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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 18, 2022 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines... more pressure on the prime minister, amid claims he was warned in advance about number ten drinks during lockdown. he's dismissed the claims: nobody told me that what we were doing was as you say against the rules, that the event in question was something that... we were going to do something that was not a work event. a british man who took four people hostage at a texas synagogue had been investigated by m15. but by the time he flew to the us, malik faisal akram was assessed to be no longer a risk. aerial footage from tonga shows the devastation caused after a volcanic eruption triggered a tsunami. three people are now confirmed dead.
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scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon is to update msps about coronavirus rules shortly — we'll have live coverage from holyrood. huge crowds gather for the funeral of ashling murphy, the primary school teacher killed while out running in county offaly in ireland. britain's emma raducanu wins through to the next round of the australian open, on a good day for british players. good afternoon. borisjohnson has rejected a claim by his former chief advisor that he was warned in advance about a drinks party in the downing street garden during lockdown in may 2020. dominic cummings has said that he's
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certain he'd told the prime minister that it might break covid rules, but he claimed mrjohnson �*waved aside�* the concerns. mrjohnson also revealed that he's already been interviewed by sue gray, the senior civil servant investigating parties in downing street. in response, labour have said the pm set the rules — he didn't need anyone to tell him that the party he attended broke them. here's our political correspondent, helen catt. almost a week after the prime minister apologised in the commons for attending what he said he implicitly believed was a work event in the downing street garden during lockdown, there are claims he was warned about it. i want to begin by repeating my apologies to everybody for this judgment that i made, that we may have made in number ten and beyond, whether in downing street or throughout the pandemic.
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nobody told me that what we were doing was, as you say, against the rules, that the event in question was something that... we were going to do something that was not a work event. and, you know, as i said in the house of commons, when i went out into that garden, i thought that i was attending a work event. the chancellor was also facing questions for the first time since the prime minister's apology to the commons. do you believe the prime minister? of course i do. the prime minister... you believe he is telling the truth? of course i do. the prime minister set out his understanding of this matter in parliament last week and i'd refer you to his words. as you know, sue gray is conducting an inquiry into this matter and i fully support the prime minster�*s request for patience while that inquiry concludes. the fresh claims come from dominic cummings, the former aide to the prime minister, now a frequent public critic. writing online, he said that on the day of the event in may 2020, "i said to the prime minister something like martin has invited the building to a drinks party,
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you've got to grip this madhouse." he went on to say, "not only me but other eyewitnesses who discussed this at the time would swear under oath this is what happened." that, he said, means the prime minister had misled parliament. if that were to be the case it would have consequences. if it is lying and deliberate in the way you describe, if it was not corrected immediately it would normally, under the ministerial code and the governance around parliament, be a resigning matter. that is the principal and we uphold the highest standards of principles in public life, that is critically important. i'm not going to prejudge the facts in this or any other aspects of the claims that have been made. 0ther tory mps have expressed anger at what it's claimed happened in downing street.
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many are also waiting for sue gray's report but labour says, whatever it says, mrjohnson is still on the hook. there has been umpteen parties in downing street. a culture is set at the top, as william hague — no labour stooge, the former tory leader — writes in the times newspaper today. culture is set at the top, so in that respect, the buck stops with borisjohnson. until that report is published it looks like claims and counter claims may well continue. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. let's talk to our political correspondent, damian grammaticas. mps correspondent, damian grammaticas. have had so the mps have had some time to digestive the thoughts of their constituents, tory mps in particular. are things looking better or worse for the prime minister, would you say? i think they sort of pretty much... difficult to say at the minute because they have been hearing what we hear is a lot of anger from their constituents in some parts, in other parts some people saying they don't think support... supporters of boris
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johnson say they don't think it is enough for him to go. but what everyone is doing critically is not saying they are going to judge the primaries at this stage, but wait to see that report and that might turn on some quite fine things when you listen to those comments today. borisjohnson in his... in his categorical denial of something very specific, the fact that he says he was not warned about what the event was not warned about what the event was and that it was breaking the rules. dominic cummings in his blog yesterday had come out and said he had gone to the prime minister and told him that... and talk to him about this drinks event, so it may be there that the crucial question that might hang on is, is there any sense in which dominic cummings can show that he actually warned the prime minister this would break the rules or does that give a sort of gap or a reason which borisjohnson
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can say he did not really believe it was breaking the rules? all of this is going to be sort of addressed in part by the report, the report will look to examine the facts around what happened, the holding of these events, what the rules were at the time, it won't apportion blame, so that... how mps then look at that and how constituents feel about that and how constituents feel about that and how constituents feel about that and how they feel about what the outcome is will all be very, very important for mrjohnson. everybody sa in: the important for mrjohnson. everybody saying they are _ important for mrjohnson. everybody saying they are waiting _ important for mrjohnson. everybody saying they are waiting for _ important for mrjohnson. everybody saying they are waiting for sue - saying they are waiting for sue gray's report. when we going to get it? ., , , , ., ., , it? that is the big question. it was talked about _ it? that is the big question. it was talked about as _ it? that is the big question. it was talked about as if _ it? that is the big question. it was talked about as if it _ it? that is the big question. it was talked about as if it was _ it? that is the big question. it was talked about as if it was coming i talked about as if it was coming this week but then we get more sort of events keep cropping up, like this dominic cummings claim, we don't know yet whether sue gray will talk to dominic cummings or whether actually those working... around half a dozen people are working on this report and it seems they may have been the ones doing some of the
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interviews and she is overseeing events. having more and more things to take into account might delay it a little bit. the talk was this week but we just don't know.— a little bit. the talk was this week but we just don't know. but we 'ust don't know. thank you ve but we just don't know. thank you very much- _ a british man who took four people hostage at a synagogue in texas had been investigated by mi5. malik faisal akram, from blackburn in lancashire, was the subject of an investigation in late 2020, though by the time he flew to the us he was assessed to be no longer a risk. 0ur security correspondent, frank gardner, joins me. so frank, he was known about. why weren't they able to stop him? did mis did mi5 miss a trick? it is one of the questions — did mi5 miss a trick? it is one of the questions they _ did mi5 miss a trick? it is one of the questions they will - did mi5 miss a trick? it is one of the questions they will be - did mi5 miss a trick? it is one of| the questions they will be asking themselves. it is quite usual for people being investigated for a short time, in this case he was investigated for four weeks, a short lead investigation in the latter half of 2020, because he did have a
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criminal record and a violent temper and they were a number of records of him being quite disruptive. he has been banned from certain courts. he was known to both the police and mis. was known to both the police and mi5. there was nothing there that they found that justified, mi5. there was nothing there that they found thatjustified, i am told, putting him on a kind of active list, bumping him up into something of a higher priority. to give you an idea of the numbers and i am not exaggerating him, these are questions they will have to answer internal into the home office, but to give you an idea of numbers, they had two lists, the list of active subjects of interest and that is around 3000 4000 people, people they are concerned about right now, some of whom may be engaged in preparations for acts of terrorism, some of whom will be in contact with people they are concerned about. then the not exacto closed files but people they have investigated and decide they are too fussed about right now. that list is up to 40,000
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long. he was on that list at the time he flew to the united states. either he did not give any indication that he was going to do this, all he did and they mistake. but even if he was on that wider list, that the authorities in the united states were not alerted and they let him into the country? this is the second _ they let him into the country? in 3 is the second question. the first question is did mi5 drop the ball? if there were no signs he was going to do anything, then they did not but who knows question of that is subject to an internal investigation will have to hold, i think. the second question is how did this man who had a record, had a cruel record, how was he able to fly to the united states and purchase a firearm and walking to the synagogue and hold four people hostage question mark —— criminal record. it says very clearly on the phone, have
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you ever had a criminal record? words that effect. there is clearly a loophole. we have been to the latest date and we have seen these questions and i have thought, what would happen if i did have a criminal record and ijust so to say —— just chose to say no. criminal record and ijust so to say -- just chose to say no.— -- just chose to say no. shouldn't mi5 have told _ -- just chose to say no. shouldn't mi5 have told the _ -- just chose to say no. shouldn't mi5 have told the american - -- just chose to say no. shouldn't| mi5 have told the american border authorities? in advance, that he had been on their radar at some stage? along with 40,000 others. certainly i think if he had been bumped up to a higher priority, someone they are actively investigating, i would like to think they would have certainly warned the border authorities but someone who had not actually committed anything at that stage, it would be seen as disproportionate to then put them on a no—fly list. frank, good to see you, thank you
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very much. huge numbers of friends and family of ashling murphy, the primary school teacher who was killed last week while out running, have gathered in county 0ffaly in ireland for her funeral mass. the 23—year—old was attacked along the grand canal outside tullamore on wednesday, her death intensifying the debate about women's safety. 0ur correspondent, danjohnson, reports from county 0ffaly. yes, this is the church where the funeral for ashling yes, this is the church where the funeralfor ashling murphy yes, this is the church where the funeral for ashling murphy was yes, this is the church where the funeralfor ashling murphy was held this morning into this lunchtime. that service has ended and people have gone on to a private funeral, a private burial. some of those people are just coming back now after the burial. this is a crime, killing, that clearly has shocked everybody here. it is the kind of cliche that we often hear in these situations but this is rural ireland, small villages around a little town. it is the sort of place where people know
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each other and are close. everyone knew and like the murphy family and it really has hit people hard. everyone here has been stunned by the pain of the killing that made people catch their breath. these are the children ashling murphy taught, the children ashling murphy taught, the youngest guard of honour for a committed primary school teacher. these little streets were filled to remember a smart, warm, lovely young woman stopped to support her grieving family and reflect on how the brightest of lives was taken. in the brightest of lives was taken. in the parish church, courage was the theme of this funeral mass but ashling murphy was the main focus. he was well—known, well liked, she was a woman of many talents. to he was well-known, well liked, she was a woman of many talents. to her “0 of was a woman of many talents. to her joy of sport. — was a woman of many talents. to her joy of sport. her _ was a woman of many talents. to her joy of sport, her vocation _ was a woman of many talents. to her joy of sport, her vocation as - was a woman of many talents. to her joy of sport, her vocation as a - joy of sport, her vocation as a teacher, today we simply can only give thanks for having had some
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small share in the privilege of knowing such a wonderful and lovely human being. ireland's critical leader sat beside those who knew her best. as well as being a community in mourning, women are left wondering once again if are safe. ashling murphy was found dead last week after going for a run along the canal. there were videos in support and solidarity but also a nervous anxiety. if that can happen here, where are women safe? ireland is now the latest place try to answer that question. a really sombre moods, so much sadness, that there is concern as to the widening purgation is of this killing. those are questions and issues for another day. there is a
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huge police investigation ongoing, more than 50 detectives working on this case now and they say they are making progress and that there is a suspect they want to talk to, somebody who is actually in hospital, being treated, he has been there since the day after ashling murphy was killed and they will have to wait until he is fit enough to be questioned. police also want to hear from anybody who saw a man in this area last wednesday, a man in a black tracksuit with a white stripe. thank you very much indeed. the headlines on bbc news... borisjohnson has rejected a claim by his former chief advisor that he was warned in advance about a downing street drinks party during lockdown in may 2020. a british man who took four people hostage at a texas synagogue had been investigated by m15. but by the time he flew to the us,
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malik faisal akram was assessed to be no longer a risk. three people are now known to have died following the eruption of an underwater volcano near tonga, in a disaster the government there has called "unprecedented". three people are now known to have died following the eruption of an underwater volcano near tonga, in a disaster the government there has called "unprecedented". there are fears that ash could contaminate the water supply. and ash cloaking the airport runway has been hampering efforts to bring in aid. 0ur corrrespondent, howard johnson sent, this report. a state of emergency has been declared by the tongan authorities, and here's why. newly released images captured by an australian surveillance flight show badly damaged buildings, knocked over shipping containers and whole communities covered in volcanic ash. we have seen that the airport and most part of the main island, where the capital is,
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it's been covered with volcanic ash. so unfortunately this will require a lot of clean—up. with airport runways currently off—limits, australia and new zealand's navies have been dispatched with humanitarian aid relief, and it's expected to take days before they arrive. the severing of an underwater internet cable is severely hampering communications. aid agencies are only slowly beginning to understand the extent of the damage. the damage doesn't seem to have been as catastrophic as we had first imagined that it might be, but there is still widespread damage, particularly to the western part of the main island. the family of angela glover, a 50—year—old british woman who died after being swept away by the tsunami, told bbc news today that they're devastated by the confirmation of her death. angela's husband james is said to be inconsolable with grief. you know, he's quite naturally,
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you know, blaming himself for really not being able to do... being able to save angela. we have, you know... it doesn't matter how many times we tell him that, you know, he has nothing to reproach himself for, you know, inside himself he is carrying an incredible burden of guilt. for the tens of thousands of tongan expatriates living around the world, like wasps rugby player malakai fekitoa, there is concern for their loved ones at home. i haven't spoken to my mum, it's been a week now. 0bviously all comms down now and, yeah, we are still waiting. i literally can't do anything from here. so it's... it's been tough in the last couple of days. in an age of instant communication, the slow response to last saturday's devastating eruption is causing unbearable anxiety. howard johnson, bbc news, manila.
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job vacancies in the uk soared to a record high of more than 1.2 million between october and december. the new figures from the 0ns are the first to exclude the impact of the government's furlough scheme, which ended in september. but the figures also show that average pay rises are failing to keep up with the increase in the cost of living. here's ben king. you should be respected, you should be well paid and you should have decent facilities. staff are hard to find these days and these refuse workers in eastbourne know it. the council offered a 7% pay rise but they say they are worth more, and with prices increasing fast, 7% does not go as far as it used to. i think it is not only the cost of living, people understanding they are poorer coming to work, it work poverty is growing. they know the market forces and the catalyst, a dispute a few months ago,
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showed that when the hgv driver stood together and demanded fair pay, you can fight and win. today's unemployment figures show why they feel they are in a strong position. the unemployment rate is down to 4.1%, almost where it was before the pandemic. vacancies are at a record high of 1.24 million and is well a dispute a few months ago, showed that when the hgv paid went up for 0.2%, excluding bonuses and adjusting for the fact that prices are going up, in real terms it fell 1%. unemployment data this morning was really quite positive, unemployment is very near pre—pandemic levels. we were very worried about a rise in unemployment but it does not seem to have materialised. the big story from the database morning as pay rises, it is not so much that pay has not grown it is that the cost of living has increased by more than that, from the data this morning.
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what you can buy with your pay packet is going down. that is a political issue as well as economic. we are seeing challenges with inflation, we are not alone in that, it is a global issue because the causes of inflation, whether supply chains or energy prices, are global in nature. we are supporting people as best we can, that is why the national living wage is going up. if lots of workers negotiate big pay rises and employers will have to pass on costs in higher prices, pushing up the cost of living, meaning we will all want a bigger pay rise next time. at the bank of england they keep a close eye on this wage price spiral and if they see it going out of control bible put up interest of control they'll put up interest rates to bring it down. there are more price rises to come, driven by the increasing costs and energy. workers will have to bargain hard if
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they want their wages to keep pace. we can take you now to holyrood. i will provide a further update on the vaccination programme. first though, today's statistics show that 7752 positive cases were reported yesterday through both pcr and lateral flow tests. 1000 yesterday through both pcr and lateralflow tests. 1000 —— 1005 yesterday through both pcr and lateral flow tests. 1000 —— 1005 and 47 people are currently in hospital with covid, 21 fewer than yesterday. 59 people are currently in intensive care, including 17 who have been nicu for more than 28 days and that is one more than yesterday. sadly, a further 41 deaths have been reported, taking the total number and the daily definition to 10,093. 0nce and the daily definition to 10,093. once again, i send my condolences to everyone mourning a loved one. as we can see from the data, 0micron is
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continuing to infect large numbers of people in scotland, across the uk and in many other countries around the world. hospital admissions and overall hospital occupancy also remains high. however notwithstanding the very real challenges covid continues to present the evidence i set out last week suggesting that the situation was beginning to improve has significantly strengthened over the past seven days for topic combination booster vaccinations, the willingness of the public to adapt their behaviour to help stem transmission and temporary measures introduced in december have helped blunt the impact of the 0micron wave. last week i said the data indicated cases were falling across most age groups and i can report today that this trend has continued. there still needs to be some caution applied in interpreting case data at this stage given the recent changes to guidance on pcr and lateral flow
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tests in, however data for the past 13 days, taking account of both pcr and lateral flow tests shows a significant fall in the number of new positive cases and to put some detail on that, on sunday, monday and tuesday of last week, 36,526 new positive cases were recorded through pcr and lateral flow tests, this week over sunday, monday and today, tuesday, 20,268 cases have been reported, so quite a significant drop and if we look atjust at pcr tests, although i would ask everybody to bear in mind the limitations now in doing so, we have seen cases fall from an average of almost 13,000 per day to just over 4600, a decline of 64% and cases have fallen across all age groups. test positivity in pcr tests has also declined from almost 30% in early january to also declined from almost 30% in earlyjanuary to under also declined from almost 30% in early january to under 20% now. the
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most recent 0ffice early january to under 20% now. the most recent office of national statistics data which covers the week to the 7th of january and so does not have a time—lag associated with it reinforces this more stable and positive assessment and indicated the number of people with covid exactly, around one in 20, was broadly the same as in the previous week. taking all of this into account and play in collating the various sources of data allows us to say with some confidence that the rise in cases driven by 0micron peak in the first week of january and that we are now on the downward slope of this wave of cases. this assessment is also reflected in the data on hospital admissions, hospital occupancy, the number of patients in hospital at any given time with covid is higher than it was seven days ago, increasing from 1479 to 1546 today. the increase of 67 is significantly smaller than it
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was in the previous seven days. and encouragingly, admissions to hospital all people with covid although still too high, is now actually falling. in the week to the 7th of january, 1040 were admitted. in the week of the 14, that was downing to 960. the number of people nicu, which this time last week was rising, has now fallen slightly over the past seven days, from six to five to 59. all of this is very positive news and it comes as a relief to all of us, i am sure. we do need to recognise there are still some uncertainties ahead and so throwing all caution to the wind at this stage would be a mistake. for exam the full impact of the return to work and school after the festive break won't be be apparent yet in the data, so it is possible that we will see case numbers rise again in next couple of weeks. also just as
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the introduction of some protective measures may have some —— help slow down transition, it stands to reason that the lifting of these measures could have the opposite effect and indeed that is exactly why it makes safe to lift measures on a phased basis. and lastly, although cases are now falling, the nhs remains under acute pressure and staff absences are still causing some disruption across the economy and our critical services. where we can take great heart from the latest data, we know from experience how important it is to be responsible and appropriately cautious in the face of this virus and that is the context then for the decisions that cabinet reached this morning. yesterday of course the limit on attendances at outdoor public events was lifted. the remaining statutory measures introduced in response to 0micron are as follows, limits on attendance at indoor public events with the requirement for physical
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distancing between different groups and indoor public places with a requirement for table service and hospitality premises serving alcohol on the premises on the closure of nightclubs. given the improving situation and as i said last week we hoped to be able to do, i can't confirm today that all of these measures will be lifted from next monday, the 24th of january. we will also from monday remove the guidance advising adults against nonprofessional indoor contact sport so that these can resume as normal and from monday, we will also lift the guidance asking people to stick to a three household limit on indoor gatherings. however, it is important i think to stress this point, notwithstanding the improving situation comedy level of covid infection circulating in the committee is still high, so to minimise the risk of getting the virus, it would be sensible for all of us to remain cautious in our social interactions at this stage, even though from monday, we will no
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longer recommend a fixed upper limit on numbers of households, if we all continue to keep gatherings as small as our circumstances allow for now, i would suggest until the end of this month, we will reduce our chances of getting infected and of course, we should continue to take lateral flow tests before meeting up with people from other households. please also remember to record test results, whether positive or negative through the uk government website. this is even more important now that we are no longer advising confirmatory pcr tests for those without symptoms who test positive through lateral flow devices, recording these results ensures that we horrible to make better assessments of the in infection. —— we are able. we will continue to ask people to work from home wherever possible at this stage and for employers to facilitate this, however we will engage with business elbowed a return to a more hybrid approach from the of february. the
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measures that were in place before 0micron on the requirement for businesses, service providers and prices of worship to take reasonable measures to minimise the spread of covid on their premises will be retained at this stage to help keep covid contained. that means face coverings should still be warm, must still be warm in indoor settings and on public transport, businesses and other organisations continue to regard guidance and take reasonable steps to eyes the spread of covid. in addition, the covid certification scheme will continue for now. settings where transmission risks can be higher. n eave eve nts neave events with a thousand or more in attendance should have
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certification status of at least 50% of attendees, and are indicated last week the cabinet would consider and decide today whether or not to extend the certification scheme to other premises, such as licence hospitality venues, and this was undoubtedly the most difficult decision we faced this morning and again at thejudgment decision we faced this morning and again at the judgment we have arrived at was finely balanced. 0n the one hand extending covid certification could offer public health benefits, making sure people attending are vaccinated or toasted, reducing the risk of transmission —— tested. 0r reducing the risk of serious illness, but on the other hand we understand that extending certification could create additional cost for businesses at an already very challenging time and of course the smaller the business to more difficult these costs can be to bear so the cabinet was weighing up these decisions and deciding what
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would be proportionate. given that cases are now falling rapidly and the current wave is receding, we decided that we will not at this stage extend the covid certification scheme to other premises, but we will reconsider this should circumstances and therefore the balance ofjudgment a change in any significant way. new cases were to start to rise very sharply again, extension of certification might be a more proportionate alternative to other more restrictive measures. but our conclusion today given the improving situation is that extending certification would not be proportionate at this stage but there is one minor change to the certification regulations that we will propose. nightclubs and other late—night venues must apply the scheme if they have in use a designated area for dancing and we intend to amend the defamation to the macro definition to provide
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greater clarity —— to amend the definition to provide greater clarity over this. this change will take effect from monday went late—night venues are able to reopen. finally, let me say a few words about the updated rules on self isolation after a positive covid test. these confirmed two weeks ago and they remain in place, and if you test positive you will be advised to self—isolate for ten days but if you don't have a fever and you take two negative lateral flow tests more than 24 hours apart on days six and seven you can end self isolation on day seven, and last week the uk government announced further changes to self isolation for england and this was publicised as allowing people to end self isolation after day five. but essentially this change simply brings england's rules into those already enforced in scotland —— into
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line with those. in scotland we count the day of a positive test as day one in isolation but this is counted as day zero in england and in england you can end self isolation after day five and in scotland on day seven so a slightly different way of defining the beginning and the end of the self isolation period has given the impression of difference but the substance, the period people are asked to self—isolate for is in fact the same in scotland and england and it is important that people are clear about that. the lifting of the protection from monday that were introduced in response to 0micron is possible because of the efforts everyone has made voluntarily and as a result of guidance and statutory measures to help stem transmission and i want to put on record again my thanks to people across the country. it is also down to the success of vaccines and at this stage of the vaccination programme we continue to offer boosters and also to implement
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the latest advice from the jcvi and just before christmas they recommended that boosterjabs should be offered to 16 and 17—year—olds, 12 weeks after their second jab, so any 16 or 17—year—old who had won 12 weeks or more ago or is just approaching that point can now book approaching that point can now book a booster appointment online —— who had one. or they can turn up at a drop—in centre. again, points can be booked online. alternatively, young people can choose to go to a drop—in centre and parents and carers are welcome to attend with them. so far at the jcvi have welcome to attend with them. so far at thejcvi have recommended that boosterjabs at thejcvi have recommended that booster jabs should at thejcvi have recommended that boosterjabs should be offered only to those 12—15 —year—olds at particular clinical risk from covid and any in that position will receive a letter inviting them for a
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booster 12 weeks after their last primary dose, and there is no need to book an appointment. finally, 5-11 to book an appointment. finally, 5—11 —year—olds with specific medical conditions that put them at greater risk from covid will be invited for their first vaccination from this week onwards. again, they will be contacted directly and there is no need for them or their parents or carers to book online, and in due course 5—11 —year—olds who are household contacts of people with immune suppression will also be invited to receive vaccination and we stand ready to quickly implement any updated advice from thejcvi about vaccinating all 5—11 —year—olds. there are reasons why the jcvi has —year—olds. there are reasons why thejcvi has given different advice for different age groups but i realise it can be confusing so the nhs inform website now has a self—help guide for parents, carers and children, setting out what young people need to do to get vaccinated
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and when they can do it, and if you can't get online you can get this information or by phoning the vaccination hotline on oh 800, —— by phoning the vaccination hotline. the final point is to do with vaccination for adults in scotland has achieved very high rates of vaccination and we are the most vaccinated pipe of the uk in terms of first, second and third and booster doses but there are more than 600,000 people over the age of 18 who are eligible for a booster but haven't yet had it and there are hundreds of thousands more have not had a first or second dose so i would encourage anyone who falls into these categories to make an appointment as soon as possible or go to a drop in clinic because there is plenty of capacity. someone not fully vaccinated is at least four times more likely to require hospital treatment than someone who has had a booster or the dose and
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although being fully vaccinated does not eradicate the risk for anyone of getting covid, it reduces the risk and therefore it also reduces the risk of passing it on to others. if you choose therefore without good reason not to be fully vaccinated, you are putting your own and others' lives at unnecessary risk so if you haven't had a booster or a third jab come forward as soon as possible and if you have not had a first or second dose please do so without delay. it is never too late to get a covid vaccine and to start getting the protection that these vaccines do offer. the situation we face todayis do offer. the situation we face today is undoubtedly less severe and much more positive than it might otherwise have been without the sacrifices everyone has made over these past few weeks and despite what people may be hearing from media commentary, we have not yet moved from the epidemic to the endemic face of covid although i hope that transition is under way.
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however, we are once again entering a much calmer phase of the epidemic. this allows us to consider the adaptations we might need to build our resilience and manage the virus in a less restrictive way in future as we move into an endemic phase and as we move into an endemic phase and as we move into an endemic phase and as we have said, we have started work on an updated strategic framework and we will consult on this, and this gives us much cause for renewed optimism but we are still in a challenging period and the nhs remains under very significant pressure and indeed as is reflected in today's a&e waiting times, the past couple of weeks have been the most difficult the nhs has ever faced as covid related staff absences have compound of the other pressures it is dealing with. the number of covid cases across scotland also remains high, although
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declining, and because 0micron is so infectious that is to a significant risk attached to social meetings and interactions and that is why although we can be increasingly optimistic at this stage, we must all still play a part in helping further slow the spread of the virus and i will close by highlighting again the steps we can all take to help do that, firstly as i have talked about, please get fully vaccinated, if you haven't already, and second, take care with socialising and until monday keep indoor gatherings to a maximum of three households and try to keep them as small as your circumstances allow. test before you go every time and please take all the other precautions that we know make a difference and keep windows open if meeting indoors, keep continuing to work from home if you can, and wear a face covering on public transport in shops and when moving about in hospitality and follow all advice on hygiene. these measures make a
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difference, the fact so many people have stuck with them has helped make it possible to lift the protective measures put in place before christmas so if we continue to stick with them we can all continue to do our bit to keep each other save and protect the nhs and to keep us firmly on the path even if only metaphorically speaking to a much sunnier spring and summer. the first minister will — sunnier spring and summer. the first minister will now— sunnier spring and summer. the first minister will now take _ sunnier spring and summer. the first minister will now take questions - sunnier spring and summer. the first minister will now take questions on i minister will now take questions on the issues — minister will now take questions on the issues raised _ minister will now take questions on the issues raised and _ minister will now take questions on the issues raised and i— minister will now take questions on the issues raised and i intend - minister will now take questions on the issues raised and i intend to . the issues raised and i intend to allow_ the issues raised and i intend to allow around _ the issues raised and i intend to allow around 40 _ the issues raised and i intend to allow around 40 minutes - the issues raised and i intend to allow around 40 minutes for- allow around 40 minutes for questions _ allow around 40 minutes for questions after— allow around 40 minutes for questions after which - allow around 40 minutes for questions after which we - allow around 40 minutes for| questions after which we will allow around 40 minutes for- questions after which we will move onto the _ questions after which we will move onto the next— questions after which we will move onto the next item _ questions after which we will move onto the next item of— questions after which we will move onto the next item of business. . questions after which we will move onto the next item of business. i. onto the next item of business. i will he _ onto the next item of business. i will be grateful— onto the next item of business. i will be grateful if _ onto the next item of business. i will be grateful if members - onto the next item of business. i. will be grateful if members present at the _ will be grateful if members present at the request _ will be grateful if members present at the request to _ will be grateful if members present at the request to speak— will be grateful if members present at the request to speak button - will be grateful if members present at the request to speak button if. at the request to speak button if they want— at the request to speak button if they want to _ at the request to speak button if they want to ask— at the request to speak button if they want to ask a _ at the request to speak button if they want to ask a question. - at the request to speak button if they want to ask a question. letj at the request to speak button if they want to ask a question. let me beain b they want to ask a question. let me begin by urging _ they want to ask a question. let me begin by urging everyone _ they want to ask a question. let me begin by urging everyone to - they want to ask a question. let me begin by urging everyone to keep i begin by urging everyone to keep getting _ begin by urging everyone to keep getting vaccinated and even if you have so _ getting vaccinated and even if you have so far — getting vaccinated and even if you have so far been against the vaccine, _ have so far been against the vaccine, there is still time to change — vaccine, there is still time to change your mind and get your first 'ab. change your mind and get your first jab the _ change your mind and get your first jab. the first minister's statement begins _ jab. the first minister's statement begins a _ jab. the first minister's statement begins a sea change in the
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government's policy, starting to shift _ government's policy, starting to shift from — government's policy, starting to shift from a rules —based approach more _ shift from a rules —based approach more towards trusting the scottish public, _ more towards trusting the scottish public, as— more towards trusting the scottish public, as we were pushing for. yesterday— public, as we were pushing for. yesterday we called for an end to all business restrictions and an end to guidance — all business restrictions and an end to guidance on household mixing and social— to guidance on household mixing and social distancing and an end to the ban on _ social distancing and an end to the ban on indoor sports, and we did so because _ ban on indoor sports, and we did so because the — ban on indoor sports, and we did so because the data shows that we are past the _ because the data shows that we are past the peak of omicron and at this stage _ past the peak of omicron and at this stage protecting mental health, physical— stage protecting mental health, physical health and scottish jobs stage protecting mental health, physical health and scottishjobs is every— physical health and scottishjobs is every bit _ physical health and scottishjobs is every bit as important as slowing the spread of covid. most of what we have called _ the spread of covid. most of what we have called for has been met but the government still has not gone far enough _ government still has not gone far enough in — government still has not gone far enough in a couple of key areas, and we welcome — enough in a couple of key areas, and we welcome the move away from guidance — we welcome the move away from guidance on working from home but can be _ guidance on working from home but can be first— guidance on working from home but can be first minister explain the evidence — can be first minister explain the evidence behind that decision? why can we _ evidence behind that decision? why can we not— evidence behind that decision? why can we not go further and may be all the evidence used to make the decision? _ the evidence used to make the decision? secondly, it is right that the first _ decision? secondly, it is right that the first minister has backed down on extending the passport scheme and for many— on extending the passport scheme and
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for many scottish businesses it remains — for many scottish businesses it remains a _ for many scottish businesses it remains a burden at a potential risk and the _ remains a burden at a potential risk and the first minister has twice threatened to extend the scheme to scottish _ threatened to extend the scheme to scottish businesses, twice she has backed _ scottish businesses, twice she has backed down, so isn't it about time that the _ backed down, so isn't it about time that the first minister accepted that the first minister accepted that this — that the first minister accepted that this scheme is a dud and scrapped _ that this scheme is a dud and scrapped it altogether? finally, white _ scrapped it altogether? finally, while we — scrapped it altogether? finally, while we are past the peak of the omicron — while we are past the peak of the omicron crisis we are at the peak of the crisis _ omicron crisis we are at the peak of the crisis in — omicron crisis we are at the peak of the crisis in a&e departments at the latest _ the crisis in a&e departments at the latest appalling figures show the worst— latest appalling figures show the worst ever waiting times for patients— worst ever waiting times for patients and they are double the number— patients and they are double the number of patients waiting more than the target _ number of patients waiting more than the target time compared to the same week last _ the target time compared to the same week last year —— and there were double _ week last year —— and there were double my— week last year —— and there were double. my colleagues on the front line are _ double. my colleagues on the front line are overwhelmed and covid is making _ line are overwhelmed and covid is making things worse, but the root of the problem is not omicron, it is the problem is not omicron, it is the tack— the problem is not omicron, it is the lack of— the problem is not omicron, it is the lack of a _ the problem is not omicron, it is the lack of a credible plan. how many— the lack of a credible plan. how many wake—up calls does the health sector— many wake—up calls does the health sector need before he finally devises _ sector need before he finally devises a coherent strategy to tackle — devises a coherent strategy to
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tackle the unacceptable emergency waiting _ tackle the unacceptable emergency waiting times in scotland? first minister. thank _ waiting times in scotland? first minister. thank you. _ waiting times in scotland? first minister. thank you. studio: l waiting times in scotland? first i minister. thank you. studio: we waiting times in scotland? first - minister. thank you. studio: we will leave it there. _ minister. thank you. studio: we will leave it there. we _ minister. thank you. studio: we will leave it there. we were _ minister. thank you. studio: we will leave it there. we were listening - minister. thank you. studio: we will leave it there. we were listening to i leave it there. we were listening to the first minister, nicola sturgeon. we can get some analysis now. joining me now is our scotland correspondent, lorna gordon. this will be met with a huge sigh of relief? it this will be met with a huge sigh of relief? . , , . this will be met with a huge sigh of relief? ., , , ., ., ., relief? it has been a tough time for the hospitality _ relief? it has been a tough time for the hospitality sector _ relief? it has been a tough time for the hospitality sector and _ relief? it has been a tough time for the hospitality sector and this - relief? it has been a tough time for the hospitality sector and this was. the hospitality sector and this was trailed ahead, nicola sturgeon frequently gives these tuesday afternoon updates and of course yesterday the limits on crowds at outdoor gatherings was lifted and today we were looking to see what would happen with the numbers to do
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with indoor gatherings as well so the first minister said that the rise in cases driven by omicron peaked in the first week of january and she said the situation is improving in scotland mainly because of the vaccination booster programme and because of the willingness of the public to adapt their behaviour to stem transition and the protective measures introduced in december. so today she said she confirmed that there would be changes and they will come into force next monday and it will allow force next monday and it will allow for nightclubs to reopen and fought large indoor events to resume physical distancing between different groups in indoor public places will be dropped and the requirement for table service in hospitality where they serve alcohol will also be dropped and also another change is that nonprofessional indoor contact sports can start again as normal, so all this will change on monday. she said the situation is still a little
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bit uncertain so she is urging people to continue with their lateral flow test and urging people to keep their gatherings as small as possible and there was the guidance that people should limit it to three households in indoor spaces and she said wherever possible please continue with that for the time being and where ever possible continue with working from home. she described it saying that they would not yet moved from the epidemic stage of covid to the endemic stage but we are entering what she called a karma phase in the epidemic and she was hopefulfor a better spring and summer ahead she was hopefulfor a better spring and summerahead —— she was hopefulfor a better spring and summer ahead —— what she called and summer ahead —— what she called a much calmer phase. we heard from the scottish conservatives health spokesperson and they welcomed the changes but they would have liked to have seen it go further, not least in terms of moving towards scrapping the vaccine passport scheme, and there was speculation that might be extended, but she said it would
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remain as it is for now and the scottish conservatives would like to go further and i would like to have it scrapped. that won't happen —— and they would like to have it scrapped. they say there is a lack of a credible plan from the scottish government in terms of dealing with the crisis in the health service in scotland especially in terms of a&e. thanks forjoining us. let me bring you some breaking news. police in the republic of ireland investigating the death of ashling murphy have arrested a man in his 30s on suspicion of murder. that comes on the day of the funeral of ashling murphy. mourners at the funeral were told it was a depraved act of violence. she was a 23—year—old school teacher and her body was found on the banks of the grand canal in county offaly and her
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death has intensified the debate around the safety of women and has prompted calls for more to be done to tackle gender—based violence and there have been vigils in the republic of ireland and also northern ireland in her memory. the headlines on bbc news... borisjohnson has rejected a claim by his former chief advisor that he was warned in advance about a downing street drinks party during lockdown in may 2020. a british man who took four people hostage at a texas synagogue had been investigated by m15. but by the time he flew to the us, malik faisal akram was assessed to be no longer a risk. aerial footage from tonga shows the devastation caused after a volcanic eruption triggered a tsunami — three people are now confirmed dead. there are serious concerns about the standard of specialist care being provided to patients with the most complex
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mental health needs, a bbc investigation has found. people sent by the nhs to stay in mental health rehabilitation units say they've been placed in unsafe environments, often far from home, with staff that aren't suitably trained. some patients remain there for 10 or more years. our reporter adam eley has been to meet lisa, who says her experience left her suicidal. you may find some of what she says upsetting. i had a little bit of depression from when i was a kid and then, when i lost my dad, that was a tricky time. i'd gone through a lot of trauma. by 2019, lissa from coventry had been in and out of hospital struggling with her mental health. the nhs decided to send her for treatment at a specialist rehabilitation unit. i was desperate. kind of, like, no... i had no other choice. but the hospital she went to, run by the company cygnet health care, was in special measures at the time. there had been two deaths
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in the previous 20 months. some believe the nhs should never have sent her there. i struggle with us having the knowledge that an environment is rated as inadequate and thinking that is the best place to confine the people we are supposed to care for. it doesn't add up for me. at least 3,500 patients are treated within mental health rehabilitation units each year, run by both the nhs and private providers. but there are serious concerns over standards of care on some wards. lisa's mental health deteriorated within the unit. she tried to take her own life 32 times within six months. i was there to be able to get better and i felt that i came away, like, worse. a bbc investigation has found some patients are placed within units for a decade or more. many experts want a greater focus on community care. there are significant amounts of money, around half a billion pounds,
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spent on this cohort of people. when people are supported in the community it is less expensive and, obviously, from a patient experience perspective, people want to live in the community. the government says it is rolling out integrated community mental health teams to give 370,000 people with severe mental illness greater choice. lissa left her unit after nine months, after taking her case to a mental health tribunal. i felt like i won the lottery, that i was going home. cygnet health care said its aim is always to create a culture that supports recovery. lissa is now back at university and enjoying her hobbies, like boxing. really happy with just being able to take that step away from hospital and try and get a sort of normal life. but questions remain over whether the system is fit for purpose. adam eley, bbc news.
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details of organisations which offering information and support with mental health are available at... several dozen swans on the thames at windsor have been exposed to avian influenza also known as the bird flu. earlier this month, seven birds were found dead in the river, which led the department for environment, food and rural affairs to send in a vet to cull other infected swans. so far more than 25 birds have been culled by vets. this is a swan in some distress, you may find it distressing yourself.
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joining me now isjoanne de nobriga who is a trustee and rescuer at swan support who have been feeding the surviving swans and monitoring them on both sides of the river at windsor. thanks forjoining us. what is actually going on with them and how long has this been going on? we first long has this been going on? - first heard evidence of avian flu in the reading area, albeit not on the river thames, the reading area, albeit not on the riverthames, back the reading area, albeit not on the river thames, back in november, and since then we have been monitoring the flocks and various lakes where there were incidents of avian flu. we have had 20 cases in the reading area, although nothing on the thames in redding, and subsequent to that it came to windsor and as you said in the report there have been seven
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deaths actually in the flock and several that are looking for the at the moment. several that are looking for the at the moment-— the moment. they are amazingly beautiful creatures, _ the moment. they are amazingly beautiful creatures, how - the moment. they are amazingly beautiful creatures, how many i the moment. they are amazingly| beautiful creatures, how many do the moment. they are amazingly i beautiful creatures, how many do you think there are in that area of the terms? is it possible to give an idea of how many there are potentially still at risk? potentially all of them at risk. experience tells us that some seem to get it and recover, some don't seem to get it, and then some obviously get it and i. —— and die. if i was to take the numbers which occurred at a particular lake in redding, i would say a third of them actually succumbed to the disease and two thirds hadn't, so that might be an indicator of what we are looking at. be an indicator of what we are looking at— be an indicator of what we are lookin: at. . ., , ., ., looking at. what can be done to rotect looking at. what can be done to protect the _ looking at. what can be done to protect the healthiest _ looking at. what can be done to protect the healthiest ones i looking at. what can be done to | protect the healthiest ones from bird flu? , , ., ., .,
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bird flu? the best thing to do, and it varies, bird flu? the best thing to do, and it varies. but _ bird flu? the best thing to do, and it varies, but if _ bird flu? the best thing to do, and it varies, but if they _ bird flu? the best thing to do, and it varies, but if they are _ bird flu? the best thing to do, and it varies, but if they are in - bird flu? the best thing to do, and it varies, but if they are in an i it varies, but if they are in an environment where they are naturally fed, we actually recommend keeping feeding them because then it means that they don't fly off in search of food elsewhere. however, if there is a restriction zone which there is at the moment in windsor, the public are not feeding them, and we are feeding them under controlled circumstances instead, so keeping them in small groups so that they don't all flock together and potentially cross contaminate. 25 have been culled by vets, is that right? will that have do happen to moore? the right? will that have do happen to moore? ., , , ,
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moore? the 25 were on the premises which is why — moore? the 25 were on the premises which is why they _ moore? the 25 were on the premises which is why they were _ moore? the 25 were on the premises which is why they were culled - moore? the 25 were on the premises which is why they were culled but i which is why they were culled but there is no plan to do this to birds out in the wild. that is what i understand. as far as i know there won't be any more culling, unless the avian flu turned up in an environment where they were enclosed and on a premises. environment where they were enclosed and on a premises-— and on a premises. joanne, thanks for “oininr and on a premises. joanne, thanks forjoining us- _ and on a premises. joanne, thanks forjoining us. joanne _ and on a premises. joanne, thanks forjoining us. joanne has - and on a premises. joanne, thanks forjoining us. joanne has been i forjoining us. joanne has been helping the surviving swans and monitoring them. good luck with your work. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris. hello. we had a particularly nice sunrise earlier on today in parts of the country. i think what made the sunrise really nice was this layer of medium cloud. this is alta—cumulus
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you can see here. we had these scenes up and down the country and it really was quite a fiery start to the day. now, the fiery sunrise was caused by the variable cloud that we have in the skies. some gaps in this allowing the sunshine to poke through. we do have some of this cloud just working its way into southern areas of england and wales, pushing into the midlands this afternoon, but should be largely clear for north wales and much of northern england having the best of the sunshine. meanwhile, further north—westwards for northern ireland and scotland, the cloud will thicken to bring some outbreaks of rain for some. now, overnight tonight, that first batch of rain clears through, but then we get this cold front arriving southwards later in the night, bringing some heavy rain to scotland and northern ireland. behind that, we will start to get the wind switching round to a north—westerly direction. because of all the cloud around, it will not be quite as cold as it was last night. indeed, many of us will have a frost free night. big changes in the forecast for tomorrow, we still have our area of high pressure with us, but it is moving a bit further westwards and is allowing these cold north—westerly winds to dive southwards behind
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this weather front. so, for wednesday, england and wales getting off to a cloudy start with outbreaks of rain moving southwards. cold enough for snow showers, even down to sea—level in shetland and progressively, as the air gets colder through the day across the north of mainland scotland, we will start to see some of those showers turn to sleet and a little bit of hill snow high up late in the day. temperatures around 10 degrees in the south with colder air arriving firmly in shetland, just 1c here with some bitter winds and the wednesday night will be a cold one with a frost becoming widespread and returning across most parts of the country. a chilly one, then, for thursday. again with some showers for shetland and also for the north of mainland scotland. could be an odd wintry one coming down the north sea, but by this stage, the wind should just about be offshore which will keep most of the showers out into the north sea. a much colder day, though. temperatures struggling really, four, five, six celsius. but towards the end of the week, we are going to start to get milder air coming
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round our area of high pressure, so temperatures are going to start to lift through friday and the weekend. we'll have probably a lot of cloud but mainly dry weather and some sunny spells. that's the latest.
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this is bbc news, i'm ben brown. the headlines... more pressure on the prime minister, amid allegations he was warned in advance about number ten drinks during lockdown. he's dismissed the claims. nobody told me that what we were doing was, as you say, against the rules, that the event in question was something that... we were going to do something that was not a work event. on the day that crowds gathered for the funeral of irish primary school teacher ashling murphy, police investigating the death have arrested a man on suspicion of murder. a british man who took four people hostage at a texas synagogue had been investigated by m15. but by the time he flew to the us, malik faisal akram was assessed to be no longer a risk.
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scotland's covid—19 restrictions are to be eased from monday, with nightclubs reopening, large indoor events resuming and social distancing rules dropped. the rise in cases driven by omicron peak in the first week of january and we are now on the downward slope of this wave of cases. aerial footage from tonga shows the devastation caused after a volcanic eruption triggered a tsunami. three people are now confirmed dead. britain's emma raducanu wins through to the second round of the australian open, on a good day for british players, with andy murray among those also through to the second round.
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good afternoon. borisjohnson has rejected a claim by his former chief advisor that he was warned in advance about a drinks party in the downing street garden during lockdown in may 2020. dominic cummings has said that he's certain he'd told the prime minister that it might break covid rules, but he claimed mrjohnson �*waved aside�* the concerns. mrjohnson also revealed that he�*s already been interviewed by the inquiry over parties held in downing street. in response, labour have said the pm set the rules — he didn�*t need anyone to tell him that the party he attended broke them. here�*s our political correspondent, helen catt. almost a week after the prime minister apologised in the commons for attending what he said he implicitly believed was a work event in the downing street garden during lockdown, there are claims he was warned about it. i want to begin by repeating my apologies to everybody for this judgment that i made,
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that we may have made in number ten and beyond, whether in downing street or throughout the pandemic. nobody told me that what we were doing was, as you say, against the rules, that the event in question was something that... we were going to do something that was not a work event. and, you know, as i said in the house of commons, when i went out into that garden, i thought that i was attending a work event. the chancellor was also facing questions for the first time since the prime minister�*s apology to the commons. do you believe the prime minister? of course i do. the prime minister... you believe he is telling the truth? of course i do. the prime minister set out his understanding of this matter in parliament last week and i�*d refer you to his words. as you know, sue gray is conducting an inquiry into this matter and i fully support the prime minster�*s request for patience while that inquiry concludes. the fresh claims come from dominic cummings, the former
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aide to the prime minister, now a frequent public critic. writing online, he said that on the day of the event in may 2020, "i said to the prime minister something like martin has invited the building to a drinks party, you�*ve got to grip this madhouse." he went on to say, "not only me but other eyewitnesses who discussed this at the time would swear under oath this is what happened." that, he said, means the prime minister had misled parliament. if that were to be the case it would have consequences. if it is lying and deliberate in the way you describe, if it was not corrected immediately it would normally, under the ministerial code and the governance around parliament, be a resigning matter. that is the principal and we uphold the highest standards of principles in public life, that is critically important. i�*m not going to prejudge the facts in this or any other aspects of the claims that have been made. other tory mps have expressed anger at what it�*s claimed happened in downing street. the health minister and nurse maria
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caulfield told her constituency was clearly spirit of the rules had been broken in number ten and she would be calling for action against anyone found to have breached them. she is also waiting for the report. labour says whatever the report says, mr johnson is still on the hook. there has been umpteen parties in downing street. a culture is set at the top, as william hague — no labour stooge, the former tory leader — writes in the times newspaper today. culture is set at the top, so in that respect, the buck stops with borisjohnson. until that report is published it looks like claims and counter claims may well continue. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. earlier, i spoke to our political correspondent, damian grammaticas, who told us about the current mood amongst the tory party. they have been hearing what we hear is a lot of anger from their constituents, in some parts, in other parts, some people saying they don�*t think that support for... borisjohnson supporters say they do not think it is enough for him to go
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but pretty much everyone is not saying they are going to judge the prime minister at this stage but wait to see that report on that report might turn on some quite fine things, when you listen to those comments today. borisjohnson in his... his categorical denial, a categorical denial of something very specific, the fact that he says he was not warned about what the event was, that it was breaking the rules. dominic cummings in his blog yesterday had come out and said that he had gone to the prime minister and told him that... and talk to him about this drinks event, so it may be that the crucial question that might hang on is, is there any sense in which dominic cummings and show that he can actually warned the prime minister this broke the rules or does this give a gap through which... a reason where boris johnson can say he did not really
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believe it was breaking the rules? but all of this is going to be addressed in part by the report. the report will look to examine the facts around what happened, the holding of these events, what the rules were at the time, you don�*t apportion blame, so how mps then look at it and constituents feel about it and how they feel about what the outcome is will all be very, very important for mrjohnson. will all be very, very important for mrjohnson-— will all be very, very important for mrjohnson. , , , mrjohnson. everybody is saying they are waitin: mrjohnson. everybody is saying they are waiting for _ mrjohnson. everybody is saying they are waiting for sale _ mrjohnson. everybody is saying they are waiting for sale grey's _ mrjohnson. everybody is saying they are waiting for sale grey's report. i are waiting for sale grey�*s report. it is a bit like waiting for godot! when we going to get it? it it is a bit like waiting for godot! when we going to get it?- it is a bit like waiting for godot! when we going to get it? it has been talked about — when we going to get it? it has been talked about as _ when we going to get it? it has been talked about as if _ when we going to get it? it has been talked about as if it _ when we going to get it? it has been talked about as if it is _ when we going to get it? it has been talked about as if it is coming - when we going to get it? it has been talked about as if it is coming this i talked about as if it is coming this week sometime but then we get more sort of events that keep cropping up like this dominic cummings claim, we don�*t know yet whether sue gray will talk to dominic cummings or seek to whether actually those working with her, there are around half a dozen people working on this report, it seems they may have been the ones actually doing the interviews and
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she is overseeing events, the inquiry, having more and more things to take into account might delay it a little bit, so the talk was this week but we just don�*t know. we can talk now to human rights barrister adam wagner. it is interesting, the prime minister has used quite legalistic kind of words and terminology when he has been talking about this work event, as he calls it, what others have insisted was effectively a part in the garden of number ten back in may 2020. you are a lawyer, what do you see as the way that he has been talking about this and handling this? i talking about this and handling this? ~ ., ., , , , this? i think that he has been very careful with _ this? i think that he has been very careful with the _ this? i think that he has been very careful with the language - this? i think that he has been very careful with the language he i this? i think that he has been very careful with the language he has l careful with the language he has used. he has stuck very very narrowly to, this is a work event and what is so interesting about that expression, work—related event, that expression, work—related event,
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thatis that expression, work—related event, that is not the question. the question in the law at the time, and the like the time said no person may be outside the place they are living without a reasonable excuse and one of those reasonable excuses was the need to work, where it is not reasonably possible for able person to work at home and so the question is not whether it is work—related, anything can be work—related, it is whether it was necessary for work and it could not be done from home and it could not be done from home and i think that the reason he is choosing such careful languages because it is not possible to justify realistically this event, this obvious social event for work, there was no work being done, just on a basic level, how could it be necessary for work if no work was being done? but necessary for work if no work was being done?— necessary for work if no work was being done? but surely he can say that he was _ being done? but surely he can say that he was in _ being done? but surely he can say that he was in his _ being done? but surely he can say that he was in his home, - being done? but surely he can say that he was in his home, he i being done? but surely he can say that he was in his home, he was i being done? but surely he can say| that he was in his home, he was in his own back garden effectively. yes, and that is what his defence will be. on the bit of the law that ijust will be. on the bit of the law that i just read will be. on the bit of the law that ijust read out. there is another
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crime which the metropolitan police has been prosecuting people for and these regulations covered under the serious act, and that is assisting others to breach the regulations and thatis others to breach the regulations and that is why i think he has been very adamant, the use of this word, i implicitly believe, this phrase, he didn�*t know, and now he has to strongly deny he was warned because i sat any point he says actually i was warned and i went ahead anyway or i did know, i did know it would be unlawful, he could be in theory at least in line for a crime under the serious act for aiding and abetting effectively other people, this party that he basically held in his own garden, that was not necessary for work for all of those people. necessary for work for all of those eo - le. �* ., necessary for work for all of those --eole. �* ., . ., people. and the other thing he could face, if he people. and the other thing he could face. if he is — people. and the other thing he could face, if he is proved _ people. and the other thing he could face, if he is proved to _ people. and the other thing he could face, if he is proved to have - people. and the other thing he could face, if he is proved to have gone i face, if he is proved to have gone knowingly to a party is misleading parliament. ,
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knowingly to a party is misleading parliament-— knowingly to a party is misleading parliament. , ., , ., parliament. yes, i have been reading throu~h his parliament. yes, i have been reading through his statements _ parliament. yes, i have been reading through his statements and - parliament. yes, i have been reading through his statements and actually i through his statements and actually he has been extreme cautious in what he has been extreme cautious in what he has been extreme cautious in what he has said, everything is... in relation to the christmas party, i was assured this was not against the regulations, it does not say what he thought all he knew. and again with the 20th of may gathering, i implicitly believed it was for work. that is quite different to either believe it was not lawful, no one warned me, he has never said that in parliament. yes, he could be caught for lying to parliament, the dietary think he has been very cautious in what he has said and for a very good reason. ~ , ., what he has said and for a very good reason. ~ i. _ what he has said and for a very good reason. ~ reason. when you say, he says, i imlicitl reason. when you say, he says, i implicitly believed, _ reason. when you say, he says, i implicitly believed, what - reason. when you say, he says, i implicitly believed, what is i reason. when you say, he says, i implicitly believed, what is the i implicitly believed, what is the significance of that wording? it is difficult to significance of that wording? it 3 difficult to know. i interpreted it as i adamantly believed or i
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definitely believed, but it is one of those funny words that you can use to kind of mean... it can have opposite meanings. he is using it as a sort of phrase that means i believed very strongly. but it is a very curious expression and one which i think speaks to... the very specific words he has used. he is behaving, i have to say this from my professional... with my professional hat on, he is behaving like someone who was not giving the full story and is being very careful and you see this with witnesses in court, because it is a crime to lightweight code, you have witnesses trying to avoid lying and they have to use very strange language, they have to be very careful about what they say. ultimately, they can be questioned. but i do think he is behaving in that way, i may be wrong, maybe this is just the way he talks, but if you
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look carefully at what he has said, he is being very, very careful, not to lie to parliament, not to be caught lying to parliament, not to admit what could be construed as a criminal offence, but at the same time, give the public a kind of apology, the humility they are demanding, so i think... i think that path is impossible to tread. there is essentially conflicting demands. ., , , demands. reading between the lines, he may have — demands. reading between the lines, he may have a — demands. reading between the lines, he may have a top _ demands. reading between the lines, he may have a top lawyer— demands. reading between the lines, he may have a top lawyer like - he may have a top lawyer like yourself advising him and maybe even writing his statements? i yourself advising him and maybe even writing his statements?— writing his statements? i would be very surprised _ writing his statements? i would be very surprised if — writing his statements? i would be very surprised if he _ writing his statements? i would be very surprised if he did _ writing his statements? i would be very surprised if he did not - writing his statements? i would be| very surprised if he did not because he and his staff are potentially going to be investigated by the police and potentially they will have to account for what they did with potential criminal ramifications. and that is really serious for anybody involved. i would be amazed if he was not being advised by a lawyer. i would be very surprised if lawyers were not
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looking over the public statements he is giving but we don�*t know. thank you very much indeed. scotland�*s first minister has announced that coronavirus restrictions will be lifted from monday. nightclubs will be allowed to reopen and the requirement for table service in hospitality will end. the three—household limit on indoor gatherings will also end. she said scotland is now on the "downward slope" of infections and that there has been a "significant fall" in new cases. given that cases are now falling quite rapidly and the current wave is receding, we decided that we were not at this stage extend the covid certification scheme to other premises. we will of course reconsider this should circumstances and therefore the balance of judgment change in any significant way. if cases were to start to rise
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very sharply again, extension of certification may well be a more proportionate alternative to other more restrictive measures. however our conclusion today given the improving situation is that extending certification would not be proportionate at this stage. there is though one reasonably minor change to the certification regulations that we will propose. at the moment: my clubs and other late—night venues must apply the scheme if they have any use a designated area for dancing. we intend to amend the definition here to provide greater clarity and prevent premises avoiding certification simple by having tables on the dance floor and therefore claiming it is not a dance floor but nevertheless permitting dancing to take place. this change will take effect from monday when late—night venues are able to reopen. the headlines on bbc news... borisjohnson has rejected a claim by his former chief advisor that he was warned in advance about a downing street drinks party during lockdown in may 2020.
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a man in his 30s has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher, ashling murphy, in ireland last week. scotland first minister says covid—19 restrictions are to be eased from monday, with nightclubs reopening, large indoor events resuming and social distancing rules dropped. a british man who took four people hostage at a synagogue in texas had been investigated by m15. malik faisal akram, from blackburn in lancashire, was the subject of an investigation in late 2020, though by the time he flew to the us he was assessed to be no longer a risk. our security correspondent, frank gardner, gave me this update a short time ago. it is quite usual for people to be investigated for quite a short time, investigated for quite a short time, in this case he was investigated for four weeks, what is known as a short
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lead investigation in the latter half of 2020, because he did have a criminal record, he had a violent temper, and they were in of records of him being quite disruptive, he had been banned from certain courts. and he was known to both police and mis. and he was known to both police and m15. was nothing that they found thatjustified i am told putting him on a kind of active list, bumping him up into something of a higher priority. just to give you an idea of the numbers, i am not exonerating him, these are questions they are going to have to answer internally into the home office but to give youridea into the home office but to give your idea of numbers, they had two lists, they have the list of active subjects of interest, that ranges somewhere between three and 4000 people, people they are concerned about right now, some of who may be engaged in preparations for active terrorism, some in contact with people they are concerned about. then there is the not exactly closed files with people they have
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investigated and decided they are not too fussed about right now. that list is up to 40,000 long. he was on that list at the time he flew to the united states. either he did not give any indication that he was going to do this all he did and they missed it. , �* , , , ., missed it. isn't it surprising that even if he _ missed it. isn't it surprising that even if he was _ missed it. isn't it surprising that even if he was on _ missed it. isn't it surprising that even if he was on that _ missed it. isn't it surprising that even if he was on that wider- missed it. isn't it surprising that even if he was on that wider list| missed it. isn't it surprising that i even if he was on that wider list of more people that the authorities in the united states were not alerted and they let him into the country? this is the second question. the first question is did m15 drop the ball in not investigating this guy further? if there were no signs he was going to do anything, then they did not. but who knows question mark thatis did not. but who knows question mark that is subject to an internal investigation they are going to have to hold, i think. the second question is how did this man who had a record, had a crew in oracle, how is he able to fly to the united states and purchase a firearm and walking to the synagogue and hold for people hostage question mark almost certainly he will have lied on his these are form to get into
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the united states, where it says very clearly, have you ever had a criminal record? words to that effect. he will have obviously said no because if he had said yes, he would not have got in. it is clearly a loophole. you and i have probably been to the united states pledge your times and have seen these questions and i have always thought, what would happen if i did have a criminal record and i chose to assign no? now we know, you walk in. we will find out more... maybe we won�*t. shouldn�*t m15 have told the border authorities in advance that he had been on the radar at some stage? he had been on the radar at some stare? �* ., i: i: i: i: ., , stage? along with 40,000 others. there was no... _ stage? along with 40,000 others. there was no. .. if— stage? along with 40,000 others. there was no... if he _ stage? along with 40,000 others. there was no... if he had - stage? along with 40,000 others. there was no... if he had been i there was no... if he had been bumped up to a higher priority, someone who they were actively investigated, i would like to think that they would have certainly warned the border authorities but somebody who had not actually committed anything at that stage, it would be seen as disproportionate to then put him on a no—fly list.
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a man in his 30s has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher, ashling murphy, in ireland last week. the 23—year—old was killed last wednesday while out jogging by a canal in county offaly. ireland�*s president, michael d higgins, and prime minister, micheal martin, joined friends and family at her funeral earlier today. our correspondent, danjohnson, is outside the police station in tullamore, county offaly. a major development in this police investigation.— investigation. yes, exactly four eeled investigation. yes, exactly four peeled breaking _ investigation. yes, exactly four peeled breaking news - investigation. yes, exactly four peeled breaking news to i investigation. yes, exactly four| peeled breaking news to shortly after the funeral service for ashling murphy concluded. it has been announced the police have arrested a man in his 30s on suspicion of murdering ashling murphy and that man is detained at this police station and is being questioned. no further comment on
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that at this stage but a major breakthrough in this investigation for the irish police. we knew that they were around 50 detectives working on this case now, trying to establish what ashley happened and who was responsible for ashling murphy losing her life when she went running along the canal last wednesday. that is when she was found dead, prompting notjust the shock that has rippled through this community but the wider concerns that have resonated across ireland and beyond about why women are not safe, doing something as simple as going jogging? that is why we have seen those huge videos that have taken place in support of the family and the funeral in the last couple of hours was hugely well attended —— vigils. people right from the top of irish politics, down to the children who were in the primary school class at ashling murphy was teaching, she herself was only 23, but there were
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the youngest children from that school lining the route that her coffee took to reach the parish church where her funeral mass was held and they were hundreds of people who could not fit inside the church, so the streets were filled with people listening on the public address system, some of them watching the service being streamed. it is a shocking crime that has upset everybody in what is a rule community, a small immunity of villages, and people really do know each other. that is why there is intense sadness at what ashling murphy are possibly as family are now dealing with.— murphy are possibly as family are now dealing with. prompting a new debate about _ now dealing with. prompting a new debate about safety _ now dealing with. prompting a new debate about safety for _ now dealing with. prompting a new debate about safety for women i now dealing with. prompting a new debate about safety for women in l now dealing with. prompting a new i debate about safety for women in the same way as sarah everard are possibly as death did eschenbach absolutely. possibly as death did eschenbach absolutel . ., ., , , absolutely. there are absolutely international... _ absolutely. there are absolutely international... nobody - absolutely. there are absolutely international... nobody can i absolutely. there are absolutely i international... nobody can remember anything like this happening around here for decades someone was heading
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latest 25 years since a woman was murdered in this town. it is a shocking event for the people of this community in that way. but it has drawn wider residents and broader concern about, if that can happen to someone here who was so young and innocent and well—known, well liked, well—respected, talented young musician as well as a committed teacher, if that could happen to her, doing something as ordinary and everyday is going jogging ordinary and everyday is going jogging along the canal, then where are women safe question of that is the question being asked notjust by women here. there has been a promise that steps will be taken to make sure that women can have confidence being out and about anywhere at any time. there is no doubt work to do on that front. but there are still despite this progress... still work to do in this investigation and the early stages of questioning the
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suspect and everyone is aware that the murphy family are still, on the day of the funeral, they still have much grieving to do and there is huge support for that family throughout this town and this community. the 10 biggest us airlines have warned that the impending switch—on of 5g mobile phone services will cause "major disruption" to flights. they said the start of verizon and at&t 5g mobile phone services, planned for wednesday, would cause a "completely avoidable economic calamity". let�*s speak to our north america business correspondent, michelle fluery, who�*s in new york. they are making it sound like it is doomsday really but this could leave thousands of passengers stranded around the world potentially. the airlines are _ around the world potentially. tie: airlines are deploying every sort of
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scare tactic that they have available to them, warning that it is going to be catastrophe for the skies, that hundreds of thousands of passengers could see more flight delays, cancellations as a result of this. what exactly is going on here right now? well, as of midnight in the united states, wireless carriers are set to deploy their 5g service but the problem is it uses something called c band 5g and the concern is that this somehow interferes with some of the instruments used by planes radio water metres, and that is vital for when it comes to landing a plane. it measures the distance between the underside of the plane on the ground below. there is concern there could be interference and that is why you are seeing this sort of push to have this kind of deadline for 5g to go live delayed and pushed back for a third time. the regulators are sort
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of trying to say, we may need more time, there is this kind of tension going on, but it really has been left to the wireless carriers, who have spent 80 billion trying to buy at the sort of airwaves they need to deploy the service and the airlines on the other side will warning the potential fallout from this could be catastrophic. i5 potential fallout from this could be catastrophic-— catastrophic. is there a sort of compromise — catastrophic. is there a sort of compromise solution - catastrophic. is there a sort of compromise solution that i catastrophic. is there a sort of. compromise solution that could catastrophic. is there a sort of i compromise solution that could be reached to sort this out? i compromise solution that could be reached to sort this out?— compromise solution that could be reached to sort this out? i think on the side of — reached to sort this out? i think on the side of the _ reached to sort this out? i think on the side of the mobile _ reached to sort this out? i think on the side of the mobile carriers, i the side of the mobile carriers, there is a sense of growing station on here is why, it was meant to be deployed or launched back in december and they dilated for 30 days. they compromised again and said we will create an exclusion zone, around 50 airports in the country for six months. now there is a push from the airline industry saying that is not enough and you have got the us transportation
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secretary saying this tension is in place and airlines are worried about safety. it keeps being kicked back to the wireless industry but i suspect their patients has begun to run out, especially when you look at other parts of the world where some of these planes that there is concern about our flying, they already have 5g in operation, so there is a sort of argument being made by the carriers that, if you can fly to france, why is it a problem in the united states? it has been left to the industry with the regulators really sort of taking a step back. i don�*t know how long this kind of uneasy truce will carry on. we will have to see when this service goes live.— service goes live. thank you very much. job vacancies in the uk soared to a record high of more than 1.2 million between october and december. the new figures from the ons are the first to exclude the impact of the government�*s furlough scheme, which ended in september.
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but the figures also show that average pay rises are failing to keep up with the increase in the cost of living. our business correspondent, ramzan karmali, joins me now. it isa it is a mixed picture. exactly, there are _ it is a mixed picture. exactly, there are two _ it is a mixed picture. exactly, there are two stories - it is a mixed picture. exactly, there are two stories in i it is a mixed picture. exactly, there are two stories in one. | it is a mixed picture. exactly, i there are two stories in one. you have record vacancies but on the other hand, wages... even though they went up 3.8%, which normally would seem pretty decent, they are well below where inflation is. the last inflation but we had was over 5%. the numbers tomorrow are expected to hit a 30 year high. we have a cost of living squeeze. i�*m joined by sarah hewin who is the head of research at standard chartered. how long is the squeeze on the cost of living going to last? it is how long is the squeeze on the cost of living going to last?— of living going to last? it is going
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to last for quite _ of living going to last? it is going to last for quite a _ of living going to last? it is going to last for quite a few— of living going to last? it is going to last for quite a few more i of living going to last? it is going i to last for quite a few more months. but what _ to last for quite a few more months. but what we — to last for quite a few more months. but what we are seen as wage growth slowing _ but what we are seen as wage growth slowing and inflation accelerating. we are _ slowing and inflation accelerating. we are likely to see inflation at a 30 year— we are likely to see inflation at a 30 year high tomorrow and that will be reporting the different —— december inflation and by the time we get _ december inflation and by the time we get to— december inflation and by the time we get to april, it could be up to 7% or— we get to april, it could be up to 7% or even— we get to april, it could be up to 7% or even higher. in the meantime, earnings _ 7% or even higher. in the meantime, earnings growth is slowing. in november, it was down to 3.5% and if we continue _ november, it was down to 3.5% and if we continue on this trend, we will see a _ we continue on this trend, we will see a huge — we continue on this trend, we will see a huge gap between wage growth and inflation, the real spending ability— and inflation, the real spending ability will be squeezed. but surely with the amount _ ability will be squeezed. but surely with the amount of _ ability will be squeezed. but surely with the amount of vacancies i ability will be squeezed. but surely with the amount of vacancies we i with the amount of vacancies we have, it gives people who are in the workforce greater ability to negotiate higher pay rises, surely that should catch up some of the gap? i that should catch up some of the .a . ? ~' , that should catch up some of the . a . ? ~' , , ., that should catch up some of the aa-? ~ , , ., ,, gap? i think this is what the bank of encland gap? i think this is what the bank of england is _ gap? i think this is what the bank of england is concerned _ gap? i think this is what the bank of england is concerned about i of england is concerned about because — of england is concerned about because if we start to see wages
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rising. _ because if we start to see wages rising, reflecting the increase in inflation, — rising, reflecting the increase in inflation, then there is a greater chance _ inflation, then there is a greater chance that inflation stays high for even longer, higher wages means higher— even longer, higher wages means higher prices, they have to be passed — higher prices, they have to be passed the consumers. the question is, what _ passed the consumers. the question is, what is _ passed the consumers. the question is, what is happening in the labour force? _ is, what is happening in the labour force? we — is, what is happening in the labour force? we have seen quite a squeeze with very— force? we have seen quite a squeeze with very high levels of vacancies but still— with very high levels of vacancies but still quite a number of people leaving _ but still quite a number of people leaving the workforce every month. if leaving the workforce every month. if older _ leaving the workforce every month. if older people can be enticed back into the _ if older people can be enticed back into the jobs market and maybe there is something to do with omicron and the pandemic perhaps once we get past the _ the pandemic perhaps once we get past the pandemic, people will feel more _ past the pandemic, people will feel more confident about re—entering the 'obs more confident about re—entering the jobs market, and that could alleviate some of the pressures on vacancies — 400,000 people left the workforce which is very unusual, we have never seen numbers like that? we which is very unusual, we have never seen numbers like that?— seen numbers like that? we haven't but it is not — seen numbers like that? we haven't but it is not unusual _ seen numbers like that? we haven't but it is not unusual when _ seen numbers like that? we haven't but it is not unusual when you i seen numbers like that? we haven't but it is not unusual when you see i but it is not unusual when you see what _ but it is not unusual when you see what is _ but it is not unusual when you see what is happening in america, for e>
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e>
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ease back— inflation will in any event probably ease back after we get to a peak in april and _ ease back after we get to a peak in april and may and we should see energy— april and may and we should see energy prices coming down and we should _ energy prices coming down and we should see — energy prices coming down and we should see some of the costs that have _ should see some of the costs that have been— should see some of the costs that have been driving inflation higher starting _ have been driving inflation higher starting to ease but the bank of england — starting to ease but the bank of england is sending a signal that it is worried — england is sending a signal that it is worried about where inflation is by gradually raising interest rates, and that— by gradually raising interest rates, and that takes some of the steam out of the _ and that takes some of the steam out of the economy and it should dampen price pressures but getting the balancing act right is very, very difficult, — balancing act right is very, very difficult, because what we are seeing — difficult, because what we are seeing at _ difficult, because what we are seeing at the same time is people's real spending power declining, so if in addition — real spending power declining, so if in addition mortgage rates increase, that will— in addition mortgage rates increase, that will be — in addition mortgage rates increase, that will be another hit to households, so the bank of england has to— households, so the bank of england has to calibrate and fine tune its policy _ has to calibrate and fine tune its policy quite carefully to avoid slowing — policy quite carefully to avoid slowing the economy too much. sarah, thanks forjoining _ slowing the economy too much. sarah, thanks forjoining us. _ slowing the economy too much. sarah, thanks forjoining us. i— slowing the economy too much. sarah, thanks forjoining us. i will—
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slowing the economy too much. sarah, thanks forjoining us. i will be - thanks forjoining us. i will be talking inflation, probably, tomorrow, because it could reach a 30 year high tomorrow. iloathed tomorrow, because it could reach a 30 year high tomorrow.— tomorrow, because it could reach a 30 year high tomorrow. what kind of fi . ure? 30 year high tomorrow. what kind of figure? maybe _ 30 year high tomorrow. what kind of figure? maybe 5.296 _ 30 year high tomorrow. what kind of figure? maybe 5.296 which _ 30 year high tomorrow. what kind of figure? maybe 5.296 which would i 30 year high tomorrow. what kind of figure? maybe 5.296 which would be | figure? maybe 5.296 which would be the hirhest figure? maybe 5.296 which would be the highest since _ figure? maybe 5.296 which would be the highest since 1992. _ figure? maybe 5.296 which would be the highest since 1992. that - figure? maybe 5.296 which would be the highest since 1992. that is i figure? maybe 5.296 which would be the highest since 1992. that is your| the highest since 1992. that is your exclusive prediction? _ the highest since 1992. that is your exclusive prediction? that - the highest since 1992. that is your exclusive prediction? that is i the highest since 1992. that is your exclusive prediction? that is what i exclusive prediction? that is what economists _ exclusive prediction? that is what economists are _ exclusive prediction? that is what economists are saying. _ exclusive prediction? that is what economists are saying. i'm i exclusive prediction? that is what economists are saying. i'm no i exclusive prediction? that is what i economists are saying. i'm no mystic economists are saying. i�*m no mystic meg! now it�*s time for a look at the weather with chris. hello. for most of england and wales, we are looking at variable amounts of cloud. the best of the sunshine will be across north wales, the north midlands and north england. further north for scotland and northern ireland, cloud will continue to thicken and we have a weather front moving in, quite a weak front but it will spread rain eastward over the next few hours. temperatures for most will be between 7—9 degrees. overnight we will see a weather front moving into scotland bringing more rain and this is a cold front and finishes the night across parts of northern england.
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ahead of that, a lot of cloud over many of us means it will stay frost free. tomorrow, colder air on the way and behind the cold front and the fronts themselves bringing rain across england and wales but it will be patchy and the afternoon becoming much sunnier. the coldest weather will be in shetland where there will be snow showers getting down to sea level and particularly bitter winds and temperatures are only! degrees, but otherwise it will feel colder from the north. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: more pressure on the prime minister, amid allegations he was warned in advance about number ten drinks during lockdown. he�*s dismissed the claims... nobody told me that what we were doing was against the rules, that the event in question was something, that we were going to do something that we were going to do something that wasn�*t a work event. police investigating the death of irish primary school teacher
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ashling murphy have arrested a man in his 30s on suspicion of murder. a british man who took four people hostage at a texas synagogue had been investigated by m15. but by the time he flew to the us, malik faisal akram was assessed to be no longer a risk. scotland�*s covid—19 restrictions are to be eased from monday, with nightclubs reopening, large indoor events resuming and social distancing rules dropped. aerial footage from tonga shows the devastation caused after a volcanic eruption triggered a tsunami — three people are now confirmed dead. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. after the fairytale in new york at the us open for emma raducanu, she�*s started her australian open campaign with a big win. she beat american sloane
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stephens in three sets. she�*s stuggled a little since that last grand slam win, but she got off to a brilliant start — cruising to the first set against another former us champion 6—0 injust 17 minutes. some errors crept in and stephens upped her game in the second, taking that 6—2. but raducanu dug in and reasserted her control on the match to wrap up the third 6—1. she�*ll face montenegro�*s danka kovinic next. elsewhere, there was a five set thriller ending in a win for andy murray. he beat nicolas basilashvili to make it into the second round, three years on from the tearful farewell after losing in the first round in melbourne. many thought that could have been the end of the three time grand slam champions career, but one metal hip later, a lot of hard work, he reached
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the second round of the tournament. he came through a tense match with momentum swinging both ways, eventually overcoming the 21st seed from georgia. murray said he hopes to enjoy a deep run, and will feel confident of making the third round when he plays qualifier tyrone daniel next. it�*s been a tough three or four years. i put in a lot of work to get back here. i�*ve played on this court a number of times and the support and atmosphere has been incredible. this is the one where i thought, potentially, i played my last match three years ago, but amazing to be back winning a five—set battle like that. i couldn�*t ask for anything more. also into the second round, heatherwatson, who beat mayer sherif in three sets. she is one of only two british female players to qualify automatically for the main draw. a big win, having won only one match since the end of the grasscourt season. earlier, harriet dart was beaten by iga swiantek. british men�*s number two dan evans is also through — he beat david goffin in straight sets. he�*s started the year
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in great form, winning five of his six matches this year. not so good for liam broady — he was beaten in straight sets by the australian nick kyrgios, but seemed to enjoy the encounter with a big smile on his face leaving court. can only smile with some of the tricks on show by kygrios. blockbuster second round ahead for him, he�*ll meet us open champion daniill medvedev. everton are looking at other options in their quest for a new manager after their bid to bring back roberto martinez ended in frustration. everton approached the belgian fa about the possibility of a return for martinez, who managed the club from 2013 to 2016. but they have not been persuaded to let him leave. wayne rooney — currently manager of championship side derby county — has been linked with an emotional return to his first club. also in the frame is frank lampard, who�*s been out of work since being sacked by chelsea
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a year ago. there are six uncapped players included in eddiejones�* 36 man england squad for next month�*s six nations. in—form wasps back row alfie barbeary is called up — the 21—year—old has scored four tries in seven games for his club this season after returning from injury. there is no space for bath back row sam underhill, centre manu tuilagi and george ford. owen farrell remains as captain. while fly—half dan biggar will captain wales, with regular skipper alun wynjones out injured. wales are stuggling with injuries, seven other key players are unavailable. three uncapped players have been included. ospreys hooker dewi lake, flankerjac morgan and cardiff forward james ratti. that�*s all the sport for now. i�*ll have more for you in the next hour. let�*s return to the news that borisjohnson has rejected a claim by his former chief advisor that he was warned in advance about a drinks party in the downing street garden during lockdown in may 2020.
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dominic cummings says the prime minister was told the gathering would breach covid rules but "waved aside" the concerns. let�*s hear more of what borisjohnson had to say. we will have to see what she says and i think that she should be given the space to get on and conclude her inquiry and i would urge everyone who has knowledge of this and understanding, and memories of this, to tell her what they know. you would like _ to tell her what they know. you would like her _ to tell her what they know. you would like her to _ to tell her what they know. you would like her to interview dominic cummings? it is would like her to interview dominic cumminrs? , ., would like her to interview dominic cummings?— cummings? it is not for me to say but everyone _ cummings? it is not for me to say but everyone who _ cummings? it is not for me to say but everyone who has _ cummings? it is not for me to say but everyone who has memories l cummings? it is not for me to say| but everyone who has memories of these events should tell her what they know. if it these events should tell her what the know. , these events should tell her what they know-— these events should tell her what the know. , , ., ., they know. if it emerges you have misled parliament, _ they know. if it emerges you have misled parliament, are _ they know. if it emerges you have misled parliament, are you i they know. if it emerges you have misled parliament, are you going| they know. if it emerges you have l misled parliament, are you going to resign? misled parliament, are you going to resin? �* , , ., misled parliament, are you going to resin? �*, , ., resign? let's see what the report sa s. the resign? let's see what the report says. the chancellor _ resign? let's see what the report says. the chancellor said - resign? let's see what the report says. the chancellor said the - says. the chancellor said the ministerial _ says. the chancellor said the ministerial code _ says. the chancellor said the ministerial code is _ says. the chancellor said the ministerial code is clear - says. the chancellor said the ministerial code is clear on i says. the chancellor said the - ministerial code is clear on these matters when asked if you should resign if you lied to parliament, and in principle should a prime minister stay in office if it
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emerges he misled parliament? i think we need to see what the report says, and with the greatest possible respect to you and to our viewers, we need... we can't anticipate the conclusion of the inquiry. you must be worried — conclusion of the inquiry. you must be worried about _ conclusion of the inquiry. you must be worried about losing _ conclusion of the inquiry. you must be worried about losing your - conclusion of the inquiry. you must be worried about losing yourjob? l be worried about losing yourjob? what i'm thinking about today is coming through the covid pandemic in the way that we are, and i'm here at a community diagnostics hub in north london, where there are 108,000 people on the waiting list in the royal free, people on the waiting list in the royalfree, incredible hospital but they have a huge backlog partly caused by covid and what we have got here is a community diagnostics hub, one of a0 that we have green—lighted in october, we are going up to 100 and i think they will make a big difference to people on waiting lists. i difference to people on waiting lists. . , difference to people on waiting lists. ., , ., _ lists. i have been asked by the broadcasters _ lists. i have been asked by the broadcasters to _ lists. i have been asked by the broadcasters to ask _ lists. i have been asked by the broadcasters to ask these - lists. i have been asked by the - broadcasters to ask these questions and you know i am here to represent
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everybody, and you are not ruling out that you will have to resign if you have misled parliament? i’m you have misled parliament? i'm sa inc you have misled parliament? i'm saying that _ you have misled parliament? i'm saying that we — you have misled parliament? in saying that we need... you have asked me what i'm focused on what i want to do, and what i want to do is... if want to do, and what i want to do is... ,, , ._ , want to do, and what i want to do is... if sue gray finds that you misled parliament, _ is... if sue gray finds that you misled parliament, are - is... if sue gray finds that you misled parliament, are you i is... if sue gray finds that you i misled parliament, are you going is... if sue gray finds that you - misled parliament, are you going to resign? misled parliament, are you going to resin? ~ . . misled parliament, are you going to resin? ~ ., ., misled parliament, are you going to resin? . ., ., ., resign? what i am saying to you come u . resign? what i am saying to you come u- with the resign? what i am saying to you come up with the deepest _ resign? what i am saying to you come up with the deepest respect, - resign? what i am saying to you come up with the deepest respect, is - resign? what i am saying to you come up with the deepest respect, is that i up with the deepest respect, is that we have got to wait for the outcome of the report, but in the meantime i'm focused on delivering here at this fantastic community diagnostics hub, run by people from the royal free hospital, offering an amazing service, and what i am focused on, number one is clearing the covid backlogs and delivering on our priorities for the british people. we have still got a problem with covid and we still have 16,000 people in beds and i'm in front of the cameras, i must remind people that it the cameras, i must remind people thatitis the cameras, i must remind people that it is a great thing to get a
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booster. we have still got a lot of people who could get infected. do you accept that a prime minister if he is found to have misled parliament has got to stand down from office?— parliament has got to stand down from office? ~ ., ., , ., from office? what i am telling you, and i will repeat _ from office? what i am telling you, and i will repeat this, _ from office? what i am telling you, and i will repeat this, you - from office? what i am telling you, and i will repeat this, you are - and i will repeat this, you are slightly anticipating things and i will come back to parliament with a full account when the inquiry reports but it would be wrong of me to anticipate or prejudge what the inquiry may conclude.— to anticipate or prejudge what the inquiry may conclude. some of your mps and members _ inquiry may conclude. some of your mps and members of _ inquiry may conclude. some of your mps and members of the _ inquiry may conclude. some of your mps and members of the public - inquiry may conclude. some of your. mps and members of the public think this is your barnard castle moment and that the idea that you walked into the garden, a0 people came, the tables are laid with alcohol, and alcohol is being served in the middle of a lockdown, and you think thatis middle of a lockdown, and you think that is a work event, that is ludicrous, you are just taking the mickey out of the british people? you know how silly that sounds. what you know how silly that sounds. what eo - le
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you know how silly that sounds. what peeple need — you know how silly that sounds. what peeple need to _ you know how silly that sounds. what peeple need to do _ you know how silly that sounds. what people need to do is _ you know how silly that sounds. b�*ué�*jf people need to do is to wait you know how silly that sounds. “kwiait people need to do is to wait and see what the report says but i repeat my deep apologies to people for mistakes that may have been made on my watch. mistakes that may have been made on m watch. ., , ., my watch. you see that looks ridiculous? _ my watch. you see that looks ridiculous? it _ my watch. you see that looks ridiculous? it sounds - my watch. you see that looks i ridiculous? it sounds ridiculous. my watch. you see that looks - ridiculous? it sounds ridiculous. i repeat my apologies, for any and all misjudgments that were made for which i take full responsibility, but i think people do need to wait and see the conclusion of the report and see the conclusion of the report and i will draw the necessary consequences and conclusions and then come back to the house. fine then come back to the house. one final thought. _ then come back to the house. one final thought, this _ then come back to the house. one final thought, this is important, the first time we have seen you since reports emerged in the daily telegraph, not denied by downing street, about two boozy parties held in the grounds of downing street the night before the funeral of prince philip, was having to apologise to the queen about those parties the night before she put her husband of
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over 70 years, she laid him to rest in what was that the moment of shame for you? in what was that the moment of shame foryou? i in what was that the moment of shame for ou? , , ., ., for you? i bitterly regret that that ha - ened. for you? i bitterly regret that that happened- i _ for you? i bitterly regret that that happened- i can _ for you? i bitterly regret that that happened. i can only _ for you? i bitterly regret that that happened. i can only renew - for you? i bitterly regret that that happened. i can only renew my i happened. i can only renew my apologies both to her majesty and to the country for misjudgments that were made. for which i take full response ability. d0 were made. for which i take full response ability.— were made. for which i take full response ability. do you think you can recover— response ability. do you think you can recover from _ response ability. do you think you can recover from this? _ response ability. do you think you can recover from this? your - response ability. do you think you | can recover from this? your polling is terrible and the public think you should go and your mps are in revolt, six of them have publicly said you should resign. i understand --eole's said you should resign. i understand peeple's feelings — said you should resign. i understand people's feelings and _ said you should resign. i understand people's feelings and i _ said you should resign. i understand people's feelings and i understand l people's feelings and i understand why people feel strongly about this issue and i repeat my apologies for what happened and i'm heartily sorry for misjudgments that were made in number ten. the for misjudgments that were made in number ten-—
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number ten. the prime minister sa inc number ten. the prime minister sa in: he number ten. the prime minister saying he was — number ten. the prime minister saying he was heartily _ number ten. the prime minister saying he was heartily sorry. - let's speak now to kirsten oswald — the snp deputy westminster leader. thanks forjoining us. he has again said he was very sorry and he has again said we should wait for sue gray's whitehall inquiry. there is only a few days to wait, i suppose he is right? i’m only a few days to wait, i suppose he is right?_ he is right? i'm interested to see the report _ he is right? i'm interested to see the report when _ he is right? i'm interested to see the report when it _ he is right? i'm interested to see the report when it emerges - he is right? i'm interested to see the report when it emerges but l the report when it emerges but listening to the prime minister, that would have been frustrating for people across all the nations of the uk, because he went to great lengths to avoid answering any of the questions which he must know the answer to, the prime minister will know whether he misled parliament, thatis know whether he misled parliament, that is a pretty fundamental and critically question that he should be able to answer, and he must have known when he went into the garden, and there are multiple reports that he was warned, to go to an event
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that should not have been taking place, he must have known that was not appropriate event, at the very least when he got into the garden. it is not good enough for him to say it was a work event because what kind of work event could that possibly have been an think that actually washes in any case? he has said that with _ actually washes in any case? he has said that with hindsight _ actually washes in any case? he has said that with hindsight he - actually washes in any case? he has said that with hindsight he wishes i said that with hindsight he wishes he had gone out to thank staff and he had gone out to thank staff and he had gone out to thank staff and he had told staff to go back inside, so he has already said that. he is skirtin: so he has already said that. he is skirting around _ so he has already said that. he is skirting around a _ so he has already said that. he is skirting around a lot _ so he has already said that. he is skirting around a lot of _ so he has already said that. he: 3 skirting around a lot of things he needs to say more about. the prime minister in downing street is clearly in a situation where he has been presiding over a platter of parties, none of which should have happened, and we heard him being asked about the parties which happened the night before prince philip's funeral took place, and it
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is one thing after another. the latest revelations we have heard from dominic cummings who says the prime minister actually was warned and that these events were not suitable and that they should not happen, not the first time we have heard similar stories, and he doesn't have an answer to that. the prime minister has denied he was warned it was a party of any kind. that is something that needs to come out in the wash and there's the matter of him saying that that didn't happen, and i'm not sure i'm convinced by that, it is very clear to me that the prime minister has not been frank and forthright when he has spoken to mps in the house of commons or to the media, and then there is the other issue of what on earth did he think was going on in the garden if he is seriously suggesting that that was not some kind of party? i think people across the country are deeply fed up and
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they know what is going on and it is clearly prime minister has not been frank and people had enough. we are auoin to frank and people had enough. we are going to hear — frank and people had enough. we are going to hear from _ frank and people had enough. we are going to hear from sue _ frank and people had enough. we are going to hear from sue gray - frank and people had enough. we are going to hear from sue gray soon - frank and people had enough. we are going to hear from sue gray soon butj going to hearfrom sue gray soon but the word is that she will set out the word is that she will set out the facts as she sees them but not necessarily apportion blame. sue gra isa necessarily apportion blame. sue gray is a civil— necessarily apportion blame. si? gray is a civil servant necessarily apportion blame. si;e: gray is a civil servant who necessarily apportion blame. si9 gray is a civil servant who has necessarily apportion blame. si9: gray is a civil servant who has to report to a higher up civil servant and of course that is a civil service which is there to support the work of the government, and i think it is unfair and not reasonable for us to think that sue gray is now in charge of the prime minister's conduct, so she will provide a report and no doubt it will be very interesting to read what is in the report but there is a limit to what that can possibly contain and what it can do, so that won't take away from the very serious questions that the prime minister has to answer and i have to say it won't take away from the real upset that i and other mps are still
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hearing from constituents who are really upset because they followed the rules that number ten made, which they did not follow, and because of that they missed things like funerals and being able to see loved ones at the end of their lives, not things people will forget easily.
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there is another crime which the metropolitan police has been prosecuting people for and these regulations covered under the serious act, and that is assisting others to breach the regulations, and that is why i think he has been very adamant, the use of this word, “'i implicitly believe," this
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phrase, he didn't know, and now he has to strongly deny he was warned because if at any point he says actually “'i was warned and i went ahead anyway" or “'i did know, i did know it would be unlawful," he could be in theory at least in line for a crime under the serious act for aiding and abetting effectively other people — this party that he basically held in his own garden, that was not necessary for work for all of those people. and the other thing he could face, if he is proved to have knowingly misled parliament. yes, i have been reading through his statements and actually he has been extreme cautious in what he has said, everything is... in relation to the christmas party, “'i was assured this was not
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against the regulations," it does not say what he thought or he knew. and again with the 20th of may gathering, “'i implicitly believed it was for work." that is quite different to either believe it was not lawful, "no one warned me," he has never said that in parliament. yes, he could be caught for lying to parliament, and i think he has been very cautious in what he has said for a very good reason. when you say, he says, “'i implicitly believed," what is the significance of that wording? it is difficult to know. i interpreted it as “'i adamantly believed" or “'i definitely believed," but it is one of those funny words that you can use to kind of mean... it can have opposite meanings. “'i believed very strongly." but it is a very curious expression and one which i think speaks to...
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the very specific words he has used. he is behaving, i have to say this from my professional... with my professional hat on, he is behaving like someone who is not giving the full story and is being very careful and you see this with witnesses in court. you have witnesses trying to avoid lying and they have to use very strange language, they have to be very careful about what they say. ultimately, they can be questioned. but i do think he is behaving in that way, i may be wrong, maybe this is just the way he talks, but if you look carefully at what he has said, he is being very, very careful, not to lie to parliament, not to be caught lying to parliament, not to admit what could be construed as a criminal offence, but at the same time, give the public a kind of apology, or the humility they're demanding, so i think... i do think that path is impossible to tread. it's an essentially conflicting demand. a british man who took four people hostage at a synagogue in texas had been
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investigated by m15. malik faisal akram, from blackburn in lancashire, was the subject of an investigation in late 2020 — though by the time he flew to the us he was assessed to be no longer a risk. our security correspondent frank gardner gave me this update a short time ago.
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tthat is subject to an internal investigation they are going to have to hold, i think. the second question is how did this man who had a record, had a criminal record, how is he able to fly to the united states and purchase a firearm and walk in to the synagogue and hold four people hostage? almost certainly he will have lied on his forms to get into the united states, where it says very clearly, have you ever had a criminal record? or words to that effect. he will have obviously said "no" because if he had said yes, he would not have got in. it is clearly a loophole. you and i have probably been to the united states several times and have seen these questions and i have always
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thought, what would happen if i did have a criminal record and i chose to say no? now we know, you walk in. we will find out more... maybe we won't. shouldn't m15 have told the border authorities in advance that he had been on the radar at some stage? along with a0,000 others. if he had been bumped up to a higher priority, someone who they were actively investigated, i would like to think that they would have certainly warned the border authorities but somebody who had not actually committed anything at that stage, it would be seen as disproportionate to then put him on a no—fly list. job vacancies in the uk soared to a record high of more than 1.2 million between october and december. the new figures from the ons are the first to exclude the impact of the government's furlough scheme, which ended in september. but the figures also show that average pay rises are failing to keep up with the increase in the cost of living. here's ben king. you should be respected and well paid. it is not much to ask. staff
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offered them — paid. it is not much to ask. staff offered them a _ paid. it is not much to ask. staff offered them a pay _ paid. it is not much to ask. staff offered them a pay rise - paid. it is not much to ask. staff offered them a pay rise but they say they worth more. 7% does not go as far as it used to, they say. in they worth more. 7% does not go as far as it used to, they say.— far as it used to, they say. in work ove far as it used to, they say. in work poverty is — far as it used to, they say. in work poverty is going — far as it used to, they say. in work poverty is going and _ far as it used to, they say. in work poverty is going and they - far as it used to, they say. in work poverty is going and they know i poverty is going and they know market forces, and it showed that hgv drivers when they stood together and demanded fair pay for the job they do, you can actually fight and win. , , :, win. the unemployment figures today showed why they _ win. the unemployment figures today showed why they feel _ win. the unemployment figures today showed why they feel they _ win. the unemployment figures today showed why they feel they are - win. the unemployment figures today showed why they feel they are in i win. the unemployment figures today showed why they feel they are in a i showed why they feel they are in a strong position, the unemployment rate is down to a.1%, almost where it was before the pandemic, vacancies are at a record high of 1.2 million and while pay went up a.2%, if you exclude bonuses, and adjust for the fact that prices are going up, in real terms it fell 1%.
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the unemployment data this morning was really quite positive, unemployment is very near pre—pandemic levels and we were worried about rising unemployment but that does not seem to have materialised. the big story from the date of this morning is pay rises, it is not that pei hasn't grown, but that the cost of living has increased by more than that so the amount you can buy with your pay packet is going down. fishd amount you can buy with your pay packet is going down.— amount you can buy with your pay packet is going down. and that will be a political _ packet is going down. and that will be a political issue _ packet is going down. and that will be a political issue as _ packet is going down. and that will be a political issue as well - packet is going down. and that will be a political issue as well as i packet is going down. and that will be a political issue as well as an i be a political issue as well as an economic one. istate be a political issue as well as an economic one.— economic one. we are seeing challenges — economic one. we are seeing challenges with _ economic one. we are seeing challenges with inflation i economic one. we are seeing challenges with inflation but l economic one. we are seeing i challenges with inflation but we are not alone in that, this is a global phenomenon because the of inflation whether it is supply chains or energy prices global in nature, but we are taking action to support people the best recount which is why the national living wage is up. if lots of workers negotiate big pay rises that employers will have to pass the costs on to us in the form of higher prices, pushing up the cost of living, which means that we will all want a bigger pay rise next
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time. at the bank of england they keep a close eye on the wage price spiral and if they see it getting out of control they will put up interest rates to slow it down. these refuge collectors want a pay deal worth up to 15% and this year workers around the country will be bargaining hard. ben king, bbc news. several dozen swans on the thames at windsor have been exposed to avian influenza also known as the bird flu. earlier this month seven birds were found dead in the river, which led the department for environment, food and rural affairs to send in a vet to cull other infected swans. so far more than 25 birds have been culled by vets. earlier i spoke with joanne de nobriga who is a trustee and rescuer at swan support who have been feeding the surviving swans and monitoring them on both sides of the river at windsor. she updated us on the issue.
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we first heard evidence of avian flu in the reading area, albeit not on the thames, back in november, and since then we have been monitoring the flocks and various lakes where there were incidents of avian flu. we have had 20 cases in the reading area, although nothing on the thames in reading, and subsequent to that it came to windsor, and as you said in the report there have been seven deaths actually in the flock and several that are looking for poorly at the moment. they are amazingly beautiful creatures, how many do you think there are in that area of the thames? is it possible to give an idea of how many there are potentially still at risk? potentially, all
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of them are at risk. experience tells us that some seem to get it and recover, some don't seem to get it, and then some obviously get it and die. if i was to take the numbers which occurred at a particular lake in reading, i would say a third of them actually succumbed to the disease and two thirds hadn't, so that might be an indicator of what we are looking at.
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that. sunshine in eastern an indicator of what we are looking at. areas not sure about that. sunshine in eastern an indicator of what we are looking at. areas of not sure about that. sunshine in eastern an indicator of what we are looking at. areas of england not sure about that. sunshine in eastern an indicator of what we are looking at. areas of england but not sure about that. sunshine in eastern an indicator of what we are looking at. areas of england but also eastern areas of england but also mist an indicator of what we are looking at. eastern areas of england but also mist an indicator of what we are looking at. and eastern areas of england but also mist an indicator of what we are looking at. and fog eastern areas of england but also mist an indicator of what we are looking at. and fog patches eastern areas of england but also mist an indicator of what we are looking at. and fog patches which eastern areas of england but also mist an indicator of what we are looking at. and fog patches which have eastern areas of england but also mist an indicator of what we are looking at. and fog patches which have not mist and fog patches which have not shifted all an indicator of what we are looking at. mist and fog patches which have not shifted all an indicator of what we are looking at. day, mist and fog patches which have not shifted all an indicator of what we are looking at. day, some mist and fog patches which have not shifted all an indicator of what we are looking at. day, some of mist and fog patches which have not shifted all an indicator of what we are looking at. day, some of that mist and fog patches which have not shifted all an indicator of what we are looking at. day, some of that will shifted all day, some of that will linger into an indicator of what we are looking at. shifted all day, some of that will linger into an indicator of what we are looking at. the shifted all day, some of that will linger into an indicator of what we are looking at. the first shifted all day, some of that will linger into an indicator of what we are looking at. the first part shifted all day, some of that will linger into an indicator of what we are looking at. the first part of shifted all day, some of that will linger into an indicator of what we are looking at. the first part of the linger into the first part of the night. an indicator of what we are looking at. linger into the first part of the night. an indicator of what we are looking at. at linger into the first part of the night. an indicator of what we are looking at. at the linger into the first part of the night. an indicator of what we are looking at. at the same linger into the first part of the night. an indicator of what we are looking at. at the same time linger into the first part of the night. an indicator of what we are looking at. at the same time over night. at the same time over scotland an indicator of what we are looking at. night. at the same time over scotland an indicator of what we are looking at. and night. at the same time over scotland an indicator of what we are looking at. and northern night. at the same time over scotland an indicator of what we are looking at. and northern ireland night. at the same time over scotland an indicator of what we are looking at. and northern ireland and scotland and northern ireland and eventually northern an indicator of what we are looking at. scotland and northern ireland and eventually northern an indicator of what we are looking at. england scotland and northern ireland and eventually northern an indicator of what we are looking at. england we scotland and northern ireland and eventually northern an indicator of what we are looking at. england we have eventually northern england we have rain on an indicator of what we are looking at. eventually northern england we have rain on an indicator of what we are looking at. the eventually northern england we have rain on an indicator of what we are looking at. the way eventually northern england we have rain on an indicator of what we are looking at. the way overnight eventually northern england we have rain on an indicator of what we are looking at. the way overnight and eventually northern england we have rain on an indicator of what we are looking at. the way overnight and that rain on the way overnight and that will see an indicator of what we are looking at. rain on the way overnight and that will see an indicator of what we are looking at. a rain on the way overnight and that will see an indicator of what we are looking at. a cold rain on the way overnight and that will see an indicator of what we are looking at. a cold front. rain on the way overnight and that will see an indicator of what we are looking at. a cold front. it rain on the way overnight and that will see an indicator of what we are looking at. a cold front. it is rain on the way overnight and that will see an indicator of what we are looking at. a cold front. it is going will see a cold front. it is going to be an indicator of what we are looking at. will see a cold front. it is going to be an indicator of what we are looking at. dragging will see a cold front. it is going to be an indicator of what we are looking at. dragging some will see a cold front. it is going to be an indicator of what we are looking at. dragging some colder air will see a cold front. it is going to be an indicator of what we are looking at. dragging some colder air in to be dragging some colder air in across the an indicator of what we are looking at. to be dragging some colder air in across the
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an indicator of what we are looking at. uk to be dragging some colder air in across the an indicator of what we are looking at. uk over to be dragging some colder air in across the an indicator of what we are looking at. uk over the to be dragging some colder air in across the an indicator of what we are looking at. uk over the next to be dragging some colder air in across the an indicator of what we are looking at. uk over the next couple across the uk over the next couple of days an indicator of what we are looking at. across the uk over the next couple of days an indicator of what we are looking at. as across the uk over the next couple of days an indicator of what we are looking at. as these across the uk over the next couple of days an indicator of what we are looking at. as these weather across the uk over the next couple of days an indicator of what we are looking at. as these weather fronts of days as these weather fronts shift southwards. an indicator of what we are looking at. of days as these weather fronts shift southwards. an indicator of what we are looking at. the of days as these weather fronts shift southwards. an indicator of what we are looking at. the coldest of days as these weather fronts shift southwards. an indicator of what we are looking at. the coldest air of days as these weather fronts shift southwards. an indicator of what we are looking at. the coldest air is shift southwards. the coldest air is limited an indicator of what we are looking at. shift southwards. the coldest air is limited an indicator of what we are looking at. to shift southwards. the coldest air is limited an indicator of what we are looking at. to the shift southwards. the coldest air is limited an indicator of what we are looking at. to the far shift southwards. the coldest air is limited an indicator of what we are looking at. to the far north shift southwards. the coldest air is limited an indicator of what we are looking at. to the far north of limited to the far north of scotland on an indicator of what we are looking at. limited to the far north of scotland on an indicator of what we are looking at. wednesday limited to the far north of scotland on an indicator of what we are looking at. wednesday in limited to the far north of scotland on an indicator of what we are looking at. wednesday in particular, limited to the far north of scotland on an indicator of what we are looking at. wednesday in particular, snow on wednesday in particular, snow showers an indicator of what we are looking at. on wednesday in particular, snow showers an indicator of what we are looking at. in on wednesday in particular, snow showers an indicator of what we are looking at. in shetland on wednesday in particular, snow showers an indicator of what we are looking at. in shetland down on wednesday in particular, snow showers an indicator of what we are looking at. in shetland down to showers in shetland down to sea level, an indicator of what we are looking at. showers in shetland down to sea level, an indicator of what we are looking at. also showers in shetland down to sea level, an indicator of what we are looking at. also gusts showers in shetland down to sea level, an indicator of what we are looking at. also gusts of showers in shetland down to sea level, an indicator of what we are looking at. also gusts of a0—50 showers in shetland down to sea level, an indicator of what we are looking at. also gusts of a0—50 mph, showers in shetland down to sea level, an indicator of what we are looking at. also gusts of a0—50 mph, it level, also gusts of a0—50 mph, it will an indicator of what we are looking at. level, also gusts of a0—50 mph, it will an indicator of what we are looking at. feel level, also gusts of a0—50 mph, it will an indicator of what we are looking at. feel freezing level, also gusts of a0—50 mph, it will an indicator of what we are looking at. feel freezing cold. level, also gusts of a0—50 mph, it will an indicator of what we are looking at. feel freezing cold. england will feel freezing cold. england with cloud an indicator of what we are looking at. will feel freezing cold. england with cloud an indicator of what we are looking at. and will feel freezing cold. england with cloud an indicator of what we are looking at. and light will feel freezing cold. england with cloud an indicator of what we are looking at. and light and will feel freezing cold. england with cloud an indicator of what we are looking at. and light and patchy with cloud and light and patchy rain, an indicator of what we are looking at. with cloud and light and patchy rain, an indicator of what we are looking at. and with cloud and light and patchy rain, an indicator of what we are looking at. and the with cloud and light and patchy rain, an indicator of what we are looking at. and the area with cloud and light and patchy rain, an indicator of what we are looking at. and the area of with cloud and light and patchy rain, an indicator of what we are looking at. and the area of high with cloud and light and patchy rain, an indicator of what we are looking at. and the area of high pressure rain, and the area of high pressure has an indicator of what we are looking at. rain, and the area of high pressure has an indicator of what we are looking at. been rain, and the area of high pressure has an indicator of what we are looking at. been around rain, and the area of high pressure has an indicator of what we are looking at. been around for rain, and the area of high pressure has an indicator of what we are looking at. been around for ages. rain, and the area of high pressure has an indicator of what we are looking at. been around for ages. sunshine has been around for ages. sunshine for an indicator of what we are looking at. has been around for ages. sunshine for an indicator of what we are looking at. most has been around for ages. sunshine for an indicator of what we are looking at. most of has been around for ages. sunshine for an indicator of what we are looking at. most of the has been around for ages. sunshine for an indicator of what we are looking at. most of the afternoon has been around for ages. sunshine for an indicator of what we are looking at. most of the afternoon but for most of the afternoon but starting to an indicator of what we are looking at. for most of the afternoon but starting to an indicator of what we are looking at. feel colder for most of the afternoon but starting to an indicator of what we are looking at. feel colder across starting to feel colder across the north an indicator of what we are looking at. starting to feel colder across the north an indicator of what we are looking at. and starting to feel colder across the north an indicator of what we are looking at. and then starting to feel colder across the north an indicator of what we are looking at. and then through starting to feel colder across the north an indicator of what we are looking at. and then through wednesday north and then through wednesday night, an indicator of what we are looking at. north and then through wednesday night, an indicator of what we are looking at. as north and then through wednesday night, an indicator of what we are looking at. as the north and then through wednesday night, an indicator of what we are looking at. as the colder north and then through wednesday night, an indicator of what we are looking at. as the colder air night, as the colder air increasingly an indicator of what we are looking at. night, as the colder air increasingly an indicator of what we are looking at. edges night, as the colder air increasingly an indicator of what we are looking at. edges in night, as the colder air increasingly an indicator of what we are looking at. edges in we night, as the colder air increasingly an indicator of what we are looking at. edges in we see night, as the colder air increasingly an indicator of what we are looking at. edges in we see more night, as the colder air increasingly an indicator of what we are looking at. edges in we see more of increasingly edges in we see more of the an indicator of what increasingly edges in we see more of the an indicator of what shower increasingly edges in we see more of the an indicator of what shower we are looking at. increasingly edges in we see more of the an indicator of what shower we are looking at. turning increasingly edges in we see more of the an indicator of what shower we are looking at. turning to increasingly edges in we see more of the an indicator of what shower we are looking at. turning to snow increasingly edges in we see more of the an indicator of what shower we are looking at. turning to snow and increasingly edges in we see more of the an indicator of what shower we are looking at. turning to snow and the the shower turning to snow and the frost becomes an indicator of what we are looking at. the shower turning to snow and the frost becomes an indicator of what we are looking at. extensive, the shower turning to snow and the frost becomes an indicator of what we are looking at. extensive, thursday frost becomes extensive, thursday promises to an indicator of what we are looking at. frost becomes extensive, thursday promises to an indicator of what we are looking at. be frost becomes extensive, thursday promises to an indicator of what we are looking at. be the frost becomes extensive, thursday promises to an indicator of what we are looking at. be the coldest frost becomes extensive, thursday promises to an indicator of what we are looking at. be the coldest day frost becomes extensive, thursday promises to an indicator of what we are looking at. be the coldest day of promises to be the coldest day of the an indicator of what we are looking at. promises to be the coldest day of the an indicator of what we are looking at. week, promises to be the coldest day of the an indicator of what we are looking at. week, but promises to be the coldest day of the an indicator of what we are looking at. week, but for promises to be the coldest day of the an indicator of what we are looking at. week, but for many promises to be the coldest day of the an indicator of what we are looking at. week, but for many sparkling the week, but for many sparkling blue an indicator of what we are looking at. the week, but for many sparkling blue an indicator of what we are looking at. skies the week, but for many sparkling blue an indicator of what we are looking at. skies for the week, but for many sparkling blue an indicator of what we are looking at. skies for the the week, but for many sparkling blue an indicator of what we are looking at. skies for the most the week, but for many sparkling blue an indicator of what we are looking at. skies for the most part the week, but for many sparkling blue an indicator of what we are looking at. skies for the most part and blue skies for the most part and showers an indicator of what we are looking at. blue skies for the most part and showers an indicator of what we are looking at. to blue skies for the most part and showers an indicator of what we are looking at. to do blue skies for the most part and showers an indicator of what we are looking at. to do affecting blue skies for the most part and showers an indicator of what we are looking at. to do affecting parts showers to do affecting parts of northern an indicator of what we are looking at. showers to do affecting parts of northern an indicator of what we are looking at. scotland showers to do affecting parts of northern an indicator of what we are looking at. scotland and showers to do affecting parts of northern an indicator of what we are looking at. scotland and a showers to do affecting parts of northern an indicator of what we are looking at. scotland and a couple showers to do affecting parts of northern an indicator of what we are looking at. scotland and a couple of northern scotland and a couple of wintry an indicator of what we are looking at. northern scotland and a couple of wintry an indicator of what we are looking at. ones northern scotland and a couple of wintry an indicator of what we are looking at. ones coming northern scotland and a couple of wintry an indicator of what we are looking at. ones coming down northern scotland and a couple of wintry an indicator of what we are looking at. ones coming down the northern scotland and a couple of wintry an indicator of what we are looking at. ones coming down the north wintry ones coming down the north sea an indicator of what we are looking at. wintry ones coming down the north sea an indicator of what we are looking at. but wintry ones coming down the north sea an indicator of what we are looking at. but the wintry ones coming down the north sea an indicator of what we are looking at. but the wind wintry ones coming down the north sea an indicator of what we are looking at. but the wind should wintry ones coming down the north sea an indicator of what we are looking at. but the wind should keep wintry ones coming down the north sea an indicator of what we are looking at. but the wind should keep most sea but the wind should keep most of them an indicator of what we are looking at. sea but the wind should keep most of them an indicator of what we are looking at. out sea but the wind should keep most of them an indicator of what we are looking at. out to sea but the wind should keep most of them an indicator of what we are looking at. out to sea, sea but the wind should keep most of them an indicator of what we are looking at. out to sea, although sea but the wind should keep most of them an indicator of what we are looking at. out to sea, although a sea but the wind should keep most of them an indicator of what we are looking at. out to sea, although a few them out to sea, although a few showers an indicator of what we are looking at. them out to sea, although a few showers an indicator of what we are looking at. around them out to sea, although a few
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showers an indicator of what we are looking at. around the them out to sea, although a few showers an indicator of what we are looking at. around the welsh them out to sea, although a few showers an indicator of what we are looking at. around the welsh coast. showers around the welsh coast. temperatures an indicator of what we are looking at. showers around the welsh coast. temperatures an indicator of what we are looking at. for showers around the welsh coast. temperatures an indicator of what we are looking at. for pretty showers around the welsh coast. temperatures an indicator of what we are looking at. for pretty much temperatures for pretty much everyone an indicator of what we are looking at. temperatures for pretty much everyone an indicator of what we are looking at. will temperatures for pretty much everyone an indicator of what we are looking at. will be temperatures for pretty much everyone an indicator of what we are looking at. will be a temperatures for pretty much everyone an indicator of what we are looking at. will be a bit temperatures for pretty much everyone an indicator of what we are looking at. will be a bit below temperatures for pretty much everyone an indicator of what we are looking at. will be a bit below average everyone will be a bit below average for the an indicator of what we are looking at. everyone will be a bit below average for the an indicator of what we are looking at. time everyone will be a bit below average for the an indicator of what we are looking at. time of everyone will be a bit below average for the an indicator of what we are looking at. time of year, everyone will be a bit below average for the an indicator of what we are looking at. time of year, but everyone will be a bit below average for the an indicator of what we are looking at. time of year, but the everyone will be a bit below average for the an indicator of what we are looking at. time of year, but the cold for the time of year, but the cold speu an indicator of what we are looking at. for the time of year, but the cold speu an indicator of what we are looking at. is for the time of year, but the cold speu an indicator of what we are looking at. is short for the time of year, but the cold speu an indicator of what we are looking at. is short lived for the time of year, but the cold speu an indicator of what we are looking at. is short lived because for the time of year, but the cold speu an indicator of what we are looking at. is short lived because through spell is short lived because through friday and an indicator of what we are looking at. spell is short lived because through friday and an indicator of what we are looking at. the spell is short lived because through friday and an indicator of what we are looking at. the weekend, spell is short lived because through friday and an indicator of what we are looking at. the weekend, high friday and the weekend, high pressure is an indicator of what we are looking at. friday and the weekend, high pressure is an indicator of what we are looking at. still friday and the weekend, high pressure is an indicator of what we are looking at. still there friday and the weekend, high pressure is an indicator of what we are looking at. still there but friday and the weekend, high pressure is an indicator of what we are looking at. still there but we friday and the weekend, high pressure is an indicator of what we are looking at. still there but we get pressure is still there but we get the an indicator of what we are looking at. pressure is still there but we get the an indicator of what we are looking at. milder pressure is still there but we get the an indicator of what we are looking at. milder air pressure is still there but we get the an indicator of what we are looking at. milder air recirculating, pressure is still there but we get the an indicator of what we are looking at. milder air recirculating, and the milder air recirculating, and what an indicator of what we are looking at. the milder air recirculating, and what an indicator of what we are looking at. does the milder air recirculating, and what an indicator of what we are looking at. does that the milder air recirculating, and what an indicator of what we are looking at. does that mean? the milder air recirculating, and what an indicator of what we are looking at. does that mean? it the milder air recirculating, and what an indicator of what we are looking at. does that mean? it means the milder air recirculating, and what an indicator of what we are looking at. does that mean? it means on what does that mean? it means on friday most an indicator of what we are looking at. what does that mean? it means on friday most an indicator of what we are looking at. of what does that mean? it means on friday most an indicator of what we are looking at. of us what does that mean? it means on friday most an indicator of what we are looking at. of us will what does that mean? it means on friday most an indicator of what we are looking at. of us will have what does that mean? it means on friday most an indicator of what we are looking at. of us will have a what does that mean? it means on friday most an indicator of what we are looking at. of us will have a fine friday most of us will have a fine day, an indicator of what we are looking at. friday most of us will have a fine day, an indicator of what we are looking at. frost friday most of us will have a fine day, an indicator of what we are looking at. frost and friday most of us will have a fine day, an indicator of what we are looking at. frost and fog, friday most of us will have a fine day, an indicator of what we are looking at. frost and fog, and friday most of us will have a fine day, an indicator of what we are looking at. frost and fog, and the friday most of us will have a fine day, an indicator of what we are looking at. frost and fog, and the cloud day, frost and fog, and the cloud for western an indicator of what we are looking at. day, frost and fog, and the cloud for western an indicator of what we are looking at. scotland day, frost and fog, and the cloud for western an indicator of what we are looking at. scotland might day, frost and fog, and the cloud for western an indicator of what we are looking at. scotland might be day, frost and fog, and the cloud for western an indicator of what we are looking at. scotland might be thick for western scotland might be thick enough an indicator of what we are looking at. for western scotland might be thick enough an indicator of what we are looking at. for for western scotland might be thick enough an indicator of what we are looking at. for damp for western scotland might be thick enough an indicator of what we are looking at. for damp weather for western scotland might be thick enough an indicator of what we are looking at. for damp weather at for western scotland might be thick enough an indicator of what we are looking at. for damp weather at times for western scotland might be thick enough an indicator of what we are looking at. for damp weather at times but enough for damp weather at times but nothing an indicator of what enough for damp weather at times but nothing an indicator of what too enough for damp weather at times but nothing an indicator of what too we are looking at. enough for damp weather at times but nothing an indicator of what too we are looking at. significant. nothing too significant. temperatures an indicator of what we are looking at. nothing too significant. temperatures an indicator of what we are looking at. highest nothing too significant. temperatures an indicator of what we are looking at. highest in nothing too significant. temperatures an indicator of what we are looking at. highest in western temperatures highest in western scotland, an indicator of what we are looking at. temperatures highest in western scotland, an indicator of what we are looking at. but temperatures highest in western scotland, an indicator of what we are looking at. but otherwise temperatures highest in western scotland, an indicator of what we are looking at. but otherwise those scotland, but otherwise those temperatures an indicator of what we are looking at. scotland, but otherwise those temperatures an indicator of what we are looking at. are scotland, but otherwise those temperatures an indicator of what we are looking at. are coming scotland, but otherwise those temperatures an indicator of what we are looking at. are coming back scotland, but otherwise those temperatures an indicator of what we are looking at. are coming back to temperatures are coming back to average, and an indicator of what we are looking at. temperatures are coming back to average, and an indicator of what we are looking at. as temperatures are coming back to average, and an indicator of what we are looking at. as high temperatures are coming back to average, and an indicator of what we are looking at. as high pressure temperatures are coming back to average, and an indicator of what we are looking at. as high pressure is average, and as high pressure is going an indicator of what we are looking at. average, and as high pressure is going an indicator of what we are looking at. to average, and as high pressure is going an indicator of what we are looking at. to stay average, and as high pressure is going an indicator of what we are looking at. to stay with average, and as high pressure is going an indicator of what we are looking at. to stay with us average, and as high pressure is going an indicator of what we are looking at. to stay with us for average, and as high pressure is going an indicator of what we are looking at. to stay with us for a average, and as high pressure is going an indicator of what we are looking at. to stay with us for a long going to stay with us for a long time an indicator of what going to stay with us for a long time an indicator of what and going to stay with us for a long time an indicator of what and we are looking at. going to stay with us for a long time an indicator of what and we are looking at. so going to stay with us for a long time an indicator of what and we are looking at. so this going to stay with us for a long time an indicator of what and we are looking at. so this is going to stay with us for a long time an indicator of what and we are looking at. so this is the going to stay with us for a long time an indicator of what and we are looking at. so this is the weekend going to stay with us for a long time an indicator of what and we are looking at. so this is the weekend into time and so this is the weekend into next an indicator of what we are looking at. time and so this is the weekend into next an indicator of what we are looking at. week. time and so this is the weekend into next an indicator of what we are looking at. week. there time and so this is the weekend into next an indicator of what we are looking at. week. there won't time and so this is the weekend into next an indicator of what we are looking at. week. there won't be time and so this is the weekend into next an indicator of what we are looking at. week. there won't be that time and so this is the weekend into next an indicator of what we are looking at. week. there won't be that many next week. there won't be that many changes. an indicator of what we are looking at. next week. there won't be that many changes. an indicator of what we are looking at. frost next week. there won't be that many changes. an indicator of what we are looking at. frost and next week. there won't be that many changes. an indicator of what we are looking at. frost and fog next week. there won't be that many changes. an indicator of what we are looking at. frost and fog but next week. there won't be that many changes. an indicator of what we are looking at. frost and fog but otherwise changes. frost and fog but otherwise an indicator of what we are looking at. changes. frost and fog but otherwise an indicator of what we are looking at. fine changes. frost and fog but otherwise an indicator of what we are looking at. fine lengthy changes. frost and fog but otherwise an indicator of what we are looking at. fine lengthy spell changes. frost and fog but otherwise an indicator of what we are looking at. fine lengthy spell of changes. frost and fog but otherwise an indicator of what we are looking at. fine lengthy spell of dry changes. frost and fog but otherwise an indicator of what we are looking at. fine lengthy spell of dry weathei
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this is bbc news i'm the headlines: more pressure on the prime minister, amid allegations he was warned in advance about number ten drinks during lockdown. he's dismissed the claims: nobody told me that what we were doing was against their wills. at the event in question was something we were going to do something that was not a work event. he we were going to do something that was not a work event.— was not a work event. he is not takin: was not a work event. he is not taking responsibility _ was not a work event. he is not taking responsibility because i was not a work event. he is not| taking responsibility because he keeps _ taking responsibility because he keeps hiding behind still grey because that's unacceptable. you cannot— because that's unacceptable. you cannot hide behind table seven. he knows _ cannot hide behind table seven. he knows what the rules were and he broke _ knows what the rules were and he broke the — knows what the rules were and he broke the rules. a man in his 30s has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher, ashling murphy, in ireland last week. scotland's covid—19 restrictions are to be eased from monday, with nightclubs
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reopening, large indoor events resuming and social distancing rules dropped.
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lives, not things people will forget easil . :, :, :, , campaigners are calling for robust action to tackle plastic pollution. a new report by the environmental investigation agency has described it as a global emergency and are supporting proposals for a un global plastics treaty. with me now is sander defruyt, who leads plastics research at the ellen macarthur foundation. thanks forjoining us.
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thanks for joining us. just thanks forjoining us. just sum up how bad plastic pollution is and what it is doing to the planet? this re ort what it is doing to the planet? this report once — what it is doing to the planet? “in 3 report once again confirms that our linear plastics economy are making waste and the way of dealing with plastics is completely broken and this is leading to huge impact environmentally, socially as well as economically. it is contributing to the climate crisis and contributing to pollution, with so much of it going into our oceans, and the report also shows the vast scale and the truly global nature of this challenge and therefore calling on the need for a truly global response, a coordinated global response, a coordinated global response to this in the form of a un treaty on plastics. response to this in the form of a un treaty on plastics-— treaty on plastics. what would a treaty on plastics. what would a treaty achieve, _ treaty on plastics. what would a treaty achieve, how _ treaty on plastics. what would a treaty achieve, how would - treaty on plastics. what would a treaty achieve, how would it - treaty on plastics. what would a l treaty achieve, how would it stop plastic pollution?— treaty achieve, how would it stop plastic pollution? there are many efforts around _ plastic pollution? there are many efforts around the _
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plastic pollution? there are many efforts around the world - plastic pollution? there are many efforts around the world to - plastic pollution? there are many efforts around the world to try . plastic pollution? there are many| efforts around the world to try and address and tackle this problem but given the vast nature and the many millions of organisations involved in producing and using plastics around the world, it is very important to have a coordinated approach, and such a treaty could set a clear global direction for all countries and businesses around the world to move in the same direction, clear and ambitious goals for all actors around the world to adhere to, so in that sense it can really harmonise the efforts that are currently happening around the world. ~ :, , currently happening around the world. :, , :, currently happening around the world. ~ :, , :, , ., ., currently happening around the world. :, , :, . world. who is to blame for plastic ollution, world. who is to blame for plastic pollution. is _ world. who is to blame for plastic pollution, is it _ world. who is to blame for plastic pollution, is it the _ world. who is to blame for plastic pollution, is it the big _ world. who is to blame for plastic| pollution, is it the big companies, the manufacturers, or individuals? i guess there are many millions if not billions, we are all playing a part in this plastics system, and the key to changing the system from the linear waste economy, it lays in the hands of businesses and policymakers
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because they are the ones who decide what they put on the market and how it is designed and what the regulation is and what the regulation is and what the regulation landscape is, so that is where the key is, so it will be crucial that all of these work together to eliminate all plastics that we don't need and then innovate the plastics we do need to make sure they are all reusable and recyclable and can stay in the economy and be kept out of the environment. for now, kept out of the environment. for now. thanks _ kept out of the environment. for now, thanks forjoining us. let's return to the news that borisjohnson has rejected a claim by his former chief advisor that he was warned in advance about a drinks party in the downing street garden during lockdown in may 2020. let's speak now to the leader of the liberal democrats ed davey. outright denial of that claim from borisjohnson, and he said once again we need to wait for sue gray's report into this. ida
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again we need to wait for sue gray's report into this.— report into this. no surprise he is continuing _ report into this. no surprise he is continuing to _ report into this. no surprise he is continuing to deny _ report into this. no surprise he is continuing to deny what - report into this. no surprise he is continuing to deny what the - report into this. no surprise he is continuing to deny what the rest| report into this. no surprise he is. continuing to deny what the rest of us know is true and there has been so much evidence, notjust what dominic cummings said but the photographs and the witnesses to many press reports and the fact there were so many parties. every friday, going on at number 10 downing street, all against the rules that borisjohnson himself forced on the rest of us, and i think it is clear that the prime minister and his team broke the law. on many occasions. the prime minister is trying... he on many occasions. the prime minister is trying. . ._ minister is trying... he said he didn't, minister is trying... he said he didn't. the _ minister is trying... he said he didn't, the one _ minister is trying... he said he didn't, the one specifically - minister is trying... he said he| didn't, the one specifically that minister is trying... he said he - didn't, the one specifically that he was at, in may 2020, was a work event, and he now staying with hindsight he should have told the people he was talking to —— and he now says with hindsight. but he said implicitly it was a work event. i don't believe him. i don't believe the british public believe him and they are tired of borisjohnson and
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his attempts to wriggle out and to blame everyone else but him. if he had a record of honesty and being straightforward throughout his career, i think maybe people would be prepared to accept his word, but this is a man who has been sacked twice before in two previousjobs for lying. he is a serial offender and not a man of integrity. he is not a decent person, and i'm sorry to have to say that. i wouldn't have said that about other prime ministers of other political parties before, but i think we are being governed by someone who is notjust breaking the rules, doesn't even recognise when he is telling lies, and it is so obvious, is excuses are empty, his lies are transparent, and he will wriggle, of course, that is the sort of person he is, but i think reasonable people, neutral people, notjust opposition parties
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like myself, but neutral people have now seen through the prime minister. but unless and until anyone can prove incontrovertibly that he went to that gathering in the garden of downing street in may 2020 knowing it was a party, well, then, what he says presumably, saying he denies it all and that he thought it was a work event, that stance? —— stands. we don't have only the word of dominic cummings that he knew, we have the e—mailfrom dominic cummings that he knew, we have the e—mail from the private secretary who works directly for the prime minister inviting 100 people to a party, so what is going on? complete chaos. as well as the fabrication from the prime minister. the prime minister is known as someone who likes a good time and he knows, he can see a party when there is a party, so i'm afraid ijust
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think he is making it worse for himself and he is digging the hole and he should stop digging and just tell the truth for once in his life. while we have you can i ask about the police and courts bill, and it is interesting what has been going on in the lords because peers backed the amendments which scraps the power to impose conditions on so—called noisy protests, very loud protest, but the government are looking at pursuing the idea of a ban on noisy protests, what is your position? i’m ban on noisy protests, what is your osition? “ , :, , ban on noisy protests, what is your osition? �* , :, , ., ., , position? i'm strongly against the conservative _ position? i'm strongly against the conservative government's - position? i'm strongly against the . conservative government's proposals and i think the crackdown in this bill is dangerous and draconian and frankly undemocratic. the right to peaceful assembly and protest is a fundamental human right and just as
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importantly it is a crucial part of any democratic society. these new laws from boris johnson any democratic society. these new laws from borisjohnson undermine those rights that are traditional british rights, so the liberal democrat peers, i“m british rights, so the liberal democrat peers, i'm proud of them, they were very much part of leading they were very much part of leading the opposition to these undemocratic, draconian laws proposed by the conservatives and we will continue to fight them. ed dave , will continue to fight them. ed davey, the leader of the liberal democrats, thanks forjoining us. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello. for most of england and wales, we are looking at variable amounts of cloud. the best of the sunshine will be across north wales, the north midlands and north england. further north for scotland and northern ireland, cloud will continue to thicken and we have a weather front moving
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in, quite a weak front but it will spread rain eastwards over the next few hours. temperatures for most will be between 7—9 degrees. overnight we will see a weather front moving into scotland bringing more rain and this is a cold front and finishes the night across parts of northern england. ahead of that, a lot of cloud so for many of us it will stay frost free. tomorrow, colder air on the way and behind the cold front and the fronts themselves bringing rain across england and wales but it will be patchy in nature and the afternoon becoming much sunnier. the coldest weather will be in shetland where there will be snow showers getting down to sea level and particularly bitter winds and temperatures are only1 degree, but otherwise it will feel colder from the north.
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the headlines... this is bbc news, i'm ben brown. the headlines... more pressure on the prime minister, amid allegations he was warned in advance about number ten drinks during lockdown. he's dismissed the claims. nobody told me that what we were doing was, as you say, against the rules, that the event in question was something that... we were going to do something that was not a work event. he is not taking responsibility because — he is not taking responsibility because he keeps hiding behind sue gray and _ because he keeps hiding behind sue gray and that is unacceptable. he cannot_ gray and that is unacceptable. he cannot hide behind a civil servant
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he knows — cannot hide behind a civil servant he knows what the rules were, he broke _ he knows what the rules were, he broke the — he knows what the rules were, he broke the rules. a man in his 30s has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher, ashling murphy, in ireland last week. a british man who took four people hostage at a texas synagogue had been investigated by m15. but by the time he flew to the us, malik faisal akram was assessed to be no longer a risk. scotland's covid—19 restrictions are to be eased from monday, with nightclubs reopening, large indoor events resuming and social distancing rules dropped. the rise in cases driven by omicron peak in the first week of january and we are now on the downward slope of this wave of cases. aerial footage from tonga shows the devastation caused after a volcanic eruption triggered a tsunami — three people are now confirmed dead, britain's emma raducanu wins through to the second round of the australian open, on a good day for british players, with andy murray among
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those also through. good afternoon. borisjohnson has rejected a claim by his former chief advisor that he was warned in advance about a drinks party in the downing street garden during lockdown in may 2020. dominic cummings has said that he's certain he'd told the prime minister that it might break covid rules, but he claimed mrjohnson “waved aside“ the concerns. mrjohnson also revealed that he's already been interviewed by the inquiry over parties held in downing street. in response, labour have said the pm set the rules — he didn't need anyone to tell him that the party he attended broke them. here's our political correspondent, helen catt.
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almost a week after the prime minister apologised in the commons for attending what he said he implicitly believed was a work event in the downing street garden during lockdown, there are claims he was warned about it. i want to begin by repeating my apologies to everybody for the misjudgment that i made, that we may have made in number ten and beyond, whether in downing street or throughout the pandemic. nobody told me that what we were doing was, as you say, against the rules, that the event in question was something that... we were going to do something that was not a work event. and, you know, as i said in the house of commons, when i went out into that garden, i thought that i was attending a work event. the chancellor was also facing questions for the first time since the prime minister's apology to the commons. do you believe the prime minister? of course i do.
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the prime minister... you believe he is telling the truth? of course i do. the prime minister set out his understanding of this matter in parliament last week and i'd refer you to his words. as you know, sue gray is conducting an inquiry into this matter and i fully support the prime minster“s request for patience while that inquiry concludes. the fresh claims come from dominic cummings, the former aide to the prime minister, now a frequent public critic. writing online, he said that on the day of the event in may 2020, “'i said to the prime minister something like martin has invited the building to a drinks party, you've got to grip this madhouse." he went on to say, "not only me but other eyewitnesses who discussed this at the time would swear under oath this is what happened." that, he said, means the prime minister had misled parliament. if that were to be the case it would have consequences. if it is lying and deliberate in the way you describe, if it was not corrected immediately it would normally, under the ministerial code and the governance around parliament, be a resigning matter. that is the principal and we uphold the highest standards of principles in public life,
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that is critically important. i'm not going to prejudge the facts in this or any other aspects of the claims that have been made. other tory mps have expressed anger at what it's claimed happened in downing street. the health minister and nurse maria caulfield told her constituency that clearly spirit of the rules had been broken in number ten and she would be calling for action against anyone found to have breached them. many are also waiting for sue gray's report but labour says, whatever it says, mrjohnson is still on the hook. there has been umpteen parties in downing street. a culture is set at the top, as william hague — no labour stooge, the former tory leader — writes in the times newspaper today. culture is set at the top, so in that respect, the buck stops with borisjohnson. until that report is published it looks like claims and counter claims may well continue. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. in the past hour, labour's deputy leader angela rayner has repeated her call for borisjohnson to resign.
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he for boris johnson to resi-n. he for borisjohnson to resi-n. thinks he for boris johnson to resi-n. thinks that he for borisjohnson to resi-n. thinks that he is above rules. he thinks that he is above the rules it — he thinks that he is above the rules it is _ he thinks that he is above the rules. it is up to his mps now to show— rules. it is up to his mps now to show the — rules. it is up to his mps now to show the british people that they put them — show the british people that they put them first rather than the prime minister— put them first rather than the prime minister and they take him out of office _ minister and they take him out of office because if he is not willing to go— office because if he is not willing to go himself and cannot recognise what he _ to go himself and cannot recognise what he has done is an acceptably wrong _ what he has done is an acceptably wrong then his must mps must act and do sunning _ wrong then his must mps must act and do supping about it. the wrong then his must mps must act and do supping about it.— do supping about it. the prime minister did _ do supping about it. the prime minister did say _ do supping about it. the prime minister did say earlier - do supping about it. the prime minister did say earlier that - do supping about it. the prime minister did say earlier that he | minister did say earlier that he takes full responsibility. do you think he is taken responsibly? he is not taken responsibly. _ think he is taken responsibly? he is not taken responsibly. he is hiding behind _ not taken responsibly. he is hiding behind sue gray. you cannot hide behind _ behind sue gray. you cannot hide behind a — behind sue gray. you cannot hide behind a civil servant. he knows the rules, _ behind a civil servant. he knows the rules, he _ behind a civil servant. he knows the rules, he broke the rules, he lied to the _ rules, he broke the rules, he lied to the british people, you should no. with me now is dave penman, general secretary of the fda, a trade union for civil servants. civil servants are very much involved in this. how worried are you about what happens to them and what comes out of this report? i
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think everyone from the most junior think everyone from the mostjunior civil servant to the prime minister has to take some responsibility for their own actions but obviously, any recriminations would have to be proportionate. those in leadership positions set the tone and culture in organisations and therefore they should have greater responsibility and also if there are to be consequences, that is quite clear how that would be dealt with for a civil servant, that could be a disciplinary process, if they are found to have committed something that would be subject to discipline, but it is not clear how the prime minister would. but it is not clear how the prime ministerwould. he but it is not clear how the prime minister would. he is the arbiter of his own fate. he has not made the commitment on the ministerial code. it has to be reasonable and fair to everyone. it has to be reasonable and fair to eve one. ,, , , :, everyone. sue gray, herself of because a _ everyone. sue gray, herself of because a civil _ everyone. sue gray, herself of because a civil servant, - everyone. sue gray, herself of because a civil servant, a - everyone. sue gray, herself of because a civil servant, a very| because a civil servant, a very senior civil servant, because a civil servant, a very senior civilservant, is because a civil servant, a very
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senior civil servant, is effectively judging and investigating not only other civil servants but the prime minister of the united kingdom. it is a bit of an odd situation. but she is well used to dealing with the most difficult and sensitive political issues in government and has been involved in investigations into ministers“ conduct before,. whilst the stakes are a bit higher when it comes to this investigation, she will establish the facts. i think there are limitations on what you cannot cannot do. this is not an investigation under the ministerial code. the prime minister would have to grant that after sue gray reduces a report. this is not the end of the matter when sue gray produces a report. it depends on what is in there but if there are any questions about the prime minister's conduct, what should follow is an investigation by the independent
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adviser. i investigation by the independent adviser. ~ :, , , : adviser. i know you represent civil servants but _ adviser. i know you represent civil servants but we _ adviser. i know you represent civil servants but we have _ adviser. i know you represent civil servants but we have seen - adviser. i know you represent civil servants but we have seen with i adviser. i know you represent civil. servants but we have seen with this, all these revelations about all these various parties during lockdown and during covid restrictions, some pretty appalling behaviour at downing street, haven't we? we have heard about a drinking culture, a fridge in the press office with alcohol in it, about a suitcase bringing in supplies of alcohol for a party the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral. it goes on and on. it is the duke of edinburgh's funeral. it goes on and on— goes on and on. it is quite extraordinary. _ goes on and on. it is quite extraordinary. this - goes on and on. it is quite extraordinary. this is - goes on and on. it is quite extraordinary. this is not| goes on and on. it is quite| extraordinary. this is not a goes on and on. it is quite - extraordinary. this is not a civil service culture, although some around the prime minister seem to be pointing the finger. it feels very much not only like a culture at number ten but i culture this number ten. we have heard from ministers in the past and they have rejected the idea that this sort of culture
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around drinking and breaking the rules was something that was there before. we have to ask questions, which i am sure sue gray will be looking at, why has culture at number ten over this period of time led to a position where they felt that they could act in this way? and given the leadership that they have, not just for the group given the leadership that they have, notjust for the group of civil servants with the country, how they felt that they were in a position to be breaking the rules, what appears to be, so routinely and that was the point about the leadership and the tone set by those who lead. some of that will be the primaries to run some of them will be the civil servants. some of them will be the civil servants-— some of them will be the civil servants. , : , ., , ., servants. these civil servants are all grown-up _ servants. these civil servants are all grown-up and _ servants. these civil servants are all grown-up and intelligent - servants. these civil servants are i all grown-up and intelligent people. all grown—up and intelligent people. you can tell me that the culture there in downing street is dictated by the prime minister? h0. there in downing street is dictated by the prime minister?— there in downing street is dictated by the prime minister? no, i am not, but clearly those _ by the prime minister? no, i am not, but clearly those in _ by the prime minister? no, i am not, but clearly those in leadership - but clearly those in leadership positions, the prime minister or the senior managers at number ten, have to take greater responsibility but
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everyone also has to be accountable for the chances they make. —— choices they make. everyone has had to make choices in their private life. everyone has to take accountability for the choices they have made but you have to ask the question on an organisation where it is clearfrom the question on an organisation where it is clear from the top to the bottom that it seems to have been a flouting of the rules and i think thatis flouting of the rules and i think that is a organisational question that is a organisational question that has to be asked to try and get right because it is not a healthy culture and also it goes to the heart of where responsibly lives and proportionately, those in leadership positions having a greater responsibly than perhaps morejunior civil servants. responsibly than perhaps more 'unior civil servants.— civil servants. thank you very much for bein: civil servants. thank you very much for being with _ civil servants. thank you very much for being with us. _
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let's take a look at the latest coronavirus figures. there have been 9a,a32 new cases of covid 19 recorded in the past 2a hours. a38 deaths have been recorded within 28 days of a postive covid test and more than 36.5 million people have now received a boosterjab — that's 63.6% of the population aged 12 and over. that death figure, a38... a very high death figure. paul banham runs the buff club which is a nightclub in glasgow, hejoins me now.
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he is going to talk about the lifting of most remaining restrictions from monday in scotland. what is your reaction to that news question market has been a very tough time for the hospitality industry in scotland. i don't think we can hearfrom paulfor the moment. we will move on. we will try and get back to him later on. let's bring you up—to—date with the latest from ireland. a man in his 30s has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher, ashling murphy, in ireland last week. the 23—year—old was killed last wednesday while out jogging by a canal in county offaly. ireland's president, michael d higgins, and prime minister, micheal martin, joined friends and family at her funeral earlier today. just shortly after the funeral
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service for ashling murphy concluded, the irish police announced they have arrested a man in his 30s on suspicion of murdering ashling murphy and that man is detained at this police station and is being questioned. no further comment on that from the irish police at the moment but a major breakthrough in this investigation. we knew that there were around 50 detectives working on the case now, trying to establish what actually happened, who was responsible for ashling murphy losing her life when she just went ashling murphy losing her life when shejust went running ashling murphy losing her life when she just went running along the canal last wednesday. that is when she was found dead, prompting not just the shock that has rippled through this community but the wider concerns that have resonated across ireland and beyond about why women are not safe doing something as simple as going jogging. that is why we have seen those huge vigils that has taken place in support of
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ashling murphy's family and the funeral in the last couple of hours here was hugely well attended, hundreds of people, right from the top of irish politics, the president and prime minister, down to the children who were in the primary school class that ashling murphy was teaching. she herself was only 23. they were the youngest children from that school lining the route that her coffin took to reach the parish church where her funeral mass was held and there were hundreds of people who could not fit inside the church, so the streets around it were filled with people listening on the public address system, some of them watching the service being streamed. it really is an incident, a shocking crime, that has upset everyone in what is a rural community, a small village community, a small village community, and this little town, but a community where people really do know each other, so that is why there is intense sadness at what ashling murphy's family are now dealing with.
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and prompting new concerns and a new debate about women's safety in much the same way as sarah everard possibly has case did? absolutely. there are broader _ possibly has case did? absolutely. there are broader international- there are broader international echoes because nobody here can remember anything like this happening around here for decades. somebody was telling me it was 25 years since a woman was murdered in this town, so it is a shocking event for the people of this community, in that way, but it has drawn wider resonance and broader concern about, if that can happen here to somebody who was so young, so innocent, so well—known, so were like, is so well—respected, talented young musician as well as a teacher, if that can happen to her, doing some thing as ordinary as going jogging along the canal, then where are women safe is the question that is being asked, notjust by women here, but there has been a promise from
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the top of irish politics and beyond that they will take steps to make sure that women can have confidence being out and about anywhere at any time. there is no doubt work to do a mad front but there is still despite this progress work to do in this investigation and it is still the early stages of questioning the suspect and everyone is aware that the murphy family still on the day of ashling murphy's funeral as much grieving to do and there is huge support for that family throughout this town and this community. let's talk to gearoid keegan, deputy editor of the tullamore tribune newspaper in county offaly. thank you so much for being with us. i think you live very close to the canal where this horrific event happened, heartbreaking event happened, heartbreaking event happened, and also your daughters went to the same school as ashling murphy. went to the same school as ashling murh . , ,:, , went to the same school as ashling murh. , , ., , murphy. yes, both my daughters went to the same school, _
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murphy. yes, both my daughters went to the same school, secondary - to the same school, secondary school, it is an all girls school. and indeed my daughter, 18—year—old daughter, still attends there. she was at a guard of one of this morning at the church where people from her school were representing and there were lots of symbolic gestures at the church today in what was a moving ceremony. it has struck everybody, especially young women. my everybody, especially young women. my other daughter, she is 26 and she is a regular user of the canal. it has struck everybody, women are... with frightened last wednesday and thursday when did began to sink in that a young woman was killed tragically on the canal. it was mentioned about the other woman murdered 25 years ago, in 1996, fiona pender, she was seven months pregnant at the time. she grew up at
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the housing estate. no trace of her has ever been found. they actually name the stretch of the grand as we call it, that bank in her memory. she was murdered just about a kilometre from where most people access the canal walk eastwards along what is a designated walking and cycling route. it is safe normally. this attack occurred in broad daylight, during what was a very sunny afternoon. the bishop who spoke at the funeral today said that a walk on a sunny afternoon in
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january should be a happy event, and that resonated with a lot of people. a lot of people with aching last week when they heard that ashling murphy had been murdered. igrate week when they heard that ashling murphy had been murdered. we had the funeral today at — murphy had been murdered. we had the funeral today at which _ murphy had been murdered. we had the funeral today at which she _ murphy had been murdered. we had the funeral today at which she was - funeral today at which she was remembered and what a wonderful person she was, by all accounts, an accomplished musician, sportswoman, fantastic teacher, with her whole life ahead of her. so heartbreaking. yes, this has resonated with people on so many levels, she was a woman, young woman and then she was a musician, he played irish music, she played the fiddle to a high level and also was a sportswoman. we have national games in this area. and she was a very accomplished player and
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played with the local club. and she played with the local club. and she played at county level as well. i think the fact that she was a primary teacher and only 23 but she taught the children of such a young age a lot of people can identify and remember being a children, that is an age when they may be love their teacher and she was well loved. after school, she went to study teaching at a college town in limerick and during teaching practice, she went to teach in a school, again a small rural school, and coincidentally the principle was from her home area and then she got a permanentjob around four miles from here. the principle there was actually a past pupil of the other
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principal and the other school so there are all these links on summary levels. this morning, i was running into people on the street and explaining the connections. that sense of community is intensely strong here. because it is so strong on the one hand, this killing has hurt people in a big way but also it has... the bond there has really come out in the last few days and we have had vigils here, on friday night and everyone is very conscious of the international aspect. by friday night, people were aware that we were at the centre of what was becoming an international news story. everyone here has heard of sarah everard. a lot of people were aware that there were vigils in london, edinburgh, america, and
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other places, notjust places with strong irish connections. and we heard there was one in a parking edinburgh, ata heard there was one in a parking edinburgh, at a tree called sarah everard tree. it has focused the debate again on how safe are women question market is a debate that everyone recognises we should have. and i know that speaking to women in my own life, they never feel safe, as men do. people around here the stretch of the grand canal, i use it myself, i have used it to train for a half marathon and a marathon, and it is a very popular spot but from talking to men, no man i spoke to ever had concerns about using the grand canal, whereas women would always be a little more careful, a little more vigilant and even more
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so unfortunately this week. we are talking about a part of the grand canal asked —— actually named after a woman who disappeared and her remains were never found. a woman who disappeared and her remains were neverfound. the murder investigation is still open. and now unfortunately, a beautiful stretch of the waterway, you know, it has been tarnished again.— of the waterway, you know, it has been tarnished again. thank you so much for all — been tarnished again. thank you so much for all your _ been tarnished again. thank you so much for all your thoughts - been tarnished again. thank you so much for all your thoughts and i been tarnished again. thank you so| much for all your thoughts and your memories of ashling murphy as well. many thanks for being with us on bbc news. three people are now known to have died following the eruption of an underwater volcano near tonga, in a disaster the government there has called "unprecedented". there are fears that ash could contaminate the water supply. and ash cloaking the airport runway has been hampering efforts to bring in aid. our correspondent, howard johnson, sent this report. a state of emergency has been declared by the tongan authorities, and here's why. newly released images captured by an australian surveillance flight
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show badly damaged buildings, knocked over shipping containers and whole communities covered in volcanic ash. we have seen that the airport and most part of the main island, where the capital is, it's been covered with volcanic ash. so unfortunately this will require a lot of clean—up. with airport runways currently off—limits, australia and new zealand“s navies have been dispatched with humanitarian aid relief, and it's expected to take days before they arrive. the severing of an underwater internet cable is severely hampering communications. aid agencies are only slowly beginning to understand the extent of the damage. the damage doesn't seem to have been as catastrophic as we had first imagined that it might be, but there is still widespread damage, particularly to the western part of the main island.
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the family of angela glover, a 50—year—old british woman who died after being swept away by the tsunami, told bbc news today that they're devastated by the confirmation of her death. angela's husband james is said to be inconsolable with grief. you know, he's quite naturally, you know, blaming himself for really not being able to do... being able to save angela. we have, you know... it doesn't matter how many times we tell him that, you know, he has nothing to reproach himself for, you know, inside himself he is carrying an incredible burden of guilt. for the tens of thousands of tongan expatriates living around the world, like wasps rugby player malakai fekitoa, there is concern for their loved ones at home. i haven't spoken to my mum, it's been a week now. obviously all comms down now and, yeah, we are still waiting. i literally can't do
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anything from here. so it's... it's been tough in the last couple of days. in an age of instant communication, the slow response to last saturday's devastating eruption is causing unbearable anxiety. howard johnson, bbc news, manila. siniva valu filise is from tonga and lives in barry in south wales where her husband played played professional rugby. my my parents still live in tonga. the last time i spoke to them was last thursday. and that was it. it is
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last time i spoke to them was last thursday. and that was it.- thursday. and that was it. it is a very chaotic _ thursday. and that was it. it is a very chaotic situation _ thursday. and that was it. it is a very chaotic situation but - thursday. and that was it. it is a very chaotic situation but very i very chaotic situation but very upsetting for you not being able to talk to them. i upsetting for you not being able to talk to them-— upsetting for you not being able to talk to them. :, :, ., talk to them. i have to admitted has been tough- — talk to them. i have to admitted has been tough- very — talk to them. i have to admitted has been tough. very tough _ talk to them. i have to admitted has been tough. very tough few- talk to them. i have to admitted has been tough. very tough few days. i been tough. very tough few days. what is your latest information about the communication links? is it possible for anybody to get through to people there? he. possible for anybody to get through to people there?— to people there? no, no, a friend manared to people there? no, no, a friend managed to _ to people there? no, no, a friend managed to get — to people there? no, no, a friend managed to get a _ to people there? no, no, a friend managed to get a message i to people there? no, no, a friend managed to get a message to i to people there? no, no, a friend| managed to get a message to me, to people there? no, no, a friend i managed to get a message to me, she called my parents and she spoke to them on the phone. it was on sunday. and that was it. i take comfort at that. but sulphur we have not been able and i am sure the same with my husband as well,, the same case with thousands of tongans around the world, we have not been able to make contact with our loved ones back
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home. :, , .,, ., , home. your husband has family there as well. home. your husband has family there as well- yes. — home. your husband has family there as well- yes. my _ home. your husband has family there as well. yes, my husband _ home. your husband has family there as well. yes, my husband got - home. your husband has family there as well. yes, my husband got his i as well. yes, my husband got his older brother _ as well. yes, my husband got his older brother and _ as well. yes, my husband got his older brother and his _ as well. yes, my husband got his older brother and his family, i as well. yes, my husband got his older brother and his family, we | older brother and his family, we both have relatives, aunts... yes. give us an idea as you understand it, the scale of destruction in tonga? i it, the scale of destruction in tonaa? , , ~. it, the scale of destruction in tonaa? , , ,, ., ., tonga? i grew up in punk and we are rone to tonga? i grew up in punk and we are prone to that — tonga? i grew up in punk and we are prone to that natural _ tonga? i grew up in punk and we are prone to that natural disaster- tonga? i grew up in punk and we are prone to that natural disaster -- i prone to that natural disaster —— grew up in tonga. even like thousands of miles away, i felt it and it... it is... i have neverfelt like this. in 2018, with the cyclone, category five cyclone, and category four in 2020, i was here
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with my parents at home but i have never felt this. because food is contaminated, water is contaminated. you see the before and after photos of the island. it is devastating. and what it is like, give us an idea, in normaltimes, before and what it is like, give us an idea, in normal times, before this terrible disaster, give us an idea what it like living there? it terrible disaster, give us an idea what it like living there?- what it like living there? it is... the tongan _ what it like living there? it is... the tongan people _ what it like living there? it is... the tongan people are - what it like living there? it is... the tongan people are very i what it like living there? it is... i the tongan people are very happy people, very laid—back, they wake up and go about their day. my mother will call almost everyday. they go about their business, visiting families, go to work, normal routine, go to school. but this, i
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think, we have never experienced something like this before. we are seeing the information coming out on social media and some of the people, their hearing is affected from the explosions. the international community is trying to help, would you urge the rest of the world to do what they can to help tonga?— rest of the world to do what they can to help tonga? yes. for now, i think all of— can to help tonga? yes. for now, i think all of us _ can to help tonga? yes. for now, i think all of us people _ can to help tonga? yes. for now, i think all of us people in _ can to help tonga? yes. for now, i think all of us people in tonga i can to help tonga? yes. for now, i think all of us people in tonga and| think all of us people in tonga and everyone from tonga around the world is to get contact with their loved ones at home and then when we get the assessment and the full scale of the assessment and the full scale of the damage, tonga needs all the help we can get to rebuild and recover the country because i think this is on another level.— the country because i think this is on another level. thanks for 'oining us, and i on another level. thanks for 'oining and i do —
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on another level. thanks for 'oining us, and i do hope i on another level. thanks for 'oining us, and i do hope you i on another level. thanks for 'oining us, and i do hope you are i on another level. thanks forjoining us, and i do hope you are able i on another level. thanks forjoining us, and i do hope you are able to i us, and i do hope you are able to make contact with your parents very soon. at least you have heard through a third party that they are safe. thanks forjoining us. safe. thanks for 'oining us. thanks for havin: safe. thanks for 'oining us. thanks for having me. — a pensioner remains in a critical condition in hospital after an attack in his derbyshire home in which his wife was killed. detectives say they think ken walker and his wife freda may have been attacked during a burglary at their home near shirebrook at the weekend. police are treating freda“s death as murder. no arrests have been made. detectives are also considering if her murder could be linked to another attack in nottinghamshire last month, although there's no evidence at the moment to suggest that. now we can have a look at the weather forecast with chris. how is it looking? lovely sunrise behind you. i it looking? lovely sunrise behind ou. ~' , , it looking? lovely sunrise behind ou. ~ , , :, . , you. i keep trying to find a better icture
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you. i keep trying to find a better picture than _ you. i keep trying to find a better picture than this _ you. i keep trying to find a better picture than this but _ you. i keep trying to find a better picture than this but i _ you. i keep trying to find a better picture than this but i have i you. i keep trying to find a better picture than this but i have not i picture than this but i have not managed to do it, this was shropshire this morning, the frost on the ground with a red sky and a layer of anti cumulus cloud. it has been a day where we have had patchy cloud and overnight some mist and fog patches ahead of this band of rain and it will head south over scotland and northern ireland, rich in northern england by the end of the night, and this rain is a cold front and behind that the air will turn colder over the next couple of days with temperatures dipping down below average for a couple of days. wednesday, patchy cloud to start the day, england and wales with light rain, fizzling out as it works its way south, and in the sunshine comes out, and it will be a really cold day for shetland, with snow showers down to sea level, and winds gusting to a0-50 down to sea level, and winds gusting to a0—50 mph, so it will feel freezing cold, but for many of the damages will slowly drop away, especially in northern areas. —— but for many, the temperatures will
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slowly drop away. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: more pressure on the prime minister, amid allegations he was warned in advance about number ten drinks during lockdown. he's dismissed the claims. nobody told me that what we were doing was against the rules, that the event in question was something, that we were going to do something that wasn't a work event. a man in his 30s has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher, ashling murphy, in ireland last week a man from cumbria has pleaded guilty to a modern slavery offence after a vulnerable worker was kept in a six foot shed. a british man who took four people hostage at a texas synagogue had been investigated by m15. but by the time he flew to the us, malik faisal akram was assessed to be no longer a risk.
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scotland's covid—19 restrictions are to be eased from monday with nightclubs reopening, large indoor events resuming and social distancing rules dropped. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. it's been a great return to grand slam tennis for emma raducanu. the us open champion started her australian open campaign with a win, beating american sloane stephens in three sets. she's stuggled a little since that win in new york, but she got off to a brilliant start — cruising to the first set against another former us champion 6—0 injust 17 minutes. some errors crept in and stephens upped her game in the second, taking that 6—2. but raducanu dug in to wrap up the third set 6—1.
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elsewhere, there was a thrilling five set win for andy murray. he beat nicolas basilashvili to make it into the second round, three years on from the tearful scenes at the same stage of the event. many thought that could have been the end of the three time grand slam champions career, but one metal hip later, a lot of hard work, he has reached the second round of the tournament. he fought all the way through a tense match, eventually overcoming the 21st seed from georgia. it's been a tough three or four years. i've put in a lot of work to get back here. i've played on this court a number of times and the support and atmosphere has always been incredible. this is the one where i thought, potentially, i“d played my last match three years ago, but amazing to be back winning a five—set battle like that. i couldn't ask for anything more. also into the second round, is heather watson, who beat mayer sherif in three sets. earlier, qualifier harriet dart
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was beaten by iga swiantek. good news as well for british men's number two dan evans, also through — he beat david goffin in straight sets with a confident performance. not so good for liam broady, beaten in straight sets by nick kyrgios, but broady did seem to enjoy his time on court, a big smile on his face at times. including at some of the tricks on show from kygrios. blockbuster second round ahead for him, the australian will meet us open champion daniill medvedev. everton are looking at other options in their quest for a new manager after their bid to bring back roberto martinez ended in frustration. everton approached the belgian fa about a possibile return for martinez, who managed the club from 2013 to 2016. but they've not been persuaded to let him leave. derby county boss wayne rooney has been linked with an emotional return to his first club.
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also in the frame is frank lampard, who's been out of work since being sacked by chelsea a year ago. the final games in group b of the african cup of nations are underway. this one is pretty tight with senegal and guinea both on a points from two games and malawai on 3 points. the top two team automatically qualify. malawai v senegal is goaliess but zimbabwe have taken the lead against guinea. you can follow the latest on the bbc sport website. there are six uncapped players included in eddiejones“ 36 man england squad for next month's six nations. in—form wasps back row alfie barbeary is called up — the 21—year—old has scored four tries in seven games for his club this season after returning from injury. there is no space for bath back row sam underhill, centre manu tuilagi and george ford. owen farrell remains as captain. while fly—half dan biggar will captain wales, with regular skipper
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alun wynjones out injured. wales are stuggling with injuries, seven other key players are unavailable. three uncapped players have been included. ospreys hooker dewi lake, flankerjac morgan and cardiff forward james ratti. police were called to a hobart hotel where england and australia cricketers were drinking together following the conclusion of the ashes series. the england and wales cricket board says it is investigating. in a statement, it added... that's all the sport for now. a man from cumbria has pleaded guilty to a modern slavery offence, after a vulnerable worker was kept
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in a six foot shed. it“s believed the victim was made to carry out unpaid work for more than a0 years. the gangmasters and labour abuse authority say they have never witnessed such a traumatic case. fiona trott is following the story for us. this the story for us. sounds a really terrible case. it this sounds a really terrible case. it really is. they rescued this man in 2018 from a 6—foot shed on a caravan park near carlisle. when they went there, they found that this man who was 58 then, he was sleeping on a floor and it was freezing and he had a soiled duvet and there was no heating. and they found him they described him as being a rabbit in the headlights and the first thing that he did was ask them if he could have a wash and he told them he had been living like this for a0 years or so. later in
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interviews, he told them he had been working on farms and painting and tyre in and said he was paid as little as £10 per day, and it was understood he had been working like this since about the age of 16 —— and doing tiles. to date 56—year—old peter swales from carlisle pleaded guilty to conspiring travel of another with a view to exploitation and he will be sentenced next month —— today. the victim is living in supported accommodation now, outside cumbria, and he was described as being well but he will need care for the rest of his life. the senior investigating officer for the gang masters and labour abuse authority said this, i have never known a modern slavery case where the exploitation has taken place over such a long period of time. first
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and foremost in my mind is the victim, let's remember that he has been exploited for all of his adult life untiljust a few been exploited for all of his adult life until just a few years been exploited for all of his adult life untiljust a few years ago. and he is now in his early 60s. this is something, he said, even now, i struggle to comprehend. for four decades he was in effect kept as a slave. , :, , decades he was in effect kept as a slave. , ., , ., , ., decades he was in effect kept as a slave. , .,, ., , ., ., decades he was in effect kept as a slave. , ., , ., :, ,. ., slave. kept as a slave for such a lona slave. kept as a slave for such a long period _ slave. kept as a slave for such a long period of — slave. kept as a slave for such a long period of his _ slave. kept as a slave for such a long period of his life _ slave. kept as a slave for such a long period of his life and i slave. kept as a slave for such a long period of his life and from | slave. kept as a slave for such a i long period of his life and from the age of 16, that is extraordinary. what is extraordinary, that somehow this had gone unnoticed over decades and what we are hearing from the authorities is that the only reason it came to their attention was that somebody made a call to a confidential phone line and that is how come up with the police and others, they were able to bring this case today. —— that is how, with the police and others.
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case today. -- that is how, with the police and others.— police and others. fiona, thanks for 'oinin: police and others. fiona, thanks for joining us- — let's return to the news that prime minister has rejected a claim by his former chief advisor that he was warned in advance about a drinks party in the downing street garden during lockdown in may 2020. borisjohnson has confirmed he attended the event, saying he was there for 25 minutes and "believed implicitly that this was a work event". earlier i spoke to human rights barrister adam wagner, i asked him why borisjohnson had used legal terminology to address mr cummings alllegations if he thought it was a work—related event.

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