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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 18, 2022 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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russian counterpart in geneva on friday for face—to—face talks on ukraine. it comes as america warns russian could invade ukraine at any moment. borisjohnson has denied he was warned about a party at downing street that broke lockdown rules. the civil servant leading the inquiry will now speak to mrjohnson�*s former adviser dominic cummings, who made the claim. us telecoms giants at&t and verizon have agreed to delay the roll—out of new 56 mobile networks near airports, after warnings it could cause chaos in the aviation industry. microsoft is set to buy the company that makes call of duty and candy crush for more than $70 billion. the takeover of activision blizzard is the biggest deal ever by the technology giant. those are the headlines from abc news. those are the headlines
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from bbc news. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. joining me, thejournalist and times radio presenter jenny kleeman and political commentator and former conservative party press chief, giles kenningham. more from them in a moment. just to update you on the front pages — we have had quite a few more in the last 45 minutes or so. we begin with the telegraph. they are reporting that plan b coronavirus restrictions are set to be scrapped as the pm faces a plot to call a vote of no confidence from rebels in his party. the metro has a picture of the prime minister looking glum as he's questioned over whether downing street parties broke covid rules, under the headline "nobody told me".
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on the front page of the guardian is a report on the clamour to oust the prime minister — they also report plan b restrictions will be eased on the 26th of january. and note claims that lateral flow tests may be charged for any summer, a claim the government denies. the times has a big picture of the pm looking sombre as they lead with the story of tory mps teaming up to topple their boss. the i has the same picture as they highlight that chancellor rishi sunak has only given borisjohnson lukewarm support. the mirror has more on the backbench scheming to unseat the prime minister, reporting the involvement of the mp for melton mobray in what has been dubbed the "porkie pie plot". "what a sorry state!", exclaims the express, reporting the pm apologised ten
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times in his tv interview. it also focuses on the involvement of members of the 2019 intake in the plot. and there is some strictly news on the front page of the sun, who have a story about nadiya dumping herfiance. a quick 2—step, that one, i suspect! let's begin with giles. do you want to kick us off with the front of the times? credible tory mps team up to tacklejohnson. —— red wall. the lines on these headlines seem to be heartening as the evenings progressed. heartening as the evenings progressed-— heartening as the evenings progressed. heartening as the evenings roaressed. , , ., , ., progressed. there seems to be a amonust progressed. there seems to be a amongst the _ progressed. there seems to be a amongst the papers _ progressed. there seems to be a amongst the papers of _ progressed. there seems to be a amongst the papers of a - progressed. there seems to be a amongst the papers of a number| progressed. there seems to be a i amongst the papers of a number of the 29 take — the so—called red wall and he's — or did he oust the prime minister, and they have actually been quite open about it, and when
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the widths approached the mp5, they said, yes, we are. and there's also this idea, veep three, which almost sound satirical, but interesting to see if that was down in history —— the pork pie plot. it is a question of when, not if, this happens. earlier today, of when, not if, this happens. earliertoday, i of when, not if, this happens. earlier today, i think people were saying, mps are keeping their powder dry, they are going to pay for the superior report. it seems there's been some movement tonight and they might not wait for the sucre report —— v might not wait for the sucre report —— v suit rate report. not pretty. and it seems to be that one of the things which has
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triggered this is this interview the pm did with sky news of his first interview since pmqs of a 15 interview since pmqs of a 15 interview which is very visual for —— very unusual for the prime minister. he said, i don't know. this wait for sue gray stuff, the prime minister did not wait for sue gray, he apologised last week! we had mps say, which for sue gray, but we know at least seven have publicly said they would back the confidence, we will note if graham brady makes a sudden appearance on college degrees make that announcement. theresa may was prime minister last time — it
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all happen in the same day. we had the announcement at 8am, producers questions being of the committee —— prime minister's questions. they cannot do that this time, can they? if they want to wait until sue gray, they cannot waiting for the report is published, or can they? the government — is published, or can they? the government has _ is published, or can they? the government has said they need to wait, _ government has said they need to wait, that— government has said they need to wait, that is the cabinet line. if you need the detail of there are 20 of these _ you need the detail of there are 20 of these mps waiting for after pmqs to send their letters to sir graham brady — send their letters to sir graham brady we _ send their letters to sir graham brady. we note sir graham brady needs_ brady. we note sir graham brady needs 54 — brady. we note sir graham brady needs 54 letters. the times has gone to the _ needs 54 letters. the times has gone to the facebook pages of
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painstakingly because of conservative mps and have found 58 instances _ conservative mps and have found 58 instances of conservative mps criticising _ instances of conservative mps criticising the government is saying -- the _ criticising the government is saying —— the prime minister and steakhouse appointed _ —— the prime minister and steakhouse appointed they are. his suggestion -- there _ appointed they are. his suggestion -- there is— appointed they are. his suggestion -- there is a — appointed they are. his suggestion —— there is a suggestion there is a groundswell — —— there is a suggestion there is a groundswell at the moment. the conservative party are very good at heating _ conservative party are very good at beating the wp think that peter is a liability _ beating the wp think that peter is a liability it — beating the wp think that peter is a liability. it is significant between 19 take _ liability. it is significant between 19 take have lost faith or of his faith — you would think it would be loyal to the leader_ you would think it would be loyal to the leader they won their seats unden — the leader they won their seats unden all_ many who have not spent many time in the house _ many who have not spent many time in the house of— many who have not spent many time in the house of commons because of covid, _ the house of commons because of covid, who— the house of commons because of covid, who don't feel perhaps as much _ covid, who don't feel perhaps as much loyalty to the prime minister
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as other— much loyalty to the prime minister as other intake mps might do. boris johnson _ as other intake mps might do. boris johnson today, he looked broken, he looked beaten. and we all know that _ broken, he looked beaten. and we all know that borisjohnson is broken, he looked beaten. and we all know that boris johnson is the optimistic candidate, the boost to canada. _ optimistic candidate, the boost to canada, the one want to get things done _ canada, the one want to get things done with— canada, the one want to get things done with a — canada, the one want to get things done with a smile on his face. this is not _ done with a smile on his face. this is not his— done with a smile on his face. this is not his comfortjoan do not his own, _ is not his comfortjoan do not his own, apologising he looked floundering, robotically repeating these _ floundering, robotically repeating these two lines of saying that nobody — these two lines of saying that nobody told him and saying he apologise for that what he apologise for was _ apologise for that what he apologise for was misjudgment, apologise for that what he apologise forwas misjudgment, not apologise for that what he apologise for was misjudgment, not necessarily for was misjudgment, not necessarily for misleading parliament. and that is what _ for misleading parliament. and that is what remains to be established. that would — is what remains to be established. that would be terminal to any prime minister if that was established that he intentionally or knowingly misled parliament for the bees flatly denied. we should mention the mirror, only in passing because it's got such great headline because they've taken the pork pie and called it the porky pipe plot. a reflection of course the fact that quite a lot of people don't think
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boris is credibility on this is very convincing. boris is credibility on this is very convincing-— convincing. yet as to be fair i think the _ convincing. yet as to be fair i think the mirror _ convincing. yet as to be fair i think the mirror it _ convincing. yet as to be fair i think the mirror it was - convincing. yet as to be fair i think the mirror it was the i convincing. yet as to be fair i i think the mirror it was the paper which first broke the slew of stories on party gate. let's be clear, no friend of the government but quite headline.— clear, no friend of the government but quite headline. let's move on to a --aer but quite headline. let's move on to a paper that — but quite headline. let's move on to a paper that perhaps _ but quite headline. let's move on to a paper that perhaps would - but quite headline. let's move on to a paper that perhaps would be - but quite headline. let's move on to a paper that perhaps would be a - but quite headline. let's move on to a paper that perhaps would be a bit| a paper that perhaps would be a bit more welcoming to downing street which is the daily mail, exposed, the book pipe plot to topple pm as boris shows the strain. panicking, it accuses panicking turning on the manager of them elected. that must be how it looks to those inside camp boris was up yet, i think there is a real feeling that these mps have been genuinely disloyal for the bayeux seats to borisjohnson. they've only been in power for two years but over two years, why they panicking? they were boris supporters he is arguably one of the
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most successful campaigners of his generation. he produced this bumper 80 seat majority and yet they're turning on him at the slightest without trouble. i think it does underline the fact that he has a very transactional relationship with his mps. these mps are concerned, maybe panicking because they're looking at the inboxes and they are saying that they are getting a deluge of e—mails from constituents, getting letters complaining about the government breaking the lotto rules. the issue here is that there's cut through that they think are toxic. remember a lot of these mps are making marshall c, the making a judgment call thinking that boris will cost them a seat next time. �* , ., ., ., , time. an interesting analogy. it reminds me _ time. an interesting analogy. it reminds me of _ time. an interesting analogy. it reminds me of 1992, _ time. an interesting analogy. it reminds me of 1992, 92 - time. an interesting analogy. it| reminds me of 1992, 92 election time. an interesting analogy. it - reminds me of 1992, 92 election when a lot of mps were pam don't let people who wanted 92 and they were turning onjohn major. because the
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election accusing them of forgetting the fact that they were only there because john the fact that they were only there becausejohn major had won the majority against the office. i think my colleague clive miry spent most of the guys in bristol city council house searching for missing bows because tory majority seat had fallen to just 21, the final count was up there is an argument for saying that the male has a point people should have a bit more nerve, politics is a rough old game. there is another argument which - politics is a rough old game. there is another argument which is we don't vote — is another argument which is we don't vote for prime minister in this country, we don't have a presidential system, with over mps, our representatives, local representatives and those red while mps are _ representatives and those red while mps are aware of their duties to listen _ mps are aware of their duties to listen to— mps are aware of their duties to listen to what their constituents are telling them. because it's their constituents that both them and wouldn't — constituents that both them and wouldn't be doing as if they weren't taking _ wouldn't be doing as if they weren't taking temperature locally and seeing — taking temperature locally and seeing that this last few weeks and months _ seeing that this last few weeks and months from owen patterson onward has gone _ months from owen patterson onward has gone down really badly with the public— has gone down really badly with the
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public who stood by some incredibly difficult _ public who stood by some incredibly difficult restrictions for the sake of other— difficult restrictions for the sake of other people. in this kind of one rule for— of other people. in this kind of one rule for them and another system going _ rule for them and another system going on— rule for them and another system going on in— rule for them and another system going on in downing street really sticks— going on in downing street really sticks in— going on in downing street really sticks in the craw of people. yes, you should — sticks in the craw of people. yes, you should say they should be grateful — you should say they should be grateful for boris johnson but ultimately it's their constituents and they should be listening — it is interesting. some mps who have expressed disquiet have pointed things like the announcement yesterday of the first on pvc licence fee, that they feel it was rushed out. any more the announcement on asylum—seekers. suddenly about your saying, we cannot handle this, we've got to send it to the navy. this is interesting, the telegraph story, because there's lots of detail in
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here of the plot in various parts of the there's a quote from saying, one of the mps voted from derbyshire, described as being unsure if he wants to carry on packing boris johnson. it will be perfectly reasonable for someone with his background to be a little bit changeable, wouldn't get? there are those across the conservative _ wouldn't get? there are those across the conservative party _ wouldn't get? there are those across the conservative party feeling - the conservative party feeling uncomfortable. there is not that i think— uncomfortable. there is not that i think giies— uncomfortable. there is not that i think giles said this last time we spoke _ think giles said this last time we spoke not — think giles said this last time we spoke not one coherent set of enemies _ spoke not one coherent set of enemies. also as a people from all parts _ enemies. also as a people from all parts of— enemies. also as a people from all parts of the — enemies. also as a people from all parts of the continuum of the conservative party have different reasons — conservative party have different reasons to feel incredibly disappointed in the prime minister.
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gites, _ disappointed in the prime minister. gites, this— disappointed in the prime minister. giles, this front page, to be effective the telegraph, starts as full of dc by many as the good news tomorrow, which is that the prime minister is expected to announce tomorrow morning that plan b restrictions ending the move will, to end and of the month. == restrictions ending the move will, to end and of the month.- restrictions ending the move will, to end and of the month. -- will be cominu to end and of the month. -- will be coming to — to end and of the month. -- will be coming to an _ to end and of the month. -- will be coming to an end. _ to end and of the month. -- will be coming to an end. this _ to end and of the month. -- will be coming to an end. this is _ to end and of the month. -- will be coming to an end. this is what - to end and of the month. -- will be | coming to an end. this is what down do like to be focusing on. —— downing street was like to be focusing on. they are going to try new business back to normal here. the second half is about the blood—letting. the telegraph problem of evil supported paper of boris johnson out for you... taste of evil supported paper of boris johnson out for you. . ._ of evil supported paper of boris johnson out for you... we are on aaain!
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johnson out for you... we are on again! -- — johnson out for you... we are on again! -- assuming _ johnson out for you... we are on again! -- assuming one - johnson out for you... we are on again! -- assuming one of- johnson out for you... we are on again! -- assuming one of then. | again! —— assuming one of then. laughter onto expressed laughter o nto expressed pretty laughter onto expressed pretty much taking the daily mail line. forrest johnson lookin: daily mail line. forrest johnson looking pretty _ daily mail line. forrest johnson looking pretty crestfallen, - daily mail line. forrest johnson looking pretty crestfallen, this | daily mail line. forrest johnson i looking pretty crestfallen, this has been splashed across the papers. someone looking like a broken man. the express saying he apologised ten times during this 15 minute review with sky news today, and as was at an earlier review of the growing sense that that interview was a bit of a car crash, and not go well, has weakened his position tonight, a couple of the paper tonight, saying, i did not know i broke the rules,
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with the response being, you make the rules. ., , ~ with the response being, you make the rules. ., , . , ., , the rules. onto the times. a story telegraph. — the rules. onto the times. a story telegraph. the _ the rules. onto the times. a story telegraph, the governments i the rules. onto the times. a story telegraph, the governments back| telegraph, the governments back against —— the government pushing against —— the government pushing against the story about... the health agency is discussing a timetable with lateral protest might stop being free, possibly injune. the government pushing back against that, but one thing that is not going to disappear with lateral protest, but facemasks, giles? that is a difficult one. there is quite a bit done —— there are quite a lot of tory backbenchers and built like facemasks, including jacob rees—mogg tell. facemasks, including jacob rees-mogg tell. , ., facemasks, including jacob rees-mogg
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tell. , ,, ., ., tell. yes. i think also of observed behaviour on _ tell. yes. i think also of observed behaviour on the _ tell. yes. i think also of observed behaviour on the train _ tell. yes. i think also of observed behaviour on the train or - tell. yes. i think also of observed behaviour on the train or the i tell. yes. i think also of observed behaviour on the train or the tube for see a lot of people not bothering to her facemasks any more and to try and implement it is quite difficult and will listing of other laws and restrictions.— difficult and will listing of other laws and restrictions. what do you make of this _ laws and restrictions. what do you make of this story _ --?| --? ithink --? i think about money. they're t in: to --? i think about money. they're trying to produce _ --? i think about money. they're trying to produce our _ --? i think about money. they're trying to produce our club - --? i think about money. they're trying to produce our club this i --? i think about money. they're| trying to produce our club this gap in the budget, trying to going down pcr tests _ in the budget, trying to going down pcr tests —— trying to plug this gap _ pcr tests —— trying to plug this gap. working from home that is and curving _ gap. working from home that is and curving passports, this is the most coveted _ curving passports, this is the most coveted for— curving passports, this is the most coveted for the economy. anything not costing the government money is offering _ not costing the government money is offering facemasks. —— the only
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thing _ offering facemasks. —— the only thing not — offering facemasks. —— the only thing not costing is wearing facemasks. thing not costing is wearing facemasks-— thing not costing is wearing facemasks. �* ., ., , facemasks. but yvonne from poorest related stories. _ facemasks. but yvonne from poorest related stories. m15 _ facemasks. but yvonne from poorest related stories. m15 understood i facemasks. but yvonne from poorest related stories. m15 understood to i related stories. m15 understood to be on the front of the telegraph stop —— that's on four stories. shot dead, more details about him. he was— shot dead, more details about him. he was a _ shot dead, more details about him. he was a father of six. a year before — he was a father of six. a year before this _ he was a father of six. a year before this austin situation. the detail— before this austin situation. the detail on— before this austin situation. the detail on this is interesting. 3000 peopie _ detail on this is interesting. 3000 people are subject ofjustice for mi5~ _ people are subject ofjustice for mi5~ the — people are subject ofjustice for m15. the they cannot keep close tabs on mis. the they cannot keep close tabs on ali— mis. the they cannot keep close tabs on all of— m15. the they cannot keep close tabs on all of them so the question was about— on all of them so the question was about how— on all of them so the question was about how this man got into the us and give _ about how this man got into the us and give something done illegally, so there _ and give something done illegally, so there are major questions for agencies — so there are major questions for agencies in _ so there are major questions for agencies in both countries over how this austin —
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agencies in both countries over how this austin situation was allowed to make _ this austin situation was allowed to make her_ this austin situation was allowed to make her -- — this austin situation was allowed to make her —— get a gun illegally. gites, _ make her —— get a gun illegally. gites, a — make her —— get a gun illegally. giles, a quick thought on that persia asjenny said to their questions to both agencies. i persia as jenny said to their questions to both agencies. i have heard across _ questions to both agencies. i have heard across whitehall, _ questions to both agencies. i have heard across whitehall, there i questions to both agencies. i have heard across whitehall, there are | heard across whitehall, there are some whispers, some speculations that mis some whispers, some speculations that m15 is underfunded, and innovative compared to some of our —— we can hurt to ourforeign counterparts, it is quite small. lights and only story that is likely, but not for a lover of hamsters! giles, you havejust taken delivery of a dog. is it house—trained? i delivery of a dog. is it house-trained? . , ., house-trained? i have! it is meant to be house-trained, _ house-trained? i have! it is meant to be house-trained, has- house-trained? i have! it is meant to be house-trained, has had i house-trained? i have! it is meant to be house-trained, has had a i house-trained? i have! it is meant| to be house-trained, has had a few to be house—trained, has had a few slip—ups. to be house-trained, has had a few sli-u s. , to be house-trained, has had a few sli--us. _, , ._ to be house-trained, has had a few sli--us. _, , ., , ., slip-ups. tell us about the story on the front of— slip-ups. tell us about the story on the front of the _ slip-ups. tell us about the story on the front of the ft. _
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slip-ups. tell us about the story on the front of the ft. in _ slip-ups. tell us about the story on the front of the ft. in hong - slip-ups. tell us about the story on the front of the ft. in hong kong . the front of the ft. in hong kong the front of the ft. in hong kong the had the front of the ft. in hong kong they had to _ the front of the ft. in hong kong they had to kill— the front of the ft. in hong kong they had to kill more _ the front of the ft. in hong kong they had to kill more than - the front of the ft. in hong kong they had to kill more than 1000 l they had to kill more than 1000 hamsters, and fears of decoding progress passing through animals to humans —— peers of the virus. an interesting because hong kong, china has some the most severe proven regulations —— covid—19 regulations. a cause for concern. absolutely. jenny, invest thought for these hamsters —— a last thought? for these hamsters -- a last thought?— for these hamsters -- a last thou:ht? , , ., , thought? very sorry for these hamsters- — thought? very sorry for these hamsters. there _ thought? very sorry for these hamsters. there is _ thought? very sorry for these hamsters. there is a - thought? very sorry for these hamsters. there is a dphili thought? very sorry for these hamsters. there is a dphil at| thought? very sorry for these i hamsters. there is a dphil at the end of— hamsters. there is a dphil at the end of it — hamsters. there is a dphil at the end of it which is set of 15 officials _ end of it which is set of 15 officials in hong kong for the trouble — officials in hong kong for the trouble after attending a karaoke party~ _ trouble after attending a karaoke .a . ., , trouble after attending a karaoke party. party story all over again! they sobered —
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party. party story all over again! they sobered nitrogen _ party. party story all over again! they sobered nitrogen and i party. party story all over again! they sobered nitrogen and on. l party. party story all over again! i they sobered nitrogen and on. could be a very interesting day tomorrow —— a sober story and on. the papers will be back tomorrow evening with the deputy online editor at the new statesman, rachel cunliffe, and chief political commentator at times radio, tom newton—dunn, with ben brown presenting. i think it will be worth your while joining an —— and brown and tom and everyone else — rachel too. i will see you in a couple of minutes. bye—bye. good evening. i'm tulsen tollett and this is your sports news, where we start with football. and chelsea have been held to a 1—1 draw by brighton on the south coast. a win for the blues would have taken
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them second and to within ten points of leaders manchester city. hakim ziyech had them on target when he scored just before the half—hour mark. but adam webster equalised when he found himself in acres of room and unchallenged to head in for graham potter's side, who are ninth on the table. rangers were held to a 1—1 draw by aberdeen in the scottish premiership, which sees their lead at the top cut tojust four points. ianis hagi put the champions ahead in the 20th minute at pittodrie and they were on their way to re—establishing a six—point lead over celtic, but the hosts were given a penalty in the 73rd minute, which lewis ferguson converted for the sixth—placed dons. elsewhere, third place hearts were 2—0 winners over bottom—of—the—table stjohnstone and there were wins for st mirren, livingston and ross county. four—time winners ghana have been eliminated from the africa cup of nations after losing 3—2 to comoros in what is their first ever victory in this tournament.
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comoros went 2—0 up and ghana were down to ten, with andre ayew shown a controversial straight red card for this challenge. but ghana fought back despite being a man down and alexander djiku levelled the score with 13 minutes left on the clock, before ahmed mogni grabbed a second of the match for him, handing his team the win and placing them third in group c. in the other match in the group, it was 1—1 between gabon and morocco. before an own goal looked to have handed gabon top spot, psg defender achraf hakimi scored the equaliser in the 84th minute for a 2—2 draw, which means morocco, who were last champions in 1976, are through top of the group. in other football news, duncan ferguson has been appointed as everton caretaker manager for the club's upcoming games. the blues legend took charge of training this morning as the squad prepare for the visit of aston villa to goodison park on saturday. everton's bid to bring back roberto martinez as manager ended in frustration.
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they approached the belgian fa, but they've not been persuaded to let their national team boss leave. derby county manager wayne rooney has been linked with an emotional return to his first club. also in the frame is frank lampard, who's been out of work since being sacked by chelsea a year ago. england's first meeting with australia on the netball court in three years ended in a dramatic draw in theirfinal group game of the quad series in london. both teams came into the match with two wins over south africa and new zealand. the roses trailed for long periods, but helen housby levelled with seconds left on the clock. they won't have long to wait for another crack at each other — they meet again tomorrow night in the grand final. there are six uncapped players included in eddiejones' 36—man england squad for next month's six nations. in—form wasps back row alfie barbeary is called up after scoring four tries in seven games for his club this season after returning from injury. there is no space for bath back row sam underhill, centre manu tuilagi and george ford,
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but owen farrell remains as captain. jones was asked today if farrell is still the right man to lead the team on the pitch. at the moment, he's the right guy for thejob, mate. and you talk about marcus — he's going to be an important player for marcus. marcus could be an absolutely brilliant ten, so he needs to have a 12 next to him that can run the game for him, and that's where owen's so good. selection's always about historical form, its about current form and it's about the potential of how you can improve. and what we saw with owen in november, the short time he played, was really positive. he came back in rejuvenated. and you've also got to remember those saracens blokes, they've had a really tough time, and i don't think we appreciate it. i certainly didn't appreciate it as much as i should've. you know, you go from being the champion team in england and in europe and everything's
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taken away from you. we were going through covid, they weren't training, they weren't playing at a higher level, and i thought they could come back and play in the six nations at the level they should. i overestimated that. i have said previously i got that wrong. and now is the opportunity for this players to come back. and we've seen it with jamie george in november, how positive it was when he came back, and owen showed that in the australian game, and i've got no doubt that he can go on and play really well in the six nations. elsewhere, fly—half dan biggar will captain wales, with alun wynjones out injured. wales are stuggling with injuries — seven other key players are unavailable. three uncapped players have been included — ospreys hooker dewi lake, flankerjac morgan and cardiff forward james ratti. police were called to a hobart hotel where england and australia cricketers were drinking together following the conclusion of the ashes series. the england and wales cricket board says it's investigating. in a statement, it added...
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day three of the australian open gets under way shortly, with women's world number one and home favourite ashleigh barty second on rod laver arena. the top—seeded australian goes up against italian qualifier lucia bronzetti — and if she were to win and defending champion naomi osaka claimed victory later in the day, the pair would then bejust one game away from meeting in the fourth round. and following on from that, in the men's draw, 20—time grand slam champion rafael nadal also goes up against a qualifier in germany's yannick hanfmann. the spaniard hasn't won this tournament since 2009 and is still chasing a record—breaking 21st men's title at this level. and for more on that and everything else, you can head to the bbc sport website, but that is
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all your sport for now. hello. plenty of dry weather in the forecast for the rest of this week, although many of us will see a little bit of rain through the first part of wednesday as frontal systems push southwards across the uk. cloud and patchy rain sinking southwards across england and wales, brighter skies following on behind with some sunshine. some showers around, wintry, especially over high ground, even to quite low levels in northern scotland. and across shetland, there will be snow all the way down to sea level, i suspect. afternoon temperatures between one and 10 degrees. it will be windy. that will just accentuate that chilly feel. as we head through wednesday night, one or two showers continuing, especially for eastern and western coasts. many places dry with some lengthy clear spells. the winds will fall a little lighter and temperatures will drop away, down to freezing or below in quite a few spots, so a widespread frost to start thursday morning. the weather is looking dry for many as we head towards the end of the week. still a few showers around and a little bit chilly, particularly down towards the south,
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where any fog lingers.
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welcome to newsday reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines. prime minister boris johnson faces mounting pressure from his own mp's — over doubts about his leadership. amid claims he misled parliament, borisjohnson denies he was warned about a party at downing street that broke lockdown rules. nobody told me that what we were doing was, as you say, against the rules, that the event in question was something, we were going to do something that wasn't a work event. the us secretary of state is on his way to kyiv — as america warns russia could attack ukraine "at any point".
12:01 am
two major us telecoms providers delay the rollout of new five g

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