more scope. but a few old tidbits from the past. find effects. more scope. but a few old tidbits from the past.— effects. more scope. but a few old tidbits from the past. and dave, you on this. tidbits from the past. and dave, you on this- tell— tidbits from the past. and dave, you on this. tell about _ tidbits from the past. and dave, you on this. tell about that? _ tidbits from the past. and dave, you on this. tell about that? well, - tidbits from the past. and dave, you on this. tell about that? well, i - on this. tell about that? well, i sta ed on this. tell about that? well, i stayed here _ on this. tell about that? well, i stayed here in _ on this. tell about that? well, i stayed here in california - on this. tell about that? well, i | stayed here in california because on this. tell about that? well, i - stayed here in california because of covid _ stayed here in california because of covid i_ stayed here in california because of covid i did — stayed here in california because of covid. i did not— stayed here in california because of covid. i did not go _ stayed here in california because of covid. ! did not go to— stayed here in california because of covid. ! did not go to calgary- stayed here in california because of covid. i did not go to calgary to - covid. i did not go to calgary to shoot _ covid. i did not go to calgary to shoot the — covid. i did not go to calgary to shoot the show. _ covid. i did not go to calgary to shoot the show. i— covid. i did not go to calgary to shoot the show. i recorded - covid. i did not go to calgary to shoot the show. i recorded in i covid. i did not go to calgary to. shoot the show. i recorded in my covid. i did not go to calgary to - shoot the show. i recorded in my own little vocal _ shoot the show. i recorded in my own little vocal booth _ shoot the show. i recorded in my own little vocal booth here _ shoot the show. i recorded in my own little vocal booth here at _ shoot the show. i recorded in my own little vocal booth here at my - little vocal booth here at my office — little vocal booth here at my office at _ little vocal booth here at my office. at home. _ little vocal booth here at my office. at home. and, - little vocal booth here at my office. at home. and, you i little vocal booth here at my - office. at home. and, you know, it worked _ office. at home. and, you know, it worked out — office. at home. and, you know, it worked out pretty— office. at home. and, you know, it worked out pretty well. _ office. at home. and, you know, it worked out pretty well. they- office. at home. and, you know, it worked out pretty well. they had i office. at home. and, you know, iti worked out pretty well. they had to send the _ worked out pretty well. they had to send the equipment— worked out pretty well. they had to send the equipment over— worked out pretty well. they had to send the equipment over and - worked out pretty well. they had to send the equipment over and i- send the equipment over and i recorded — send the equipment over and i recorded it _ send the equipment over and i recorded it here, _ send the equipment over and i recorded it here, but- send the equipment over and i recorded it here, but i- send the equipment over and i recorded it here, but i was- send the equipment over and i- recorded it here, but i was working directly— recorded it here, but i was working directly with — recorded it here, but i was working directly with the _ recorded it here, but i was working directly with the producer, - recorded it here, but i was working directly with the producer, so - recorded it here, but i was working directly with the producer, so it - directly with the producer, so it was really— directly with the producer, so it was really like _ directly with the producer, so it was really like being _ directly with the producer, so it was really like being in- directly with the producer, so it was really like being in the - directly with the producer, so it i was really like being in the studio together~ — was really like being in the studio together~ brie _ was really like being in the studio touether. ~ ., ., ., , ., together. we are going to listen to it now. # with all the parts i'd say i've found a way to put it all together. # in one makes. # in one makes.
7:58 am
# put it all together, the perfect fit. # feels like it could do the trick. # feels like it could do the trick. # it could bring us all together. # it could bring us all together. # put it all together. # put it all together. # put it all together. dave, it's beautiful. you've ruined the illusion by telling me you were stuck in a sound booth! being therefore the original and sharing in that programme that became so popular in many parts of the world, what was it like to be back and doing it again and part of that fraggle rock experience a second time around?— time around? well, what's interesting _ time around? well, what's interesting is _ time around? well, what's interesting is the - time around? well, what's interesting is the show - time around? well, what's interesting is the show is i interesting is the show is infectious. _ interesting is the show is infectious. it's— interesting is the show is infectious. it's not- interesting is the show is infectious. it's not reallyl interesting is the show is - infectious. it's not really like a children's— infectious. it's not really like a children's show. _ infectious. it's not really like a children's show. it _ infectious. it's not really like a children's show. it is - infectious. it's not really like a children's show. it is for- children's show. it is for everybody. _ children's show. it is for everybody. and - children's show. it is for everybody. and the - children's show. it is for. everybody. and the whole children's show. it is for- everybody. and the whole crew children's show. it is for— everybody. and the whole crew got into it _ everybody. and the whole crew got into it of _ everybody. and the whole crew got into it of the — everybody. and the whole crew got into it of the first _ everybody. and the whole crew got into it of the first time _ everybody. and the whole crew got into it of the first time and - everybody. and the whole crew got into it of the first time and i- into it of the first time and i think— into it of the first time and i think they— into it of the first time and i think they did _ into it of the first time and i think they did this - into it of the first time and i think they did this time - into it of the first time and ij think they did this time too. everybody_ think they did this time too. everybody in _ think they did this time too. everybody in the _ think they did this time too. everybody in the room - think they did this time too. everybody in the room gets| think they did this time too. - everybody in the room gets excited about _ everybody in the room gets excited about being — everybody in the room gets excited about being a — everybody in the room gets excited about being a part— everybody in the room gets excited about being a part of— everybody in the room gets excited about being a part of it. _ everybody in the room gets excited about being a part of it. they - about being a part of it. they suggest _ about being a part of it. they suggest ideas~ _ about being a part of it. they suggest ideas. 0n— about being a part of it. they suggest ideas. on the - about being a part of it. theyl suggest ideas. on the original about being a part of it. they - suggest ideas. on the original show we worked — suggest ideas. on the original show we worked very—
7:59 am
suggest ideas. on the original show we worked very late _ suggest ideas. on the original show we worked very late summer- suggest ideas. on the original showl we worked very late summer nights. the crew— we worked very late summer nights. the crewiust— we worked very late summer nights. the crewjust always _ we worked very late summer nights. the crewjust always hung _ we worked very late summer nights. the crewjust always hung in - we worked very late summer nights. the crewjust always hung in with . the crewjust always hung in with us. the crewjust always hung in with us we _ the crewjust always hung in with us we shot _ the crewjust always hung in with us. we shot the _ the crewjust always hung in with us. we shot the original- the crewjust always hung in with us. we shot the original in- the crewjust always hung in with i us. we shot the original in toronto. this was— us. we shot the original in toronto. this was shot — us. we shot the original in toronto. this was shot in _ us. we shot the original in toronto. this was shot in toronto. _ us. we shot the original in toronto. this was shot in toronto. those - this was shot in toronto. those canadian — this was shot in toronto. those canadian crews— this was shot in toronto. those canadian crews are _ this was shot in toronto. those canadian crews are fantastic. i this was shot in toronto. those canadian crews are fantastic. lisa, what is next? _ canadian crews are fantastic. lisa, what is next? what _ canadian crews are fantastic. lisa, what is next? what is _ canadian crews are fantastic. lisa, what is next? what is next? - canadian crews are fantastic. lisa, what is next? what is next? well, | canadian crews are fantastic. lisa, i what is next? what is next? well, we want to keep — what is next? what is next? well, we want to keep making _ what is next? what is next? well, we want to keep making more _ what is next? what is next? well, we want to keep making more fraggle i want to keep making more fraggle rock _ want to keep making more fraggle rock it— want to keep making more fraggle rock. it was a joy for the first group — rock. it was a joy for the first group to— rock. it was a joy for the first group to make it. that was 35 years a-o. group to make it. that was 35 years ago it— group to make it. that was 35 years ago it is— group to make it. that was 35 years ago it is a — group to make it. that was 35 years ago. it is a joy for us to be making it again _ ago. it is a joy for us to be making it again we — ago. it is a joy for us to be making it again. we are also working on... we have _ it again. we are also working on... we have another show on apple tv plus, _ we have another show on apple tv plus, harriet the spy. next is a third _ plus, harriet the spy. next is a third show— plus, harriet the spy. next is a third show for apple, which shall be named _ third show for apple, which shall be named for— third show for apple, which shall be named for the moment. oh, third show for apple, which shall be named for the moment.— third show for apple, which shall be named for the moment. oh, so there is definitely — named for the moment. oh, so there is definitely more _ named for the moment. oh, so there is definitely more to _ named for the moment. oh, so there is definitely more to come. _ named for the moment. oh, so there is definitely more to come. we - is definitely more to come. we cannot wait. we are a big fan of fraggle rock. me cannot wait. we are a big fan of fraggle rock-— cannot wait. we are a big fan of frau ale rock. ~ . , , fraggle rock. we have been singing it all morning- _ fraggle rock. we have been singing it all morning. thank _ fraggle rock. we have been singing it all morning. thank you _ fraggle rock. we have been singing it all morning. thank you very - fraggle rock. we have been singing| it all morning. thank you very much. it is on apple tv and january ——
8:00 am
january— it is on apple tv and january —— january 31. _ it is on apple tv and january —— january 31. and _ it is on apple tv and january —— january 31. and all— it is on apple tv and january —— january 31. and all of _ it is on apple tv and january —— january 31. and all of the - it is on apple tv and january —— i january 31. and all of the episodes will be _ january 31. and all of the episodes will be there _ january 31. and all of the episodes will be there.— january 31. and all of the episodes will be there. excellent plug, dave! as well as a — will be there. excellent plug, dave! as well as a whole _ will be there. excellent plug, dave! as well as a whole host _ will be there. excellent plug, dave! as well as a whole host of - will be there. excellent plug, dave! as well as a whole host of older- as well as a whole host of older fraggle — as well as a whole host of older fraggle things. _ as well as a whole host of older fraggle things, including - as well as a whole host of older fraggle things, including the i fraggle things, including the original— fraggle things, including the original series. _ fraggle things, including the original series.— fraggle things, including the oriinal series. ., ,, ., , original series. thank you. lovely to seak original series. thank you. lovely to speak to _ original series. thank you. lovely to speak to you- _ original series. thank you. lovely to speak to you. a _ original series. thank you. lovely to speak to you. a real— original series. thank you. lovely to speak to you. a real pleasure. | to speak to you. a real pleasure. thank you very much. that will be in my head all day. very much. that will be in my head all da . �* very much. that will be in my head all da . . , ., very much. that will be in my head allda .�* ., very much. that will be in my head all da . . ., ., very much. that will be in my head allda .�* ., very much. that will be in my head allda . . ., ., , all day. are you going to sing it? i will stop there. _ all day. are you going to sing it? i will stop there. it _ all day. are you going to sing it? i will stop there. it starts _ all day. are you going to sing it? i will stop there. it starts on - all day. are you going to sing it? i will stop there. it starts on friday| will stop there. it starts on friday and apple tv plus. stay with us, headlines coming up.
8:01 am
good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. the cost of living in the uk rises at its fastest pace for 30 years — inflation now stands at 5.4%. good morning from skipton market, where traders and customers alike are already noticing that rise in average prices for the things we all buy. i will get reaction and what it all means for your cost of living. the prime minister will set out the next steps to ease england's coronavirus restrictions later today. but first he'll first face mp5 in the commons as pressure on him to resign over downing street parties intensifies. veterans who were forced out of the military because of their sexuality have welcomed a review into their treatment. rafa nadal is through at
8:02 am
the australian open. could he be the one to stand alone with the most grand slam wins? victory in melbourne would do it. it's the addictive word guessing game that's sweeping the nation — susie dent will be with us later to tell us all about wordle. good morning. we have got cloud and rain sinking south today, turning increasingly patchy in doing so. behind it, a lot of sunshine, gusty winds, and turning that bit colder. i will have all the details later on. it's wednesday 19th january. the uk's cost of living surged by 5.4% in december — the highest annual rate of increase for almost 30 years. energy costs and the price of food and drink drove the rise, which was higher than economists had been forecasting. the chancellor said he understood the pressures people were facing and that the government was providing support. ben is looking at this for us — he's at a market in skipton.
8:03 am
good morning, ben. yeah, very good morninu. good morning, ben. yeah, very good morning. welcome _ good morning, ben. yeah, very good morning. welcome to _ good morning, ben. yeah, very good morning. welcome to skipton - good morning, ben. yeah, very good| morning. welcome to skipton market, where they have been busily getting ready for the trading day ahead. now this news about inflation hitting 5.4% in december is something they know all too well. the traders and the customers. it means the cost of things like food, like clothing, but also things like cinema tickets and train tickets is all going up. now this is the fastest rates they've been rising now for nearly 30 years and, a5 been rising now for nearly 30 years and, as you say, it's been largely driven by a rise in the cost of energy and fuel. people will have noticed that on their household bills, and businesses are facing exactly the same increased costs. so if the factories and places manufacturing goods are facing higher costs, they have to pass that onto traders, like dominic here, and in turn, for his business to stay
8:04 am
viable and to be able to pay wages, he then has to pass that on to customers. now one of the other thing adding to the problem is a shortage of drivers to move produce around the country. because of that shortage, pay is having to go up to attract people to do those jobs and, again, that ends up being passed on to us as customers. the big problem is that average wages are not keeping up with the increase in average prices, so, put simply, if your wages are not going up as quickly as the price of the goods that you are buying, you will start to notice that. you'll be noticing it already in a squeeze on your household budget and the cost of living. household budget and the cost of livina. �* ., household budget and the cost of livina. �* p, , p lets us know what you think about this morning. bbcbreakfa5t@bbc.co.uk i5 this morning. bbcbreakfa5t@bbc.co.uk is where you can get in touch with any comments about the news today. the prime minister will face further
8:05 am
scrutiny surrounding his leadership today, when he returns to the house of commons for prime minister's questions. mrjohnson is under growing pressure as speculation grows about a backbench rebellion against him. our chief political correspondent adam fleming joins us now from westminster. i'm sure you are listening across to the armed forces minister atjames heappey. that interview gave an idea of the sort of questions that the prime minister will have to answer today. prime minister will have to answer toda . , p, prime minister will have to answer toda . , ., , prime minister will have to answer toda. ,~ , ., prime minister will have to answer toda. , ., ., , today. only a couple of hours until prime minister's _ today. only a couple of hours until prime minister's questions - today. only a couple of hours until prime minister's questions at - today. only a couple of hours until i prime minister's questions at noon, and engagement he cannot avoid. a lot of conservative mp5 will be watching to see what his demeanour i5 watching to see what his demeanour is like, how he approaches the issues this week after his big apology last week, and there are a group of 20 new conservative mp5 who were elected at the last election in 2019 who met yesterday to discuss what to do, which took this whole speculation about plotting against prime minister to the next level. it seems a good number of them have already submitted letters of no confidence in the prime minister, and a good number are potentially going to submit letters after my ministers questions today, so it's a
8:06 am
really, really crucial moment. but the news of that meeting they had leaked out yesterday afternoon, which prompted a bit of a backlash from some ministers, and boris johnson's allies, meaning there is a lot of tension in the conservative party, and this adds to the tension that already existed between ministers and civil servants over help this is all being handled. tension i think that will now increase as a result of your interview with the armed forces ministerjames heappey, he said that none of this is personally the prime minister's volta. mr; none of this is personally the prime minister's volta.— minister's volta. my take, as someone — minister's volta. my take, as someone who _ minister's volta. my take, as someone who has _ minister's volta. my take, as someone who has worked i minister's volta. my take, as someone who has worked in | minister's volta. my take, as - someone who has worked in downing street, _ someone who has worked in downing street, is— someone who has worked in downing street, is that the prime minister doesn't _ street, is that the prime minister doesn't really own his own diary and it really— doesn't really own his own diary and it really is— doesn't really own his own diary and it really is for his team to have had his— it really is for his team to have had his back, and i think, as he reflected — had his back, and i think, as he reflected in— had his back, and i think, as he reflected in the commons the other week, _ reflected in the commons the other week, in— reflected in the commons the other week, in hindsight he should have shut down— week, in hindsight he should have shut down that event straightaway. he apologised profusely for having not done _ he apologised profusely for having not done so, but the fact that the event _ not done so, but the fact that the event ever— not done so, but the fact that the event ever happened reflects, i fear, _ event ever happened reflects, i fear, rather poorly on those who scheduled — fear, rather poorly on those who scheduled it and put it into the
8:07 am
prime — scheduled it and put it into the prime minister's direct. | scheduled it and put it into the prime minister's direct.- prime minister's direct. i don't think that _ prime minister's direct. i don't think that intervention - prime minister's direct. i don't think that intervention will- prime minister's direct. i don'tl think that intervention will have done anything to cool the temperature either in downing street or amongst the conservative parliamentary party. the key thing to keep an eye on amongst all of this speculation is the thing that will change it is if 54 members of the conservative backbenches submit letters of no confidence in boris johnson, because that is the magic number that would trigger a vote of confidence, which could happen pretty soon afterwards. nobody knows what the numbers of lettuce i5 pretty soon afterwards. nobody knows what the numbers of lettuce is now, how high the pile is. what matters is, does it get to 54? that is really the main thing that matters today. we really the main thing that matters toda . ~ ~ , really the main thing that matters toda . ~ ,, , ., really the main thing that matters toda. ,, , really the main thing that matters toda. ~' ,., today. we will keep a close eye on that. today. we will keep a close eye on that- thank _ today. we will keep a close eye on that. thank you, _ today. we will keep a close eye on that. thank you, as _ today. we will keep a close eye on that. thank you, as ever. - the prime minister is expected to set out plans for easing england's coronavirus restrictions when he addresses parliament later today. the health secretary, sajid javid, has said he's cautiously optimistic that the so—called plan b measures — due to expire next week — can be "substantially reduced". gareth barlow reports. hi, there, good morning. how are you doing? hello, good morning. against the backdrop
8:08 am
of allegations of lockdown parties in downing street, and rumours of a vote of no confidence, the prime minister still has big decisions to make a5 england's plan b restrictions are due to end in a week's time. facemasks in schools and public settings, and covid passes for large venues were introduced in december to slow the spread of the omicron variant. but those restrictions could be gone within days, according to the health secretary, sajid javid. government officials say the decision remains finely balanced, a517,000 patients remain in english hospitals with covid. but there is growing optimism the data is now moving in the right direction. in scotland, covid—19 restrictions are to be eased from monday, with nightclubs reopening, large indoor events resuming, and social—distancing rules being dropped. the cases that we have had — and still have — with omicron are of a completely different magnitude to anything that we have experienced in relation
8:09 am
to previous waves of the virus. so the measures were proportionate, but we obviously have taken steps to remove those measures and restrictions when the time has been appropriate to do so. not everyone will welcome a loosening of restrictions — many hospitals have struggled to cope with staffing shortages, or problems discharging older patients into care homes. it's possible, therefore, that some restrictions — such as facemasks — will be retained. the prime minister will discuss the options with his cabinet this morning, and then tell parliament and the public his plan. gareth barlow, bbc news. we have been cheered up this morning, a bit of a fraggle rock and now carol has a gorgeous sky for us. what more could you ask for? good morning. good morning. i could not agree more _ good morning. i could not agree more a — good morning. i could not agree more. a gorgeous picture, look at the colours — more. a gorgeous picture, look at the colours of the sky taken by one
8:10 am
of our— the colours of the sky taken by one of our weather watchers in ipswich and we _ of our weather watchers in ipswich and we have seen a lot of different coloured _ and we have seen a lot of different coloured skies this morning. we have two weather— coloured skies this morning. we have two weather fronts sinking southwards, taking the cloud and rain with— southwards, taking the cloud and rain with them, but increasingly the rain with them, but increasingly the rain turning — rain with them, but increasingly the rain turning patchy and behind it increasingly we will see more sunshine _ increasingly we will see more sunshine this morning the show across— sunshine this morning the show across the — sunshine this morning the show across the north and scotland are of rain, _ across the north and scotland are of rain, tending to be wintry and higher— rain, tending to be wintry and higherground but rain, tending to be wintry and higher ground but there is sunshine in between. one to show it of northern— in between. one to show it of northern ireland, northern england largely— northern ireland, northern england largely dry and then we run into our two weather fronts in between some sunshine _ two weather fronts in between some sunshine. as this where the front since _ sunshine. as this where the front since south, the sun will come out behind _ since south, the sun will come out behind them. wind will also pick up across— behind them. wind will also pick up across northern england, northern and scotland in particular. in the north— and scotland in particular. in the north and — and scotland in particular. in the north and west we could have gusts up north and west we could have gusts up to— north and west we could have gusts up to 45— north and west we could have gusts up to 45 mph. as the cold air feeds in behind— up to 45 mph. as the cold air feeds in behind cold fronts, the temperature will go down through the course _ temperature will go down through the course of— temperature will go down through the course of the day and we will showers _ course of the day and we will showers increasingly turning to snow across _ showers increasingly turning to snow across the _ showers increasingly turning to snow across the far north of mainland scotland — across the far north of mainland scotland and the northern isles. it will feel— scotland and the northern isles. it will feel cold, especially in the wind — will feel cold, especially in the wind. gusty winds tonight, showers
8:11 am
across— wind. gusty winds tonight, showers across the — wind. gusty winds tonight, showers across the north and east. if you across _ across the north and east. if you across west wales and cornwall but a lot of clear _ across west wales and cornwall but a lot of clear skies means there will be widespread frost and if you are somewhere where there has been showers _ somewhere where there has been showers and low temperatures, you could _ showers and low temperatures, you could well— showers and low temperatures, you could well see some ice on untreated surfaces _ could well see some ice on untreated surfaces. tomorrow morning we start-up — surfaces. tomorrow morning we start—up which i was in the north and east — start—up which i was in the north and east in _ start—up which i was in the north and east. in the west, a few showers that will— and east. in the west, a few showers that will tend to fade and for many it will— that will tend to fade and for many it will be _ that will tend to fade and for many it will be dry with a lot of winter sunshine — it will be dry with a lot of winter sunshine. wind easing but it will still feel— sunshine. wind easing but it will still feel cold, only three in newcastle, four in aberdeen, the top temperature of about eight in plymouth. thank you. i wonder what the forecast for fraggle rock is today. sunshine and beautiful. eeeh forecast for fraggle rock is today. sunshine and beautiful.— forecast for fraggle rock is today. sunshine and beautiful. even in the cave. of sunshine _ sunshine and beautiful. even in the cave. of sunshine down _ sunshine and beautiful. even in the cave. of sunshine down there. - it's been more than 20 years since a ban on lgbt+ personnel serving in the military was lifted, but its impact still remains for many who were dismissed, convicted and sometimes imprisoned before the policy came to end. now, an independent review set up by the government will try to establish how best to help those affected.
8:12 am
josh parry reports. the year i51995. john major is the prime minister. take that are topping the charts. david was sent to military prison. his crime — being a gay man. they discovered a copy of gay times in my room after a search of my room. its two—year investigation began. when david joined the royal air force as a medic, aged 17, he was still discovering his identity. i put my life on the line for the country going to the first gulf war, and so, yeah, i was proud of that achievement of helping keep my country safe and knowing they would do the best they could for me — promote me, get the best out of me. so when i was 21, i ended up finding out i'm gay. so then you've got to lead a double life. and when that double life was discovered, david realised it would be the end of his military career. from the moment i admitted to it, i was held in a cell, separate from everyone,
8:13 am
and then the trial happened. and then you go... yeah, you're handcuffed, you're going into the cell, you're treated like any other prisoner as if i'd mugged or murdered someone. you're treated the same. offence — gross indecency under the sexual offences act 1956, section... and how has that impacted you when applying forjobs? certain offences are kept — you don't get rid of them. so as a nurse, i had to go for a job. i had to do what's called enhanced disclosure, and that's where it came out. now, unless you actually know... it's listed as a sexual offence, so unless you actually know it's the offence of actually being gay, that's quite alarming. it's thought around 5,000 servicemen and women were affected by the ban on lgbt personnel in the military. it remained in place until the year 2000, when this group of veterans took their fight against the ban to the european court of human rights. with effect from today, homosexuality will no longer be a bar to service in britain's armed forces _ he...couldn't ever go i with me to a naval ball. the way we got round it was that we
8:14 am
invited our best female friend. - you look like you're having the time of your life. but not everyone impacted by the policy was dismissed outright. some, like patrick, felt forced to resign — as they couldn't be fully open about their love lives at work. there was one time in '88 when i met a young man. | we fell in love, he was a lovely guy, he was called dennis. - but i learnt something else i the second year and that was that he was hiv positive. we knew that, one day — as was the case, then — i that he would die and... i knew that, at some point, - there would be a fork in the road. unable to tell his bosses about the relationship, and terrified of being sent to the other side of the world while his partner was dying, patrick handed in his one—year's notice to leave the navy. dennis died just two days before he was due home for good.
8:15 am
i got up there as fast as i could i after his mother had phoned me. he was still warm. you know, they'd sort of brushed his hair, i and...clean white sheet over him. he was in a little side room. i reflected on one thing —| that in the past 48 hours, the only two things that had ever mattered to me had gone. - while today's announcement is being cautiously welcomed by lgbt veterans, it's clear there's a long way to go for the military to fully regain their trust. josh parry, bbc news. we'rejoined now by caroline paige, the first openly transgender serving officer in the british armed forces, who now runs the military charity fighting with pride. thank you very much for being with us, lovely to have you on the show. when you hear stories like that, i am sure they are not unfamiliar to you, you have probably had plenty of people with those experiences. goad
8:16 am
people with those experiences. good morninu. people with those experiences. good morning. absolutely. _ people with those experiences. (limp. morning. absolutely. as a charity, fighting with pride, we have been running for two years and already engaged with hundreds of veterans who have very similar stories and it always hits you in the heart when you listen to those stories and realise what has happened to people we should be valuing and it is shameful that nothing has been done to help support them. since the ban was lifted, 22 years ago, but bear in mind that for some of these veterans thatjenny i5 in mind that for some of these veterans thatjenny is longer because they were dismissed in the 19605 or 705 or 805, they have been living their lives without any support. living their lives without any su ort. ., , living their lives without any suuort. ., , ., , .. living their lives without any suuort. ., , ., , . . . support. lots of people watching at home might _ support. lots of people watching at home might be _ support. lots of people watching at home might be surprised _ support. lots of people watching at home might be surprised that - support. lots of people watching at home might be surprised that it - support. lots of people watching at| home might be surprised that it was so recent. it was 22 years ago but feels very recent that people had to hide and could not be themselves. exactly. january the 12th 2000 i5 exactly. january the 12th 2000 is when the ban was finally lifted. up
8:17 am
until that point, anybody who was lgbt+ within the military had to hide who they wear, including myself. ijoined in 1980. you had to hide your identity and that your sexual orientation, thus laws said you not serve. —— of this law said you not serve. —— of this law said you could not serve which was contradiction to civil law because it was not illegal to be gay within civil society. it was not illegal to be gay within civil society-— civil society. what was it like for ou bein: civil society. what was it like for you being in _ civil society. what was it like for you being in the _ civil society. what was it like for you being in the raf _ civil society. what was it like for you being in the raf and - civil society. what was it like for you being in the raf and the i civil society. what was it like for i you being in the raf and the whole process, i suppose? you being in the raf and the whole process, isuppose? when you being in the raf and the whole process, i suppose? when did it start for you and what with us conversations like at the time and how hard did you have to fight? t how hard did you have to fight? i grew up in a military family sol grew up in a military family so i was already in that environment from a young age and my gender identity i became aware of around the age of five and that is when i first got the idea that the military wasn't very tolerant to lgbt+ personnel and
8:18 am
my family were not happy at all and i was made to feel that i was broken and unacceptable so i had to hide who i was all through my childhood. of course that does not make you not lose track of who you are, i always knew who i was, but wasn't allowed to tell people express that. when i joined the military ijoined an organisation that was not welcoming of lgbt+ personnel and even though i was trans and the ban was known as the gay ban because it was based on the gay ban because it was based on the sexual offences act, the fact i was different, i was lgbt+, people did not understand that, and thought it wasn't allowed so you have to hide who you wear. if you are doing a job, you are proud of doing service and you are off doing a fantastic role, but you have to hide your own personality, who you are, and do that for, in my case, 19 years and survive the possibility that i would be outed and of course
8:19 am
some people were not so lucky. what some people were not so lucky. what with those 19 — some people were not so lucky. what with those 19 years _ some people were not so lucky. what with those 19 years like, _ some people were not so lucky. what with those 19 years like, what impact did it have a new? t with those 19 years like, what impact did it have a new? i had a wonderful— impact did it have a new? i had a wonderfuliob. — impact did it have a new? i had a wonderfuljob, i— impact did it have a new? i had a wonderfuljob, i was _ impact did it have a new? i had a wonderfuljob, i was a _ impact did it have a new? i had a wonderfuljob, i was a navigator| impact did it have a new? i had a l wonderfuljob, i was a navigator on fastjets, cold war, intercepting long—range bombers, then moved to tactical helicopters, so myjob was wonderful. but i was always scared of losing the love of my family, a military family, i knew they would not understand. i was also worried about what i would lose with friends and if i was outed then i would be marched off the base, lose myjob, my income, my mortgage, my house, which was my sanctuary. i would lose my family. which was my sanctuary. i would lose m famil . , which was my sanctuary. i would lose my family._ absolutely i my family. everything. absolutely everything- _ my family. everything. absolutely everything- i— my family. everything. absolutely everything. i was _ my family. everything. absolutely everything. i was really _ my family. everything. absolutely everything. i was really lucky, - my family. everything. absolutely everything. iwas really lucky, i. everything. i was really lucky, i managed to hide through that, but those who were not so lucky, it only took a rumour or a phone call or something like that and all of a sudden the special investigations branch is involved and all sorts of
8:20 am
horrendous stories from the veterans we speak to. horrendous stories from the veterans we speak to— horrendous stories from the veterans we seakto. ~ ., ., we speak to. when you hear about the minist of we speak to. when you hear about the ministry of defence _ we speak to. when you hear about the ministry of defence launching - we speak to. when you hear about the ministry of defence launching this - ministry of defence launching this review into the impact of that ban, obviously that is good news but there will be all sorts of more stories coming out of the way people were dealt with. tt is stories coming out of the way people were dealt with.— were dealt with. it is brilliant news. it were dealt with. it is brilliant news- it is — were dealt with. it is brilliant news. it is part _ were dealt with. it is brilliant news. it is part of _ were dealt with. it is brilliant news. it is part of the - were dealt with. it is brilliant| news. it is part of the veteran strategy action plan, a range of for veterans, but of course the independent review is really important to us at fighting with pride because that is what we have been driving for for the last two years so it is untested to see. but that doesn't mean we can all relax now, it isjust that doesn't mean we can all relax now, it is just the start of things to come —— it is fantastic to see. there is a lot of work that now needs to be done to capture those stories, those experiences, find out what happened to our veterans and do something about it.— something about it. thank you though much for coming _ something about it. thank you though much for coming in _ something about it. thank you though much for coming in and _ something about it. thank you though much for coming in and talking - something about it. thank you though much for coming in and talking to - something about it. thank you though much for coming in and talking to us i much for coming in and talking to us this morning. it is fascinating, thank you. covid restrictions introduced to curb the spread of omicron in scotland will be lifted from monday. this means nightclubs can reopen, attendance limits at indoor events will be removed and social
8:21 am
distancing rules will be dropped. non—professional indoor contact sports will also resume — but people are still being asked to work from home and to take lateral flow tests before meeting with others. we'rejoined now byjason leitch, the national clinical director for scotland. great to see this morning. thank you talking to us. can you, first of all, give us the latest rates in scotland?— all, give us the latest rates in scotland? a, ., ., , ., scotland? morning, how are you toda ? scotland? morning, how are you today? things — scotland? morning, how are you today? things are _ scotland? morning, how are you today? things are helpful. - scotland? morning, how are you today? things are helpful. i- scotland? morning, how are you | today? things are helpful. i think they are hopeful across the whole of they are hopeful across the whole of the uk, actually. unfortunately we were the second, third, fourth and fifth countries to get omicron, really, after south africa, with a few stragglers, a5 really, after south africa, with a few stragglers, as well, around the world. we have been quite early in the omicron wave, which has been horrible, particularly the families who have suffered it, but also for our health and care system. now the
8:22 am
ons survey, our best measure of surveillance across the nation, says we are somewhere between one in 15 for england, one in 24 the other three countries, but it looks as though —— one in 20 four the other three countries but it looks as though we are coming down the mountain peak. you can't see it when you are in it, only when you pass it. it looks as though in the next little while we were still it will be able to make decisions about easing protection.— be able to make decisions about easing protection. what will change? in scotland we _ easing protection. what will change? in scotland we have _ easing protection. what will change? in scotland we have done _ easing protection. what will change? in scotland we have done this - easing protection. what will change? in scotland we have done this and i in scotland we have done this and tried to do it quite deliberately in phases. one of the things we have learnt about this virus is if you move everything at once the virus catches you, and if you close down fast, that usually helps, and if you open up slowly, that usually helps. that is a judgment for politicians about how you should do that, so last monday we reopened the large
8:23 am
outdoor events because we are not quite as worried about them. but next monday, the 24th, we will be opening indoor events, theatres, cinemas, in your contact sports, those kind of things. we are asking people still to be careful, still do the lateral flow tests, the science—fiction test that you can do in your house to find an infectious disease. i still can't believe we can all do that in our houses for free, and that will still protect you. don'tjust throw free, and that will still protect you. don't just throw all caution to the wind, because there is 200,000 people still very severely at risk of this disease who are shielding. we still want you vaccinated, we want you to wash your hands before you go to the bbc studio, etc. but those indoor events and everything else will open next monday. but --eole else will open next monday. but people are _ else will open next monday. but people are still being advised to work from home. why is that? working from home is — work from home. why is that? working from home is one _ work from home. why is that? working from home is one of _ work from home. why is that? working from home is one of the _ work from home. why is that? working from home is one of the key _ from home is one of the key remaining baseline measures. effectively we are going back to kind of what we had before omicron,
8:24 am
plus a little bit more emphasis on working from home. if you think about working from home, it is not so much the working from home that does it, it is everything around it. it is transportation, retail, everything. now we know everybody wants that back because of the retail and businesses and the sandwich shops and coffee shops. i want that back, as well, i miss going to the office. i am not sure i want to go back to my commute every day, but i do miss being in the office with other people so we are hoping we can gradually change that over the next little while, but the number of people that involves... if you look at the risk menu and you have got the cinema with 200 people in it, compared to asking the working population of scotland to go back on the trains, i am the buses, back on the trains, i am the buses, back to work, that is a different level of risk. that is why we are holding that back for now, that was our advice, and gradually we will be able to get that back. i hope if omicron continues on a downward
8:25 am
slope, we don't get another variant, we will be able to do that in the next few weeks and months. you mentioned _ next few weeks and months. you mentioned the _ next few weeks and months. you mentioned the science—fiction test, the lateral flow test we can all do at home. do you think they will always be free?— at home. do you think they will always be free? that is a difficult auestion always be free? that is a difficult question for _ always be free? that is a difficult question for always. _ always be free? that is a difficult question for always. i _ always be free? that is a difficult question for always. i think - always be free? that is a difficult question for always. i think it - always be free? that is a difficult question for always. i think it is i question for always. i think it is too early to talk about removing them for free just now. you can imagine a world in which this infectious disease is entirely different from how it is now, and poses a risk only to a very high risk group of individuals for most of the year, and then maybe is a big risk to all of us in the winter. a bit like flu might be. i can imagine a world in which all of that changes. for now, january 2022, i think they should remain free because i think they are one of the key baseline mitigations. we have had conversations a5 clinicians acro55 had conversations a5 clinicians across the uk countries and my understanding is that there has been no discussion amongst the politicians that would change that. for now. i think that is exactly the
8:26 am
right thing. for now. i think that is exactly the right thing-— for now. i think that is exactly the riuuhtthin. ., . right thing. professorjason leitch, alwa s right thing. professorjason leitch, always great _ right thing. professorjason leitch, always great to _ right thing. professorjason leitch, always great to talk _ right thing. professorjason leitch, always great to talk to _ right thing. professorjason leitch, always great to talk to you, - right thing. professorjason leitch, always great to talk to you, thankl always great to talk to you, thank you very much for talking to us on bbc breakfast this morning. thank you. thank you for your messages. — thank you. thank you for your messages, including - thank you. thank you for your messages, including from - thank you. thank you for your j messages, including from one thank you. thank you for your - messages, including from one fella 5ay5 messages, including from one fella says he is very much enjoying singing along to the fraggle rock theme tune today. thank you very much, says nick. since you announce the return of fraggle rock i have been dancing around and singing the theme music. my 11—year—old son fixes that is crazy. theme music. my 11-year-old son fixes that is crazy.— fixes that is crazy. dancing his care is crazy- _ fixes that is crazy. dancing his care is crazy. dancing - fixes that is crazy. dancing his care is crazy. dancing his - fixes that is crazy. dancing his| care is crazy. dancing his cares away. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a new report's highlighted how more than two billion litres of raw sewage was dumped in the river thames over two days. thames water's mogden wastewater treatment works in isleworth discharged enough sewage to fill 400 olympic—sized swimming pools in october 2020. the figures were published
8:27 am
in a report by the environmental audit committee. thames water said any discharges of untreated sewage were "unacceptable". a school in croydon which saw two pupils lost to knife crime last year, is trying to build hope through a new youth centre. zaian aimable—lina, 15, was stabbed to death in december. he attended oasis academy shirley park, as did 16—year—old damarie omare roye, who was attacked injuly. students are now fundraising for a youth centre in a nearby park to honour both pupils. a london council is training people to become lorry drivers to tackle the uk—wide shortage of hgv drivers. the road haulage association estimates there's a shortage of more than 100,000 qualified drivers. the new scheme run by waltham forest council will support 20 trainees. learning lots of different new skills. first and foremost, safety,
8:28 am
how the vehicle works, and then obviously, the skill set of driving a vehicle. doing something new, especially at my age, has been fantastic. more importantly, it's to be able to help the local community out for me, really, and drive that. so i'm looking forward to it. i'm going to do a good job. well, let's see what's happening on the tubes. a good service apart from the northen line which is part closed — for major upgrade works meaning there's no service between moorgate and kennington until mid may. for all other travel updates, tune in to your local bbc radio station. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. temperatures widely above zero this morning. quite a bit of cloud overnight has helped to lift those temperatures. that cloud brought to you by these fronts. now they are sinking south through this morning, brightening up for the afternoon. the cloud — there are a few breaks in there, so some bright spells, a few splashes of rain in there as well, but once they clear, drier and brighter. sunshine through the afternoon. the north—westerlyjust starting to dig in. 10 celsius the maximum.
8:29 am
but once that sun comes out it is likely to feel chillier. overnight it is going to be quite cold. the wind drops out and the temperature, therefore, dropping down to zero, if not below. so, a widespread frost first thing on thursday morning. the risk of maybe one or two mist and fog patches. for thursday, plenty of winter sunshine. it is going to feel quite chilly, a north—westerly breeze. but you can see high pressure starts to edge east, so the fronts veering around the outside. settled conditions really for the rest of this week and into the weekend. plenty of fine weather, some sunshine for the next couple of days, a bit more cloud by the end of the weekend, but night—time temperatures cold, so frost and fog. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to dan and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast
8:30 am
with dan walker and sally nugent morning live follows us on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's in store with kimberley and gethin. i'v e i've got to tell you, i'm becoming slightly obsessed with your programme. i texted slightly obsessed with your programme. itexted my slightly obsessed with your programme. i texted my wife this morning. meant to say, morning, love. and i said morning live xxx ——! love. and i said morning live xxx ——i t love. and i said morning live xxx ..j , love. and i said morning live xxx --j , , ., , love. and i said morning live xxx --j , , , _ ., coming up on morning live... a record 15 million people used buy now pay later schemes at christmas, leaving some shoppers now facing a new year debt crisis. today we uncover the tricks to help you tackle your bills — including how you can avoid paying interest on your credit cards. and, with the average household clinging on to over £500 - worth of unused items, _ professional organiser dilly carter explains why decluttering isn't just good for your mind, - but also for your bank balance, - as she shows us the pillow case hack that will add space to your draws. plus, a sprinkle of cinnamon a day
8:31 am
can help reduce high cholesterol and even banish bad breath. cinemas —— cinnamon is the one spice you need _ cinemas —— cinnamon is the one spice you need in— cinemas —— cinnamon is the one spice you need in your— cinemas —— cinnamon is the one spice you need in your kitchen. _ cinemas —— cinnamon is the one spice you need in your kitchen. it— cinemas —— cinnamon is the one spice you need in your kitchen. it can - you need in your kitchen. it can potentially _ you need in your kitchen. it can potentially control _ you need in your kitchen. it can potentially control cholesterol i potentially control cholesterol levels — potentially control cholesterol levels and _ potentially control cholesterol levels and even _ potentially control cholesterol levels and even had _ potentially control cholesterol levels and even bad breath. i also coming up, over 200,000 people in the uk are forced _ to sleep on the streets, - with little hope of a better life. but we visit a project giving i the homeless a life—changing opportunity to study for a degree and invest in their future. - plus, it's the humble work boot that gained worldwide recognition that went on to become an iconic british design. gregg wallace finds out how doc martens are made, and explains why he compares the process to making a biscuit. and, he gets all the latest gossip fresh from the boardroom, - host of the apprentice: you're fired — tom allen tells us why he thinks he'd give the contestants - on the show a run for their money. see you at 9:15.
8:32 am
see you later. we've heard already this morning how the cost of living has risen at its fastest pace for nearly 30 years, by 5.4% in the uk. ben's looking at what the latest inflation figures mean for us, and he's at the market in skipton. yes, good morning. welcome to skipton market, where dominic and the other traders are getting ready for the day ahead. they are already noticing that rising the of living. it hit 5.4% in december. that is the highest rate of inflation for nearly 30 years. economists think it'll go even higher. the bank of england expects inflation to hit 6% by the spring — way above it's target of 2%.
8:33 am
it's causing a jump in the cost of living, which is being driven mainly by rising fuel and energy costs, which in turn has been the consequence of various factors, including shortages of labour and materials. so to produce food like this, but also clothes and other things we spend our money on. it is costing more. the manufacturers and producers charge more to traders like dominic here and others in the market. they have to grapple with passing it on to their customers. we have been told to expect price rises for everyday goods for the things we are buying. the big problem is that average wages are not keeping up with average price increases. the latest average wage data shows they were going up by 3.8% per week, weekly wages were going up only three weeks to november. that is well behind inflation.
8:34 am
that is what is causing a big cost of living squeeze. we have been at the fruit and veg stall for much of the fruit and veg stall for much of the morning. if you have a slightly sweeter tooth, take a look at the neighbouring stall. this could be for you. the finest forge. —— fudge. look attempting these are. the people who run this store are tom and mariah. have you guys noticed that increasing costs for things that increasing costs for things that you buy to run your business? definitely. even in the last week we have had two e—mails from suppliers sing costs are going up 5% across the board. that is something we have seen already. share the board. that is something we have seen already-— seen already. are you having to put our seen already. are you having to put your prices — seen already. are you having to put your prices are _ seen already. are you having to put your prices are up? _ seen already. are you having to put your prices are up? we _ seen already. are you having to put your prices are up? we have - seen already. are you having to put your prices are up? we have had i seen already. are you having to put your prices are up? we have had a| your prices are up? we have had a conversation _ your prices are up? we have had a conversation about _ your prices are up? we have had a conversation about it _ your prices are up? we have had a conversation about it but - your prices are up? we have had a conversation about it but it - your prices are up? we have had a conversation about it but it is - conversation about it but it is something that we are going to try to avoid _ something that we are going to try to avoid if— something that we are going to try to avoid if we can. it might be something for the future. do you think people _ something for the future. do you think people will _ something for the future. do you think people will understand, - something for the future. do you think people will understand, or| something for the future. do you i think people will understand, or do you worry you might lose customers and your business will struggle? t and your business will struggle? i
8:35 am
think people do it like our forge micra. but in the long term it won't help. we could do with some help. == help. we could do with some help. —— fudge. you have been running your business for two years. have you noticed the prices going up more sharply? noticed the prices going up more sharl ? , , noticed the prices going up more sharl? , sharply? definitely, especially with thins like sharply? definitely, especially with things like fuel. _ sharply? definitely, especially with things like fuel. we _ sharply? definitely, especially with things like fuel. we can't _ sharply? definitely, especially with things like fuel. we can't get - sharply? definitely, especially with things like fuel. we can't get away| things like fuel. we can't get away with it. we have looked to speak to manufacturers and that kind of thing just to try to bring the cost down, rather than get them from distributors and wholesalers. {etc distributors and wholesalers. ok. before i go. _ distributors and wholesalers. ok. before i go, the _ distributors and wholesalers. 0k. before i go, the best flavour you do? mars and maltese. we will come back for some later. thank you for speaking to us. let's find out what all of this means for people's household bills and cost of living. we can speak to peter from the joseph rowntree foundation. peter, what does this mean for people day—to—day? what does this mean for people day-to-day?— what does this mean for people day-to-day? what does this mean for people da -to-da ? , , ., ., day-to-day? everybody is going to notice this- — day-to-day? everybody is going to notice this. all _ day-to-day? everybody is going to notice this. all items _ day-to-day? everybody is going to notice this. all items are _ day-to-day? everybody is going to notice this. all items are going - day-to-day? everybody is going to j notice this. all items are going up. ithink— notice this. all items are going up. i think what— notice this. all items are going up. i think what we are worried about is those _ i think what we are worried about is those on _ i think what we are worried about is those on the — i think what we are worried about is those on the lowest incomes won't be able to— those on the lowest incomes won't be able to absorb those prices. they
8:36 am
are already struggling. so yeah, something has to be done to help them _ something has to be done to help them. �* , ., _, , something has to be done to help them. , , something has to be done to help them. , ., them. and it is of course comes at a time when — them. and it is of course comes at a time when it's _ them. and it is of course comes at a time when it's not _ them. and it is of course comes at a time when it's notjust _ them. and it is of course comes at a time when it's notjust the _ them. and it is of course comes at a time when it's notjust the prices i time when it's notjust the prices in the shops that are rising for people. households are already dealing with higher electricity bills, higher gas bills. it costs more to fill the car. it feels like there is a cost of living squeeze. is that what you are hearing? t is that what you are hearing? i think so. we are also thinking benefits— think so. we are also thinking benefits are not going to rise enough — benefits are not going to rise enough next time around. i really do think— enough next time around. i really do think there _ enough next time around. i really do think there is something the government can do in terms of emergency support and just generally do things— emergency support and just generally do things for low—income households. what would _ do things for low—income households. what would you like to see the government do to help people struggling the most? by, government do to help people struggling the most? a one-off -a ment. struggling the most? a one-off payment. particularly _ struggling the most? a one-off payment. particularly the - struggling the most? a one-off payment. particularly the big i struggling the most? a one-off. payment. particularly the big rise in april — payment. particularly the big rise in april lt — payment. particularly the big rise in april. it is not something anybody— in april. it is not something anybody can factor in comedy wholesale of gas. you can't factor it into _ wholesale of gas. you can't factor it into your— wholesale of gas. you can't factor it into your budget and we think the
8:37 am
government should be helping people at that— government should be helping people at that time. the government should be helping people at that time. ., government should be helping people at that time. p, , ., , at that time. the other thing people notice is this — at that time. the other thing people notice is this is _ at that time. the other thing people notice is this is coming _ at that time. the other thing people notice is this is coming at _ at that time. the other thing people notice is this is coming at a - at that time. the other thing people notice is this is coming at a time - notice is this is coming at a time when, in april, they will be paying more in national insurance, rail fares go up in march. this seems to be right across the board and really impact people's quality of life? yeah, that is what we are hearing. really— yeah, that is what we are hearing. really stressful situations. i think that is— really stressful situations. i think that is it — really stressful situations. i think that is it. we do need to help people — that is it. we do need to help --eole. thank you. peter from thejoseph rowntree foundation. let's come back to this stall. it is a real concern for people. dominic here, let's have a quick chat. have you had to put prices up for the goods you sell to customers?— prices up for the goods you sell to customers? . , ~ customers? yeah, definitely. like i said before. _ customers? yeah, definitely. like i said before, with _ customers? yeah, definitely. like i said before, with a _ customers? yeah, definitely. like i said before, with a dull— customers? yeah, definitely. like i said before, with a dull coming - customers? yeah, definitely. like i said before, with a dull coming and overseas, — said before, with a dull coming and overseas, there has to be a slight increase _ overseas, there has to be a slight increase on— overseas, there has to be a slight increase on some stuff, especially fruit~ _ increase on some stuff, especially fruit. , ., , ., , increase on some stuff, especially fruit. , ., , . , ., fruit. customers have been coming to ou for fruit. customers have been coming to you for years- — fruit. customers have been coming to you for years- are _ fruit. customers have been coming to you for years. are they _ fruit. customers have been coming to you for years. are they noting - fruit. customers have been coming to you for years. are they noting it? - you for years. are they noting it? are they saying, why has this gone up are they saying, why has this gone up so much?—
8:38 am
up so much? they are very understanding. _ up so much? they are very understanding. i— up so much? they are very understanding. iwill- up so much? they are very understanding. i will tell i up so much? they are very - understanding. i will tell them the situation _ understanding. i will tell them the situation we are up against. there are very— situation we are up against. there are very understanding and happy to pay it _ are very understanding and happy to -a it. . ., ,, pay it. ok. dominic, thank you. it is worth saying — pay it. ok. dominic, thank you. it is worth saying this _ pay it. ok. dominic, thank you. it is worth saying this does - pay it. ok. dominic, thank you. it is worth saying this does come i pay it. ok. dominic, thank you. it is worth saying this does come at| pay it. ok. dominic, thank you. it. is worth saying this does come at a time when household budgets are really being squeezed. energy bills have already gone up. they are expected to go up even more in april when the price cap is expected to rise. railfares and england are going up in march. and people will also be paying more on national insurance in april as well. if you are affected by this, we are keen to hear from you. are affected by this, we are keen to hearfrom you. get in are affected by this, we are keen to hear from you. get in touch with us at the usual ways. we are keen to your stories and how you are dealing with it and if the effect it's having on your lives day—to—day. ben michael, thank you. brilliant look around the market. it is a bit rainy. i particularly like the look of that fudge. we've gotjohn talking about the day
8:39 am
three of the australian open. i know it is a slight aside point, but ad is a vibrant top from rafael nadal. i was wondering what colour it is. it's purple. no, what's that? flat it's purple. no, what's that? not runed it's purple. no, what's that? not pruned out _ it's purple. no, what's that? not pruned out prune is a little darker. long match ok. it clearly worked because he is through to the third round. it is his lucky colour. he is playing well. it has opened up the debate as to whether or not, no novak djokovic, no roger federer, can easily correct to seize the opportunity to stand alone on 21 titles? perhaps those three will forever be locked on 20 grand slams. there is a window of opportunity for us that nadal, albeit he hasn't done particularly well in melbourne in the past. you wonder who will win the past. you wonder who will win the men's title. the 20 time grand slam champion rafa nadal into the third round,
8:40 am
after another straight sets win, this time against the german qualifier yannick hanfmann. his side of the draw opening up after the deportation of the nine time champion novak djokovic. danil medvedev is the top ranked male player in the absence of the world number one. home favourite ash barty is through. the wimbledon champion is the top ranked player in melbourne. she's not lost this year, and will be many people's pick to go all the way at a tournament she's never won. she only dropped two games against lucia bronzetti, and she's been keeping things simple. someone who has won in australia is victoria azarenka, where crowds have been capped at 50% this year because of covid rules. the two time champion has been voicing her support for the vaccination requirements for players. i think that it would just be helpful for everybody in the world, especially when we are coming, when we are travelling internationally. in our case, i think
8:41 am
this was recommended, and that is what i believe is the right thing to do. as soon as there's a grey area in the rules that gives a bit too much questions, situations like this happen. so, on certain things, i think black and white approach is necessary. and in my opinion, this should be the case. is it over for big spending chelsea in the title race? manager thomas tuchel says a tough schedule is taking its toll on his side. a draw against brighton last night leaves them 12 points adrift of leaders manchester city, who look uncatchable now. hakim ziyech scored first for chelsea. but adam webster equalised for brighton. tuchel said his side was weary. of course we are tired — mentally tired and physically tired — and you can see it in our performance. er... it's as easy as that. look at our last week and then
8:42 am
you know what we are talking about — in seven days, three away games — and, you know, it's not only about playing, it's about travelling, it's about not sleeping. so we arrive in a game where we don't reach our full potential — 0k, welcome to reality! rangers saw their lead in the scottish premiership cut to four points, after a 1—1 draw with aberdeen. a fantastic delivery from ryan kent left iannis hagi with a tap—in, to put rangers ahead, and they were on their way to extending their winning run to 10 games, when lewis ferguson equalised from the penalty spot in the 73rd minute. there was incredible drama in netball�*s quad series in london, with england snatching a late draw with australia in their first meeting for nearly three years. how about this for keeping cool? helen housby levelled with seconds left. you may remember the name — it was housby who scored the goal against australia that won them commonwealth gold in 2018. it finished 48—all — and they won't have long to wait for another crack at each other — they meet again tonight
8:43 am
in the grand final. of course we will be looking ahead to the brits in action tomorrow. andy murray will be back in action. emma raducanu a5 andy murray will be back in action. emma raducanu as well. she has been looking very good. i guess new experiences for her on her first tour. she has to deal with late finishes, potentially. you are kind of playing until two o'clock, three o'clock in the morning. it's very different. that is probably something she has never had before. she had a great 2021. it will be interesting to see what this year brings. one other thing to look forward to any sporting scale is the winter olympics which starts in china in a of weeks. but the event has already been overshadowed by ongoing claims beijing is committing genocide against some of its people. the western region of xinjiang has proven to be contentious for human rights violations, but is hoping to benefit from these controversial games. our china correspondent robin brant reports.
8:44 am
this is the image of china you'll be seeing over the next few weeks. beautiful snow—covered slopes. china's communist party leaders hope it will persuade millions to grab a board or boots and come here. like yao. but he isn't near the host city of beijing. this is xinjiang. it's a troubled region, hoping for a major boom off the back of these olympic games. what's that going to be like in 20 years' time where you are? translation: simply _ because of president xi's one call to get 300 million chinese people skiing — that's why the ski industry has taken off. a5 china's second olympics approaches, these images have been part of state media reporting on xinjiang — almost as if it's part of the games. it's very different to these images from the bbc�*s reporting in xinjiang over recent years — of mass indoctrination and incarceration of
8:45 am
chinese ethnic muslims. inside places that china used to deny even existed. china's leaders call it anti—terror re—education. the us and others say it's part of a genocide. there are numerous foreign firms lining up to sell you part of the alternative xinjiang — the american snowboard pioneers burton is one of them. we've already seen in the last couple of years — we've seen, you know, triple—digit growth. so we are... we're very excited about that. burton has signed up a world—class chinese boarder, and she isn't even a teenager yet. the company is planning dozens more stores here. but how does its presence in xinjiang sit with an ethos that's about more than being just a business? we have two choices — we can either, you know, divorce ourselves from xinjiang and just say, "no, we're not going to do anything out there," or what we can do is we can
8:46 am
try to understand what's going on in xinjiang better. and, you know — yes, there may be some, you know... again, factually, i don't know. i'm not a politician, i've never studied any type of aspect of that. have you seen the media reports over the last couple of years? yeah, yeah, of course — everyone has, i believe so. but, again, i divorce myself. what i mean by that is, i can't change that, and we focus on what we can change. some would say maybe you can, actually. let's just go back to your statement here on the website — we want to effect positive change for our people, our factories and create ripples. yeah. maybe you can change things. yeah, i hope so, for the better. again, that's what i'm saying is — what we'll focus on is what we can change for the better. burton is just one of numerous foreign firms who've decided xinjiang — the china market as a whole — i5 irresistible. president xijinping thinks his critics are politicising his big sporting moment. his government says the olympics should rise above politics. it's a distinction some of the businesses looking to ride the olympic wave want you to make, as well. robin brant, bbc news, shanghai.
8:47 am
it is just after quarter to nine. carol a5 it is just after quarter to nine. carol as the weather. a beautiful picture behind you. good morninu. a beautiful picture behind you. good morning- isn't— a beautiful picture behind you. good morning. isn't it _ a beautiful picture behind you. (limp. morning. isn't it gorgeous? taken in thurso by one of our weather watchers. blue skies. showers in the vicinity. what is happening today is we have got a couple of weather fronts sinking south. they are taking the cloud and rain with them. the rain increasingly patchy in nature. the urgent i5 the rain increasingly patchy in nature. the urgent is much colder. look at the blues. a little trough acro55 look at the blues. a little trough across the north of the country is going to enhance the showers, which later will turn wintry, even to lower levels in the far north. we have got a two fronts sinking south, take in the rain with them. quite a few showers following behind. behind these weather fronts it will turn increasingly sunny. the other feature of the weather today is the wind. gusty winds across northern england and northern and western
8:48 am
scotland. and the winds coming from a north or north—westerly direction. as the cold front sinks south, the temperature is also going to sink south a5 temperature is also going to sink south as well. it is going to turn colder through the day. in the far north of mainland scotland and the northern isles, those showers will turn wintry down to sea level. a few showers down the east coast. the west of wales, south—west england. these are the temperatures. five to 10 degrees. through this evening and overnight we still have gusty winds. we still have the showers in the north and east. a lot of clear skies. that means the temperature is going to sink. it also means we are looking at a widespread frost. if you are in an area where you have had a shower and there are low temperatures, that could lead on untreated surfaces. tomorrow we start off on a windy note, the winds will slowly ease. showers in west wales and cornwall tending to push out to sea. there will still be a few showers on the east coast. a lot
8:49 am
of dry weather, a lot of sunshine. 6 degrees in edinburgh, four in newcastle and hull. another cold day in prospect. through thursday into friday and for the weekend as well, we have got this high—pressure moving on from the atlantic, building across us. the air moves in a clockwise direction, so you can see how the highest temperatures are likely to be in parts of the north and west. we are also pulling in some moisture from the atlantic. so in the west there will be a bit more cloud. they can offer some drizzle. in the east we are looking at something drier. the wind won't be as strong either. these are the temperatures. sixes and sevens in the east, as we pulled towards the north—west, a ten in stornoway. for the weekend, where we have that high—pressure, there will be a fair bit of cloud, thick enough for some drizzle. rain at times. in the south
8:50 am
things are a bit quieter. also cooler. again, quite a bit of cloud around with fog and frost to watch out for bike around with fog and frost to watch out for bike ni-ht. out for bike night. thank you, carol. have a great wednesday. thank you, carol. have a great wednesday-— they're reminders of one of the worst tragedies in welsh history — artefacts from the aberfan disaster in which 118 children and 28 adults were killed in 1966. over the years they've been kept in various attics and cupboards, but their owners now feel there's a danger they'll be lost forever unless a permanent home is found for them. steve fairclough reports. a broken clock is among the most enduring images of the aberfan disaster. it stopped at precisely the moment it was struck by millions of tonnes of coal spoil that had spilled down the mountainside, engulfing pantglas junior school and the pupils and staff inside, as well as nearby homes. 116 children and 28 adults lost their lives. parents and teachers join police, firemen, civil defence workers and mine rescue teams at the school. some of the helpers tore
8:51 am
at the rubble with bare hands in their desperate efforts to get out of the children. the last time that clock ticked all those children were still alive, and the adults as well. it's a very strange feeling. it brings back, it brings back a lot of emotions and a lot of memories for me. mike flynn's father was one of those who rescued people from aberfan. he found the clock. it's now stored in a box in his home. i would like to see it kept somewhere in a location where it is on permanent display. there's a lot of people, if they went to see it, would get some strength from it. there's a lot of people that would like to see it because it is such a significant piece of welsh history. this now, little boy, is myself. garethjones survived the disaster. at six years old, pulled from the window of his classroom and told to run home to safety, visited by the duke of edinburgh. his family collection
8:52 am
of artefacts were nearly thrown away in a clear out. he fears the same could happen in the future. my grandchildren are interested, i but my children are not interested in actually the stuff itself. what they told me, if — - god forbid — if i died tomorrow they'd chuck it all away. oh, that would break my heart. i'd like some of it to go to a place where people can look— at it and treasure it. i've treasured it in my life. the scene is one of the most tragic in the history of welsh mining valleys, which are so used to the horrors of pit disasters. this memorial garden is on the site of pantglasjunior school, where so many people lost their lives in the aberfan disaster. the aim is that the artefacts could be kept somewhere safe and secure outside of aberfan. it's clear that the community in aberfan have been quite careful
8:53 am
about how memorialisation works, and that they have wanted to be able to hold their own space for it and not let it be overwhelmed. as one observer commented, "we're prepared for it if it's a smash underground. it's what we call part of the price of coal, men getting killed underground. but when it's kids, my god, you just aren't prepared for it." the national museums and galleries of wales say they do have items associated with aberfan, and they are seeking to collect more iconic artefacts. for survivors like gareth, what happened to them and their school will never leave them. but they would like the artefacts they have to be saved forfuture generations. steve fairclough with that report. we have had some fun with fraggle rock this morning. something else people are talking about this morning is wordle. you may never
8:54 am
have heard of it and you are none the wiser. , ., have heard of it and you are none the wiser-— have heard of it and you are none the wiser. , ., ., . you may not have heard of wordle, but you've most likely seen it — posts featuring yellow, green and grey boxes are littering social media feeds. it's a game that's sky rocketed in popularity, starting injanuary with 300,000 users, and now boasting approximately two million daily players. so, how does it work? the aim is to guess a single five letter word, and you have six tries. let's give it a go with this example. the board goes grey for letters not in the word, and yellow if the letters are correct, butjust in the wrong place. if it goes green, that means you've got the right letter in the right place. you can share your scores and results with friends online, with a new puzzle to work out each day. everybody does the same puzzle more or less at the same time.— or less at the same time. there is the word- —
8:55 am
or less at the same time. there is the word- the _ or less at the same time. there is the word. the word _ or less at the same time. there is the word. the word is _ or less at the same time. there is the word. the word is proxy. - one lover of words, and player of the popular puzzle, is susie dent, countdown's dictionary corner resident. shejoins us now. were you an early wordle adopter? i do love it. i was late to this. in january— do love it. i was late to this. in january for— do love it. i was late to this. in january for me. it has become part of my— january for me. it has become part of my daily— january for me. it has become part of my daily routine. it isjust so simple — of my daily routine. it isjust so simple. that is what i love about it. simple. that is what i love about it there — simple. that is what i love about it there is— simple. that is what i love about it. there is only one, so you have to wait— it. there is only one, so you have to wait until — it. there is only one, so you have to wait until the next one. be honest, to wait until the next one. fe: honest, how brilliant are you at this? , ,., , honest, how brilliant are you at this? _., , , ., honest, how brilliant are you at this? _., , ., ,, , ., ., this? everybody assumes i am a uenius at this? everybody assumes i am a genius at these _ this? everybody assumes i am a genius at these games. - this? everybody assumes i am a genius at these games. i - this? everybody assumes i am a genius at these games. i am - this? everybody assumes i am a - genius at these games. i am rubbish at scrabble — genius at these games. i am rubbish at scrabble. my excuse is i don't play scrabble because the dictionary is different to countdown. i am 0k. is different to countdown. i am ok. my averages about three. i got today's— my averages about three. i got today's in— my averages about three. i got today's in two but that was pure luck~ _ today's in two but that was pure luck~ your — today's in two but that was pure luck. your first guess is what it is all about — luck. your first guess is what it is allabout~ if— luck. your first guess is what it is all about. if you strike gold, that's— all about. if you strike gold, that's great. if all about. if you strike gold, that's great.— all about. if you strike gold, that's great. all about. if you strike gold, that's areat. ., ., , that's great. if not, tough. it is aood for that's great. if not, tough. it is good for your— that's great. if not, tough. it is good for your brain. _ that's great. if not, tough. it is
8:56 am
good for your brain. i _ that's great. if not, tough. it is good for your brain. i guess i that's great. if not, tough. it is| good for your brain. i guess the brain ticking over. most people do it early in the morning. it is just the basic simplicity of it and then this other element of sharing it with everyone else and the frustration of not being able to get it. ., frustration of not being able to get it. . , it. that is the thing. i find it astonishing _ it. that is the thing. i find it astonishing that _ it. that is the thing. i find it astonishing that so - it. that is the thing. i find it astonishing that so many i it. that is the thing. i find it - astonishing that so many people manage — astonishing that so many people manage to share it without giving a spoiler _ manage to share it without giving a spoiler. sometimes i get a bit disgruntled because people dojust -ive disgruntled because people dojust give you _ disgruntled because people dojust give you a — disgruntled because people dojust give you a bit of a clue. it is such a community— give you a bit of a clue. it is such a community game. i have my kids playing _ a community game. i have my kids playing it — a community game. i have my kids playing it. you can actually play side by— playing it. you can actually play side by side as well, which is what fun. side by side as well, which is what fun it _ side by side as well, which is what fun. it involves some cheating because — fun. it involves some cheating because you can see what they are trying _ because you can see what they are trying as— because you can see what they are trying as well. it is a community—based thing. the genius is its simplicity. | community-based thing. the genius is its simplicity-— its simplicity. i was going to ask what makes _ its simplicity. i was going to ask what makes it _ its simplicity. i was going to ask what makes it so _ its simplicity. i was going to ask what makes it so addictive? - its simplicity. i was going to ask what makes it so addictive? is i its simplicity. i was going to askj what makes it so addictive? is it because you have always got to wait for the next one? we are so used to having everything straightaway. you have to be patient? ties. having everything straightaway. you have to be patient?— have to be patient? yes, i think so. a lot of people _ have to be patient? yes, i think so. a lot of people are _ have to be patient? yes, i think so. a lot of people are saying _ have to be patient? yes, i think so. a lot of people are saying on - a lot of people are saying on twitter. _ a lot of people are saying on twitter, that is the joy of teaching people. _ twitter, that is the joy of teaching people. it — twitter, that is the joy of teaching people, it is worth waiting for
8:57 am
things — people, it is worth waiting for things. there is no commercial side to it either — things. there is no commercial side to it either. no ads. it is not an app _ to it either. no ads. it is not an app it— to it either. no ads. it is not an app. it is— to it either. no ads. it is not an app. it is online. anybody can get it. app. it is online. anybody can get it also, — app. it is online. anybody can get it. also, there is a version where i think— it. also, there is a version where i think for— it. also, there is a version where i think for those that have visual impairment they can actually see the grades _ impairment they can actually see the grades more easily as well. it caters — grades more easily as well. it caters for— grades more easily as well. it caters for everybody. that is the beauty _ caters for everybody. that is the beauty of — caters for everybody. that is the beauty of it. caters for everybody. that is the beauty of it— caters for everybody. that is the beau of it. ., ., , beauty of it. how do we get better at it? what _ beauty of it. how do we get better at it? what are _ beauty of it. how do we get better at it? what are the _ beauty of it. how do we get better at it? what are the tricks? - beauty of it. how do we get better at it? what are the tricks? are - beauty of it. how do we get better| at it? what are the tricks? are you already getting _ at it? what are the tricks? are you already getting competitive, - at it? what are the tricks? are you i already getting competitive, sally?! people like to start with the vowels _ people like to start with the vowels. for me, that is all well and good _ vowels. for me, that is all well and good but _ vowels. for me, that is all well and good but i — vowels. for me, that is all well and good but i like some continents to hang _ good but i like some continents to hang things on. sometimes i go for wild guesses. if you want to go for frequency, — wild guesses. if you want to go for frequency, the letter e is the most frequent — frequency, the letter e is the most frequent. to be honest, ithink frequency, the letter e is the most frequent. to be honest, i think the beauty— frequent. to be honest, i think the beauty of— frequent. to be honest, i think the beauty of it— frequent. to be honest, i think the beauty of it is just freefalling. and then _ beauty of it is just freefalling. and thenjust trying beauty of it is just freefalling. and then just trying to analyse it and work— and then just trying to analyse it and work from there. sol and then just trying to analyse it and work from there. so i would say make _ and work from there. so i would say make the _ and work from there. so i would say make the first one a complete guest. for those _ make the first one a complete guest. for those who don't know. it was started by a software engineer called josh wurl, who was trying to
8:58 am
keep his wife entertained during the pandemic. i don't think covid has been a word yet but i suppose there are obvious five letter words that may come up because of the world we are living in at the moment? that may come up because of the world we are living in at the moment?— are living in at the moment? that is true. are living in at the moment? that is true- panic— are living in at the moment? that is true. panic was _ are living in at the moment? that is true. panic was one _ are living in at the moment? that is true. panic was one of _ are living in at the moment? that is true. panic was one of them. - true. panic was one of them. everybody— true. panic was one of them. everybody was saying, yes, that is the zeitgeist of the moment. we are all creating — the zeitgeist of the moment. we are all creating our new normal. some interesting — all creating our new normal. some interesting research about what is normal? — interesting research about what is normal? 50% of us don't know what that is— normal? 50% of us don't know what that is any— normal? 50% of us don't know what that is any more. whether it is what we eat. _ that is any more. whether it is what we eat. or— that is any more. whether it is what we eat, or the way that we live. this— we eat, or the way that we live. this could — we eat, or the way that we live. this could become part of our routine — this could become part of our routine and part of the new normal. it is routine and part of the new normal. it is a _ routine and part of the new normal. it is a beautiful thing. it is inspiring _ it is a beautiful thing. it is inspiring people to get into word games— inspiring people to get into word games and exercise their brain, as you say, _ games and exercise their brain, as you say, and — games and exercise their brain, as you say, and share with other people — you say, and share with other people l _ you say, and share with other --eole. ., .,. you say, and share with other --eole. ., ., �* people. i love the fact you don't claim to be _ people. i love the fact you don't claim to be good. _ people. i love the fact you don't claim to be good. i— people. i love the fact you don't claim to be good. i have - people. i love the fact you don't claim to be good. i have seen i people. i love the fact you don't i claim to be good. i have seen your skills. �* , ., claim to be good. i have seen your skills. 2 . ,. claim to be good. i have seen your skills. �* , . ,. ., claim to be good. i have seen your skills. 2 . ,. ., , skills. it's a muscle. that is the thing with _ skills. it's a muscle. that is the thing with wordle, _ skills. it's a muscle. that is the thing with wordle, the - skills. it's a muscle. that is the thing with wordle, the more i skills. it's a muscle. that is the l thing with wordle, the more you play. _ thing with wordle, the more you play. the — thing with wordle, the more you play, the better you get. we thing with wordle, the more you play, the better you get.- play, the better you get. we will become more — play, the better you get. we will become more addicted? -
8:59 am
play, the better you get. we will. become more addicted? possibly, play, the better you get. we will- become more addicted? possibly, but it is only one — become more addicted? possibly, but it is only one day. _ become more addicted? possibly, but it is only one day. where _ become more addicted? possibly, but it is only one day. where is _ become more addicted? possibly, but it is only one day. where is the - it is only one day. where is the harm — it is only one day. where is the harm l — it is only one day. where is the harm. , ., it is only one day. where is the harm. i. ., ., ., harm. i will ring you tomorrow morning! _ harm. i will ring you tomorrow morning! thank _ harm. i will ring you tomorrow morning! thank you. - you're watching bbc breakfast, it's 8.59.
9:00 am
good morning, it's wednesday, i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to bbc news, here are your headlines. the cost of goods and services we buy are going up at their fastest rate for 30 years. in the last week, we've had two e—mails from suppliers saying that costs have gone up by 5% across the board, and that is something we are seeing already. let me know how you're being affected by the rising cost of living, the kind of choices you might be having to make. a group of 20 conservative mp5 elected in 2019 have met to discuss boris johnson's future. our political editor is reporting one of them claims ten of the 20 submitted letters of no confidence in their boss this morning. willfacemasks, working from home and covid passes be scrapped in england onjan 26? the pm is expected to make an announcement today.

70 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on