Skip to main content

tv   Newsday  BBC News  January 17, 2022 11:00pm-11:31pm GMT

11:00 pm
welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines. tonga's volcanic eruption, an anxious wait for news from the pacific islands where communications are cut—off. we'll hear from an aid group preparing to send supplies to the country boris johnson's former top adviser says the prime minister was warned about staff holding a drinks party during lockdown — downing street deny the allegations. the uk's culture secretary freezes the bbc licence fee for two years, she says it's to help household budgets and not a political attack on the corporation. you will make we simply could not justify that the extra pressure on
11:01 pm
the wallets of hard—working households. and, one of the great wartime mysteries, who betrayed the family of anne frank to the nazis? a new investigation offers an answer. it's seven in the morning in singapore, and mid—day in tonga, which remains virtually cut off from the rest of the world after an underwater volcano erupted on saturday, damaging an underwater communications cable. surveillance flights from australia and new zealand reported significant damage in the capital, nuku'alofa. tonga has a population of around a hundred thousand — the red cross estimates that about 80 per cent of them may have been affected. our correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes has the latest.
11:02 pm
these pictures of the hunga tonga—hunga ha'apai volcano erupting are from last friday. this is just a foretaste of what was to come a day later — an eruption many, many times larger. this is the volcano poking above the ocean's surface last week. and today, it's completely gone. it has now been confirmed the huge eruption severed the main cable linking tonga to the outside world. this morning, new zealand dispatched aircraft to try and find out what is going on. some of those islands are reporting that they haven't had loss of life but i would reiterate that is second—hand and it's early days. this evening we learned this british woman, angela glover, was killed by the tsunami that hit the island on saturday. she had moved to tonga in 2015 to open an animal shelter. she died trying to rescue her dogs. the strange thing was, the uglier the dog,
11:03 pm
the more she loved it. her initial call to go to tonga was to swim with whales, which she did, and yeah. beautiful girl, she is irreplaceable. offers from new zealand and australia to help tonga are being complicated by the covid pandemic. the island nation is currently covid—free and it wants to stay that way. they have had disasters during the pandemic previously, from cyclones and hurricanes, and what they did then was just air drop supplies in and there was no physical contact or interaction between, say, troops and the local forces. a century ago, nearly one in ten tongans died in the 1918 flu pandemic. any reluctance now to ask for help would not be without reason. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, tokyo.
11:04 pm
i'm joined now byjenny salesa, an mp in new zealand. she's the co—chair of the tonga relief committee — and was herself born and raised in tonga. thank you so much for taking the time to talk with us on the programme. i really appreciated. have you been able to get in touch with anybody in the affected areas? what are you hearing about the damage? what are you hearing about the damaue? a, what are you hearing about the damaue? , , what are you hearing about the damaue? , _ ., , damage? may begin by saying that my heartfelt condolences _ damage? may begin by saying that my heartfelt condolences to _ damage? may begin by saying that my heartfelt condolences to the _ damage? may begin by saying that my heartfelt condolences to the first - heartfelt condolences to the first casualty of this volcanic eruption and synonymy. and it is, it is heartbreaking in terms of hearing that one of your own family members passed away and what have we been hearing. just over the 70,000 tompkins live in new zealand and many have reached out to others and
11:05 pm
basically, because they're worried about their loved ones, i myself was involved in a zoom conversation two days ago now with members of the methodist church and ministers of the methodist church in one of the ones who connected with us was from the main islands and one of the closest islands to this volcano eruption and the good news from this river is that on the main island, that as far as they knew at the time, there has been no lives lost, however, we do not know the extent of the damage, especially around the outline of the smaller islands and we expect that some of those really low lying islands are especially affected by the synonymy and for those of you who do not know much,
11:06 pm
the place of my birth, it is made up of 169 different islands and 36 of those are inhabited and we have to report of one of the 36 islands, but we don't have the full report from the other 35. we don't have the full report from the other 35— the other 35. what a worrying and anxious time _ the other 35. what a worrying and anxious time for _ the other 35. what a worrying and anxious time for so _ the other 35. what a worrying and anxious time for so many - the other 35. what a worrying and anxious time for so many people, j anxious time for so many people, including yourself. i know that you are helping to organise aid supplies to the region. what are the main priorities right now?— to the region. what are the main priorities right now? from what we have seen and _ priorities right now? from what we have seen and been _ priorities right now? from what we have seen and been advised - priorities right now? from what we have seen and been advised of, - have seen and been advised of, drinking water is one of the main issues of priority for the people and the ash from the volcano and throughout all of the country, all of the main islands and we also are worried that some of the supplies from the water pipes are also
11:07 pm
affected and our new zealand government and this is actually the prime minister of new zealand, the right honourable member who has made the announcement that some funds have been put aside to begin with, as well as always and yesterday. we are awaiting for the analysis of the report from them and two of our meeting ships are also sent out and one of those also has the facilities to be able to help people in terms of the drinking water.— of the drinking water. thank you so much for taking _ of the drinking water. thank you so much for taking the _ of the drinking water. thank you so much for taking the time _ of the drinking water. thank you so much for taking the time to - of the drinking water. thank you so much for taking the time to speak. of the drinking water. thank you so l much for taking the time to speak to us on newsday. much for taking the time to speak to us on newsday-_ much for taking the time to speak to us on newsday. thank you so much for the opportunity- _ borisjohnson�*s former chief adviser dominic cummings, now one of his leading critics, has said he warned the uk prime minister in person about a downing street drinks party, in may 2020, during the first lockdown. last week mrjohnson
11:08 pm
said he believed he was attending a �*work event�* —— and downing street said it was untrue that the prime minister had been given a warning about the event in advance. 0ur political editor laura kuenssberg has more details. the prime minister needs friends. an earlyjog with the dog at the start of a week that could decide his future. waiting for an official verdict over what gatherings were going on under his own roof during lockdown. last week there was an apology and an admission about one event. i believed implicitly that this was a work event. but, mr speaker, with hindsight i should have sent everyone back inside. the evening in the number 10 garden had been organised by one of his right—hand men, his private secretary martin reynolds here, who had invited around 100 people. but a man who used to be beside boris johnson's side has challenged the version of events. writing online, dominic
11:09 pm
cummings says on the day of the event itself, amid many arguments... number 10, though, says... remember, mr cummings doesn't hide his desire to see borisjohnson gone. chief adviser back then, perhaps now enemy number one. yet two other former officials say they remember mr cummings telling them that day he'd warned the prime minister not to go ahead before the drinks gathering took place in the garden in any case. number 10 firmly disputes this account yet tonight's spat will dim government hopes that the febrile atmosphere may have started to calm. do you have confidence in the prime minister? there is widespread fear
11:10 pm
and sometimes loathing about the mess and the public�*s reaction. yet there is a pause before the official report from civil servant sue gray emerges. it is only right that we don't condemn the prime minister, someone who has apologised to parliament and said that he will come back when the sue gray investigation is finished. that is the fairest way of dealing with this. it's impossible to know right now how many mps really want borisjohnson out. but many have heard anger from constituents. when, not if, is a common refrain. my constituents at the moment are about 60—1 against - the prime minister and i've listened very carefully to members - of my association too. there are some very strident voices in my constituency demanding thatl i support the prime minister. for many conservatives it's the style and character of this government that concerns, not the specifics of any parties. but acting to take out
11:11 pm
a leader is a drastic move, and it's not clear yet how many punches the prime minister can really withstand. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. the labour party has accused the government in london of trying to regain popularity, by punishing those who've been reporting the scandal of lockdown parties in downing street. the culture secretary, nadine dorries, one of borisjohnson�*s strongest supporters in the cabinet, has suggested that the bbc licence fee could be abolished in 2027. she's confirmed that the corporation's funding will be frozen for the next two years. media experts predict that the bbc will face the prospect of having to close services and make significant redundancies, on top of the those already seen in recent years. our culture editor katie razzall has more details. the bbc is 100 this year and so much has changed across radio, tv and more recently, online. in a digital age, the corporation is under increasing pressure.
11:12 pm
and today came the opposite of a birthday present — the £159 licence fee that funds nearly three quarters of the bbc�*s budget will be frozen for two years. the bbc wanted the fee to rise to over £180 by the end of this settlement. instead, it will remain fixed at £159 until april 202a. that's more money in the pockets of pensioners, in the pockets of families, who are struggling to make ends meet. labour says this government wants to destroy the bbc because it doesn't like its journalism. is the licence fee really at the heart of the cost of living crisis? or is this really about their long—standing vendetta against the bbc? now it's part of operation red meat, to save the prime minister from becoming dead meat. the culture secretary had claimed yesterday in a headline—making tweet
11:13 pm
that this license fee announcement would be the last. today, she appeared to row back, simply saying discussions on future funding must begin. suggested replacements include a subscription service, perhaps with a government grant to fund less commercial programming, or even allowing the bbc to run adverts. the biggest living thing... quality broadcasting doesn't come cheap. freezing the licence fee for two years is a real terms annual cut of nearly half a billion pounds by 2027 according to one media analyst, enders — that is around the same as the bbc spent on all its radio output last year. we're going to have to address how we do what we do differently and there will have to be changes and consequences. if you diminish capital resources, there are going to be effects. the bbc has already had ten years of real reduction by about 30%. whatever the funding after 2027, cuts are inevitably coming as a result of this latest settlement.
11:14 pm
if you don't watch it, why would you pay the licence fee? you should be able to have a tv in your house without paying it. i'm happy to pay it. the bbc produces some great programmes. - things have changed with streaming services but i think the bbc is one of the things out there that is still the same, still part of british culture. frozen for next year, it's good really, isn't it? that's what we want. it would help our pensions. the culture secretary has effectively kick—started a public debate on the future of the bbc, putting those who say she wants to destroy a national treasure against those who argue that the licence fee model is outdated in a world of netflix and disney+. today though, she wouldn't commit to offering up any alternatives. and in the short term alone, hyperinflation in the likes of drama and sports programming means whatever the bbc decides to axe, difficult decisions lie ahead. katie razzall, bbc news. you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme:
11:15 pm
as novak djokovic arrives back in serbia after losing his visa battle in australia, one of his sponsors says it will "review" what happened as soon as possible. donald trump is now the 45th president of the united states. he was sworn in before several hundred thousand people on the steps of capitol hill in washington. it’s capitol hill in washington. it's auoin to capitol hill in washington. it's going to be — capitol hill in washington. it�*s going to be only america first! america first! demonstrators waiting for the rebel cricket _ demonstrators waiting for the rebel cricket team were attacked with tear -as cricket team were attacked with tear gas and _ cricket team were attacked with tear gas and set — cricket team were attacked with tear gas and set upon by police talk. anti—apartheid campaigners say they will carry— anti—apartheid campaigners say they will carry on the protests throughout the tour. will carry on the protests throu~hout the tour. , .., throughout the tour. they called him the butcher. being _
11:16 pm
throughout the tour. they called him the butcher. being held _ throughout the tour. they called him the butcher. being held fraud - throughout the tour. they called him the butcher. being held fraud chargej the butcher. being held fraud charge in bolivia _ the butcher. being held fraud charge in bolivia they— the butcher. being held fraud charge in bolivia. they want _ the butcher. being held fraud charge in bolivia. they want to _ the butcher. being held fraud charge in bolivia. they want to extradite - in bolivia. they want to extradite him for _ in bolivia. they want to extradite him for crimes— in bolivia. they want to extradite him for crimes committed - in bolivia. they want to extradite him for crimes committed more. him for crimes committed more wartime — him for crimes committed more wartime france. _ him for crimes committed more wartime france. there, - him for crimes committed more wartime france. there, he- him for crimes committed more wartime france. there, he wasl wartime france. there, he was gestapo— wartime france. there, he was gestapo chief _ wartime france. there, he was gestapo chief. in _ wartime france. there, he was gestapo chief.— wartime france. there, he was gestapo chief. wartime france. there, he was gestao chief. ., ., , ., gestapo chief. in to have broken all records. this is newsday on the bbc. aid efforts to tsunami— hit islands in tonga have been gathering pace, as further information comes in — from damage assessment teams boris johnson's former adviser dominic cummings says the prime minister was warned about a downing street party at the height of lockdown. downing street denies the allegations. france has announced that athletes wishing to compete
11:17 pm
in international sporting competitions taking place there must be vaccinated against covid—19. it means that world number one tennis star novak djokovic faces the prospect of being denied entry to the french open in may. it comes as djokovic arrived back in the serbian capital, belgrade, after losing a visa battle in australia, that centred on the fact he is unvaccinated — leading to his deportation. one of his sponsors — clothing firm lacoste — says it will "review" what happened as soon as possible. i'm joined now by tim lopez from the sports marketing firm csm. the impact this has had on the novak djokovic brand and it's good to have you on the programme today. just a start by asking, what could the potential loss of a sponsor that, it has not happened yet. what kind of impact may that have for novak djokovic?
11:18 pm
impact may that have for novak d'okovic? , ., . ., , impact may that have for novak d'okovic? , ., , , ., djokovic? this a couple ways to answer the _ djokovic? this a couple ways to answer the question, _ djokovic? this a couple ways to answer the question, from - djokovic? this a couple ways to answer the question, from a i answer the question, from a financial perspective it's one of his major responses but many winnings on tour and having had such a long and illustrious career on and off the court, it would be the negligible part for me. it would be the signal that it would send out to the signal that it would send out to the public and to the of the that may not be considering the symbolic nature of his principal sponsor deciding to cut or to stick. i thing that's going to be the interesting development over the next couple of days when they do review it. but there be assessing is the public perception first and foremost and then the strength of depth of that feeling and the collateral damage that they may be experiencing. from future planning perspectives, they need to be looking at the upcoming
11:19 pm
schedule and just ascertaining whether or not is likely to be some sort of a circus around jock of when he moves from grand slam to grand slam and from one tournament of the other. so, ithink slam and from one tournament of the other. so, i think there will be a lot of deep thinking going on at this point in time and they'll be coming up with the decision as to whether or not the flipper the twist? ., . ., y. ~ , whether or not the flipper the twist? ., . ., ~ , , twist? how much do you think this is had on the nova _ twist? how much do you think this is had on the nova djokovic— twist? how much do you think this is had on the nova djokovic brand? - twist? how much do you think this is had on the nova djokovic brand? i i had on the nova djokovic brand? i think up until the australian open that he is entitled to his opinion and he has chosen not to get vaccinated in that sweet lead people to believe and in a free road, he's entitled to do as he wishes. it's when he stepped over that line and try to get on the plane and go to australian do something that millions of people have not been to do in australia it's what suffered
11:20 pm
the most restrictions to the covid—19 and i think prior to that, it was tone deaf in his messaging was not good and slightly smog messaging coming out of the camp, it went down badly and it was a little bit tone deaf and lacking in empathy but when it turned into this legal battle and things transpired or came to light that were potential abuses and he was quick to blame other people and say that he did not mean it, but it did feel that there was some slightly dubious practices taking place in the camp and that is played extremely badly and it's one thing for an athlete to have an opinion on something and many brands want their talent to be able to speak about something about other than what they do a dayjob. but it becomes controversial and argumentative, breaking rules and laws, i things that's when they
11:21 pm
think hard about that association. two days after the hostage—taking incident at a synagogue in texas, two teenagers have been arrested in greater manchester. the attacker was a british man named as malik faisal akram, from blackburn, who was shot dead by police at the scene after a 10—hour standoff. he'd taken four people hostage, including a rabbi, who all survived unharmed. friends of akram said he'd suffered from mental health problems, and they expressed surprise that he'd been able to travel to the us. sophie long has more from dallas. the authorities here at the united states have made it very clear that this is now an investigation with several strands and one that is global in reach. certainly counterterror officers here in texas and in the north of england are now working on this investigation as evidenced by the arrests of two
11:22 pm
teenagers and manchester overnight. they're still being questioned. but we have learned here today as many more details about exactly what happened in the building behind me during that ordeal on saturday and we've heard from the rabbi, rabbi charlie walker, he is been speaking to our partners in the united states and he told them that when the hostage taker arrived here on saturday, he looked like a vulnerable person, perhaps someone who did not have a home they him into the synagogue and gave them a cup of tea so they talked to him as other parts of the story did not stand up and nothing particularly suspicious. it was only much later when their praying that they turned at his back towards the hostage taker and hear the click. he said it could've been anything, but it was the click of a gun it was then that their ordeal began. we also learned about what happened in the final minutes of this hostage situation on saturday night here and he set the
11:23 pm
rabbi said the sun opportunity, they had training, him and his congregation had active shooter training that was invaluable in he said they owe their lives to that. he said that they saw an opportunity and he checked with the two men that were still with them and ready and he threw a chair the hostage taker and it was then that they made their dramatic and very brief escape. —— very brief —— very brave escape. it's a question that has plagued historians ever since the end of the second world war. who betrayed the family of anne frank to the nazis. anne frank died in a concentration camp in 1945, at the age of 15, after two years in hiding. her diary, published after her death, is probably the most famous first—hand account ofjewish life during the war. anna holligan reports from amsterdam. the final entry in anne frank's diary. tuesday 1st august 191m. three days later, thejewish teenager was arrested. this was the frank family's hiding place during the nazi
11:24 pm
occupation of the netherlands. and this question of who betrayed the frank family, who had lived in this building undetected for more than two years, untiljust months before the end of the war, has remained one of the great mysteries of dutch history. and now this team of investigators have identified a man who they believe is the key suspect, ajewish lawyer who had been based here in amsterdam helping jewish refugees fleeing nazi germany. no dna clues or video images existed, so the detectives relied on circumstantial evidence, and a note. the final suspect became the person who was named in an anonymous note sent to 0tto frank shortly after he got back from the camp, auschwitz, in which a man called van
11:25 pm
den bergh was identified as the betrayer. 0tto frank was anne's father and the only member of the family to survive the war. the suggestion that the betrayer appears to be someone from within thejewish community is hard for many to bear. the historic context is critical here. it's a story of a man who was cornered and in order to save himself, his wife, his children from the gas chambers he gave a list of addresses to the sd which had no names. so the story is tragic. while there is still a degree of scepticism that we may never know the true identity of the betrayer, this tale serves as a warning, a lesson of what humanity may be capable of in its darkest time.
11:26 pm
yet another way anne frank's legacy remains alive. anna holligan, bbc news, amsterdam. that's all for now — stay with bbc world news. hello. clear skies across most parts of the uk at the moment. may mean we're getting to see a full glimpse of the first full moon of the season, the wolf moon, but it also has led to temperatures dropping quite widely. a widely frosty start to tuesday morning, maybe as low as —3 to —5 in some parts of central, southern england, and it's here where we've got some dense patches of fog to start the tuesday morning commute. some of that could start to build for a while during the morning rush—hour but then slowly start to shift during the morning. lots of sunshine elsewhere. a bit more breeze to the north and west, so not as cold here, but it's here in northern ireland
11:27 pm
and western scotland we'll see some outbreaks of rain develop from lunchtime into the afternoon. most parts, though, will stay dry. cloud amounts increase. predominantly sunny, though, for northern england. and with winds lightest towards the south and east of the country, here, we'll see temperatures actually the lowest after that foggy start — only 3 to 5 celsius for one or two. the milder breeze out in the west lifts temperatures between 9 and 11 celsius. into this evening, some showers for a time in scotland and then another batch will push in on strengthening winds, all tied into this cold front. this is a bit more active than the one that precedes it, just bringing a few showers across england and wales during the night, meaning not as cold a start to wednesday morning. but cold air will be pushing southwards through the day behind this zone of cloud and showers which starts around the borders of scotland, northern england, north wales and then drifts its way southwards. in its wake, though, most will see good long sunny spells through the afternoon. one or two showers dotted around to the north and northwest, those showers turning wintry in northern scotland — just 2 degrees in lerwick, holding onto around 10 celsius in the south. but as we go through into wednesday
11:28 pm
night and thursday morning, a widespread frost will develop once again. perhaps for some of you, a colder night than we will start tuesday. and that frost will be greeted with some sunshine overhead too. but a cold breeze down eastern coasts could feed in one or two wintry showers for a time. a noticeable wind—chill here. maybe feeling subzero through the day across some eastern coastal counties of england. come further west, with the winds lighter, temperatures up to where we should be for this stage injanuary. another chilly night to come, then, through thursday night into friday, and as the high—pressure starts to drift its way southwards once again, we are back to the problems with mist and fog in the south, but allowing more of an atlantic breeze to push in through the north, bringing varying amounts of cloud and lifting the temperature a little bit. and, crucially, for much of the uk, end of the week and the weekend will be staying dry. see you soon.
11:29 pm
11:30 pm
this is bbc news. 0ur headlines: international efforts to deliver aid to tsunami—hit islands in tonga have been gathering pace. communications with the island nation are still very limited. one british man reports his sister died. borisjohnson's former chief adviser dominic cummings — now one of his leading critics — has said he warned the prime minister in person about a downing street drinks party in may 2020, during the first lockdown. britain's culture secretary has confirmed the bbc�*s licence fee will be frozen for the next two years. nadine dorries also announced a review into how the corporation is funded after 2027. two teenagers have been arrested in the english city of manchester as part of the investigation into a siege at a synagogue in the us. a british man was shot and killed by police in texas, after taking four people hostage.

19 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on