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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  January 18, 2022 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the us is planning to attend talks with russia over ukraine and the white house as the crisis has become serious. , , . , serious. this is an extremely dangerous — serious. this is an extremely dangerous situation - serious. this is an extremely dangerous situation and - serious. this is an extremely i dangerous situation and rewrite serious. this is an extremely - dangerous situation and rewrite a stage where russia could at any point launch an attack in ukraine. we know russia has amassed 100,000 troops along the border with ukraine and the us secretary of state is on his way to the ukraine and we would have the latest on all of this from washington. tonga'uiha says it has been hit by an unprecedented disaster and the first images are arriving to the nation was hit by volcanic ash and a synonymy. here in the uk borisjohnson it again categorically denied that he was
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whined about the garden party in downing street during lockdown breaking regulations.— downing street during lockdown breaking regulations. nobody told me that what we were _ breaking regulations. nobody told me that what we were doing _ breaking regulations. nobody told me that what we were doing was - breaking regulations. nobody told me that what we were doing was as - breaking regulations. nobody told me that what we were doing was as you i that what we were doing was as you say against the rules at the event in question was something that we were going to do something that was not a work event. let us begin with tensions on the ukraine party. the us secretary of state will be holding talks with his russian counterpart on friday and he's also en route to ukraine to meet the ukrainian president. that is here from the white house press secretary. fix, is here from the white house press secreta . �* , , ., secretary. a review if this is a dangerous — secretary. a review if this is a dangerous situation _ secretary. a review if this is a dangerous situation and - secretary. a review if this is a dangerous situation and we i secretary. a review if this is a l dangerous situation and we are secretary. a review if this is a - dangerous situation and we are at a stage where russia could launch an attack in the ukraine and what secretary banking is going to do is highlight very clearly there is a bit radical path for it and it's the
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choice of president putin and the russians to make whether they are going to suffer severe economic consequences or not. if we have a look at the map, have a look at this map. this is what has the us and western allies so worried. it shows the scale of russian military build up on the border. as you can see, russian forces have surrounded ukraine on three sides. nina jankowicz is an expert on ukraine and russia. let's hear her assessment of the upcoming meeting between mr blinken and his russian counterpart sergei lavrov. (tx sot) what is their message to the diplomats who are trying to avert a dramatic explanation of the conflict between you and moscow right now? i would say the main message is that i show the kremlin that they understand all threats and you can't make this invasion very expensive for them. and you can start with the sanctions on this moment.—
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sanctions on this moment. before, not after. sanctions on this moment. before, not after- if — sanctions on this moment. before, not after. if they _ sanctions on this moment. before, not after. if they do _ sanctions on this moment. before, not after. if they do not, _ sanctions on this moment. before, not after. if they do not, will- sanctions on this moment. before, not after. if they do not, will you i not after. if they do not, will you regard that as a betrayal? it will be very late _ regard that as a betrayal? it will be very late because _ regard that as a betrayal? it will be very late because they - regard that as a betrayal? it will be very late because they would i regard that as a betrayal? it ll be very late because they would be a lot of blood and they will be a lot of refugees and it will be disaster because they swear is not only used in ukraine, a smart is going into east of europe. russian foreign minister sergei lavrov had this to say. we are not threatening anyone but we hear threats thrown at us. us security officials are also concerned about russian movements into belarus. remember, the country's leader, alexander lukashenko is an ally of russian president vladimir putin. these pictures show russian military vehicles being transported into belarus earlier today. russia says the two countries intend to practice military drills. but as you can see, belarus borders ukraine.
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so the us fears that moscow is actually looking for a new route to invade. there may be a major military offensive launched by moscow involving the hundred thousand or more trips on the massive arsenal that vladimir putin has put on the border next to your country. do you believe that is coming soon? i believe that is coming soon? i believe that is coming soon? i believe that they did not make the decision yet and i hope they will continue the diplomatic and political negotiations with their nato ally and a hope they will not come through our border. you can see
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the full interview— come through our border. you can see the full interview with _ come through our border. you can see the full interview with the _ come through our border. you can see the full interview with the ukraine - the full interview with the ukraine defence minister tomorrow on bbc iplayer if you're in the uk were on bbc world news outside the uk. let's bring in our barbara plett usher in washington. (0s dtl) the americans and the russians have already been talking and they did not seem much different from either side so how are we setting expectations ahead of this meeting? there were talks in europe earlier this month and bilateral talks between the americans and russians and also talks between russia and nato and everyone came away still sticking to their side and they did not seem to be any movement towards some sort of agreement. what the state department is seeing and be reprieved by a senior official in just a little while ago is that while he was on a phone call suddenly they decided they will meet
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in geneva on friday to talk face—to—face. he was going to be going to europe anyway and they said this happened so suddenly we could not even be told who asked for the meeting that had not come through yet to the officials information that let me know and it was pointed out that talks had not been successful and also the russian foreign minister said he was written responses to the demand that russians made security demands and in essence talk about stopping in eastern movement of nato as well as denying ukraine the right to join the group and everyone in nato and the group and everyone in nato and the united states said that's not going to happen and suddenly there are talks and it looks as if the russians are willing to talk to the americans and the state department is saying he's willing to go as far as he can to get it dramatic solution for this is testing the waters to see if there is there is
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one. ., . y nato has repeated its warning to moscow that any invasion would come at a high cost. here's nato's —jens stoltenberg in berlin. the risk of conflict is real. nato allies call— the risk of conflict is real. nato allies call to _ the risk of conflict is real. nato allies call to de-escalate - the risk of conflict is real. nato allies call to de-escalate any . allies call to de—escalate any further will come with a high cost for moscow. nato is a defensive alliance which does not threaten russia or any other country. let's take a closer look at russia's demands. as i mentioned, it wants nato to rule out membership for ukraine. but it also wants guarantees that other former soviet countries, including georgia, won't be allowed to join. it's also demanding that nato stop its expansion eastwards. and the roll back
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of all of nato's military deployments in central and eastern europe. germany's foreign minister had this strong message for moscow. it is very difficult not to see that as a threat. he it is very difficult not to see that as a threat-— as a threat. he hurriedly me run throu~h as a threat. he hurriedly me run through the list _ as a threat. he hurriedly me run through the list of— as a threat. he hurriedly me run through the list of russian - through the list of russian demands. it's hard for me to pick out any on which nato are the americans might give ground. but which nato are the americans might give ground-— give ground. but i i seeing it wron: ? give ground. but i i seeing it wrong? no- _ give ground. but i i seeing it wrong? no. you _ give ground. but i i seeing it wrong? no. you are - give ground. but i i seeing it wrong? no. you are seeing l give ground. but i i seeing it| wrong? no. you are seeing it give ground. but i i seeing it - wrong? no. you are seeing it right. they have been clear they're not going to give ground on any of those demands. what they are trying to do is find something that they can talk about which they say might address some of moscow's security concerns. things like talking about military exercises, greater transparency with them, better communications, arms control, risk reduction, and in fact the secretary—general of nato had sent out an offer to the russians to hold another round of talks on this basis which the russians have not accepted. this is what the nato and
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us position is and on the other side of it they say if we cannot resolve this diplomatically than they will be very massive response in terms of financial sanctions and in terms of actually increasing may to the planet to the eastern flank and in terms of giving extra defensive equipment to be ukraine. there is a standoff now with this build—up of military forces by russia. it's not clear to the americans are nato that this is a matter of trying to intimidate while they're trying to get what they want and if they're serious about an inpatient on the other side trying to keep unity within nato to have a very strong response to message to russia that they will be a strong and united response to any possible invasion. tonga says it's been hit
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by an �*unprecedented disaster�*. this is the first formal update since saturday's undersea volcanic eruption — and the tsunami that followed. initially virtually all communications with the country were severed — but we now know at least three people have died. and the scale of the damage is becoming clearer. this is one of the first pictures we have had since the eruption it's taken by new zealand's defence force. we also have this image taken of one island in tonga in december — you can seen its vibrant and green. after the eruption — it's grey from ash. and this is the assessment of a tongan government official in australia. we have seen that there are a lot of extreme damages on the ground and he had seen the airport in most parts of the main island it's been covered with volcanic ash so unfortunately this will require a lot of clean—up
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and also to assess further to allow aeroplanes to be able to land at the airport. i think it will be definitely a huge impact and it would be very long especially not only because of the tsunami but also the ash that has erupted from the volcano so there will be health concerns as people are briefing it especially with the huge clean—up that's happening in congo now and these are all done by humans about 200 volunteers and people coming to sleep the run rate for the to do it but we now they would be a long—term problem. tonga is in the south pacific. it's made up of over 170 islands. 105,000 people live there. and its estimated 80% of them have been affected by this. the eruption was so big it severed the single fibre optic cable
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which connects tonga to the world. it lasted 8 minutes — and sent ash 20 kilometres into the air. and it triggered a tsunami across the pacific waves reached as far as alaska almost 10,000km away. and this was the tongan capital, nuku'alofa. waves nearly a metre high flooded buildings. now these are pictures from saturday and now several days on we got an idea of the damage. here's the new zealand's high commissioner to tonga on the phone from capital. it's a huge clean—up operation under way that the town has been blanketed in volcanic dust but they are making progress and roads have been cleared and the buildings being cleaned up and the buildings being cleaned up and on the waterfront lots of rubble and on the waterfront lots of rubble and rock and some damage to the
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buildings there might they're trying to get back to normal. and we have these pictures of the tongan capital. this is the main port in december. and this is the same port facility two days after the eruption. again, it's covered in ash.(ani)so that's the view from the capital. but we know the damage to the outlying islands is far greater. mung—oh island is 70km from the volcano. 50 people live there. on monday the un detected a distress signal coming from the island. and this is why. this image is taken by the new zealand defence. tsunami waves destroyed every home here. a—ta—ta island is closer to the volcano — and home to a 100 people. there "a large number of buildings missing. remaining structures probably had flood damage." and this island is 80 kilometres from the volcano. the image caption says all but the largest buildings were destroyed. and here's the international
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federation for the red cross. the government has managed to dispatch a couple of search and rescue operations that began on sunday morning and unfortunately there remains a number of injuries report that person army and the team has been sent now because of the destruction of the health facilities there so with materials and support from the un the who was there on the ground supporting it in the health team is setting up a temporary clinic to see how to support so that health team is there and they have some relief items including water and food and tends and yesterday another ship was sent to a second island with additional resources.
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the tongan government has also given its assessment. it says: evacuations from the worst—hit islands have flights have been temporarily halted and sea transport disrupted. the internet is down — but some local phone services are available. and its message is this. i know it is hard for everyone to wait as much as we hear and the government will be trying to connect to the government and we ask that anyone be with us and be patient and the government is working really hard to be able to allow connectivity to connect with their loved ones in tonga so it definitely a few days from today possibly be able to have satellite communication to tonga where it would allow limited access to international and communication with families and friends back in tonga.
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ash is hampering any aid deliveries by air. in the meantime — new zealand has sent to navy ships — this one left auckland earlier. it's carrying water and other aid supplies. a un team is also on standby. there is though, a big concern about when aid does start to arrive. tonga is covid—19 free. a un spokesman told afp: "one of the first rules of humanitarian action is �*do no harm'. so we want to make absolutely sure that all necessary protocols for entry into the country will be followed." and here's another red cross spokesperson. tonga has done very well in the pandemic response so far. 0nly tonga has done very well in the pandemic response so far. only three cases. if government remains absolutely determined to protect its population from covid—19 and it does not want to introduce a new threat while trying to mitigate the threats caused by the tsunami. so they're unlikely to large numbers of a workers of any sort being allowed on the island to support the assistance
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because the quarantine rules are extremely strict. three weeks on arrival. the other concern is contaminated water. here's katie greenwood from the red cross again. the drinking water is the number one issue and for that reason our red cross teams on the ground are certainly active now distributing hygiene kits and purifying small amounts of household water and some of the relief items coming in on some of those flights and ships and our baked water purification models that can pump out between 100000 and 500,000 l of water per day so that is good for community use and debts would be fair in the coming days because that is going to stop ongoing effects of other disasters that might happen as a result of unclean water such as waterborne diseases and things like that.
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tonga's government has confirmed three deaths. two are locals and one is british national, angela glover. her husband james is said to be inconsolable. this is angela's brother. many tongans abroad have been waiting since saturday to hear news from loved ones. malakai fekitoa is a tongan rugby player. we are still waiting. cannot do anything from here so it's been tough in the last couple of days. i know it's going to take a while for them to get everything back together and i know at least i can get it together and food supplies and water and whatever i can get from here i get sent from new zealand i am sure you will help a lot of people by not getting any communication from home
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it's a lot of damage. borisjohnson says he wasn't told a drinks party —— held in the number 10 garden during the uk's first lockdown —— would break covid rules. here's some of what he said. ican i can tell you categorically that nobody told me and nobody said that this is something that was against the rules or a breach of the covid—19 rules or we are doing something that was not a work advance because i don't think and i can't imagine why on earth it would have gone ahead or why it would have been allowed to go ahead. we know it did go ahead. borisjohnson's principal private secretary invited staff to "socially distanced drinks in the number 10 garden". the
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prime minister's former chief adviser dominic cummings, says borisjohnson "was told about the invite, he knew it was a drinks party, he lied to parliament." there's also this from sunday times columnist dominic lawson: "i spoke to a former downing street official who said at least two people had told the pm that this was �*a party�* and should be immediately cancelled." it's these allegations that borisjohnson denies. now — accusing someone of lying to parliament is a serious accusation. so let's go back to what the prime minister said last week. when i went into that garden just after six on the 20th of may 2020 to thank groups of staff from going back into my office 25 minutes later to continue working i believed implicitly that this was a work indent. if that was a lie, borisjohnson would be in breach of the ministerial code.
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it's a document which sets out "the standards of conduct expected of ministers and how they discharge their duties." and part of the code is: "ministers who knowingly mislead parliament will be expected to offer their resignation to the prime minister." the deputy prime minister, dominic raab, was asked what the consequences would be if a prime minister lied to the house of commons. if it is annoying and deliberate in the way described and not corrected immediately nobody under the ministerial code it would be an be a resigning matter and that is the principal. we uphold the highest standards of principles and that's critically important. we've also heard from the chancellor, rishi sunak, for the first time since borisjohnson's apology to parliament last week. dominic cummings and others have said that the prime minister was warranted at this party should not go ahead. if the prime minister lied and lied to part he should resign, shouldn't he? i and lied to part he should resign, shouldn't he?— and lied to part he should resign, shouldn't he? i am not going to get into hypotheticals, _ shouldn't he? i am not going to get into hypotheticals, the _ shouldn't he? i am not going to get into hypotheticals, the men -- - into hypotheticals, the men —— ministerial colour is clear on these matters but as you now sue grey is
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conducting an inquiry into the situation and i think it's right we allow her to conclude thatjob. as rishi sunak says, civil servant sue gray is doing an investigation into the parties. we don't know when she'll present her results. and when it comes to borisjohnson, the labour opposition don't want to wait for it. he's not taking responsibility because he keeps hiding behind sue grey and that's totally unacceptable. you cannot hide behind a civil servant. he broke the rules and lied to the british people and he should go. jonathan blake is in westminster sue gray inquiry ongoing — when result?— boris says �*nobody told him�* it was against rules. that is the task that sue grey has as you are explaining a few moments ago to establish the facts because as has become very clear and
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confusingly for most people i�*m sure there are different and quite starkly different versions of events emerging from different parties. the prime minister has given his and dominic cummings has given his and we have not heard from anyone else in public at least for less at that event but sue grey has the task of establishing the facts and getting to the bottom of what that event was and whether the prime minister had been told that it was a drink reception or party or something other than the work event which he claims he assumed or thought that it was. when he turned up for as you heard him say about 25 minutes or so we will get that report probably sometime next week and there is no definite timescale network but all eyesin definite timescale network but all eyes in westminster are on what it has to say but there is a danger that expectations are too high and
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that expectations are too high and that it may pass judgement one may give a conclusive verdict one way or the other on whether the prime minister has like the to parliament or misled mps about what happened. expect to establish the facts not necessarily pass judgement. stay there jonathan —— i want to play another clip of boris johnson. because he was asked about two parties held in downing street the night before the funeral of prince philip in april last year. was having to apologise to the queen about those parties the night before she put her husband of over 70 years she put her husband of over 70 years she made interest, was that the moment of shame for you? i deeply and bitterly — moment of shame for you? i deeply and bitterly regret _ moment of shame for you? i deeply and bitterly regret that _ moment of shame for you? i deeply and bitterly regret that that - and bitterly regret that that happened and i can only renew my apologies both to her majesty and to the country for misjudgments that were made and we take full responsibility.—
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were made and we take full resonsibili . ~ ., ., w were made and we take full resonsibili . ~ ., ., .,~ ., responsibility. what do you make of that response? _ responsibility. what do you make of that response? if— responsibility. what do you make of that response? if an _ responsibility. what do you make of that response? if an extraordinary l that response? if an extraordinary interview the _ that response? if an extraordinary interview the prime _ that response? if an extraordinary interview the prime minister - that response? if an extraordinary interview the prime minister gave | interview the prime minister gave today. you saw him looking downcast and crestfallen and far from his normal upbeat and bullish persona and i think the question that conservative mps have been asking themselves today is that an expression of humidity from the prime minister or is it humiliating for him? and people have come to different conclusions and the mood is pretty dark and what that is not is pretty dark and what that is not is a consensus about what to do so they have been conversations and meetings among various groups of conservative mps today and there is talk that more are preparing to send a letter to the chair of the backbench 1922 a letter to the chair of the backbench1922 committee if he receives 5a and that will trigger a vote of confidence in the prime minister but so far on the a handful at least has set in public that they have submitted those letters that it�*s one thing to say you�*re going to do it and it�*s another to
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actually follow through with that. more pressure and more difficult questions coming borisjohnson�*s me tomorrow at prime minister�*s questions. in tomorrow at prime minister's questions-— tomorrow at prime minister's questions. . , , ., questions. in the last minute before we take a break— questions. in the last minute before we take a break a _ questions. in the last minute before we take a break a quick _ questions. in the last minute before we take a break a quick procedural. we take a break a quick procedural question, if a leadership challenge was triggered borisjohnson could still be in that leadership contest. it would trigger a vote of no confidence or a vote of confidence in him first of all and that would be a straight vote majority vote among conservative mps and if he loses that he is over and finished and he can�*t stand in the contest and he can�*t stand in the contest and if he wins if you can. but if he won the confidence vote critics of borisjohnson worry won the confidence vote critics of boris johnson worry that they would then be stuck with him as a leader without a full contest taking place until the next election. thea;r without a full contest taking place until the next election.— until the next election. they are not uuite until the next election. they are not quite there _ until the next election. they are not quite there yet _ until the next election. they are not quite there yet as _ until the next election. they are not quite there yet as jonathan l not quite there yet asjonathan has been explaining, nowhere near the number of letters required to trigger that kind of contest. thank you. join me in a few minutes as we
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continue outside source guides here in the bbc news fan. most of us had a dry day. the sun rise earlier this morning was spectacular. this was one of the leather watch pictures sent to us showing being lit up by the rising sun and it was a decent day across parts of eastern england that�*s where the sunshine was. a recent places that can�*t mist and fog all day. 0vernight if you mist and fog patches initially and number three have a band of rain spreading into scotland and northern ireland reaching northern england texts and this is a cold front. his cold front will be pushing southwards bringing something of a change to our weather. 0ver something of a change to our weather. over the next couple of days it will get colder gradually. the cold air will be across the far
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north of scotland during wednesday and snow showers coming down to sea level where gusts of wind and reach 40 level where gusts of wind and reach a0 or 50 mph with temperatures feeling cold. england and wales have an eye rain easing as the front proceedings into our area of high pressure. for many of us lots of sunshine and a few showers coming into northwestern areas. wednesday night it will get cold and they will be fast and as the cold air arrives we will see increasing showers turning to snow and that�*s the way of things into thursday. went to showers possible around the north sea but the winds of short enough to take most of the showers out to see which showers coming down the irish sea coast of west wales in southwest england but for many of us another day of sparkling sunshine but it will be chilly and temperatures on thursday for many of us will be around two or three celsius below average forjanuary but the cold air does not hang around for long and
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high pressure is still with us the same one but what happens is we get the recirculation of air moving into northern regions of the country. friday summer i�*ll be able to be across north scotland with a lot of crowd thick enough to bring drizzle to the western isles and the highlands with foss to start the day with a few mist and fog patches and temperatures ranging from ten england and scotland to around 6 degrees across the southeast. as we get into the weekend and next week a lot of there with temperatures returning to average or the above.
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hello, i�*m ros atkins with 0utside source. the us is planning urgent face—to—face talks with russia over theissue face—to—face talks with russia over the issue of ukraine. this was the white house today. this is an extremely dangerous situation and we are in a stage where russia could at any point want an attack in ukraine. russia has amassed 100,000 troops on the border and the us secretary of state is heading to ukraine. we will keep you updated. the un is reporting significant damage to infrastructure and multiple injuries on tonga�*s outlying island following the volcanic eruption and tsunami on
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saturday. because of the destruction,... with just hours to go until the new 56 with just hours to go until the new 5g service in the us, airlines have forced the telecom firms not to switch them on around airports to do with concerns over interference with flights. the uk has seen as highly daily death toll since february. new cases across the uk have fallen by more than a third in a week. no country is out of the woods yet. we can start to see the light at the end of the tunnel. we still have a
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bumpy period to go through. we will still have some moments when we are really scratching our heads and wondering what to do about the problem because, quite simply, this virus in the past has surprised us. it's virus in the past has surprised us. it�*s going to go on surprising us, and in my view, it�*s not yet run its course. and in my view, it's not yet run its course. ,,, ., ~ ., ., course. speaking earlier today, the uk health secretary _ course. speaking earlier today, the uk health secretary said _ uk health secretary said restrictions and england could be lifted very soon. we have always said that these restrictions should not stay in place a day longer than they are absolutely necessary. due to these pharmaceutical defences and the likelihood that we have already reached the peak of the case numbers and hospitalisations, i am optimistic that we'll be able to substantially reduce measures next week. england�*s current restrictions are known as plan b. here�*s a reminder of what they include. wearing a face mask is compulsory in most indoor public places. to get into nightclubs and large events, you need a covid pass, and the advice is to work from home where possible. it�*s a similar picture in scotland,
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with first minister nicola sturgeon announcing that restrictions will be lifted from monday. nightclubs will be allowed to reopen and the requirement for table service in hospitality will end. here�*s ms sturgeon. |the rise in cases driven by omicronj peaked in the first week ofjanuary, and we are now in the downward slope in this wave of cases. _ despite the sharp decline in cases across the uk, to canada now. quebec province has introduced new curbs on the unvaccinated. as of today, customers at alcohol and cannabis stores need to show proof of vaccination to secure their purchases. it�*s hoped that the move will incentivise people to get their first dose. more measures against the unvaccinated are expected to follow, with the province even proposing a health tax on unvaccinated adults. right now, these people, they put a very important burden on our health care network. and i think it�*s
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normal that the majority of the population is asking that there be a consequence. let�*s take a look at some of the numbers. around 10% of adults in quebec are unvaccinated — but they represent about 50% of intensive care patients. the canadian ministry of health says unvaccinated people are 5.8 times more likely to be hospitalised. we�*ve seen similar patterns of data elsewhere. i guess the question is what you do about that. stephanie marin is a journalist for le devoir newspaper based in montreal. great to have you back on 0utside source. this is an unusual approach compared to most places in the world. doesn�*t popular support? well, the minister has been criticised on both sides. having to show proof of vaccinations to enter alcohol or cannabis stores. the unvaccinated are saying it�*s
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discrimination, where whereas people who are vaccinations are saying the measures aren�*t harsh enough because the unvaccinated can still get alcohol and cannabis delivered. meanwhile, alcohol stores are really concerned about customers, so they�*ve hired security guards across province. they've hired security guards across rovince. ., ., , , ., ~ province. how does this work practically? _ province. how does this work practically? do _ province. how does this work practically? do they - province. how does this work practically? do they have - province. how does this work practically? do they have to i province. how does this work - practically? do they have to have a pass on their phone? how does it work? ., . , pass on their phone? how does it work? , ~ pass on their phone? how does it work? , ., , pass on their phone? how does it work? , ., ,., ., pass on their phone? how does it work? ., ., ., work? exactly. most of us to have a qr code on — work? exactly. most of us to have a qr code on our— work? exactly. most of us to have a qr code on our phone, _ work? exactly. most of us to have a qr code on our phone, but - work? exactly. most of us to have a qr code on our phone, but you - work? exactly. most of us to have a qr code on our phone, but you can | qr code on our phone, but you can also printed out on a piece of paper, and itjust has to be scanned by an employee before entering the store. it�*s fairly easy, but it doesn�*t slow down the process of entering the store. i doesn't slow down the process of entering the store.— doesn't slow down the process of entering the store. i mentioned that some politicians _ entering the store. i mentioned that some politicians are _ entering the store. i mentioned that some politicians are suggesting - entering the store. i mentioned that| some politicians are suggesting more measures will be introduced. what kind of things are being considered? as of next monday, proof of vaccination, passports will be required as well to enter large
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social stores. required as well to enter large socialstores. really required as well to enter large social stores. really big ones that are not party merrily selling food. that is also causing a bit of confusion because many stores that sell food and other items are really concerned. —— primarily selling food. there�*s also this tax that the premier of quebec has been talking about last week. we have very few details right now, but we know this tax will be applied to unvaccinated people. whether or not they use hospital services. people. whether or not they use hospitalservices. he people. whether or not they use hospital services. he also said the amount will be substantial. we have yet to see an amount next to that. help me understand the covid context here. how much pressure is the health system in quebec under at the moment? b, health system in quebec under at the moment? �* ., ~ health system in quebec under at the moment? �* ., . ., .,
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moment? a lot. we have right now 2400 hospitalisations _ moment? a lot. we have right now 2400 hospitalisations for _ moment? a lot. we have right now 2400 hospitalisations for up - 2a00 hospitalisations for up population of a .5 million. right now, there are a lot of surgeries being postponed. —— 8.5 million. we are on level five of the alert. hospitals obviously not functioning under full capacity, that�*s why the premier is talking about all these measures because he feels the unvaccinated are putting on pressure of the hospital system.— of the hospital system. stephanie, we alwa s of the hospital system. stephanie, we always appreciate _ of the hospital system. stephanie, we always appreciate your - of the hospital system. stephanie, we always appreciate your help. i we always appreciate your help. thank you very much indeed. before we move away from covid, a story from hong kong. 2000 pet shop hamsters are to be culled after some of them tested positive for coronavirus. an outbreak of the delta variant linked to a pet shop in the city prompted officials to test hundreds of animals. 11 hamsters tested positive. that led to these scenes — officials in full hazmat suits shutting down pet shops. here�*s the head of hong kong conservation department.
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translation: for all the animals in the warehouse, we will do covid—19 tests. _ warehouse, we will do covid—19 tests. and _ warehouse, we will do covid—19 tests, and then we will conduct euthanasia humanely. all pet shops selling _ euthanasia humanely. all pet shops selling hamsters need to temporarily close _ selling hamsters need to temporarily close they— selling hamsters need to temporarily close. they will be taking for testing — close. they will be taking for testing and we will conduct euthanasia humanely. let�*s turn to the us. on the eve of launching a new 5g mobile service, two giant companies have stage of climb—down. the airlines are opposed, saying transmitters could conflict with vital safety equipment on board planes. the telecoms firms are launching their 5g service tomorrow, wednesday, offering incredibly fast data to mobile phones. one of them, at&t, put out a statement saying: and it had harsh words for the government, saying:
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wednesday�*s launch had already been delayed twice because of the airlines concerns. and while it looks like 5g service will begin, from the majority of transmitters, this issue is far from settled. this was the white house spokesperson a little while ago. orthan or than 90% of transmitters are supposed to go live. the issue does not appear to be settled. comitted to reaching a solution around 5g deployment that maintains the highest level of safety while minimizing disruptions to passenger travel, cargo operations and our economic recovery. we certainly understand what�*s at stake for both industries. we believe that with continued cooperation, we can chart a path forward. airlines wrote to the government on tuesday, warning of "catastrophic disruption" if the telecommunications turned
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on the transmitters closest to airports, warning they would have to cancel flights and saying "to be blunt, the nation�*s commerce will grind to a halt" james clayton is our north america technology reporter. good to see you, james. couldn�*t they have flashed this out by now? you really would�*ve thought so. you�*d think there�*d be some binding arbitration. at&t bought this c band 56 arbitration. at&t bought this c band 5g months and months and months ago, and this has been an issue for a long time. you would�*ve thought this would�*ve been sorted out. the airlines essentially say that the new 5g will interrupt some of their equipment, particularly when landing. what at&t are saying is some of these concerns are overblown, and you have this kind of chicken situation, this standoff.
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less than 12 hours to go until 5g is supposed to roll out, and we�*ve only heard a decision. a lot of people looking at this, thinking why is this happening so soon to the deadline? ,, ., this happening so soon to the deadline?— the telecoms industry points out that nearly a0 countries already have similar 5g services in place without interfering with aircraft, but there are differences. altimeters on international aircraft operate at between a.2—a.a giga—hertz on the spectrum. in south korea, which leads the way on 5g, the upper limit for telecoms services is 3.7 giga—hertz — far enough away so they don�*t conflict. in the eu, the range goes up to 3.8 giga—hertz. but in the united states, the range they plan to launch goes up to nearly four giga—hertz — much closer to where aircraft systems operate. there are other differences, too. diana furchtgott—roth was, until last year, a senior official at the us department of transportation. she�*s now at george
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washington university. in france, for example, antennas are required _ in france, for example, antennas are required to— in france, for example, antennas are required to point down. the same in canada. _ required to point down. the same in canada. so — required to point down. the same in canada, so they will not interfere with the — canada, so they will not interfere with the plane's altar minutes. also, _ with the plane's altar minutes. also, the — with the plane's altar minutes. also, the power is lower, and if these _ also, the power is lower, and if these mitigations were put in place in the _ these mitigations were put in place in the united states, there would be fewer— in the united states, there would be fewer problems. when the teleconference bid, they played 90 fire billion dollars —— 90 $4 billion — fire billion dollars —— 90 $4 billion. that's why they did not want _ billion. that's why they did not want to— billion. that's why they did not want to limit the power, and they didn't— want to limit the power, and they didn't want— want to limit the power, and they didn't want the direction to be limited — didn't want the direction to be limited. they were sold a product and they— limited. they were sold a product and they want to get the most out of their investment. what they should've been beforehand is that they would not have free reign to use it _ they would not have free reign to use it because it could interfere with the — use it because it could interfere with the planes, but they were not given— with the planes, but they were not given that — with the planes, but they were not given that information in advance. given the importance
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of safety in air travel, it�*s fairly remarkable things have gotten to this point — with a public battle between two hugely important industries the day before the technology launches. here�*s the aviation analyst sally gethins. there's been a lack of coordination between _ there's been a lack of coordination between the — there's been a lack of coordination between the two _ there's been a lack of coordination between the two different - between the two different regulators _ between the two different regulators. you _ between the two different regulators. you have - between the two different regulators. you have thel between the two different - regulators. you have the fcc, which governs _ regulators. you have the fcc, which governs the — regulators. you have the fcc, which governs the vacancy— regulators. you have the fcc, which governs the vacancy allocation - regulators. you have the fcc, which governs the vacancy allocation of. governs the vacancy allocation of 56, governs the vacancy allocation of 56. and — governs the vacancy allocation of 56. and the _ governs the vacancy allocation of 56, and the spectrum, _ governs the vacancy allocation of 56, and the spectrum, and - governs the vacancy allocation of 56, and the spectrum, and thenl governs the vacancy allocation of. 56, and the spectrum, and then you have the _ 56, and the spectrum, and then you have the saa. — 56, and the spectrum, and then you have the saa, which _ 56, and the spectrum, and then you have the saa, which governs - 56, and the spectrum, and then you have the saa, which governs the . have the saa, which governs the safety of — have the saa, which governs the safety of aircraft. _ have the saa, which governs the safety of aircraft. —— _ have the saa, which governs the safety of aircraft. —— faa. - have the saa, which governs the safety of aircraft. —— faa. you i have the saa, which governs the i safety of aircraft. —— faa. you have the 56 _ safety of aircraft. —— faa. you have the 56 providers, _ safety of aircraft. —— faa. you have the 56 providers, and _ safety of aircraft. —— faa. you have the 56 providers, and there - safety of aircraft. —— faa. you have the 56 providers, and there have i the 56 providers, and there have been _ the 56 providers, and there have been long — the 56 providers, and there have been long conversations - the 56 providers, and there have been long conversations and i been long conversations and research, _ been long conversations and research, but _ been long conversations and research, but it— been long conversations and research, but it has- been long conversations and research, but it has in- been long conversations and research, but it has in a i been long conversations and research, but it has in a way| been long conversations and i research, but it has in a way been allowed _ research, but it has in a way been allowed to— research, but it has in a way been allowed to drag _ research, but it has in a way been allowed to drag too _ research, but it has in a way been allowed to drag too long - research, but it has in a way been| allowed to drag too long now, and there _ allowed to drag too long now, and there were — allowed to drag too long now, and there were warning _ allowed to drag too long now, and there were warning signs - allowed to drag too long now, and there were warning signs before . there were warning signs before christmas, _ there were warning signs before christmas, before _ there were warning signs before christmas, before the _ there were warning signs before christmas, before the holidays. | there were warning signs before i christmas, before the holidays. this could _ christmas, before the holidays. this could reach— christmas, before the holidays. this could reach crunch _ christmas, before the holidays. this could reach crunch time _ christmas, before the holidays. this could reach crunch time this - christmas, before the holidays. this could reach crunch time this month. j let�*s bring james clayton back in.
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yet we have a situation where we have slower phones? i yet we have a situation where we have slower phones?— yet we have a situation where we have slower phones? i don't think ou're have slower phones? i don't think you're being _ have slower phones? i don't think you're being naive. _ have slower phones? i don't think you're being naive. i— have slower phones? i don't think you're being naive. i think- have slower phones? i don't think you're being naive. i think the i you�*re being naive. i think the specific frequency is described as the goldilocks frequently, because it gives you quick and... in the us, 56 it gives you quick and... in the us, 5g is not very good. there were studies that set in canada, therefore g is almost as fast as 5g, and the telecoms company have sold this. they are really keen to roll this. they are really keen to roll this out. they have spent nearly $100 billion on doing this, so they�*re pretty peeved that the airline industry is now saying they can�*t roll this out. this is a kind of stalemate at the moment. it�*s very likely is those telecoms companies will go back to the administration and say this is only temporary. they don�*t believe this is ultimately going to affect aeroplanes in the way that the airline industry will.—
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aeroplanes in the way that the airline industry will. james, thank ou ve airline industry will. james, thank you very much — airline industry will. james, thank you very much indeed. _ stay with me here. in a few minutes, we will be here about the weight of plastic pollution in the sea can overtake that of fish within 20 years. a man has gone on trial accused of killing a six—year—old computer peterborough. he had been exhibiting a grotesque interest in child murder. he left home for school on the state in peterborough, but never returned. the following day, his naked body was discovered in woodland. the
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court was told rick he had most likely been strangled and the killer deliberately laid his body out in a shape. —— star—shaped. on a leaf was a single white short. his shirt was discovered nearby. six months later, ruth neave, his mother, was accused of his mother. she was unanimously cleared by a jury, but was jailed after admitting cruelty charges. the court was told rick he was well known on the estate, but was a vulnerable child abuse by his mother to collect drugs, and this exposed him to great risk. 27 years later, james watson is now accused of the little boy�*s murder. in 2015, a new investigation was opened using test links not available in the mid—90s. —— techniques. tapings from his close were examined and a dna match
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to james watson was allegedly made. james watson would�*ve been 13 years old at the time of ricky�*s death and he was seen with neave on the afternoon. —— ricky. he had a conspicuous preoccupation with neave�*s death. he denies murder in the case is expected to last eight weeks. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. the white house says russia could be at any point ready to launch an attack on ukraine. russia denies its troops that are on the ukrainian border mean an invasion. let me bring you an update on last weekend�*s siege in texas in the us. it�*s emerged that the man from blackburn in the uk who was shot dead in texas
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after taking hostages at a synagogue was known to the security service m15. malik faisal akram was no longer thought to be a risk when he travelled to the us late last month. then, on saturday, this happened. mr akram interrupted a morning service at the congregation beth israel in colleyville with what he claimed was a gun and a bomb. armed police and negotiators then became involved. after a ten—hour stand—off, mr akram was shot dead by police. the four hostages were unharmed. the attack on thejewish synagogue happened in dallas in texas. when it became known that mr akram was from blackburn here in the uk, the investigation became global. the uk foreign secretary is branding it an anti—semitic attack, and president biden is calling it a terrorist attack. our security correspondent, frank gardner, has the latest. the question is could it have been prevented? because he was on a watchlist or at least subject to a short investigation. at the end, it
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was decided that he didn�*t present a serious risk, and was put onto a sort of secondary list of former subjects of interest. there are up to — i in fact, over subjects of interest. there are up to — i infact, overa0,000 individual. they didn�*t pick up anything. how was somebody who had a criminal record, because he did, who had displayed erratic and bad tempered behaviour, being banned from courts, being involved in drug transactions, how did somebody like that get to united states through immigration, spend two weeks there, get a weapon and carry out this attack? lots of questions to follow there. there�*s a new warning about pollution from plastics. the ngo environmental investigation agency says it�*s now a global emergency in need of a robust un treaty. it argues that the threat is almost equivalent to climate change. it�*s reported, for instance, that
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around 20 elephants in thailand died after eating plastic waste from a rubbish dump like this one. the bbc�*s roger harrabin reports: the eia�*s tom gammage says: peter thomson is the un secretary general�*s special envoy for the ocean. there�*s no doubt that it is a huge global problem. the un has identified three global environmental problems that should be of concern. first is the climate crisis. second is biodiversity loss. the third is pollution. the ocean is affected by all three. it makes up a majority of the planet. and when you
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look at pollution, 85% of it in the ocean is from plastic. so, we do have a major problem in the report is right to point that out. the penny has dropped that we can�*t continue on the way we are with only 8% globally recycling of plastic. as the efficacy of an internationally binding treaty on plastic pollution, i point you in the direction of the 1987 montreal protocol. when i was a young man, the feel was the ozone hole was opening and we would all die of state enhancer. the protocol was based on scientific logic —— skin cancer. we put it in place and the ozone layer has been steadily decreasing, and that problem has been dealt with. the same could be done and should be done for plastic pollution. now to italy, where a 16th—century
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villa in rome went on auction today for an astonishing amount. the villa aroura had a starting price of over half a billion dollars and, as you�*re about to hear, it�*s understandable why. but when it went up for sale this morning, the owners ran into one very slight problem — no—one bid for it. our rome correspondent, mark lowen, has the story. it was to be, they thought, the world�*s most expensive home ever sold when it went under the hammer today. it is a 16th century villa owned by the late prince when he died in 2018, his wife, his widow, princess rita, who is from texas, she was forced to sell it because of an inheritance dispute with his sons. he put it up for auction, it is extraordinary. we had a glimpse and it�*s dripping with treasures. there was a michelangelo statue, of
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the god pan in the garden, and there is the only ceiling mural painted by caravaggio. it was very chilly when we sat inside with the princess this morning. the some work, but it is extraordinary. there are 150,000 documents in there, including letters from mary antoinette. there was once interest from bill gates and madonna, but they could only view it on a sunday and they didn�*t want to show it. all these amazing folklorists. the auctions went in, started and there were no bids. now it is going to come back for a second attempt for sale, and whether it attracts a sale, who knows? there is pressure on the italian state to buy it, but that would be a hefty dent in their wallet. just a reminder of our top story,
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tensions on the ukraine border are not going away. the us secretary of state will hold talks on his counterpart on friday. white house says russia could at any point launch an attack on ukraine. we know it�*s massed around 100,000 troops close to the ukrainian border, but russia is denying that any of this is a prelude to an invasion, it�*s just asking the us and nato to change its policy in eastern europe. the white house press secretary also has been talking about it, describing it as extremely dangerous, and she says anthony blink and will urge moscow to take steps to de—escalate —— anthony blink in. the context here is that russians have been a similar things for several weeks. we shall see if
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friday�*s talks deliver a different outcome. thanks for watching. hello again. most of us had a fine and dry day. the sunrise was spectacular, and this was one of the weather watcher pictures showing a layer of cumulus being lit up by the rising sun. it was a decent day across parts of eastern england. some sunshine and mist and fog all day, some of these areas and parts of the west midlands. a few patches initially, further north, with this band of rain spreading into scotland, northern ireland, northern england later. this is a cold front. this cold front is going to push its way southwards, bringing something of a change. it will be getting a good deal colder gradually. the really cold air will be across the far north of scotland during wednesday.
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snow showers coming down to sea level. a gust of wind will reach a0—50 mph. temperature is about one, it will feel freezing cold here. england and wales, cloudy with a bit of light rain. easing as the front pushes in, so there won�*t be much rain left. lots of sunshine, just a few showers coming in. heading into wednesday night, it gets cold, widespread frost, and as that colder air arrives, so we will see those showers turn to snow. across northern areas of scotland. that�*s the way of things into thursday. a few showers possible around the north sea, but for the most part, the winds offshore enough to take most of the showers and keep them out to sea. coming down the irish sea coast, but for many, another day of sparkling sunshine. but it will be chilly with temperatures on thursday for many of us around about 2 or 3 celsius below average. but the cold air doesn�*t hang around long. high pressure is still with us.
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what starts to happen is we get a recirculation of this milder air moving into northern regions of the country. so, friday, some of the mildest air across northern scotland. a lot of cloud which will be thick enough to bring some drizzle, particularly to the western isles. particularly to the western islands. our temperatures range from ten to around 6 degrees across the southeast. as we get into the weekend, a lot of dry weather. temperatures returning to average or a bit above it. that�*s your weather.
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this is bbc news. i�*m shaun ley. the headlines at 8pm — during a visit to a london hospital today, borisjohnson rejected allegations by his former top adviser dominic cummings that he had lied to parliament. i�*m absolutely categorical about this. nobody said to me this is an event that is against the rules, that is in breach of what we�*re asking everybody else to do, should not go ahead. scotland�*s covid—19 restrictions are to be eased from monday, with nightclubs reopening, large indoor events resuming and social distancing rules dropped. hundreds line the streets in ireland for the funeral of 23—year—old ashling murphy, killed while running in broad daylight, as police say a man has been arrested. a man from cumbria has pleaded guilty to a modern slavery offence after a vulnerable worker was kept in a six—foot shed.
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a british man who took four people hostage at a texas synagogue had

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