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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 18, 2022 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines: the us secretary of state, antony blinken, will meet his russian counterpart in geneva on friday for face—to—face talks on ukraine. it comes as america warns russian could invade ukraine at any moment. borisjohnson has denied he was warned about a party at downing street that broke lockdown rules. the civil servant leading the inquiry will now speak to mrjohnson�*s former adviser dominic cummings, who made the claim. us telecoms giants at&t and verizon have agreed to delay the roll—out of new 56 mobile networks across the country — after warnings it could cause chaos in the aviation industry, leading to thousands of delays and cancellations. and microsoft is set to buy the company that makes call of duty and candy crush for more than $70 billion. the takeover of activision blizzard is the biggest deal ever by the technology giant.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the journalist and times radio presenter jenny kleeman and also the political commentator and former conservative party press chief, giles kenningham. welcome to both of you. good to have you with us. let's start with the front pages, which i think will be of particular interest to them and any of you who are political enthusiasts. the telegraph who are reporting that plan b coronavirus restrictions are set to be scrapped as the pm faces a plot to call a vote of no confidence from rebels in his party. the metro has a picture of the prime minister looking glum as he's questioned over whether downing street parties broke
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covid rules — under the headline "nobody told me". on the front page of the guardian is a report on the clamour to oust the prime minister — they also report plan b restrictions will be eased on the 26th of january. buy game—maker activision blizzard the ft focuses on microsoft's bid to buy game—maker activision blizzard for a staggering £50 billion. the yorkshire post has a story on a clash between northern regional leaders and central government over the integrated railway plan. and there is some strictly news on the front page of the sun — who have a story about nadiya dumping herfiance. however, i fear we however, ifear we will however, i fear we will not get to that! jenny, do you want to kick us off? the telegraph, in two parts. the first of it looks like is a bit of a downing street route briefing on plan b restrictions, but i have to say, i do not think the second half came from number 10. ha.
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to say, i do not think the second half came from number 10. no. this is art of half came from number 10. no. this is part of what _ half came from number 10. no. this is part of what has _ half came from number 10. no. this is part of what has been _ half came from number 10. no. this is part of what has been deemed - is part of what has been deemed operation red meat, the potential ending of covid restrictions, and i think we will go into that later. the big news is it was the prime minister's first public appearance since pmqs, he has been isolating, limiting contact, because a member of a civil he has covid. he gave a 50 minute interview, in which he doubled down —— 15 minute interview. he repeated, pleading endurance, saying nobody told him it was against the rules to be in the gathering on the 20th of may 2020, the party he says he considered to be a work gathering —— pleading ignorance. nobody told him he was
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breaking the rules, which is a direct contradiction of what dominic cummings claims, his former senior adviser who says he was warned, and others have suggested, as the telegraph goes on to report, that he was born. one adviser, according to the telegraph, has told sue gray, pointed sue gray in the direction of evidence to show that borisjohnson was warned, and if that is the case, this is very serious matter. sue gray, who is investigating all of this and her name has become kind of a mantra for, "please don't ask me any more questions, wait for sue gray to report." the other thing from the interview was his contrition and house are he was in his misjudgment and holding these parties. this is clearly the line he is taking. whether or not it will be enough to save his bacon remains to be seen. , , ., ., i. enough to save his bacon remains to be seen. , , ., ., ,, ., ~ ., be seen. gyles, what do you make of
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this story? — be seen. gyles, what do you make of this story? what _ be seen. gyles, what do you make of this story? what intrigued _ be seen. gyles, what do you make of this story? what intrigued me was i this story? what intrigued me was the kind of patronising reference to the kind of patronising reference to the port pipeline. do you want to give us a bit more on that? —— pork pipeline. give us a bit more on that? -- pork --ieline. , , ., ., , pipeline. this is one of the parts ofthe pipeline. this is one of the parts of the tory _ pipeline. this is one of the parts of the tory party _ pipeline. this is one of the parts of the tory party plotting, - pipeline. this is one of the parts i of the tory party plotting, deciding whether_ of the tory party plotting, deciding whether they will put in their letters — whether they will put in their letters of no—confidence into sir graham — letters of no—confidence into sir graham brady. just a wider comment on that_ graham brady. just a wider comment on that interview today, it probably did more _ on that interview today, it probably did more harm than good. obviously the objective was for him to come out, show— the objective was for him to come out, show some contrition, for number— out, show some contrition, for number 10 _ out, show some contrition, for number 10 to out, show some contrition, for numberio to get out, show some contrition, for number 10 to get back on the front foot, _ number 10 to get back on the front foot, hut_ number 10 to get back on the front foot, but effectively what you have had, headlines saying "nobody told me i had, headlines saying "nobody told me i broke — had, headlines saying "nobody told me i broke the rules" from the guy who ashley— me i broke the rules" from the guy who ashley broke the rules. yesterday, it seems like things are calming _ yesterday, it seems like things are calming down a bit, there's a bit of a low_ calming down a bit, there's a bit of a low in _ calming down a bit, there's a bit of a low in what has been a very frenzied _ a low in what has been a very frenzied new cycle. the telegraph front page tries to capture all of
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today's— front page tries to capture all of today's dramatic elements, the work from home _ today's dramatic elements, the work from home guidance, vexing passports, but the second part talk to him _ passports, but the second part talk to him of— passports, but the second part talk to him of the blood—letting in the tory party— to him of the blood—letting in the tory party —— vaccine passports stop what _ tory party —— vaccine passports stop what apparently they're calling it the pork— what apparently they're calling it the pork pie plot, because the woman accused of— the pork pie plot, because the woman accused of working trading it. .. the pork pie plot, because the woman accused of working tradin- accused of working trading it... the mp, the home _ accused of working trading it... the mp, the home of _ accused of working trading it... the mp, the home of the _ accused of working trading it... the mp, the home of the pork - accused of working trading it... the mp, the home of the pork pie - accused of working trading it... the mp, the home of the pork pie thatl mp, the home of the pork pie that bears its name. i guess they could not call it based on the constituency because of copyright, but she has denied it, but there were some clothes from people at this meeting. wearing your hat as a former conservative party insider, is there any possibility in an environment like this for the party or the party in government to do
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anything to influence the headlines at all? , ., , , ., anything to influence the headlines at all? , .,, y., ., anything to influence the headlines at all? , ., , , ., ., ., at all? the problem you have got, which i at all? the problem you have got, which i think— at all? the problem you have got, which i think is _ at all? the problem you have got, which i think is more _ at all? the problem you have got, which i think is more accentuated | which i think is more accentuated now, _ which i think is more accentuated now. is— which i think is more accentuated now. is the — which i think is more accentuated now, is the tory party is a fragile coalition— now, is the tory party is a fragile coalition of— now, is the tory party is a fragile coalition of lots of different groups _ coalition of lots of different groups. you have the covid recovery group, _ groups. you have the covid recovery grouo, the _ groups. you have the covid recovery group, the northern research group, the european research group, and so it is very— the european research group, and so it is very difficult to corral and bring those different groups together, and the concern for number 10 is a _ together, and the concern for number 10 is a lot _ together, and the concern for number 10 is a lot of— together, and the concern for number 10 is a lot of the different groups are openly— 10 is a lot of the different groups are openly criticising the prime minister — are openly criticising the prime minister. rewinding to when theresa may was _ minister. rewinding to when theresa may was prime and esther, it was more _ may was prime and esther, it was more binary, it was depicted years and the _ more binary, it was depicted years and the remainers. —— was prime minister — and the remainers. —— was prime minister it— and the remainers. —— was prime minister. it was the brexiteers. when _ minister. it was the brexiteers. when you — minister. it was the brexiteers. when you are in a situation like this, _ when you are in a situation like this, it — when you are in a situation like this, it is — when you are in a situation like this, it is almost too late, and i think— this, it is almost too late, and i think it — this, it is almost too late, and i think it underlines and highlights his very— think it underlines and highlights his very transactional relation ship
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with backbench mps, these people elected _ with backbench mps, these people elected in 2019, elected by boris, saying. _ elected in 2019, elected by boris, saying, look at my inbox, look at my constituency. — saying, look at my inbox, look at my constituency, he is going to cost me my seat— constituency, he is going to cost me my seat next time. a difficult position— my seat next time. a difficult position for number 10 to be in. having — position for number 10 to be in. having said that, borisjohnson is the houdini of british politics! laughter yes, and he may need those skills more than he has done before. there is an interesting quote from one 2019 tory mp — we have to take it at the word of being quoted, and i have great respect for the journalist who wrote this that it will be accurate — do people think this is potentially terminal, yes, are the people looking to move? of course
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there are. do i think there is a chance a lot of people could letters in? yes, i really do. this kind of stuff, jenny, it is going to be difficult, for all the good news of plan b tomorrow, to drown any of this out, is that?— plan b tomorrow, to drown any of this out, is that? yes, and the idea that so many _ this out, is that? yes, and the idea that so many people _ this out, is that? yes, and the idea that so many people in _ this out, is that? yes, and the idea that so many people in the - this out, is that? yes, and the idea that so many people in the party i that so many people in the party were trying to wait for the outcome of sue gray's report, that seems to have passed and lots of people are prepared to make a judgment before that, because public opinion seems to have already made up its mind, really. it is very significant, this, the intake of 2019 mp saying this. they should be the most enthusiastic about the prime minister, given that they were elected with him as leader, and other politicaljournalists have been reporting some pretty scathing comments from members of the cabin, some choice lag which i am not going to use on national television, even
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after the watershed, to describe this 2019 intake as "nobodies". it is the same kind of language lobbed at douglas ross, and it suggested cabin is not listening. there is this contentious attitude —— the cabinet is not. i would say, this is really difficult, this current situation. we are faced with a choice of whether or not we are to believe the dominic cummings account versus the borisjohnson accounts of what he knew or did not know, and these are both people whose integrity is have been called into question in the past, but i would say they 2020 dentistry party is the prime minister barnard castle moment, in that he has come up with the somewhat ridiculous explanation suited to retrofit, explain the facts —— this may downing st party.
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he said he did attend this party, nobody told him the party was against the rules he made — this is not going to watch with the public, and if it is shown he lied to mps in the houses of parliament, it is potentially a resigning matter. takes onto the metro, six you quoted that line. —— sense. this is quite a simple front page, but it does remind us the competition aspects in all of this, from the point of view of borisjohnson's tricks, that the challenge is being delivered by dominic cummings. the challenge is being delivered by dominic cummings. the picture of boris dominic cummings. the picture of itoris looking _ dominic cummings. the picture of boris looking contrite, _ dominic cummings. the picture of| boris looking contrite, crestfallen, almost. _ boris looking contrite, crestfallen, almost. on — boris looking contrite, crestfallen, almost, on the front of the metro. that was— almost, on the front of the metro. that was a — almost, on the front of the metro. that was a reflection of feeling which — that was a reflection of feeling which in — that was a reflection of feeling which in this 15 minute interview, which _ which in this 15 minute interview, which is — which in this 15 minute interview, which is almost unprecedented for downing _ which is almost unprecedented for downing street to allow, but, yes, you have _ downing street to allow, but, yes, you have this borisjohnson versus dominic. _ you have this borisjohnson versus dominic, face off, and if that is what _ dominic, face off, and if that is what we — dominic, face off, and if that is what we end up with in the support,
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he may— what we end up with in the support, he may survive. nobody is putting their— he may survive. nobody is putting their head — he may survive. nobody is putting their head above the parapet saying, this is— their head above the parapet saying, this is what— their head above the parapet saying, this is what i saw, to contradict one of— this is what i saw, to contradict one of the _ this is what i saw, to contradict one of the two accounts. really, i think— one of the two accounts. really, i think that — one of the two accounts. really, i think that is — one of the two accounts. really, i think that is what you are going to need _ think that is what you are going to need you — think that is what you are going to need. you also got the strange situation — need. you also got the strange situation with the sucre report. —— sucre _ situation with the sucre report. —— sucre report _ situation with the sucre report. —— sucre report. you have effectively somebody— sucre report. you have effectively somebody doing a report on their boss _ somebody doing a report on their boss i_ somebody doing a report on their boss. i suspect sue gray is fiercely independent, a civil servant who won't _ independent, a civil servant who won't take — independent, a civil servant who won't take any criticism, but it will he — won't take any criticism, but it will be probably, if it does do for boris _ will be probably, if it does do for boris what — will be probably, if it does do for boris what dams him by faint praise or what— boris what dams him by faint praise or what is— boris what dams him by faint praise or what is not said, i do not think it will— or what is not said, i do not think it will he — or what is not said, i do not think it will be completely unequivocal, but it _ it will be completely unequivocal, hut it is— it will be completely unequivocal, but it is quite weird situation. jenny, what do you make of the — weird situation. jenny, what do you make of the metro _ weird situation. jenny, what do you make of the metro front _ weird situation. jenny, what do you make of the metro front page? - weird situation. jenny, what do you make of the metro front page? it i weird situation. jenny, what do you i make of the metro front page? it was trainin: make of the metro front page? it was training today — make of the metro front page? it was training today - _ make of the metro front page? it was training today - nobody _ make of the metro front page? it was training today - nobody told - make of the metro front page? it was training today - nobody told me - make of the metro front page? it was training today — nobody told me —— trending. because there is this sense of disbelief that
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it is his excuse. these are the rules he established himself, he should not have to be told. the idea that dominic cummings is going to present some bombshell evidence to sue gray, i doubt, because if he had any hard evidence, he would've shared with us on twitter or his quite expensive sub stack subscription service already. it is interesting, all of this. giles says sucre is independent. i do not think she can be independent. boris johnson is her boss. she can be impartial, but he is her boss. the weight is on her shoulders, because everyone in parliament says, wait for her report, but i think maybe we can go beyond this now. take for her report, but i think maybe we can go beyond this now.— for her report, but i think maybe we can go beyond this now. take us onto the guardian, which _
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can go beyond this now. take us onto the guardian, which has— can go beyond this now. take us onto the guardian, which has a _ can go beyond this now. take us onto the guardian, which has a couple - can go beyond this now. take us onto the guardian, which has a couple of. the guardian, which has a couple of interesting extra lines, pretty girly suggesting that if boris johnson is facing a votive no confidence, which becomes a not a medic process if these 5a letters are received, he may step down rather than trying fighte —— automatic process. irate rather than trying fighte -- automatic process. we know boris johnson likes _ automatic process. we know boris johnson likes to _ automatic process. we know boris johnson likes to be _ automatic process. we know boris johnson likes to be optimistic, - automatic process. we know boris johnson likes to be optimistic, he | johnson likes to be optimistic, he is not suited to circumstance like this, but it is more complicated than 5a signatures coming in and he steps down. we are facing a hike in living expenses, the may elections. i don't think many people would want to take over right now, i think there is an argument to be made among many people within the conservative party, the parliamentary conservative party, that his days are numbered but he should stick around to observe the flak coming his way. we don't know how many people have cemented —— submitted letters to graham
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brady, so we should not count our chickens, should not count letters before they are opened. fir chickens, should not count letters before they are opened. or indeed written! we _ before they are opened. or indeed written! we only _ before they are opened. or indeed written! we only know— before they are opened. or indeed written! we only know of - before they are opened. or indeed written! we only know of seven i written! we only know of seven letters, the mps considered specifically saying they have submitted them. something from my colleague, an interview with sue gray, and also her background running a bar in what used to be called bandit country in the time of the northern irish troubles. where people like the ouc were reluctant to venture. —— are you see. do you want to pick up on this, what the guardian is suggesting, that perhaps he mightjump rather than allow themselves to be pushed? you've
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known boris johnson themselves to be pushed? you've known borisjohnson a long time but

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