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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  January 18, 2022 5:00am-5:30am GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm sally bundock with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. downing street denies claims by the prime minister's former top adviser that borisjohnson was warned about staff holding a drinks party during lockdown. after tonga's volcanic eruption and tsunami — its neighbours wait to hear from the pacific islanders, cut off from the outside world. america's airlines warn of catastrophic disruption to travel if 56 technology is rolled out near airports. and who betrayed the family of anne frank to the nazis? has one of the great wartime mysteries been solved?
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hello and welcome. borisjohnson has denied claims made by his former top adviser dominic cummings that he "waved aside" warnings of a planned drinks party at downing street during the first coronavirus lockdown in the uk. the british prime minister admitted he attended the event in may 2020, but believed it was work—related. labour have accused the government of "being in chaos". jonathan blake reports. once the prime minister �*s closest advisor, now one of his fiercest critics. dominic cummings newly detailed version of events contradict what the prime minister told mps. drinks in the downing street garden when england was under strict lockdown measures on may 20, 2020. and invite sent by the
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prime minister �*s private secretary, martin reynolds, to around 100 staff told to bring their own booze. last week the prime minister gave his explanation. i believed implicitly that this was a work event but, mr speaker, with hindsight i should have sent everyone back inside. now, writing online, dominic cummings says on the day of the event itself "i said to the pm something like martin has invited the building to a drinks party. you have got to group this madhouse. going on to ride, not only me but other eyewitnesses who discussed this at the time would swear under oath that this is what happened. number10, though, happened. number 10, though, says happened. number10, though, says it is untrue that the prime minister was warned about the event in advance. [30 prime minister was warned about the event in advance.— the event in advance. do you have confidence _ the event in advance. do you have confidence in _ the event in advance. do you have confidence in the - the event in advance. do you have confidence in the primei have confidence in the prime minister?— have confidence in the prime minister? ., , ., ~ , ., minister? conservative mps have talked about _ minister? conservative mps have talked about anger _ minister? conservative mps have talked about anger among - minister? conservative mps have talked about anger among their i talked about anger among their constituents that continued accusations of events which may
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have broken the rules which most members of the public were following. the handful now say the time is up the prime minister but most are waiting for an official report. i minister but most are waiting for an official report.- for an official report. i spoke to -a for an official report. i spoke to party members _ for an official report. i spoke to party members and - for an official report. i spoke | to party members and people for an official report. i spoke - to party members and people who have been party members and activists for many years and i would say that my father clearview i have from them is that we should give the prime minister the benefit of the doubt until we see what is in the report. people are angry and want to know what is going on in the prime minister acknowledged that in a statement in the house that regardless of what may have been fought or set at the time of the party in the garden, you cannot explain it away. you cannot explain it away. you cannot say it was justifiable, it is clearly wrong and should never have happened. people are rightly angry about that and what the prime minister will do to put this right.— to put this right. labour say the government _ to put this right. labour say the government is - to put this right. labour say the government is in - to put this right. labour say the government is in chaos. to put this right. labour say l the government is in chaos. if he did no—one was aware that the invites went out, if he was aware that concerns were raised and, indeed, if he did then say that the party should go ahead, this is just extraordinary.
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conservatives are gravely concerned. all of westminster is waiting for the report, attempting to establish the facts. australia and new zealand are intensifying aid efforts in response to the devastating volcanic eruption — and subsequent tsunami — which engulfed the south pacific nation of tonga. communications with the remote islands are almost impossible, after vital undersea cable was severed during the blast. gareth barlow has more details. aid being loaded in sydney, destined for tonga. but exactly what assistance they need is far from clear after the eruption severed a vital undersea cable communications cable. images captured from aircraft sent by new zealand and australia do offer some insight. showing coastlines covered in ash and volcanic rock floating on the ocean. the damaue rock floating on the ocean. the damage does _ rock floating on the ocean. tue: damage does not rock floating on the ocean. tte: damage does not seem to have been as catastrophic as we had first imagined that it may be
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but there is still widespread damage, particularly to the western part of the main island and we are looking forward to hearing from those outer islands closer to the blast site. �* ., , , ., site. alongside struggling to contact the _ site. alongside struggling to contact the tiny _ site. alongside struggling to contact the tiny south - site. alongside struggling to | contact the tiny south pacific nation, the aid effort will be made doubly difficult by the coronavirus. tonga has only registered a single case of covid—19 and is determined to keep the virus out of the country. keep the virus out of the country-— keep the virus out of the count . ., ., ., , country. from what we have seen and been advised _ country. from what we have seen and been advised of, _ country. from what we have seen and been advised of, drinking - and been advised of, drinking water is one of the first main issues of priority for the people and for tonga. here in the uk the — people and for tonga. here in the uk the family _ people and for tonga. here in the uk the family of- people and for tonga. here in the uk the family of a - people and for tonga. here in the uk the family of a british | the uk the family of a british woman swept away by the synonymy say her body has been found. the 50—year—old angela glover ran a dog sanctuary in the tomlin capital and was reportedly killed as she tried to rescue one of her animals. she was living on the beach and living her dream. she always
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wanted to live in a place like tonga and was so proud that she was able to fulfil that. days after did there _ was able to fulfil that. days after did there is _ was able to fulfil that. days after did there is still - was able to fulfil that. days after did there is still so - after did there is still so little information as to the scale of its impact. for now, the international aid community can only prepare for the worst and hope for the best. gareth barlow, bbc news. we can speak now to tonga's deputy head of mission in australia, curtis tuihalangingie. he's in the capital, canberra. what are you hearing as to what is happening on the ground? thank you and i am happy to be a part of this programme. the latest information that we are receiving is the result of the flight that was sent by the australian government and the new zealand government to assess the situation in tonga and we have seen that there are and we have seen that there are
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a lot of extreme damage on the ground and we have seen the error report and most of the main island whether capital is has been covered with volcanic ash. so, unfortunately, this will require a lot of cleanup and also to assess further to allow air planes to be able to land into tonga at the airport. and what complicates matters in terms of aid which is desperately needed, it is the concern that covid could come in as a part of that process? yes. we are mindful of the need to have humanitarian assistance and aid to tonga but in the meantime we want to be very careful and to adhere to covid—19 protocol. not that we want to bring assistance in the meantime, we may have another
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tsunami of covid in tonga, it is still a covid free country. so the government is working hard to assess the situation and, also, to review the protocol for covid—19 restriction to see what would be the best way to be able to receive this humanitarian assistance from australia and new zealand and throughout the world. we new zealand and throughout the world. ~ ., new zealand and throughout the world. ~ . , ., new zealand and throughout the world. ~ . ., ., , world. we have spoken to family members who — world. we have spoken to family members who have _ world. we have spoken to family members who have not - world. we have spoken to family members who have not been - world. we have spoken to familyl members who have not been able to contact their family in tonga since the tsunami, since the volcanic eruption. what advice would you have for those people who are still waiting desperately to hear any news? t desperately to hear any news? i know it is hard for everyone to hear as much as we hear, connecting through the government. we ask that everyone be patient. the government is working really hard to be able to allow connectivity to connect with their loved ones in tonga. so,
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definitely a few days from today, possibly, you will be able to have satellite communication with tonga where that will allow limited access and communication with our families and friends back in tonga. families and friends back in tonaa. �* , ., tonga. briefly, the long-term im act tonga. briefly, the long-term impact of _ tonga. briefly, the long-term impact of this _ tonga. briefly, the long-term impact of this on _ tonga. briefly, the long-term impact of this on the - tonga. briefly, the long-term impact of this on the island? l tonga. briefly, the long-term impact of this on the island? i think it would definitely be a huge impact and it will be very long, especially in not only because of the synonymy but also the ash that has erupted from the volcano and the health concern as people are breathing it, especially with a huge cleanup mission happening now in tonga. this is all done by humans. about 200 volunteers, people coming to sweep the runway for the aircraft. we have to do it that we know that
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there will be a long—term problem because people are breathing this ash which is very dangerous and may cause long—term health. in the meantime we will see, because of salami ash coming into the main island, food will be limited so these are the concerns that we hold and we know for sure it will be faced by tonga. know for sure it will be faced by tonga-_ know for sure it will be faced b tonaa. ., ~' ., , by tonga. thank you for being on the programme _ by tonga. thank you for being on the programme and - by tonga. thank you for being l on the programme and updating us on the situation as you know. the deputy head of mission in australia for tonga. let's get some of the day's other news. anders behring breivik, the far—right extremist who murdered 77 people in norway eleven years ago, will today attempt to get parole. he's due to appear before judges to challenge a decision by the authorities to deny him early release. breivik has now served ten years of a 21—yearjail term.
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a controversial new policing law proposed by the british government has suffered a defeat in the country's upper chamber. critics fear the police, crime, sentencing and courts bill would place excessive curbs on the right to protest. the house of lords opposed measures allowing police in england and wales to stop a demonstration if they think it's too noisy. they also rejected plans to ban large protests directly outside parliament. members of martin luther king jr's family have led hundreds of demonstrators through washington, demanding voter reform, on the annual holiday to honour the civil rights activist. president biden and vice president harris have also urged the senate to make progress on a bill that would expand postal voting and strengthen oversight in states with a history of racial discrimination. millions of people across america's east coast and canada's southeastern provinces are hunkered down as a powerful winter storm sweeps through major population
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hubs, disrupting travel and cutting power to thousands of homes. stephanie prentice reports. a national pastime taken to the streets. in canada, when life gives you ice, make an ice rink. this neighbourhood just outside toronto using a break in the snowstorms to enjoy their new project. it's a little bit bumpy, the trees are a little bit annoying sometimes but yeah. a little bit helpful though too. we started off with two houses, we've expanded to three now. we make it a little difficult for the mail carrier, i know that. they gotta walk around the rink. the mailman may be getting through but for many the snow knocking out their usual forms of transportation. where the bleep is my car, oh my god. for others, an opportunity to try more traditional ways of getting around. it's hetting heavier.
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but not everyone is a jump away from trying to have a good day across the snow ravaged south—eastern provinces, with extreme weather warnings in place across ontario and quebec. power outages for thousands of homes, offices and schools closed and visibility at near zero in some areas. the streets are packed. the streetcar is barely moving. everything is covered with snow. never seen anything like this. over in the us, things are starting to improve, with the national weather service saying that although snowfall will continue, the storm will start to slowly wind down into tuesday. a state canadians can only anticipate. but for some, being stuck at home isn't the worst thing. stephanie prentice, bbc news. major airlines in the united states are asking
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telecommunication firms to delay the roll—out of 5g technology near the country's airports until they can upgrade their aviation equipment. our north america correspondent, peter bowes, has more. they are. talking about dire consequences. this 5g technology will be rolled out on wednesday. it was the cellphone company saying this is good for the consumer, faster data speeds, it will mean better mobile phone connections, but the airlines are very concerned about how it will affect equipment on a plane that is used by a pilot as he is coming, or she's coming in to land. specifically the radar altimeter. this is a device that sends radio waves to the ground. it helps the pilot determine the altitude of the plane, how far the aircraft is from the ground especially important when there is poor weather conditions, poor visibility, but there is plenty of bad weather
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in the united states this week. the federal aviation administration says it has cleared a dozen different types of aircraft to come into land in poor visibility after the introduction of 5g. that is about 45% of the us fleet. that leaves about 55% not cleared, and that is where the concern is, and the airlines, in a letter to the administration, to the department of transport, pointing out the potential dire consequences of the situation for passengers, if their planes are cancelled for the workers who are employed by the airlines, but perhaps most importantly, for the wider economy, and the supply chains that could potentially be disrupted. that couldn't be a worse time for supply chains to face yet another problem we know it happened with the pandemic in their letter to the government, they talk about the distribution
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of vaccines possibly being disrupted by this. the cellphone companies have been negotiating for a long time over this, and they have pointed out, for example, that this technology isn't exactly knew, and in fact has been rolled out in more than 40 different countries without any problematic situations arising. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: yours for a cool 500 million — the italian house that's for sale with its very own painting and decorating definitely not needed — we explore the italian home for sale. donald trump is now the 45th president of the united states. he was sworn in before several hundred thousand people on the steps of capitol hill in washington. it's going to be only america first. america first.
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demonstrators waiting for mike gatting and his rebel cricket team were attacked with tear gas and set upon by police dogs. anti—apartheid campaigners say they would carry on the protests throughout the tour. they called him the 'butcher of lyon'. klaus altmann is being held on a fraud charge in bolivia. the west germans want to extradite him for crimes committed in wartime france. there, he was the gestapo chief klaus barbie. millions came to bathe as - close as possible to this spot. a tide of humanity that's i believed by officials to have broken all records. this is bbc news. the latest headlines: downing street has denied claims by borisjohnson�*s former top adviser that he was warned about staff holding a drinks party during lockdown.
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australia and new zealand's military send aid to tonga following the volcanic eruption and tsunami. hours after arriving back in serbia, following his deportation from australia, world number one tennis star novak djokovic has learnt he may not be able to defend his french open title in may. the french government has ruled that all athletes will have to be vaccinated in order to attend and compete in sporting events in france. well, andy murray's taken the first set 6—1 against nikoloz basilashvili in the opening round of the australian open. let's cross now to our correspondent phil mercer in melbourne. how has it gone today? we are
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caettin how has it gone today? we are getting back — how has it gone today? we are getting back to _ how has it gone today? we are getting back to tennis - how has it gone today? we are getting back to tennis now- getting back to tennis now after the novak djokovic saga and news that he might not be able to go to the french open filtering through here as that news was coming all the way from europe. the saga not well and truly over but the tennis well and truly under way. australia tennis fans saw their number one seed ash barty demolish her employment so local supporters are in good advice. anotherfirm local supporters are in good advice. another firm favourite, andy murray, has been into the final five times without winning. he finalfive times without winning. he had to get wild car and he cruised through the first round opponent. —— wildcard. plenty forfans first round opponent. —— wildcard. plenty for fans to see to get there monies worth.
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daniil medvedev, the new favourite after djokovic, is looking good. tennis is speaking loudly after the djokovic saga.— speaking loudly after the djokovic saga. speaking loudly after the d'okovic sa . a. . ., djokovic saga. later, emma will be playing _ djokovic saga. later, emma will be playing and _ djokovic saga. later, emma will be playing and much _ djokovic saga. later, emma will| be playing and much excitement about how she will be playing? she looks in pretty good touch, up she looks in pretty good touch, up against sloane stephens. a young british sensation against a very talented american. both of these women are us open champions so a tough assignment for both of them and, of course, this year will be emma — all of the attention will be on her to see how she copes with the fame and responsibility of being the us open champion. by the australian open well and truly
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under way here. thank you. it's a question that has plagued historians ever since the end of the second world war — who betrayed the family of anne frank to the nazis? anne frank died in a concentration camp in 1945, at the age of 15, after two years in hiding in amsterdam. her diary, published after her death, is probably the most famous first—hand account ofjewish life during the war. anna holligan reports from amsterdam on the conclusion of a lengthy investigation. the final entry in anne frank's diary. tuesday 1st august 19114. three days later, thejewish teenager was arrested. this was the frank family's hiding place during the nazi occupation of the netherlands.
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and this question of who betrayed the frank family, who had lived in this building undetected for more than two years, untiljust months before the end of the war, has remained one of the great mysteries of dutch history. and now this team of investigators have identified a man who they believe is the key suspect, a jewish lawyer who had been based here in amsterdam helping jewish refugees fleeing nazi germany. no dna clues or video images existed, so the detectives relied on circumstantial evidence, and a note. the final suspect became the person who was named in an anonymous note sent to otto frank shortly after he got back from the camp, auschwitz, in which a man called van den bergh was identified as the betrayer. otto frank was anne's father and the only member of the family to survive the war. the suggestion that the betrayer appears to be someone from within thejewish
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community is hard for many to bear. the historic context is critical here. it's a story of a man who was cornered and in order to save himself, his wife, his children from the gas chambers he gave a list of addresses to the sd which had no names. so the story is tragic. while there is still a degree of scepticism that we may never know the true identity of the betrayer, this tale serves as a warning, a lesson of what humanity may be capable of in its darkest time. yet another way anne frank's legacy remains alive. anna holligan, bbc news, amsterdam. a 16th—century villa in rome will be auctioned later today and is expected to go for hundreds of millions of dollars. the villa aurora sits on one of the highest hills in the city, on the site of what was once the home
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ofjulius caesar, and contains six floors full of treasures. gail maclellan reports. up upfor up for auction, a desirable residence in rome, boasting 11 bedrooms, ten bathrooms and, oh, yes, a ceiling mural painted by italian master caravaggio, the current occupier has been forced to agree to a sale by a legal dispute and the opening bid is more than $500 million. lovely as the house and grounds may be, it is the caravaggio mural that lives the villa above its contemporaries. he was in his early 20s when he painted jupiter, neptune and pluto, on a former alchemy laboratory in 1597. working in oils directly into the plaster, he painted
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his own face and body under the figurines. the mural was hidden until 1968. figurines. the mural was hidden until1968. it figurines. the mural was hidden until 1968. it had been whitewashed over probably because it was considered customers. the villa has been in the family since 1621 and its six floors are filled with artworks and sculptures, including this statute attributed to michelangelo. compulsory renovations to the villa will cost in the region of 13 million dollars but after paying half a million for the property, it is unlikely the new owners will flinch. stargazers looking up at last night's sky or up early this morning would have spotted a rare spectacle. the first full moon of the new year — known as the wolf moon — was on clear display across the globe. incredible pictures. i had a
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look, it did not look exactly like that but it was not far off. all the top business stories. don't go anywhere. hello. clear skies across most parts of the uk at the moment. may mean we're getting to see a full glimpse of the first full moon of the season, the wolf moon, but it also has led to temperatures dropping quite widely. a widely frosty start to tuesday morning, maybe as low as —3 to —5 in some parts of central, southern england, and it's here where we've got some dense patches of fog to start the tuesday morning commute. some of that could start to build for a while during the morning rush—hour but then slowly start to shift during the morning. lots of sunshine elsewhere. a bit more breeze to the north and west, so not as cold here, but it's here in northern ireland and western scotland we'll see some outbreaks of rain develop from lunchtime into the afternoon. most parts, though, will stay dry. cloud amounts increase. predominantly sunny, though, for northern england.
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and with winds lightest towards the south and east of the country, here, we'll see temperatures actually the lowest after that foggy start — only three to five celsius for one or two. the milder breeze out in the west lifts temperatures between 9 and 11 celsius. into this evening, some showers for a time in scotland and then another batch will push in on strengthening winds, all tied into this cold front. this is a bit more active than the one that precedes it, just bringing a few showers across england and wales during the night, meaning not as cold a start to wednesday morning. but cold air will be pushing southwards through the day behind this zone of cloud and showers which starts around the borders of scotland, northern england, north wales and then drifts its way southwards. in its wake, though, most will see good long sunny spells through the afternoon. one or two showers dotted around to the north and northwest, those showers turning wintry in northern scotland — just 2 degrees in lerwick, holding onto around 10 celsius in the south. but as we go through into wednesday night and thursday morning, a widespread frost will develop once again. perhaps for some of you, a colder night than will start tuesday. and that frost will be greeted with some sunshine overhead too. but a cold breeze down eastern
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coasts could feed in one or two wintry showers for a time. a noticeable wind—chill here. maybe feeling subzero through the day across some eastern coastal counties of england. come further west, with the winds lighter, temperatures up to where we should be for this stage in january. another chilly night to come, then, through thursday night into friday, and as the high—pressure starts to drift its way southwards once again, we are back to the problems with mist and fog in the south, but allowing more of an atlantic breeze to push in through the north, bringing varying amounts of cloud and lifting the temperature a little bit. and, crucially, for much of the uk, end of the week and the weekend will be staying dry. see you soon.
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this is bbc news with the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. clamping down on tax avoidance. eu finance ministers look set to rubber stamp a global agreement on corporation tax, which will see multinationals paying 15% of their profits. booming down under! australia see's a rise in the number of aboriginal—owned businesses, however complaints about prejudice remain. and it's winnie the pooh day — he's been a global superstar since 1926, but for the first time ever the fictional character will no longer be subject to us copyright laws — we'll tell you why!

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