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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 17, 2022 10:00am-1:00pm GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. two teenagers have been arrested in manchester in connection with the texas synagogue siege. the british hostage—taker was a man from blackburn. more than a quarter of households will struggle to pay their energy bills soon, according to a new report today. it's come to the point where, if i'm a bit short on electric and it's close to the time i'm going to be paying to top up again, i have to be clever enough to say, "don't do that washing, because you'll run out of electricity." let me know how much of your budget is going on energy bills. what were you paying per month and what's it now? @vicdebryshire on twitter and instagram. search and rescue continues in tonga after a huge volcanic eruption triggered a tsunami. relatives of a british woman missing say they're desperately waiting for news.
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on his way home. novak djokovic boards a flight to belgrade at dubai airport, following his deportation from australia. hello, and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. two teenagers have been arrested in manchester as part of the investigation into a siege at a synagogue in the united states. the man responsible — malik faisal akram from lancashire — was shot and killed by police near dallas in texas, after he took a rabbi and three other people hostage during a service. they were later freed unharmed. counter—terrorism authorities on both sides of the atlantic are now investigating what happened, as sophie long reports.
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this is the moment the three final hostages ran for their lives, more than ten hours after their ordeal began. a successful, but nonetheless terrifying end, to the delicate, day—long operation involving negotiators and heavily armed police. the man, now identified as malik faisal akram, a 44—year—old british citizen, originally from lancashire, was shot and killed. he'd claimed to have a gun and a bomb when he interrupted a peaceful morning service being streamed from the congregation beth israel in dallas. akram was heard ranting about religion and demanding the release of a pakistani neuroscientist with suspected links to al-qaeda, currently serving a prison sentence in texas. people came here, a place of worship, to pray. but once again in america, a moment of peace became
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a moment of profound pain. as the people who were trapped, terrified, try to come to terms with what happened, synagogues across the country have increased security in fear of copycat attacks. this was an act of terror. we're not going to tolerate this. we have this capacity to deal with assaults on, particularly the anti—semitism that has grown up. and so i'll be talking with — i put a call into the rabbi. we missed one another on the way up here. but they should rest assured that we are focused. as soon as it became known that akram was a british citizen who, according to the fbi, entered the united states just two weeks ago, the investigation became global. counter—terror police in manchester are assisting the us authorities, and are now questioning two teenagers who were arrested in the city last night. sophie long, bbc news, dallas.
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i spoke to our correspondent dave guest, who is in blackburn, where malik faisal akram was from. well, obviously people are in a states of disbelief here in blackburn, as are his family. they have issued a statement. his brother gulbar said in a statement on social media, "we as a family do not condone any of his actions and would like to apologise wholeheartedly to all the victims involved in the unfortunate incident. we would like to add that any attack on any human being, be it ajew, christian or muslim is wrong and should always be condemned." akram's family spent a number of tense hours here at the police station over the weekend, as they liaised with fbi negotiators and british authorities, in the hope of trying to bring this to a peaceful conclusion. well, as we know the hostages thankfully were released unharmed, but akram was killed by law enforcement officers in the states. of course, police on both sides of the atlantic are looking into why he went to america, was anybody else involved or was hejust operating on his own? his family insist that he had
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mental health issues, they are not saying that excuses what he did, but they are saying that, you know, this has come out of the blue to them and they are co—operating with the police. meanwhile, those arrested in manchester overnight, now you do expect a bit of police activity in the wake of a terror related incident, and so the fact there have been some arrests perhaps not too surprising. what we don't know is who these people are, we know it was in the south manchester area, we know they are teenagers, we don't know their ages or gender, but this is an ongoing investigation, police liaising with local communities to try and calm them, and the family of this man akram still trying to come to terms with what he did. with the latest on the investigation, here's our security correspondent, frank gardner. britain and the us already share a huge amount of intelligence and obviously the origins of this come back to the uk, because malik faisal akram travelled
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two weeks�* ago to the us via jfk airport. he is believed to have bought his weapon there in the us and travelled down to dallas, where he carried this out, but the investigation is, although it has been led by the fbi, the federal bureau of investigation, it is liaising very closely notjust with british counter terrorism police, that is greater manchester police as well, but also with, they have been in contact with israel, because of the synagogue connection here. this doesn't look on the surface to be like a kind of classic isis or al-qaeda operation. the brother has suggested that there were mental health issues involved, but the fact that he was making a political statement demanding the release of aafia siddiqui, who is a pakistani neuroscientist, you heard there in sophie long's report, that has pushed it into the realm of terrorism,
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which is why all leads are being investigated, and as you heard there, two teenagers have been arrested last night in manchester, but they have not as yet been charged. a report has warned more than a quarter of households in the uk will struggle to pay their energy bills in april when the average household fuel bill is expected to increase by £600—700. the rise is coming because of an increase in the price cap — the maximum price that suppliers in england, wales and scotland can charge domestic customers on a standard tariff. the cap at the moment means no household should pay more than £1,277 per yearfor a typical amount of energy. but energy firms are having to pay more for the gas they sell onto us and many smallerfirms have been forced out of business. that means the energy price cap will have to rise — some experts think the new cap could be set at almost £2,000 a year. one group that looks at this —
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the resolution foundation — says the decision could mean more than six million households are spending at least 10% of their monthly budgets on energy bills. people who fall into that category used to be described as being in fuel poverty. the government changed the official definition in 2013, so it's now referrred to as fuel stress. whatever the term — the reality is more worry for people who've already seen their bills rise quite sharply this year. michael buchannan has been speaking to some of the people who are struggling. i weigh six stone at the moment. so i'm cold all the time. and because i'm a wheelchair user, and a lot of me doesn't move any more, my circulation is really very poor. anne vivian—smith has a neurodegenerative condition. she lives with her husband — a university manager — in a small, increasingly cold bungalow in nottinghamshire, and the rising cost of energy is harming her health. i have three thermal layers on almost all the time now. i was sat under four blankets last week.
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i no longer eat breakfast and lunch because it's too expensive. this morning, anne checked her energy bills, and received an almighty shock. we found out today — our energy bill is usually £81; a month, and it's going up to 140. that's nearly doubled, and yet dave's salary is not going up, my benefits aren't going up, and i'm really distressed about it, and i've already had a little cry, and i'm likely to have another one! many more families will be similarly anguished by rapidly rising gas and electricity bills. the resolution foundation think tank calculates that, by april, over six million households in england will struggle with their energy bills, with costs set to increase on average from £100 to £150 a month. £50 a month increase is beyond the means of millions of families, especially coming at the same time as changes to the tax system, where national insurance
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contributions will increase. so, you know, we'll see a lot of families really struggling, come april. the government say it has put a range of measures in place to support households, and will continue to listen to consumers and business on how to manage their energy costs. can i have £25 on that, please? james harpin has already seen his costs nearly double in a year, each top—up lasting less time. i've put my postcode in. usually he'd just change providers. but this time, there's no point. it turns out that i am actually, in comparison to current energy deals available, on quite a good deal, it would seem, by quite a margin. james cares for his daughter for half the week, so heats his flat when she stays. otherwise, the 33—year—old lives frugally, even limiting his use of the washing machine. it's come to the point where, if i'm a bit short on electric and it's close to the time i'm going to be paid to top up again, i have to be clever enough to say, "don't do that washing, because you'll run out of electricity."
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so, let it build up, get paid, top up and then work through the washing, which is, again, a situation i've neverfound myself in until this year. low—income families, says today's report, should be offered a bigger and broader support package by ministers. but the scale of the looming price rises creates understandable worry. i have no choice but to use my hoists to change chairs, and to use my power chair to get around. i have no choice but to use my electric bed. and all of this is going to have an impact on the costs that our energy company is going to throw us. michael buchanan, bbc news. earlier we heard from 36—year—old harry lay. we have had an e—mailfrom a man call onwho wants to help anne with her gas bills. he says please send her gas bills. he says please send her best wishes so we will pass his details on to her.
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earlier we heard from 36—year—old harry lay. he lives in a housing association property, he and his wife work, they are in receipt of universal credit and ocassionally use a food bank. he says he's resorted to using candles in the evenings when his kids have gone to bed. it is frequently a struggle. it was last year as well but it has gone up so much now, that, you know, sort of the idea of us not being able to use the idea of us not being able to use the food bank for example is, yeah, it isjust, it the food bank for example is, yeah, it is just, it is not possible, we have to keep using it. i it isjust, it is not possible, we have to keep using it.- it isjust, it is not possible, we have to keep using it. i mean the fact ou have to keep using it. i mean the fact you are _ have to keep using it. i mean the fact you are using _ have to keep using it. i mean the fact you are using candles - have to keep using it. i mean the fact you are using candles at - have to keep using it. i mean the i fact you are using candles at night. it is like going back to dickensian times? it it is like going back to dickensian times? , . , , times? it very much is, my wife said it is like living _ times? it very much is, my wife said it is like living in _ times? it very much is, my wife said it is like living in dickensian - it is like living in dickensian times for us, and for other, it is notjust us, lots of others are struggling but it feels like that, absolutely, yeah. the struggling but it feels like that, absolutely, yeah.— struggling but it feels like that, absolutely, yeah. the work and pensions secretary _ absolutely, yeah. the work and pensions secretary not - absolutely, yeah. the work and pensions secretary not that - absolutely, yeah. the work and | pensions secretary not that long absolutely, yeah. the work and - pensions secretary not that long ago suggested that if you wanted more
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money you should work more hours, would that work for you, harry? h0. would that work for you, harry? no, it doesn't work, _ would that work for you, harry? i157 , it doesn't work, but, because the way that the universal credit system is, is the more hours you work, the more money they take from you, so actually you never get ahead of yourself, never ever get ahead of course you, it is like a trap and it is very hard to get out of that, i mean, what we would have to earn, between the two of us, to get us off universal credit, to, you know, so we can stop using the food bank, and sort of get ahead of ourselves, is we are not able to earn that. do you aet this we are not able to earn that. do you get this warm _ we are not able to earn that. do you get this warm homes _ we are not able to earn that. do you get this warm homes discount, - we are not able to earn that. do youl get this warm homes discount, which the government points to for people who are struggling with energy bills and are on low incomes? h0. who are struggling with energy bills and are on low incomes?— and are on low incomes? no, we haven't been _ and are on low incomes? no, we haven't been offered _ and are on low incomes? no, we haven't been offered anything i and are on low incomes? no, we | haven't been offered anything like that, we, so for example, our local charity for energy is warm and safe wiltshire, they were fantastic and
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they have helped us, they gave us a food voucher before christmas that was really representativeful, but other than that, we haven't been offered anything. fik. other than that, we haven't been offered anything.— other than that, we haven't been offered an hina. ., ., offered anything. ok. you might have to a- -l for offered anything. ok. you might have to apply for it — offered anything. ok. you might have to apply for it harry — offered anything. ok. you might have to apply for it harry to _ offered anything. ok. you might have to apply for it harry to be _ offered anything. ok. you might have to apply for it harry to be honest - to apply for it harry to be honest but it is 140 quid a year, if you got that, how much would that help? it would certainly help, but, i mean, would it sort of, would it help us enough to get us out of the situation that we are in? no, unfortunately it wouldn't, and it is not us being ungrateful, we are very grateful for any help we receive, but, did you say £140 a year? yes. but, did you say £140 a year? yes, the prime — but, did you say £140 a year? yes, the prime minister _ but, did you say £140 a year? yes, the prime minister said _ but, did you say £140 a year? yes, the prime minister said in - but, did you say £140 a year? yes, the prime minister said in pmqs £140 a week but it is not, it's a year. well, it wouldn't scratch the surface. ., ., :::: well, it wouldn't scratch the surface. ., ., 11:1 , well, it wouldn't scratch the surface. ., ., i: i: , surface. you said for 500 litres you used to pay — surface. you said for 500 litres you used to pay 130 _ surface. you said for 500 litres you used to pay 130 quid, _ surface. you said for 500 litres you used to pay 130 quid, over- surface. you said for 500 litres you used to pay 130 quid, over what - used to pay 130 quid, over what period of time is that harry? 50 used to pay 130 quid, over what period of time is that harry? so if we were careful _ period of time is that harry? so if we were careful with _ period of time is that harry? 5r f we were careful with iters we might
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get three months out of it. let. we were careful with iters we might get three months out of it. let, and ou said get three months out of it. let, and you said that _ get three months out of it. let, and you said that has _ get three months out of it. let, and you said that has gone _ get three months out of it. let, and you said that has gone up _ get three months out of it. let, and you said that has gone up to - get three months out of it. let, and you said that has gone up to 400 i you said that has gone up to 400 quid, for 500 litres over three months, yeah, it wouldn't obviously, if it is, it is not going to get to you, 400 quid for... it if it is, it is not going to get to you, 400 quid for...— if it is, it is not going to get to you, 400 quid for... it is the aim with the increase, _ you, 400 quid for... it is the aim with the increase, the _ you, 400 quid for... it is the aim with the increase, the increase . you, 400 quid for... it is the aimj with the increase, the increase in the universal credit, by whatever, increased it by, but again, that doesn't, you no e they say it like it is a wonderful thing, but, again, for people that are already struggling, that extra bit they give you, it doesn't do, it doesn't scratch the surface. relatives of a british woman missing after a tsunami hit the pacific island nation of tonga say they're desperately waiting for news. angela glover, who runs an animal rescue centre, was swept away by a wave. air force planes from australia and new zealand have been sent to tonga — to survey the damage caused by the tsunami, which was triggered by a massive volcanic eruption.
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howard johnson report. a military surveillance plane leaving auckland, new zealand this morning, bound for tonga. australia has also sent planes to carry out an assessment of the damage caused by saturday's eruption of an underwater volcano. satellite images captured the moment a tsunami, triggered by the eruption, engulfed tonga and sent a shock wave across the pacific ocean. and listen to this. a sonic boom captured on video more than 400 miles away in fiji. sonic boom sounds. the international federation of the red cross estimate that more than 80,000 people have been affected by the eruption, with stories of missing people being reported on social media. briton angela glover was last seen by her husband clinging to a tree, before she was swept away by the tsunami. the family have put a number of posts on social media, appealing for information. she moved to tonga in 2015, leaving behind an advertising job
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to start an animal shelter, where she looks after and houses stray dogs, and is a popular figure on the island. the local authorities have been conducting searches and i believe they are still ongoing. it is daytime here. look, it is 48 hours. i am not holding out much hope. communications to tonga remain badly affected. not knowing what happened to loved ones is creating an unbearable concern. howard johnson, bbc news, manila. and we can show you some incredible footage that has been sent to us. these are pictures of the volcanic eruption off tonga from last friday, you can see the size of the black clouds and volcanic ash explosion. a japanese weather satellite detected that the ash plumes were up to 20 kilometres in size.
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the volcano erupted again on saturday, triggering a tsunami on the shores of tonga, and the island is completely blanketed with ash. mps return to westminster today as the government continues to face criticism over allegations of parties and drinking at downing street during covid lockdowns. six conservative mps have now called on borisjohnson to resign over the issue, ahead of the conclusions of an investigation by the civil servant, sue gray. our political correspondent chris mason reports. this is leigh in greater manchester. labourfor the best part of a century, until borisjohnson asked for votes in the town. then, the conservatives won. so what do people here make of what's gone on, and whether he should stay on as prime minister? it's all the nurses and the doctors who've worked hard during the pandemic, who obviously have been let down. they say that the devil
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that you know is better than the devil you don't know. and at least we know where we are with him. he won't do nothing, but somebody else might do something. i think he should go. i mean, there's been plenty of things happened in the past where politicians have done not half as bad as he's done, and they've had to leave. they've resigned, or they've been forced out. they should alljust go, for me. they're all out for themselves, not for the working people, are they? not one of them. the list of social do's that went on in westminster, when social do's were banned, is long. and these are just the ones we know about. it's up to this woman, sue gray, a senior civil servant, to catalogue the lot of them. but it could be another week or so before we find out what she's found out, leaving lots of conservative mps to ponder that... what my constituents are doing now, is they're comparing their own experiences over the last — well, almost two years, isn't it? — with what they're seeing on television. and a number of them are now looking on in disbelief that it's been
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the interpretation of some people in downing street that the law ends at the number 10 garden wall. so many conservative mps feel hugely let down, angry and unable to justify what has happened. but, for plenty of them, borisjohnson is the reason they're in politics, the reason they're in parliament. so, to topple him just two years after winning so big a a general election, is a huge thing for them to contemplate, let alone do. mps return here this morning with plenty to ponder. chris mason, bbc news. our chief political correspondent, adam fleming has more on the reaction from conservative mps. the tory party seems to be pulling in two different direction in you have an increase in the number of
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backbenchers calling for the prime minister to go, that ticked up to six over the weekend of people who have gone public, several more saying the same sort of thing in private, but equally you get some mps, saying they were surprised how little grief they got from their constituents when they saw them over the weekend, i was hearing from one red wall mp from one of those historically labour seats that the tories took, who said they had a lot less, they picked up a lower temperature from people when they were chatting to them over the weekend. the fact is this is a bit of phoney period, we are waiting for the report into what went on with all the lockdown parties by the senior civil servant sue gray, how is here to education secretary put it this morning.— is here to education secretary put it this morning. people in my post ban , feel it this morning. people in my post bag. feel upset — it this morning. people in my post bag, feel upset that _ it this morning. people in my post bag, feel upset that the _ it this morning. people in my post bag, feel upset that the people i it this morning. people in my post i bag, feel upset that the people who make _ bag, feel upset that the people who make the _ bag, feel upset that the people who make the rules look like they haveu't— make the rules look like they haven't been following the rules, some _ haven't been following the rules, some say— haven't been following the rules, some say we want to make sure that this investigation is thorough, they want to— this investigation is thorough, they want to know it is going to be
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thorough. _ want to know it is going to be thorough, and i reassure my constituents that sue gray is a very senior_ constituents that sue gray is a very senior civil — constituents that sue gray is a very senior civil servant, very well able to conduct— senior civil servant, very well able to conduct this investigation and will do _ to conduct this investigation and will do an— to conduct this investigation and will do an absolute thorough job and she can _ will do an absolute thorough job and she can follow the evidence where ever it _ she can follow the evidence where ever it takes her, if she finds any form _ ever it takes her, if she finds any form of— ever it takes her, if she finds any form of law— ever it takes her, if she finds any form of law breaking, then that will be submitted to the metropolitan police _ be submitted to the metropolitan police. �* ., ., be submitted to the metropolitan police. �* . ., ., police. and while we are waiting for that re ort police. and while we are waiting for that report from _ police. and while we are waiting for that report from sue _ police. and while we are waiting for that report from sue gray, - police. and while we are waiting for that report from sue gray, which i police. and while we are waiting for| that report from sue gray, which we are told is probably not until the end of this week at the earliest and thatis end of this week at the earliest and that is when everything will change, the government is trying to fill that time by briefing a serieses of policies and things they were already working on that we were sort of expecting but maybe accelerating them a bit and maybe seasoning them, so they seem more appealing to conservative backbenchererrors so you have the two—year freeze for the level of the bbc license fee, but with a tweet from the culture secretary saying that the government wants to replace the license fee all together, from 2027. and then youest
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get confirmation that the ministry of defence will take over the operation in the english channel to deal with the migrant boats coming from france, something that has been worked for a while but is being put out there in a partial way, and you can pick up a bit of disquiet in whitehall, there are long thought out long planned things being rushed out, for political reasons. and in about ten minutes, i'm going to be talking to three conservative voters, about what they make of the downing street parties. the chair of the global banking giant, credit suisse, has resigned following allegations that he broke the uk's covid quarantine rules. antonio horta—osorio reportedly went to wimbledon injuly at a time when the uk's covid rules required him to be in isolation. in a statement, he said he regretted that a number of his personal actions led to difficulties for the bank. our business correspondent
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theo leggettjoins me now. so did he go to wimbledon or not? well, that is the question, but he has stepped down, nobody is denying those stories, but this wasn't the only occasion on which antonio horta—osorio is reported to have broken covid regulation, he also the flew back to switzerland at one point and when he was supposed to be spending ten days in quarantine, according to swiss regulations he flew out of the country again, some three days later, so this is at least two separate occasions on which he is reported at least to have broken the covid regulations and this is the man who was brought in as a fixer, this is a bank that was once seen as a pillar of swiss banking integrity, but has been besieged by scandals, the former chief executive was forceer out after the bank was shown to be spying on its employee, it was involved in a corrupt lending
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scandal in mozambique, it lost billions of dollars during the collapse of the us hedge fund, it was involved in the collapse of another firm, was involved in the collapse of anotherfirm, so was involved in the collapse of another firm, so all of this put together, he was brought in to steady the ship, to make things stable again but he has become the story himself and having become the story, an embarrass offal the company it appears he is on his way out. there is a leader who is taking responsibility, resigning having broken the rules.— responsibility, resigning having broken the rules. well, absolutely, althou~h, broken the rules. well, absolutely, although. you _ broken the rules. well, absolutely, although, you know, _ broken the rules. well, absolutely, although, you know, you _ broken the rules. well, absolutely, although, you know, you have - broken the rules. well, absolutely, although, you know, you have to i broken the rules. well, absolutely, i although, you know, you have to look at what has happened within the board, was this the only thing that he was under pressure, that is the question, orwith he was under pressure, that is the question, or with where the steps he was taking to try and reform the institution less popular than they might have been? you have people on the outside who say he broke covid regulations but because that a reason for him to be forced out? he faced potential prosecution in
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switzerland over breaches of covid there, but, there may be other issues we don't know about at board level which have oiled the wheels of his departure. level which have oiled the wheels of his departure-— level which have oiled the wheels of his departure. after nearly a fortnight of controversy, play is under way at the australian open tennis in melbourne. last year's men's singles champion, novak djokovic, was deported from australia yesterday — when a court upheld a decision to cancel his visa on the grounds he hadn't been vaccinated against covid. he's due to arrive home in serbia later this morning. the australian home affairs minister has hinted that he won't be allowed back into the country until 2025 — throwing his hopes of a tenth title in melbourne into chaos. gareth barlow reports. taking selfies with fans after landing in dubai. it isn't how novak djokovic envisaged spending the first day of the australian open. not in australia, and not playing tennis. the world number one was on the first flight out
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of melbourne on sunday, after a court backed the australian immigration minister's decision to cancel djokovic's visa. the serbian said he was extremely disappointed by the ruling. the australian government said he was a talisman of anti—vaccination sentiment, and his presence risked civil unrest. and as crowds arrived to watch the action in the right type of court, public sentiment was mostly on the government's side. to be honest, most of the tennis players are vaccinated. obviously that was a requirement of getting into the country. i feel as though if everyone else did it, he should have done it. i do feel the government should have taken some responsibility, with giving him the exemption initially. i have a theory that anyone in australia who is not vaccinated, cannot go to work, can't go to a restaurant, probably can't walk into the gate here today, why should anyone go to work without vaccination in australia full stop? i think he deserved it.
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no player is above the game. he set himself up for that. all he had to do was get vaccinated or do the right thing, _ and he could have stayed. for 11 days, the focus of the australian open has not been on sport. it has been on djokovic's unvaccinated status and the status of his visa. the hope for the open and for australia will be that tennis will distract from the circus. for djokovic now, some time to collect his thoughts and response to the most tumultuous period of his career. novak djokovic is due to arrive back in belgrade shortly. our correspondent guy de launey is there. when is he due to touchdown and is there a being welcoming party for him, from people in belgrade? ihe there a being welcoming party for him, from people in belgrade? he is due to touchdown _ him, from people in belgrade? he is due to touchdown in _ him, from people in belgrade? he: 3 due to touchdown in admit day, which is, let me see about 31 minutes from now, so he will be landing at the
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terminal at the airport, the main arrivals are over there, we don't think he will be going into the main arrivals though, we think he will be going into the vip terminal where he will probably be whisked away without saying anything to anybody, because after all novak djokovic has said that he doesn't want to make any more public statements until after the australian open tennis has finished. he doesn't want to be a source of distraction any more, he wants people to enjoy the sport, so probably we won't get a lot from him here today. perhaps that is why the fans haven't hyun turned up. i have checked in the arrivals section, there is nobody down through with novak signs and nobody in the vip section apart from lots of tv crews as you can probably imagine. cheers combo, as you can probably imagine. cheers combo. we — as you can probably imagine. cheers combo. we will— as you can probably imagine. cheers combo, we will be _ as you can probably imagine. cheers combo, we will be back _ as you can probably imagine. cheers combo, we will be back with - as you can probably imagine. cheers combo, we will be back with you - as you can probably imagine. cheers i combo, we will be back with you when he gets there. the headlines on bbc news: two teenagers have been arrested in manchester in connection with the texas synagogue siege. the british hostage—taker was a man from blackburn. more than a quarter of households in the uk will struggle
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to pay their energy bills soon, according to a new report today. search and rescue continues in tonga after a huge volcanic eruption triggered a tsunami. relatives of a british woman missing say they're desperately waiting for news. on his way home. novak djokovic boards a flight to belgrade at dubai airport, following his deportation from australia. more now on parties in downing street during lockdown, the chinese government is drawing up contingency plans to stop the spread of covid. there are fears that the 40 day travel season could see omicron spread throughout the nation. restrictions remain in place in parts of europe, as the number of infections remains high.
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with chinese new year and the winter olympics both set to trigger mass movement across the country, beijing is determined to keep covid in check. the spring festival is the biggest annual human migration on earth, and, as such, authorities are laying out plans to control mass transit. translation: we will coordinate i with local authorities to adjust i transport plans if local outbreaks occur, we will suspend or reduce passenger trains in the affected areas, restrict or hold ticket sales from stations and strictly manage passenger movements. the chinese government expects around 1.5 billion trips, which will be made during the spring festival travel season. and with the omicron variant present in several regions, there are fears to what degree it may spread over the coming weeks. in france, meanwhile, parliament there has approved a government's latest measures to tackle covid. the new law, which takes effect on thursday, requires anyone over 16 to have a vaccine certificate to enter public places, like restaurants, cafes, cinemas and long—distance trains. and in amsterdam, as infection numbers hit a new record,
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thousands packed city streets to protest against restrictions. the netherlands has relaxed some of the measures it implemented over the christmas holidays, but bars, restaurants and cultural venues have been instructed to remain closed until at least january the 25th. i think in fact we are one of the only countries, or maybe the only country, which is still in lockdown. countries around us are actually going backwards, back to normal life, slowly. in response to the protests, riot police were deployed across the city, as almost two years on countries around the world continue to grapple with the covid pandemic. russell trott, bbc news.
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mps return to westminster today, with many having spent the weekend reading e—mails from constituents or talking to them face—to—face. six conservative mps have now called on borisjohnson to resign over the issue, ahead of the conclusions of an investigation by the civil servant, sue gray. with me are three conservative voters — olvia essem, a law student from doncaster, collette osborne, owner of a hair and beauty salon in nottingham and russ gott, a retired sculptor in crewe. thank you for talking to us. let me go round each of you. olivia, should the prime minister stay or go? i the prime minister stay or go? i think that if the inquiry concludes he broke the rules, he needs to go as soon as possible. but no matter what, i would like to see him gone and replaced by early summer at the latest. :, and replaced by early summer at the latest-- well. _ and replaced by early summer at the latest-- well. i _ and replaced by early summer at the latest. firaz�*? well, i probably have latest. oroz? well, i probably have a view that— latest. oroz? well, i probably have a view that is— latest. oroz? well, i probably have a view that is a _ latest. oroz? well, i probably have a view that is a bit _ latest. oroz? well, i probably have a view that is a bit controversial, i a view that is a bit controversial, ithink_ a view that is a bit controversial, i think the — a view that is a bit controversial, i think the prime minister has done
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a great _ i think the prime minister has done a greatioh— i think the prime minister has done a greatjob through i think the prime minister has done a great job through this pandemic. i think the prime minister has done a greatjob through this pandemic. i personally— a greatjob through this pandemic. i personally think you should stay, even _ personally think you should stay, even though i suffered personal loss myself _ even though i suffered personal loss myself last year, whilst this party was going — myself last year, whilst this party was going on. you know, great britain, — was going on. you know, great britain, we _ was going on. you know, great britain, we are a culture of forgiving _ britain, we are a culture of forgiving people. the man has stood up forgiving people. the man has stood up and _ forgiving people. the man has stood up and apologised. why not give him the opportunity to carry on and do the opportunity to carry on and do the job? _ the opportunity to carry on and do the job? i— the opportunity to carry on and do thejob? i believe he is the opportunity to carry on and do the job? i believe he is held host to a witchhunt at the moment. angela rayner— to a witchhunt at the moment. angela rayner is _ to a witchhunt at the moment. angela rayner isjust treading to a witchhunt at the moment. angela rayner is just treading on to a witchhunt at the moment. angela rayner isjust treading on his case so much, — rayner isjust treading on his case so much, to— rayner isjust treading on his case so much, to get his resignation. i think— so much, to get his resignation. i think that — so much, to get his resignation. i think that is — so much, to get his resignation. i think that is bullying tactics at the moment. carry on, boris. would ou the moment. carry on, boris. would you accept— the moment. carry on, boris. would you accept that _ the moment. carry on, boris. would you accept that there _ the moment. carry on, boris. would you accept that there would - the moment. carry on, boris. would you accept that there would not - the moment. carry on, boris. would you accept that there would not be i you accept that there would not be any kind of tactics if there hadn't been so many dos dan edge? 100%, you are riuht. been so many dos dan edge? 10096, you are right- my _ been so many dos dan edge? 10096, you are right. my father _ been so many dos dan edge? 10096, you are right. my father at _ been so many dos dan edge? 10096, you are right. my father at the _ been so many dos dan edge? 10096, you are right. my father at the time, - been so many dos dan edge? 10096, you are right. my father at the time, he - are right. my father at the time, he was in _ are right. my father at the time, he was in a _ are right. my father at the time, he was in a nursing home, i wasn't allowed — was in a nursing home, i wasn't allowed to— was in a nursing home, i wasn't allowed to go and see my dad, i got
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two supervised window visits, and then the _ two supervised window visits, and then the only time i got to see dad was the _ then the only time i got to see dad was the last three days he was sent to hospital. — was the last three days he was sent to hospital, he was put in palliative care. so, yes, i've got issues, — palliative care. so, yes, i've got issues, of— palliative care. so, yes, i've got issues, of course. but i am a forgiving _ issues, of course. but i am a forgiving person and i think boris is doing — forgiving person and i think boris is doing a — forgiving person and i think boris is doing a fine job.— is doing a fine 'ob. colette, are ou a is doing a fine job. colette, are you a forgiving _ is doing a fine job. colette, are you a forgiving person? - is doing a fine job. colette, are you a forgiving person? hello, | you a forgiving person? hello, everybody- — you a forgiving person? hello, everybody. personally, - you a forgiving person? hello, everybody. personally, i- you a forgiving person? hello, everybody. personally, ithink| you a forgiving person? hello, i everybody. personally, ithink his everybody. personally, i think his position— everybody. personally, i think his position is— everybody. personally, i think his position is untenable. _ everybody. personally, i think his position is untenable. the - everybody. personally, i think his position is untenable. the way i everybody. personally, i think his position is untenable. the way he hasm _ position is untenable. the way he hasm the — position is untenable. the way he hasm the kind _ position is untenable. the way he has... the kind of— position is untenable. the way he has... the kind of trust _ position is untenable. the way he has... the kind of trust we - position is untenable. the way he has... the kind of trust we put i position is untenable. the way he j has... the kind of trust we put on our leaders. — has... the kind of trust we put on our leaders. it— has... the kind of trust we put on our leaders, it is— has... the kind of trust we put on our leaders, it is not— has... the kind of trust we put on our leaders, it is not difficult- has... the kind of trust we put on our leaders, it is not difficult to i our leaders, it is not difficult to lead _ our leaders, it is not difficult to lead by— our leaders, it is not difficult to lead by example. _ our leaders, it is not difficult to lead by example. my _ our leaders, it is not difficult to lead by example. my industry, i our leaders, it is not difficult to i lead by example. my industry, the lreauty— lead by example. my industry, the beauty industry. _ lead by example. my industry, the beauty industry, was _ lead by example. my industry, the beauty industry, was locked - lead by example. my industry, the beauty industry, was locked downl lead by example. my industry, the i beauty industry, was locked down for 215 days _ beauty industry, was locked down for 215 days in _ beauty industry, was locked down for 215 days in england. _ beauty industry, was locked down for 215 days in england. business- beauty industry, was locked down for 215 days in england. business is- 215 days in england. business is decimated _ 215 days in england. business is decimated. no _ 215 days in england. business is decimated. no government i 215 days in england. business is- decimated. no government support, no vat cut, _ decimated. no government support, no vat cut, no— decimated. no government support, no vat cut, no eat — decimated. no government support, no vat cut, no eat out _ decimated. no government support, no vat cut, no eat out to— decimated. no government support, no vat cut, no eat out to help— decimated. no government support, no vat cut, no eat out to help out. - decimated. no government support, no vat cut, no eat out to help out. if- vat cut, no eat out to help out. if i vat cut, no eat out to help out. if i take _ vat cut, no eat out to help out. if i take myself— vat cut, no eat out to help out. if i take myself back _ vat cut, no eat out to help out. if i take myself back to _ vat cut, no eat out to help out. if i take myself back to one _ vat cut, no eat out to help out. if i take myself back to one of - vat cut, no eat out to help out. if i take myself back to one of the i i take myself back to one of the parties. — i take myself back to one of the parties. i— i take myself back to one of the parties. i was _ i take myself back to one of the parties, i was speaking - i take myself back to one of the parties, i was speaking to- i take myself back to one of the parties, i was speaking to a i i take myself back to one of the i parties, i was speaking to a salon owner— parties, i was speaking to a salon owner to— parties, i was speaking to a salon owner to convince _ parties, i was speaking to a salon owner to convince them - parties, i was speaking to a salon owner to convince them not - parties, i was speaking to a salon owner to convince them not to i parties, i was speaking to a salon i owner to convince them not to harm themselves — owner to convince them not to harm themselves. because _ owner to convince them not to harm themselves. because of— owner to convince them not to harm themselves. because of the - owner to convince them not to harml themselves. because of the financial strain _ themselves. because of the financial strain so. _ themselves. because of the financial strain. so, personally, _ themselves. because of the financial strain. so, personally, i— themselves. because of the financial strain. so, personally, ithink- themselves. because of the financial strain. so, personally, ithink if- strain. so, personally, ithink if we are— strain. so, personally, ithink if we are going _ strain. so, personally, ithink if we are going to— strain. so, personally, ithink if we are going to have _ strain. so, personally, ithink if we are going to have any- strain. so, personally, ithink if we are going to have any kind i strain. so, personally, ithink ifi we are going to have any kind of trust _ we are going to have any kind of trust in —
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we are going to have any kind of trust in our— we are going to have any kind of trust in our government, - we are going to have any kind of trust in our government, he i we are going to have any kind of. trust in our government, he needs we are going to have any kind of- trust in our government, he needs to lo. trust in our government, he needs to o, ., trust in our government, he needs to co. . :, , , trust in our government, he needs to go. olivia, if he does stay, does he have to change. — go. olivia, if he does stay, does he have to change, in _ go. olivia, if he does stay, does he have to change, in your— go. olivia, if he does stay, does he have to change, in your view? if i go. olivia, if he does stay, does he| have to change, in your view? if so, how? i have to change, in your view? if so, how? ~ : :, , have to change, in your view? if so, how? ~' : ., , :, , ., how? i think he certainly does have to change- — how? i think he certainly does have to change- you _ how? i think he certainly does have to change. you know, _ how? i think he certainly does have to change. you know, there - how? i think he certainly does have to change. you know, there has i how? i think he certainly does have i to change. you know, there has been a lot of contempt for the british public, and i think it is an issue of trust at the moment. i think he needs to change and earn that trust back. how he can do that, i'm not entirely sure. i think you could start by letting the british people make their own decisions and removing plan b restrictions, starting to move forward, starting to move on from covid, while recognising that the risk is still there. definitely, if he stays, he needs to build public trust back and only time will tell if he can do that. it only time will tell if he can do that. , , , :, only time will tell if he can do that. , , i. _ that. it is interesting, you say if he lifts all— that. it is interesting, you say if he lifts all covid _ that. it is interesting, you say if he lifts all covid restrictions i that. it is interesting, you say if he lifts all covid restrictions on | he lifts all covid restrictions on january the 26th, you will be feeling a bit more... what is the word? a bit kinder to watson? i
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word? a bit kinder to watson? i think with the parties, they were arguing they were technically within the rules on one hand, that they have discretion, that they were careful, they were sensible, so the british public have discretion and make their own decisions. i think if england is more free than it is now, with what we are going through in terms of restrictions, it would build trust back, especially from his own party, who did not necessarily agree with plan b in the first place. d0 necessarily agree with plan b in the first lace. i. ., ., first place. do you want him to chance first place. do you want him to change at _ first place. do you want him to change at all? _ first place. do you want him to change at all? well, _ first place. do you want him to change at all? well, i - first place. do you want him to change at all? well, i must i first place. do you want him to i change at all? well, i must admit, i no alon: change at all? well, i must admit, i go along with _ change at all? well, i must admit, i go along with what _ change at all? well, i must admit, i go along with what olivia _ change at all? well, i must admit, i go along with what olivia has - change at all? well, i must admit, i go along with what olivia hasjust i go along with what olivia has just sad. go along with what olivia has just sad yes. — go along with what olivia has just sad yes. it — go along with what olivia has just sad. yes, it is down to trust issues now _ sad. yes, it is down to trust issues now 0f— sad. yes, it is down to trust issues now. of course he has to change. the man has _ now. of course he has to change. the man has made a mistake. how now. of course he has to change. the man has made a mistake.— now. of course he has to change. the man has made a mistake. how does he need to change. _ man has made a mistake. how does he need to change, what _ man has made a mistake. how does he need to change, what you _ man has made a mistake. how does he need to change, what you want - man has made a mistake. how does he need to change, what you want to i man has made a mistake. how does he need to change, what you want to see l need to change, what you want to see or hear which is different? its bein: or hear which is different? its being a human being, isn't it? he is a human— being a human being, isn't it? he is a human being. the man has
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apologised, he has made a public apology — apologised, he has made a public apology. yes, he has made a mistake. so, apology. yes, he has made a mistake. so. somehow— apology. yes, he has made a mistake. so, somehow he has got to rebuild that trust— so, somehow he has got to rebuild that trust back for the country. we are a _ that trust back for the country. we are a forgiving country and we can forgive _ are a forgiving country and we can forgive someone who has made a mistake — forgive someone who has made a mistake. we have all made mistakes in the _ mistake. we have all made mistakes in the past — mistake. we have all made mistakes in the past. we mistake. we have all made mistakes in the ast. ~ : ., , mistake. we have all made mistakes in the ast. ~ : . , ., mistake. we have all made mistakes in the ast. ~ : . , :, , in the past. we certainly have, but we are not — in the past. we certainly have, but we are not the _ in the past. we certainly have, but we are not the prime _ in the past. we certainly have, but we are not the prime minister, i we are not the prime minister, imposing rules on other people. colette, how do you think, if he stays, he builds back trust with somebody like yourself, a conservative supporter? it’s conservative supporter? it's difficult, whilst _ conservative supporter? it's difficult, whilst i agree with some of the _ difficult, whilst i agree with some of the areas — difficult, whilst i agree with some of the areas the _ difficult, whilst i agree with some of the areas the other— difficult, whilst i agree with some of the areas the other guys - difficult, whilst i agree with some of the areas the other guys have i of the areas the other guys have said. _ of the areas the other guys have said. this — of the areas the other guys have said. this is _ of the areas the other guys have said, this is not _ of the areas the other guys have said, this is not one _ of the areas the other guys have said, this is not one event. i of the areas the other guys have said, this is not one event. thisl said, this is not one event. this has been — said, this is not one event. this has been a _ said, this is not one event. this has been a continual— said, this is not one event. this has been a continual breach i said, this is not one event. this has been a continual breach ofl said, this is not one event. this. has been a continual breach of the government— has been a continual breach of the government rules. _ has been a continual breach of the government rules. i— has been a continual breach of the government rules. i have - has been a continual breach of the government rules. i have not i has been a continual breach of the | government rules. i have not been allowed _ government rules. i have not been allowed to— government rules. i have not been allowed to attend _ government rules. i have not been allowed to attend funerals - government rules. i have not been allowed to attend funerals of- government rules. i have not been i allowed to attend funerals of people that i allowed to attend funerals of people that i love — allowed to attend funerals of people that i love. about— allowed to attend funerals of people that i love. about the _ allowed to attend funerals of people that i love. about the time - allowed to attend funerals of people that i love. about the time that i that i love. about the time that boris _ that i love. about the time that borisjohnson _ that i love. about the time that borisjohnson was _ that i love. about the time that boris johnson was having - that i love. about the time that boris johnson was having a i that i love. about the time that i borisjohnson was having a party, that i love. about the time that - borisjohnson was having a party, my friend _ borisjohnson was having a party, my friend lost— borisjohnson was having a party, my friend lost her— borisjohnson was having a party, my friend lost her 27—year—old _ friend lost her 27—year—old daughten _ friend lost her 27—year—old daughter. coming - friend lost her 27—year—old daughter. coming back- friend lost her 27—year—old daughter. coming back toi friend lost her 27—year—old - daughter. coming back to running a business. _ daughter. coming back to running a business. i— daughter. coming back to running a business, i kind— daughter. coming back to running a business, i kind of— daughter. coming back to running a business, i kind of represent- daughter. coming back to running a business, i kind of represent manyl business, i kind of represent many of salons —
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business, i kind of represent many of salons right— business, i kind of represent many of salons. right now, _ business, i kind of represent many of salons. right now, i— business, i kind of represent many of salons. right now, i know- business, i kind of represent many of salons. right now, i know that i business, i kind of represent many. of salons. right now, i know that we talked _ of salons. right now, i know that we talked about — of salons. right now, i know that we talked about plan _ of salons. right now, i know that we talked about plan b, _ of salons. right now, i know that we talked about plan b, restrictions i talked about plan b, restrictions being _ talked about plan b, restrictions being lifted _ talked about plan b, restrictions being lifted on— talked about plan b, restrictions being lifted on the _ talked about plan b, restrictions being lifted on the 26th, - talked about plan b, restrictions being lifted on the 26th, we i talked about plan b, restrictionsl being lifted on the 26th, we have been _ being lifted on the 26th, we have been locked _ being lifted on the 26th, we have been locked down _ being lifted on the 26th, we have been locked down by— being lifted on the 26th, we have been locked down by stealth - being lifted on the 26th, we havel been locked down by stealth since decemben — been locked down by stealth since december. around _ been locked down by stealth since december. around may— been locked down by stealth since december. around may time, - been locked down by stealth since i december. around may time, when been locked down by stealth since - december. around may time, when all of this_ december. around may time, when all of this was_ december. around may time, when all of this was going — december. around may time, when all of this was going on, _ december. around may time, when all of this was going on, we _ december. around may time, when all of this was going on, we have - december. around may time, when all of this was going on, we have our- of this was going on, we have our heads _ of this was going on, we have our heads on — of this was going on, we have our heads on our— of this was going on, we have our heads on our hands, _ of this was going on, we have our heads on our hands, we - of this was going on, we have our heads on our hands, we are - of this was going on, we have our| heads on our hands, we are trying of this was going on, we have our. heads on our hands, we are trying to fi-ht heads on our hands, we are trying to fight for— heads on our hands, we are trying to fight for business _ heads on our hands, we are trying to fight for business disruption - fight for business disruption insurance. _ fight for business disruption insurance, trying _ fight for business disruption insurance, trying to - fight for business disruption insurance, trying to fight. fight for business disruptioni insurance, trying to fight for fight for business disruption - insurance, trying to fight for the industry— insurance, trying to fight for the industry to— insurance, trying to fight for the industry to be _ insurance, trying to fight for the industry to be heard _ insurance, trying to fight for the industry to be heard because . insurance, trying to fight for thei industry to be heard because we insurance, trying to fight for the - industry to be heard because we have been completely— industry to be heard because we have been completely ignored _ industry to be heard because we have been completely ignored by— been completely ignored by government _ been completely ignored by government. what - been completely ignored by. government. what happened been completely ignored by- government. what happened in partianrent— government. what happened in parliament is— government. what happened in parliament is boris— government. what happened in parliament is borisjohnson- government. what happened in. parliament is borisjohnson mocks the health— parliament is borisjohnson mocks the health and _ parliament is borisjohnson mocks the health and beauty— parliament is borisjohnson mocks the health and beauty industry- parliament is borisjohnson mocks| the health and beauty industry and sniggers— the health and beauty industry and sniggers and — the health and beauty industry and sniggers and laughs. _ the health and beauty industry and sniggers and laughs. i— the health and beauty industry and sniggers and laughs. i don't - the health and beauty industry and sniggers and laughs. i don't think. sniggers and laughs. i don't think that sets — sniggers and laughs. idon't think that sets an— sniggers and laughs. i don't think that sets an example. _ sniggers and laughs. i don't think that sets an example. as - sniggers and laughs. i don't think that sets an example. as an - sniggers and laughs. i don't think- that sets an example. as an employee myself, _ that sets an example. as an employee nrysetf, you _ that sets an example. as an employee nrysetf, you can't— that sets an example. as an employee nrysetf, you can't go— that sets an example. as an employee myself, you can't go in— that sets an example. as an employee myself, you can't go in and _ that sets an example. as an employee myself, you can't go in and have - that sets an example. as an employee myself, you can't go in and have a - myself, you can't go in and have a party— myself, you can't go in and have a party and — myself, you can't go in and have a party and break— myself, you can't go in and have a party and break the _ myself, you can't go in and have a party and break the law. - myself, you can't go in and have a party and break the law. we - myself, you can't go in and have a party and break the law. we did i myself, you can't go in and have a. party and break the law. we did our contact _ party and break the law. we did our contact over — party and break the law. we did our contact over zoom. _ party and break the law. we did our contact over zoom. that's - party and break the law. we did our contact over zoom. that's becausei contact over zoom. that's because people _ contact over zoom. that's because people had — contact over zoom. that's because people had to _ contact over zoom. that's because people had to be _ contact over zoom. that's because people had to be in _ contact over zoom. that's because people had to be in isolation. - contact over zoom. that's because people had to be in isolation. no, i contact over zoom. that's because| people had to be in isolation. no, i don't _ people had to be in isolation. no, i don't think— people had to be in isolation. no, i don't think anybody— people had to be in isolation. no, i don't think anybody else _ people had to be in isolation. no, i don't think anybody else who - people had to be in isolation. no, i don't think anybody else who has l don't think anybody else who has broken _ don't think anybody else who has broken the — don't think anybody else who has broken the ministerial— don't think anybody else who has broken the ministerial code - don't think anybody else who has broken the ministerial code or. broken the ministerial code or broken — broken the ministerial code or broken taws, _ broken the ministerial code or broken laws, matt _ broken the ministerial code or broken laws, matt hancock, . broken the ministerial code or- broken laws, matt hancock, dominic cummings, — broken laws, matt hancock, dominic cummings, beobte _ broken laws, matt hancock, dominic cummings, people like _ broken laws, matt hancock, dominic cummings, people like that- broken laws, matt hancock, dominic cummings, people like that have - broken laws, matt hancock, dominic| cummings, people like that have had to resign _
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cummings, people like that have had to resign. another— cummings, people like that have had to resign. another thing _ cummings, people like that have had to resign. another thing is, _ cummings, people like that have had to resign. another thing is, which - to resign. another thing is, which realty— to resign. another thing is, which really concerns— to resign. another thing is, which really concerns me, _ to resign. another thing is, which really concerns me, last - to resign. another thing is, which really concerns me, last week - to resign. another thing is, which really concerns me, last week ini really concerns me, last week in partiament— really concerns me, last week in parliament jacob— really concerns me, last week in parliament jacob rees—mogg . really concerns me, last week in - parliament jacob rees—mogg actually commented _ parliament jacob rees—mogg actually commented that _ parliament jacob rees—mogg actually commented that he _ parliament jacob rees—mogg actually commented that he believed - parliament jacob rees—mogg actually commented that he believed in- parliament jacob rees—mogg actually commented that he believed in may. commented that he believed in may 2020 that— commented that he believed in may 2020 that the — commented that he believed in may 2020 that the investigation - commented that he believed in may 2020 that the investigation should i 2020 that the investigation should look 2020 that the investigation should took at _ 2020 that the investigation should look at whether— 2020 that the investigation should look at whether restrictions - 2020 that the investigation should look at whether restrictions were i look at whether restrictions were too harsh — look at whether restrictions were too harsh so _ look at whether restrictions were too harsh. so actually _ look at whether restrictions were too harsh. so actually my- look at whether restrictions were i too harsh. so actually my question too harsh. so actually my question to boris— too harsh. so actually my question to boris is, — too harsh. so actually my question to boris is, did _ too harsh. so actually my question to boris is, did you _ too harsh. so actually my question to boris is, did you have _ too harsh. so actually my question to boris is, did you have to- too harsh. so actually my question to boris is, did you have to lock. too harsh. so actually my question to boris is, did you have to lock usi to boris is, did you have to lock us down _ to boris is, did you have to lock us down at _ to boris is, did you have to lock us down at all? — to boris is, did you have to lock us down at all? did _ to boris is, did you have to lock us down at all? did we _ to boris is, did you have to lock us down at all? did we have - to boris is, did you have to lock us down at all? did we have to - to boris is, did you have to lock us| down at all? did we have to borrow five times— down at all? did we have to borrow five times our— down at all? did we have to borrow five times our normal— down at all? did we have to borrow five times our normal debt? - down at all? did we have to borrow five times our normal debt? did . down at all? did we have to borrowi five times our normal debt? did we have to _ five times our normal debt? did we have to actually _ five times our normal debt? did we have to actually go _ five times our normal debt? did we have to actually go into... - five times our normal debt? did we have to actually go into... we - five times our normal debt? did we have to actually go into... we have| have to actually go into... we have lost 8500 — have to actually go into... we have lost 8500 businesses, _ have to actually go into... we have lost 8500 businesses, 32 - have to actually go into... we have lost 8500 businesses, 32 suicidesi lost 8500 businesses, 32 suicides because _ lost 8500 businesses, 32 suicides because of— lost 8500 businesses, 32 suicides because of financial— lost 8500 businesses, 32 suicides because of financial pressure - lost 8500 businesses, 32 suicides because of financial pressure on l because of financial pressure on salon— because of financial pressure on saton owners _ because of financial pressure on salon owners. no, _ because of financial pressure on salon owners. no, he _ because of financial pressure on salon owners. no, he has- because of financial pressure on salon owners. no, he has to - because of financial pressure oni salon owners. no, he has to take responsibility _ salon owners. no, he has to take responsibility. sorry, _ salon owners. no, he has to take responsibility. sorry, long - salon owners. no, he has to take. responsibility. sorry, long answer, but i'm _ responsibility. sorry, long answer, but i'm very— responsibility. sorry, long answer, but i'm very passionate _ responsibility. sorry, long answer, but i'm very passionate about - responsibility. sorry, long answer, i but i'm very passionate about this. i but i'm very passionate about this. i don't _ but i'm very passionate about this. idon't think— but i'm very passionate about this. i don't think he — but i'm very passionate about this. i don't think he has— but i'm very passionate about this. i don't think he has set— but i'm very passionate about this. i don't think he has set the - but i'm very passionate about this. i don't think he has set the correct| i don't think he has set the correct exambte — i don't think he has set the correct example we _ idon't think he has set the correct example. i've been— i don't think he has set the correct example. i've been a _ i don't think he has set the correct example. i've been a conservativei example. i've been a conservative voter— example. i've been a conservative voter att— example. i've been a conservative voter all my— example. i've been a conservative voter all my adult _ example. i've been a conservative voter all my adult life. _ example. i've been a conservative voter all my adult life. i _ example. i've been a conservative voter all my adult life. i couldn't l voter all my adult life. i couldn't vote _ voter all my adult life. i couldn't vote him — voter all my adult life. i couldn't vote him in _ voter all my adult life. i couldn't vote him in i— voter all my adult life. i couldn't vote him in. i really— voter all my adult life. i couldn't vote him in. i really couldn't. i voter all my adult life. i couldn't vote him in. i really couldn't. [fl vote him in. i really couldn't. ll” he vote him in. i really couldn't. he was still prime minister, vote him in. i really couldn't.“ he was still prime minister, leader of the conservative party at the next general election, you would not vote for the conservatives? absolutely not. let vote for the conservatives? absolutely not.—
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vote for the conservatives? absolutel not. . w ., absolutely not. let me ask olivia and ross — absolutely not. let me ask olivia and ross. olivia, _ absolutely not. let me ask olivia and ross. olivia, would - absolutely not. let me ask olivia and ross. olivia, would you - absolutely not. let me ask olivia and ross. olivia, would you vote| and ross. olivia, would you vote conservative if he was still prime minister? i conservative if he was still prime minister? ~ ., . ., minister? i think i would have to. ross us macro _ minister? i think i would have to. ross us macro the _ minister? i think i would have to. ross us macro the answer- minister? i think i would have to. ross us macro the answer is - minister? i think i would have to. ross us macro the answer is yes, minister? i think i would have to. - ross us macro the answer is yes, but i would like to see some change. i would like to see boris now honing in and learning some interpersonal skills. what does that mean? itrrui’eiiii. skills. what does that mean? well, it means how _ skills. what does that mean? well, it means how to _ skills. what does that mean? well, it means how to treat. .. _ skills. what does that mean? well, it means how to treat. .. he - skills. what does that mean? well, it means how to treat. .. he has - it means how to treat... he has obviously— it means how to treat... he has obviously hacked _ it means how to treat... he has obviously hacked off _ it means how to treat... he has obviously hacked off a - it means how to treat... he has obviously hacked off a lot - it means how to treat... he has obviously hacked off a lot of- it means how to treat... he has- obviously hacked off a lot of people with what _ obviously hacked off a lot of people with what he — obviously hacked off a lot of people with what he has _ obviously hacked off a lot of people with what he has done. _ obviously hacked off a lot of people with what he has done. i— obviously hacked off a lot of people with what he has done. i can- obviously hacked off a lot of people with what he has done. i can sense| with what he has done. i can sense it, i with what he has done. i can sense it. i can _ with what he has done. i can sense it. i can tell— with what he has done. i can sense it. icantett in— with what he has done. i can sense it, i can tell in this _ with what he has done. i can sense it, i can tell in this meeting, - with what he has done. i can sense it, i can tell in this meeting, in- it, i can tell in this meeting, in previous— it, i can tell in this meeting, in previous meetings. _ it, i can tell in this meeting, in previous meetings. but - it, i can tell in this meeting, in previous meetings. but what l it, i can tell in this meeting, in. previous meetings. but what can it, i can tell in this meeting, in- previous meetings. but what can he do to— previous meetings. but what can he do to make — previous meetings. but what can he do to make things _ previous meetings. but what can he do to make things change? - previous meetings. but what can he do to make things change? how- previous meetings. but what can he i do to make things change? how does he win— do to make things change? how does he win back— do to make things change? how does he win back a — do to make things change? how does he win back a public— do to make things change? how does he win back a public vote? _ do to make things change? how does he win back a public vote? ”that - do to make things change? how does he win back a public vote?— he win back a public vote? that is a big question- _ he win back a public vote? that is a big question. thank _ he win back a public vote? that is a big question. thank you _ he win back a public vote? that is a big question. thank you very - he win back a public vote? that is a i big question. thank you very much. good luck with your business, continuing success. thank you, all of you, for talking to us this morning. from today, people in england with coronavirus can end their isolation after five full
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days — providing they test negative on days five and six. it's hoped the change will ease staff shortages across the economy.the latest phase of the covid vaccine programme in england also begins today — with boosterjabs available to all 16 and i7—year—olds.. scotland is welcoming back full crowds at large outdoor public events such as football matches. the holyrood government limited numbers to 500 people last month, as part of a series of measures to help slow the spread of the omicron variant of covid. people must provide proof of covid vaccination or a recent negative test. there's been a significant increase in the number of fatal collisions on uk roads. a bbc panorama investigation has found that hundreds of speed cameras are switched off, police are doing fewer breathalyser tests — and there are fewer dedicated traffic police officers. richard bilton reports. something is happening on our roads. for the first time in a0 years, there has been a significant rise in the fatality rate, the deaths per mile.
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uk roads are getting more dangerous. the thing is, it shouldn't be like this. cars are getting safer, roads should be getting safer. but that is not what is going on. panorama has found there has been a sharp reduction in the number of dedicated police traffic officers. we got figures from 3a of the 44 police forces. they had 5,000 dedicated traffic officers in 2016. but 757 officers have been lost in just five years. that's a fall of 15%. the police watchdog is concerned. there are some police forces that have got negligible presence on the road. that has happened because, in general, it's been given a low priority. you have a scenario where
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the fatality rate has risen for the first time in a0 years. yeah. is that because there are fewer police officers out there? yeah, we think so. 1,600 people die on uk roads every year. the police say roads policing remains a priority. but panorama found key methods of catching offenders have been reduced. in the last decade, the number of breathalyser tests have been cut by more than 50%. and freedom of information responses from 26 forces reveal almost half of their fixed speed cameras are not switched on. if there's less chance of being caught, some drivers, and i say some, will take those risks. they will be reckless, they will speed, they will cause deaths. the government says our roads are among the safest in the world. they add that deployment of resources is a matter for individual police forces. but it's investing an extra £1.1
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billion in police funding next year. but what panorama has found is a road network with fewer checks and increased danger. richard bilton, bbc news. aid agencies have warned that up to 80,000 people could be affected by the volcanic eruption and tsunami that hit the pacific nation of tonga at the weekend. there's been significant damage to several islands and the capital has been blanketed with ash. relatives of a british woman say they're desperately waiting for news after reports angela glover — who runs an animal rescue centre — was swept away by a wave. i'm joined now by katie greenwood who's co—ordinating the red cross response from fiji. have you been able to make contact with your red cross colleagues on
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tonga? with your red cross colleagues on tonaa?, . with your red cross colleagues on tonaa? , , ., ,, ., with your red cross colleagues on toma? , , ., ,, tonga? just before speaking to you, i have had tonga? just before speaking to you, i have had a — tonga? just before speaking to you, i have had a message _ tonga? just before speaking to you, i have had a message through - tonga? just before speaking to you, i have had a message through from| i have had a message through from the british high commission, based in wellington, to say that the high commission in tonga have spoken with the head of the red cross there, and thatis the head of the red cross there, and that is the first news we have had, the contact that we have had, with our red cross team on the ground, for over 48 hours. the last time we spoke with the team was on saturday afternoon, just after the explosion and once the tsunami warning had been founded. they were supporting local authorities to move people to the limited higher ground. we are very pleased to hear from the head of the organisation there, to say that he is safe, and that they are working on plans. and we have a plan to speak tomorrow. so we are very happy about that. i to speak tomorrow. so we are very happy about that-— to speak tomorrow. so we are very happy about that. i bet that in such a relief, really. _ happy about that. i bet that in such a relief, really. in _ happy about that. i bet that in such a relief, really. in terms _ happy about that. i bet that in such a relief, really. in terms of - happy about that. i bet that in such a relief, really. in terms of what i a relief, really. in terms of what your colleagues are going to do, is it about getting people off the
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islands, is it about trying to help people in terms of first aid, food and water, as they are there? or what? what is the priority? the good news for us — what? what is the priority? the good news for us is — what? what is the priority? the good news for us is that _ what? what is the priority? the good news for us is that we _ what? what is the priority? the good news for us is that we believe - what? what is the priority? the good news for us is that we believe that, l news for us is that we believe that, from the information we can put together, that it is not as catastrophic in those major population centres as we first thought that it might be. so, that is really good news. the team on the ground, what they are doing at the moment as they have been supporting evacuations during the immediate crisis of the eruption and the tsunami warning. they will be doing first aid as required, and now the job will be to assess the damage, and they have urgent relief items required for households, things like clean water, shoring up their homes and shelters if they have been damaged, and blankets, lamps and things like that. urgent equipment. they will be distributing that is required to people. we are also
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really keen to understand what the impact is on clean drinking water and on food gardens. taste impact is on clean drinking water and on food gardens.— impact is on clean drinking water and on food gardens. we are 'ust lookin: at and on food gardens. we are 'ust looking at pictures i and on food gardens. we are 'ust looking at pictures as i and on food gardens. we are 'ust looking at pictures as you i and on food gardens. we are just looking at pictures as you are - looking at pictures as you are talking, if whole areas are covered, blanketed with ash, that is a really serious problem for food and fresh water, isn't it? it serious problem for food and fresh water, isn't it?— water, isn't it? it absolutely is. we think that _ water, isn't it? it absolutely is. we think that in _ water, isn't it? it absolutely is. we think that in the _ water, isn't it? it absolutely is. we think that in the immediate j we think that in the immediate sense, because these eruptions have been happening since late last year, the government had been giving people warnings to cover their water sources, to take the gutter is that were feeding rainwater into rainwater tanks, the majority of people in tonga rely on rainwater for their essential household needs. so, it might be that some of those stores are clean and have been covered, and remain away from ash. however, that will run out pretty quickly. one of the first and most important thing is that we need to do in terms of the responses to make
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sure that people have access to hygiene equipment, water purification equipment, and some of those items are also coming in from new zealand and australia to enable that response as well.— that response as well. thank you very much _ that response as well. thank you very much for— that response as well. thank you very much for talking _ that response as well. thank you very much for talking to - that response as well. thank you very much for talking to us. - that response as well. thank you very much for talking to us. we i very much for talking to us. we really appreciate your time. thank you. the parents of a young woman who was fatally stabbed in derbyshire last year are one step closer to getting a new law in her memory. it's thought gracie spinks was killed by a former work colleague, whom she had previously reported for stalking her. he was found dead near the murder scene. a petition calling for more support for stalking victims will be debated in parliament. luxmy gopal has been speaking to gracie's family. go on, gracie! woohoo! just full of life and energy, and just lived for her horses, didn't she? such a beautiful young girl with her whole life ahead of her.
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she did light up the room wherever she went. gracie spinks was stabbed in the neck as she was looking after her horse lastjune. it's believed the killer was a former colleague, who was found dead shortly afterwards nearby. gracie had reported him to derbyshire police for stalking her. a bag of weapons had been found and reported to police near the spot, where, just a week later, gracie was killed. the force is being investigated by the police watchdog over its handling of the case. christmas was particularly difficult, and her birthday on the 19th of october. notjust the family, but close friends and people beyond. it's been the worst christmas we've ever had. so painful. and just... just getting worse. the pain's getting worse, not better. a petition in gracie's name, to improve support for victims of stalking, has now passed 100,000 signatures.
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how does it feel that this is now going to be potentially discussed in parliament? one of my work colleagues actually sent me a screenshot of a football stadium and said, "just to put it into perspective, this is how many people, you know, loved gracie and have signed for gracie." and i thought, yeah, that puts it into perspective, really, when you see... ..see those numbers. yeah, amazing. the campaigner who set up the petition wants police forces to allocate specific funding for stalking cases. i'd like a separate pot - for stalking, for investigations, for the cps, for the courts, in order to prioritize - stalking cases. in response to the petition, the government said... "to ensure victims and survivors are supported, the home office part funds the national stalking helpline, and has recently tripled its funding." it says it's also made a commitment to work with police, to make sure they're making proper use of stalking protection orders. for gracie's parents, it's about making a lasting difference.
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to make girls, women and men feel safer when they're out. this will go on. this will be gracie's law, gracie's legacy. it's like a message from gracie saying, "it's time for change." one young woman's life cut short by violence. but now, in her memory, a mission to try to protect others from suffering the same fate. luxmy gopal, bbc news. a 29—year—old man from london has been receiving thousands of messages from women all over the world, to his billboard ad to help him find a wife. such a massive response that he is doing a spreadsheet of all of the people that he gets in touch with. hi, i'm malik. you might have seen my face on a billboard somewhere. i'm an entrepreneur, and i am religious. i am looking for someone who is working on her din. i am open to any ethnicity.
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if you're interested, fill out the form or check out my details. 29—year—old muhammad malik from hounslow in west london decided to advertise himself on billboards in a quest to find a wife. malik decided to take this unconventional approach after years of struggling to find a life partner through other methods, including dating apps. the kernel of an idea was presented to me by a friend who i know in marketing. and it was me kind of complaining about, man, you know, i'm doing so many things, i'm so busy with work, with a side hustle, with hobbies. on top of that, events are closing because of the pandemic, right? so how can you get out there? the conversation led to something quite extreme, literally getting yourself out there, oldschool billboards, and the billboards are dotted around manchester, birmingham and london, in particular those areas with more ethnic minorities. hey, i'm malik and that's my billboard. why do you have a problem with arranged marriages?
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i am definitely not against arranged marriages. if anything, i think the evidence and the research goes to show this is probably one of the best ways to find a spouse, because you go beyond face value, to real values. but i thought, you know what, let's try this route. if not, i'm definitely not against going to the good old grapevine. so far, malik has received over 1,000 messages from women and his story has travelled all over the world. i'm getting messages from tanzania, america, overseas. it's phenomenal. friends and people who know me really well have said to me, mate, what is going on? this is absolutely... you were playing football with us the other day, just chilling, and now you are being spoken about on forums, you're being spoken about on news channels and stuff like that. the 29—year—old has been following in his dad's footsteps, who also did something similar when he was searching for a wife. this is going back 30—odd years, somebody mentioned there is an urdu
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paper, you don't have to worry about it, just put it in the paper and get some response. and i did that. and that is how i got married. so it runs in the family, i suppose. how are you going to filter these messages, and how are you going to find the one? i've got a spreadsheet and i am going through with all of the messages that have come through. so, whittling it down initially with questions. i've got some personality questions. like, what type of person are you in this scenario? and then getting it to the next stage, which is kind of skype calls, zoom calls with the person and their family as well. one of the most decorated african—american military pilots, charles mcgee, has died at the age of 102. he was an original member of the tuskegee airmen, an all—black us air force unit formed during the second world war, charles mcgee flew 409 combat missions spanning world war two, and the korean and
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vietnam conflicts. he also fought passionately against segregation in the us military. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again, throughout this working week, we're looking at areas of high pressure being in charge of our weather, so things will be fairly settled. today we've got this ridge of high pressure across us. it's been a cold start to the day and also a frosty one. and we also have a weather front waiting in the wings, coming our way later on. so a lot of dry weather around today, a lot of sunshine. bit more cloud across the north and west of scotland, that will push back towards the coast through the day and not as windy as it was yesterday for you. but some of that cloud could still produce some drizzle. temperatures between about seven and ten degrees. as we head through the evening, very quickly we'll see some fog reform across the midlands, eastern and southern parts of england now. at the same time, we've got
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a weather front waiting in the wings in the west, bringing in thicker cloud and some rain, so temperatures not falling away as much here. but we're looking at a widespread frost and of course, where we've got the fog, does mean it will be freezing fog. so here's our high pressure drifting southwards tomorrow, allowing this weather front to push in across scotland and also northern ireland. the fog will be slow to lift tomorrow. in fact, it may linger well into the afternoon and as our weather front comes in, followed hot on its heels by a second one, well, it will bring in thicker clouds, some rain and strong winds, gusting to gale force with exposure. temperatures between five and about ten degrees. now, as we move through tuesday night and into wednesday, here's our first weather front, followed by the second one, both slipping southwards. from the isobars you can tell, we've got a cold northwesterly wind, and it will be a noticeable wind. so our weather fronts moving south take the cloud and patchy rain with them. a lot of dry conditions following behind with some sunshine.
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that cold wind and some wintry showers across the hills in the north and also the east. temperatures, five in aberdeen to about nine in cardiff. now, as we move through wednesday night into thursday, this high pressure edges towards us but you can still see the blues right across the charts and still this northwesterly wind. so on thursday, it's going to start on a cold note with a widespread frost. we're not anticipating any issues with fog, probably will be too windy. but there'll be a lot of sunshine around, but still some showers coming in down this north sea coastline. there could also be wintry in nature. but again, this shouldn't be problematic. and our temperature is six to nine, feeling cold.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: two teenagers have been arrested in manchester in connection with the texas synagogue siege — the british hostage—taker was a man from blackburn. more than a quarter of households will struggle to pay their energy bills soon, according to a new report today. it's come to the point where if i'm a bit short on electric and it's close to the time i'm going to be paid, top up again, i have to be clever enough to say, "don't do that washing because you will run out of electricity." search and rescue continues in tonga after a huge volcanic eruption triggered a tsunami. relatives of a british woman missing say they're desperately waiting for news. and novak djokovic is due to land back in belgrade shortly, following his deportation, as the australian open begins without the world number one.
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two teenagers have been arrested in manchester as part of the investigation into a siege at a synagogue in the united states. the man responsible — malik faisal akram from lancashire — was shot and killed by police near dallas in texas, after he took a rabbi and three other people hostage during a service. they were later freed unharmed. counter—terrorism authorities on both sides of the atlantic are now investigating what happened, as sophie long reports this is the moment the three final hostages ran for their lives, more than ten hours after their ordeal began. a successful, but nonetheless
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terrifying end, to the delicate, day—long operation involving negotiators and heavily armed police. the man, now identified as malik faisal akram, a 44—year—old british citizen, originally from lancashire, was shot and killed. he'd claimed to have a gun and a bomb when he interrupted a peaceful morning service being streamed from the congregation beth israel in dallas. akram was heard ranting about religion and demanding the release of a pakistani neuroscientist with suspected links to al-qaeda, currently serving a prison sentence in texas. people came here, a place of worship, to pray. but once again in america, a moment of peace became a moment of profound pain. as the people who were trapped, terrified, try to come to terms with what happened,
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synagogues across the country have increased security in fear of copycat attacks. this was an act of terror. we're not going to tolerate this. we have this capacity to deal with assaults on, particularly the anti—semitism that has grown up. and so i'll be talking with — i put a call into the rabbi. we missed one another on the way up here. but they should rest assured that we are focused. as soon as it became known that akram was a british citizen who, according to the fbi, entered the united states just two weeks ago, the investigation became global. counter—terror police in manchester are assisting the us authorities, and are now questioning two teenagers who were arrested in the city last night. sophie long, bbc news, dallas. our correspondent dave guest is in blackburn, where malik faisal akram was from. obviously people in a state of disbelief here in the blackburn as
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his family. they have issued a statement, his brother said, we on a family do not condone any of his actions and would like to sincerely apologise to all the victims involved... the family spent a number of tense here at blackburn police station over the weekend as they liaised with fbi negotiators and british authorities in the hope of trying to bring this stand—off to a peaceful conclusion. the hostages were released unharmed but akram was killed by law—enforcement officers in the states. police on both sides of the atlantic are now looking into why he went to america, was anybody else involved or were teachers operating on his own? his family insist he had mental health issues, they are not saying that excuses what he did but they are saying this
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has come out of the blue to them and they are cooperating with the police. meanwhile, those arrests in manchester overnight, you do expect quite a bit of police activity in the wake of a terrorist incident, so not too surprising. what we don't know at the remedies who these people are. we know they are teenagers in the south manchester area, we don't know their ages or gender but this is an ongoing investigation. police are liaising with local communities to try and calm them and the family of this man, akram, still trying to come to terms with what he did. with the latest on the investigation, here's our security correspondent, frank gardner. britain and the us already share a huge amount of intelligence and obviously the origins of this come back to the uk, because malik faisal akram travelled two weeks' ago to the us via jfk airport. he is believed to have
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bought his weapon there in the us and travelled down to dallas, where he carried this out, but the investigation is, although it has been led by the fbi, the federal bureau of investigation, it is liaising very closely notjust with british counter terrorism police, that is greater manchester police as well, but also with, they have been in contact with israel, because of the synagogue connection here. this doesn't look on the surface to be like a kind of classics isis or al-qaeda operation. the brother has suggested that there were mental health issues involved, but the fact that he was making a political statement demanding the release of aafia siddiqui, who is a pakistani neuroscientist, you heard there in sophie long's report, that has pushed it into the realm of terrorism, which is why all leads are being investigated, and as you heard there, two teenagers have been arrested last night in manchester,
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but they have not as yet been charged. relatives of a british woman missing after a tsunami hit the pacific island nation of tonga say they're desperately waiting for news. angela glover, who runs an animal rescue centre, was swept away by a wave. air force planes from australia and new zealand have been sent to tonga to survey the damage caused by the tsunami, which was triggered by a massive volcanic eruption. howard johnson reports. a military surveillance plane leaving auckland, new zealand this morning, bound for tonga. australia has also sent planes to carry out an assessment of the damage caused by saturday's eruption of an underwater volcano. satellite images captured the moment a tsunami, triggered by the eruption, engulfed tonga and sent a shock wave across the pacific ocean. and listen to this. a sonic boom captured on video more than 400 miles away in fiji.
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sonic boom sounds. the international federation of the red cross estimate that more than 80,000 people have been affected by the eruption, with stories of missing people being reported on social media. briton angela glover was last seen by her husband clinging to a tree, before she was swept away by the tsunami. the family have put a number of posts on social media, appealing for information. she moved to tonga in 2015, leaving behind an advertising job to start an animal shelter, where she looks after and houses stray dogs, and is a popular figure on the island. the local authorities have been conducting searches and i believe they are still ongoing. it is daytime here. look, it is 48 hours. i am not holding out much hope. communications to tonga remain badly affected. not knowing what happened to loved ones is creating an unbearable concern.
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howard johnson, bbc news, manila. let's show you some extraordinary pictures of that volcanic eruption just off tonga last friday and you can see the size of the black clouds and the volcanic ash coming up here in the explosion. ajapanese weather satellite detected the ash plumes were up to 20 kilometres high. the volcano erupted again on saturday, triggering a tsunami on the shores of tonga. the island completely blanketed with ash. dave turned to night according to people who experienced it. katie greenwood, who's co—ordinating the red cross response from fiji gave us an update on the situation in tonga
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the good news for us is that we believe that from the information we can put together that it is not as catastrophic in those major populations as we first thought it might be, so that is really good news, but the team there on the ground, what they are doing at the moment is they have been supporting evacuations during the immediate crisis of the eruption and the tsunami warning. they will be doing first aid as required and now the job will be to assess the damage and they have urgent relief items are required for households for things like clean water, shoring up their homes and shelters if they have been damaged and blankets and lamps and things like that, urgent equipment. we will be distributing that is required to people. a report has warned more than a quarter of households will struggle to pay their energy bills in april when the average household energy bill is expected to increase by £600—£700. the rise is coming because of
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an increase in the price cap — the maximum price that suppliers in england, wales and scotland can charge domestic customers on a standard tariff. the cap at the moment means no household should pay more than £1,277 per yearfor a typical amount of energy. but energy firms are having to pay more for the gas they sell onto us and many smallerfirms have been forced out of business. that means the energy price cap will have to rise — some experts think the new cap could be set at almost £2,000 a year. one group that looks at this — the resolution foundation — says the decision could mean more than 6 million households are spending at least 10% of their monthly budgets on energy bills. people who fall into that category used to be described as being in fuel poverty. the government changed the official definition in 2013 so it's now referrred to as fuel stress. whatever the term, the reality is more worry for people who've already seen their bills rise quite sharply this year. michael buchannan has been speaking to some
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of the people who are struggling. i weigh six stone at the moment. so i'm cold all the time. and because i'm a wheelchair user, and a lot of me doesn't move any more, my circulation is really very poor. anne vivian—smith has a neurodegenerative condition. she lives with her husband — a university manager — in a small, increasingly cold bungalow in nottinghamshire, and the rising cost of energy is harming her health. i have three thermal layers on almost all the time now. i was sat under four blankets last week. i no longer eat breakfast and lunch because it's too expensive. this morning, anne checked her energy bills, and received an almighty shock. we found out today — our energy bill is usually £84 a month, and it's going up to 140. that's nearly doubled, and yet dave's salary is not going up,
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my benefits aren't going up, and i'm really distressed about it, and i've already had a little cry, and i'm likely to have another one! many more families will be similarly anguished by rapidly rising gas and electricity bills. the resolution foundation think tank calculates that, by april, over six million households in england will struggle with their energy bills, with costs set to increase on average from £100 to £150 a month. £50 a month increase is beyond the means of millions of families, especially coming at the same time as changes to the tax system, where national insurance contributions will increase. so, you know, we'll see a lot of families really struggling, come april. the government say it has put a range of measures in place to support households, and will continue to listen to consumers and business on how to manage their energy costs. can i have £25 on that, please? james harpin has already seen his costs nearly double in a year, each top—up lasting less time. i've put my postcode in. usually he'd just change providers.
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but this time, there's no point. it turns out that i am actually, in comparison to current energy deals available, on quite a good deal, it would seem, by quite a margin. james cares for his daughter for half the week, so heats his flat when she stays. otherwise, the 33—year—old lives frugally, even limiting his use of the washing machine. it's come to the point where, if i'm a bit short on electric and it's close to the time i'm going to be paid to top up again, i have to be clever enough to say, "don't do that washing, because you'll run out of electricity." so, let it build up, get paid, top up and then work through the washing, which is, again, a situation i've neverfound myself in until this year. low—income families, says today's report, should be offered a bigger and broader support package by ministers. but the scale of the looming price rises creates understandable worry. i have no choice but to use my hoists to change chairs, and to use my power chair
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to get around. i have no choice but to use my electric bed. and all of this is going to have an impact on the costs that our energy company is going to throw us. michael buchanan, bbc news. it isa it is a quarter past 11. the headlines on bbc news: two teenagers have been arrested in manchester in connection with the texas synagogue siege...the british hostage—taker was a man from blackburn. more than a quarter of households will struggle to pay their energy bills soon, according to a new report today search and rescue continues in tonga after a huge volcanic eruption triggered a tsunami. relatives of a british woman missing say they're desperately waiting for news. after nearly a fortnight of controversy, play is under way at the australian open
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tennis in melbourne. last year's men's singles champion, novak djokovic, was deported from australia yesterday when a court upheld a decision to cancel his visa on the grounds he hadn't been vaccinated against covid. he's due to arrive home in serbia shortly. the australian home affairs minister has hinted that he won't be allowed back into the country until 2025, throwing his hopes of a tenth title in melbourne into chaos. gareth barlow reports. taking selfies with fans after landing in dubai. it isn't how novak djokovic envisage spending the first day of the australian open. not in australia, and not playing tennis. the world number one was on the first flight out of melbourne on sunday, after a court backed the australian immigration minister's decision to cancel djokovic�*s visa.
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the serbian said he was extremely disappointed by the ruling. the australian government said he was a talisman of anti—vaccination sentiment, and his presence risked civil unrest. and as crowds arrived to watch the action in the right type of court, public sentiment was mostly on the government's side. to be honest, most of the tennis players are vaccinated. obviously that was a requirement of getting into the country. i feel as though if everyone else did it, he should have done it. i do feel the government should have taken some responsibility, with giving him the exemption initially. i have a theory that anyone in australia who is not vaccinated, cannot go to work, can't go to a restaurant, probably can't walk into the gate here today, so why should anyone go to work without vaccination in australia full stop? i think he deserved it. no player is above the game. he set himself up for that.
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all he had to do was get vaccinated or do the right thing, _ and he could have stayed. for 11 days, the focus of the australian open has not been on sport. it has been on djokovic�*s unvaccinated status and the status of his visa. the hope for the open and for australia will be that tennis will distract from the circus. for djokovic now, some time to collect his thoughts and response to the most tumultuous period of his career. his plane was due to arrive ten minutes ago but it has been delayed. as we have seen, he flew in from dubai having been deported from australia. i am dubai having been deported from australia. lam not dubai having been deported from australia. i am not sure if this is
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the plain that he is on. let us stay with these pictures. we saw some still photographs of him on the plane going to do itself. and this is obviously a live feed. we have no control over these pictures but it would seem this is the plane. let's stick with these pictures for a moment. that is obviously not him. the airport is 18 miles west of belgrade. be interesting to see, well, there has been already vociferous reaction from the media and politicians in serbia about his treatment, saying australia had treated him as a criminal and would regret the harassing of novak djokovic. i have been told on the international wire is that the plane has landed and that would make sense, bearing in mind that we are now on board were novak djokovic �*s
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is anyone's guess. i am not sure we will stay with these pictures too much longer. those following the tennis implications of this will note this is devastating for novak djokovic. he is currently on 20 grand slam titles along with roger federer and rafa nadal and he has been going for his 21st grand slam but if he is not allowed to play in australia, that will dent his chances obviously. he is also unlikely to play by the associated tennis group in indian wells and miami, the us have tightened their restrictions. france has also said that they will require everybody to be jabbed as well. maybe wimbledon, potentially will be the only one that novak djokovic will be allowed
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to compete in. apparently that is the plane where novak djokovic is due to get out of shortly. the education secretary, nadhim zahawi, says the prime minister recognises the anger surrounding the parties which took place in downing street during the lockdown. mr zahawi again urged people to wait for the findings of an inquiry being headed by a senior civil servant. six conservative mps have now called on borisjohnson to resign over the issue. our political correspondent chris mason reports. this is leigh in greater manchester. labour for the best part of a century, until borisjohnson asked for votes in the town. then, the conservatives won. so what do people here make of what's gone on, and whether he should stay on as prime minister? it's all the nurses and the doctors who've worked hard during the pandemic, who obviously have been let down. they say that the devil that you know is better than the devil you don't know.
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and at least we know where we are with him. he won't do nothing, but somebody else might do something. i think he should go. i mean, there's been plenty of things happened in the past where politicians have done not half as bad as he's done, and they've had to leave. they've resigned, or they've been forced out. they should alljust go, for me. they're all out for themselves, not for the working people, are they? not one of them. the list of social do's that went on in westminster, when social do's were banned, is long. and these are just the ones we know about. it's up to this woman, sue gray, a senior civil servant, to catalogue the lot of them. but it could be another week or so before we find out what she's found out, leaving lots of conservative mps to ponder that... what my constituents are doing now, is they're comparing their own experiences over the last — well, almost two years, isn't it? with what they're seeing on television. and a number of them
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are now looking on in disbelief that it's been the interpretation of some people in downing street that the law ends at the number 10 garden wall. so many conservative mps feel hugely let down, angry and unable to justify what has happened. but, for plenty of them, borisjohnson is the reason they're in politics, the reason they're in parliament. so, to topple him just two years after winning so big a a general election, is a huge thing for them to contemplate, let alone do. mps return here this morning with plenty to ponder. chris mason, bbc news. let's speak to our political correspondent helen catt. mps are coming back to parliament after a weekend of hearing from constituents — what is the feeling about the prime minister's current position? tory mps spent the weekend talking to their constituents. they will
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have got a better sense of how they have got a better sense of how they have been reacting to that. what we have been reacting to that. what we have seen over the last few days is a mixture i think it's fair to say within the conservative party. there are a lot of conservative mps, so on the one hand we have seen an increasing number of conservatives coming up to say he should go. now up coming up to say he should go. now up to six who have publicly said the prime minister should resign. that is a long way short of the 54 needed to trigger a vote of no—confidence. you also have other saying they spent the weekend, their inboxes are full of e—mails about this, others have said they had not seen the backlash they were expecting and will wait for the report which is the government's position, it remains that. nadhim zahawi repeating that, that they want to wait for this report to come out from sue gray. we are expecting that at the end of this week, maybe next
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week and that will be the point where tory mps will have two then decide which way they willjump. meanwhile, you have downing street denying the existence of reports of an operation red meat or operation save big dog and that is all relating to a number of announcements we have seen over the weekend which is expected will play quite well with some of the part of their party. abs. quite well with some of the part of their -a . �* ., quite well with some of the part of their -a . . ., ., quite well with some of the part of their party-— their party. a lot of the announcements - their party. a lot of the announcements were l their party. a lot of the l announcements were not their party. a lot of the - announcements were not new. their party. a lot of the _ announcements were not new. they had been rumbling along but it does look pretty clear that number ten have been trying to sell as much positive news as possible to the party faithful. pressure on keir starmer to a certain extent about a drinks party he attended last year as well. yes, keir starmer, a photograph of him clutching a bottle of beer during the hartlepool by—election. he said he didn't do anything wrong, that he was having a takeaway in the office and they stopped working to have a beer, he says that was within
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the rules but there has been pressure on him over the weekend. just back to sue gray because as more and more allegations arise, there is more for her to investigate. though she has a pretty tough reputation. she was responsible for the resignations of three cabinet ministers but she has never taken on a prime minister before. ., . �* , ,, . , . before. no, that's true. she has a formidable _ before. no, that's true. she has a formidable reputation _ before. no, that's true. she has a formidable reputation and - before. no, that's true. she has a formidable reputation and the - before. no, that's true. she has a| formidable reputation and the one thing people seem to be consistently saying is sue gray is scrupulously impartial and she will do a good job, and we have been hearing that from everyone. she is an experienced civil servant, she has investigated people before to look at potential breaches of rules and the most obvious one that comes to mind is damian green, back when he was the deputy prime minister. sue gray was
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the woman who did the investigation into him, so she does have a reputation for being thorough and impartial. we do await that report. of course we don't quite know what she can say in this report, the expectation is it will be a layout of the facts. she is unlikely to be making a judgment on whether or not the prime minister broke the rules, but she is expected to be laying out the facts in the situation at the time and we will wait and see how far she will or will not go with that. joining me now is alex crowley, former adviser to borisjohnson, now campaign consultant. is borisjohnson is boris johnson done is borisjohnson done for? i is boris johnson done for? i think he has a decision _ is boris johnson done for? i think he has a decision to _ is boris johnson done for? i think he has a decision to make. - is boris johnson done for? i think he has a decision to make. and i is boris johnson done for? i think i he has a decision to make. and this really is what everything stems back to. he has to decide does he really want to do the job? when you hear about all the things going on, you would legitimately question that. but also, if he does want to do the
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job, carry on, what does he want to do thejob for? job, carry on, what does he want to do the job for? what does he want to achieve? we have heard this week about operation red meat which is a silly destruction really, but it does go to the heart of the issue. now that the brexit deal has been signed and i appreciate brexit is notjust signed and i appreciate brexit is not just about that, what is signed and i appreciate brexit is notjust about that, what is the purpose in government? in absence of purpose, in a vacuum of purpose, conservative mps are thinking, what is the reason to hold on to our leader beyond electability? if the only reason to judge a leader is by electability then there are always vulnerable to dips in popularity as we are seeing in the current situation. we are seeing in the current situation-— we are seeing in the current situation. , . ,, ., . situation. there is talk of a night ofthe situation. there is talk of a night of the long _ situation. there is talk of a night of the long knives _ situation. there is talk of a night of the long knives but _ situation. there is talk of a night of the long knives but that - situation. there is talk of a night of the long knives but that for i of the long knives but that for people around him. will that help? there is this feeling that he is pretty cavalier with the rules and
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perhaps that is represented by the people around him as well. he likes to delegate and perhaps the people he delegated to have let him down, that certainly seems to be what he is saying. that certainly seems to be what he is sa in. . , that certainly seems to be what he issa in. , is saying. yes, i merely observed there have _ is saying. yes, i merely observed there have been _ is saying. yes, i merely observed there have been periods - is saying. yes, i merely observed there have been periods in - is saying. yes, i merely observed there have been periods in his. there have been periods in his political career where he has been quite effective when he has had a strong and disciplined and capable team around him, that has not always been the case. did team around him, that has not always been the case-— been the case. did that coincide when ou been the case. did that coincide when you were _ been the case. did that coincide when you were there? - been the case. did that coincide when you were there? i - been the case. did that coincide | when you were there? i wouldn't been the case. did that coincide - when you were there? i wouldn't say that, i wouldn't _ when you were there? i wouldn't say that, i wouldn't talk _ when you were there? i wouldn't say that, i wouldn't talk myself- when you were there? i wouldn't say that, i wouldn't talk myself or - when you were there? i wouldn't say that, i wouldn't talk myself or any i that, i wouldn't talk myself or any former colleagues up, what i would say is we are observing what we are seeing now. it is chaos. there is no other way of saying it. the government has been dragged into a scandal of its own making and it has taken decisions and communications terms that have prolonged the pain and not put an end to it. whilst all
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of this is happening, you go back to the central question, what is it the government capable of getting the dayjob? what are the priorities? there are huge issues to address in this country and in the absence of that, what is left? there is still an opportunity to reset, there is an opportunity to really knuckle down and we discover a governing mission, but the opportunity is fading. horse but the opportunity is fading. how much is this _ but the opportunity is fading. how much is this to _ but the opportunity is fading. how much is this to do _ but the opportunity is fading. how much is this to do with the vendetta from dominic cummings? you had a tricky relationship with dominic cummings when you are working for borisjohnson but he is now committed to destroying the prime minister. is that something that perhaps the prime minister should try and mend or bring about some replacement between him and dominic cummings? replacement between him and dominic cummints? . replacement between him and dominic cummints? , ., _ replacement between him and dominic cummints? . ., _ . cummings? yes, look, obviously that was a nuclear—
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cummings? yes, look, obviously that was a nuclear falling _ cummings? yes, look, obviously that was a nuclear falling out _ cummings? yes, look, obviously that was a nuclear falling out and - cummings? yes, look, obviously that was a nuclear falling out and we - cummings? yes, look, obviously that was a nuclear falling out and we are l was a nuclear falling out and we are now seeing the consequences of that. it is some kind of patching up of differences going to solve things? i suspect probably not. you can see both personalities that that is not an option and look, that is what happens when you bring someone like dominic cummings in. on the one hand he is exceptional in many ways and on the other he is incredibly volatile in many ways but that is a double—edged sword you had to deal with, and it was always likely to end in a massive falling out because they are two very different personalities. dominic cummings wants to be in charge of everything, borisjohnson likes to delegate however likes to seem like the person in charge said that was never going to work long—term. unfortunately the fallout was entirely predictable.— unfortunately the fallout was entirely predictable. let's take you back to belgrade, _ entirely predictable. let's take you back to belgrade, because - entirely predictable. let's take you back to belgrade, because novak. back to belgrade, because novak
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djokovic has landed. we were on the plane a moment ago. there he is, apparently... yes, sitting in the corner there. this is probably phone footage, but novak djokovic arriving now back at the nikola tesla airport after a pretty chaotic fortnight or so in australia. the government, or the border force of course, first of all, refusing to let a man, seeing his visa requirements were not right, held in the detention centre, and then a judge, revoking that, saying he could play, and then finally, a decision by alex hawke, the immigration minister, and another court appearance which resulted in him being deported. and he was told, actually, he might not be able to return to australia for three years, because of what he did, so, novak djokovic back. we will
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speak to our correspondent in belgrade in a few minutes. but before that... three people have died following a crash on the a1 near stamford in lincolnshire, cambridgeshire police said. they have just released that statement. we will try and get more on that. three people unfortunately dying on the a1 in a crash near stamford. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. it has been a cold and frosty start to the day. we had patchy fog as well which is now lifted, and for most of us, it will be dry and sunny. a bit more cloud across the north and west of scotland, some of which will push back to the coast, so it brightens up. but they, for the odd spot of drizzle. not as windy as yesterday. temperatures today widely between about 7—10. as we reach sunset, quite quickly, we will see some more fog form across the midlands,
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eastern and southern parts of england. a weather front coming in from the west will help keep the temperature up in western areas, but for most, it will be a cold night with a widespread frost, and where there is fog, it will likely be freezing fog. i will be slow to live tomorrow. forsome, not clearance freezing fog. i will be slow to live tomorrow. for some, not clearance of the afternoon. we also have some cloud coming up from the south—west, and at the same time, to weather fronts coming in across northern ireland and scotland. they will bring rain with them and also strong winds, with gales with exposure. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: two teenagers have been arrested in manchester in connection with the texas synagogue siege. the british hostage—taker was a man from blackburn. novak djokovic is back in belgrade following his deportation, as the australian open begins without the world number one. more than a quarter of households will struggle to pay their energy bills soon,
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according to a new report today. search and rescue continues in tonga after a huge volcanic eruption triggered a tsunami. relatives of a british woman missing say they're desperately waiting for news. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane. good morning. all the talk of the australian open has been about the previous champion novak djokovic, who is now back home in serbia — and attention in melbourne can finally turn to matters on the court. the build—up to the event was dominated by djokovic�*s fight to stay and compete after his visa was cancelled due to his vaccination status. he travelled via dubai this morning after being deported and has just landed in his native belgrade. so, to british interest at the tournament, and disappointment for cameron norrie, who's been knocked out in the first round. the british men's number one, who was seeded 12th, lost in straight sets to american
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rising star sebastian korda. no such trouble for rafael nadal, though. the spaniard's bid for a men's record 21st grand slam title got under way with victory over marcos giron. the sixth seed — the only former champion left in the men's draw — beat american giron 6—1, 6—4, 6—2. nadal is making his return to grand slam tennis after five months out with a foot injury. also a winning start for the defending women's champion, japan's naomi osaka. she beat camila osorio to go through to the second round. number one seed and home favourite ashleigh barty is also through to the second round. she comfortably defeated ukraine's lesia tsurenko 6—0, 6—1. barty could face osaka in the fourth round. and six more british players, led by emma raducanu and andy murray, are in action tomorrow. the search for a new manager at goodison park has begun in earnest. rafa benitez was sacked
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yesterday after fewer than seven months in charge. wayne rooney, graham potter and former boss roberto martinez have all been linked with the job. benitez�*s dismissal came after everton's 2—1 defeat at strugglers norwich city, prompting angry scenes from travelling fans. everton have lost nine of their previous 12 premier league games, sinking from fourth in the table to sixteenth. their rivals liverpool are up to second in the premier league after a 3—0 win over brentford at anfield. it's a crucial three points forjurgen klopp's side. fabinho, alex oxlade—chamberlain and takumi minamino here with the goals. the victory moves liverpool above chelsea, 11 points behind leaders manchester city, but with a game in hand. west ham manager david moyes was unhappy with the premier league after his side lost 3—2 at home to leeds. west ham played midweek to fit in a re—scheduled match but, despite leeds having two postponed games, they had the
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week off to prepare. having beaten south africa on saturday, england made it two wins from two in netball�*s quad series yesterday with victory over new zealand. they came back from eight points down at london's copper box arena against the silver ferns, to win their second group game by 49 points to 46. they'll play australia in their final group game tomorrow. and ten years after first lifting the trophy, neil robertson has won his second masters championship. the australian beat england's barry hawkins by 10 frames to 4 in the final at alexandra palace in london. his winning cheque was for a quarter of a million pounds. not bad! that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. yes, thank you, jane.
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let's return to the news that the number of families in england struggling to pay their energy bills is set to treble in april, according to new analysis by the resolution foundation. that's when changes are due to the energy price cap, which sets the maximum that energy firms can charge customers on a standard tariff. the think—tank, which focuses on people on lower incomes, predicts that more than six million households could suffer — with gas and electricity bills set to soar. jonny marshall is a senior economist at resolution foundation. these numbers are catastrophic for people on low incomes. just talk us through the people who will be most affected. is itjust those on low incomes, or could it be middle incomes, or could it be middle incomes as well? that is one of the key points, the price rises coming in aprilfor energy bills are at a scale that are going to affect much people who have been historically impacted by energy
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bills. so we have found that getting up bills. so we have found that getting up to 30% of households are going to struggle to pay their energy bills, using a metric of fuel stress, where energy bills make up 10% or more of household income. so that is a real big drain on household finances. if bills increase over £750 cover that will increase overnight, so the cost of living impact will be sudden and sharp. of living impact will be sudden and shar. �* . . of living impact will be sudden and shar. . . . ., , of living impact will be sudden and shar. . . . sharp. and what are the worst areas affected by this _ sharp. and what are the worst areas affected by this geographically? - sharp. and what are the worst areas affected by this geographically? the worst affected by this geographically? ire: worst areas affected affected by this geographically? ii9: worst areas affected are generally those where housing is less insulated, so where homes waste more energy and heat, so those are in the north—east, the south—west, and the east of england, compared to areas like london, for example, which has more flats and newer buildings which are better insulated. there is also are better insulated. there is also a split by age as well. we find older people are more likely to struggle by energy costs once the price goes up in april, and nearly
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40% of pension age households will find themselves in fuel stress compared to low 20% of working age people. i think many people will ask, why our wholesale energy prices so volatile? surely these companies are hedging against the price fluctuations? the price cap is a result of the energy prices, and companies will hedge a correlate of the price cap. there is a methodology in the way the price gap is calculated, which if you're an energy company, you can follow any will be well covered for the period in question. the bigger issue here is, this is what the cost of gas is now. energy markets have responded quite wildly to the lifting of covid restrictions around the world, and we burn a lot of gas in the uk and we have to pay for that gas. there is no way around that gas. there is no way around that fact. the issue is, how to make that fact. the issue is, how to make thatis that fact. the issue is, how to make that is affordable for people. so we can see all the costs of these more expensive fuels passed straight through to household through
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electricity bills, bixby generates a lot of electricity from gas, or through gas bills, because the uk is reliant on gas for heating. that's why there is a large impact so soon. what should the government be doing about this? for one thing, i think all the green issues and legislation is passed on to customers' bills are not part of general taxation. how would it change things if that were made part of general taxation? the scale of the — made part of general taxation? ii9 scale of the coming price rise mean that the government absolutely must do something. this is far greater than can be resolved with advice to turn your heating down a bit of was a jumper on. there are a number of options on the table, one of which is removing the levies from electricity bills that pay for renewable energy and social programmes such as insulation and helpful bills for those who need it the most, remove that into general taxation, which is generally a fairer way of doing things. the lower income households spend about three times as much of their budgets and energy is the highest earning ones, so levying policy costs that way isn't particularly fair, whereas
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if you move those into general taxation, that will bring down everyone has micro energy bill by about 170— everyone has micro energy bill by about 170- £180 everyone has micro energy bill by about 170— £180 per year and would pay for it of a fairer way where people pay more into the tax system, whereas those earning more money would pay more into the system. thank you for talking us through this figure. as you said, very stage rise expected in a few months' time. there's a very sharp rise. aid agencies have warned that up to 80,000 people could be affected by the volcanic eruption and tsunami that hit the pacific nation of tonga at the weekend. there's been significant damage to several islands and the capital has been blanketed with ash. i'm joined now by anna jane lagi, a tongan university student studying in fiji. how are things back in tonga? what have you heard? thank you. the most prominent would be the layer of ash upon the land.
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one of the descriptions it has come is that you could sing almost your whole hand into how thick the layer of ashes, and so everyone has their masks to keep safe, because the air is not good. water systems are contaminated, so everyone must stack up contaminated, so everyone must stack up in water, which is not something they would normally do, since we collect and boil rainwater. as well as vulnerable groups, and people whose houses were just ruined, because the western side of the island is heavily damaged, so those are a few of the pressing issues for now. :, . y are a few of the pressing issues for now. :, :, , , :,, are a few of the pressing issues for now. :, :, , , :, are a few of the pressing issues for now. :, :, now. how many people are affected? so, there now. how many people are affected? so. there has— now. how many people are affected? so, there has yet _ now. how many people are affected? so, there has yet to _ now. how many people are affected? so, there has yet to be _ now. how many people are affected? so, there has yet to be a _ now. how many people are affected? so, there has yet to be a full - so, there has yet to be a full assessment of the whole island, not just the main island, but the outer islands as well. but i would have to say that everyone is affected, even if, let's say, the water didn't reach where they were staying, the environment right now, even though there are no reported casualties yet, just because we can mark them
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safe, they are not particularly in a safe, they are not particularly in a safe environment at the moment. band safe environment at the moment. and our aten safe environment at the moment. and our agency is — safe environment at the moment. and our agency is getting in on the right volume? —— are aid agencies getting in in the right volume? i getting in in the right volume? i understand there is aid coming from australia and new zealand, and there is an assessment to see how much we will need, but i also have to add in the tongan communities outside of tonga that are moving with their own gofundme pages and collecting things they need and getting ready to send at themselves. because i presume the clear up operation is going to take many months, isn't it? and certain livelihoods will have been destroyed?— livelihoods will have been destroyed? livelihoods will have been destro ed? . , , destroyed? yes, definitely. they have started _ destroyed? yes, definitely. they have started cleaning _ destroyed? yes, definitely. they have started cleaning up. - destroyed? yes, definitely. they have started cleaning up. even l destroyed? yes, definitely. they - have started cleaning up. even those stores have to open for people to restock and everything. no one is working other than essential
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workers. everyone else has been advised to stay at home and try to clean up as much as they can. carefully, and with protection, because of the air, but they are advised to try and clean up as much as they can. we have all gone through the clean—ups after a cyclone. this is definitely a little different, so hopefully it won't take as long as a few months, but then again, tonga is full of resilient people, so we're hoping they will push to this and that it will come to this and that it will come through nicely. thank you very much indeed for joining us on bbc news. from today, people in england with coronavirus can end their isolation after five full days, providing they test negative on days five and six. it's hoped the change will ease staff shortages across the economy. the latest phase of the covid vaccine programme in england also begins today, with boosterjabs available to all 16— and 17—year—olds. scotland is welcoming back full crowds at large outdoor public events such as football matches.
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the holyrood government limited numbers to 500 people last month, as part of a series of measures to help slow the spread of the omicron variant of covid. people must provide proof of covid vaccination or a recent negative test. the government has said the armed forces will take charge of operations to try to limit the number of migrants crossing the channel. the move is intended to allow home office officials to focus on the government's reforms to the asylum system. our defence correspondent jonathan beale is here. does the navy want to do this, jonathan? i imagine there is a certain amount of trepidation about getting involved in this, because, let's be honest, nobody has succeeded so far, and there are some options which are particularly unpalatable. you know, discussions about putting boats away, i think that is a nonstarter because of the safety of lives at sea laws that exist, and i don't
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think the military would want to be involved in that. but i do know that these discussions have been going on for a number of weeks now, and we have seen the military involved in covid, responding to military assistance for civil requests, driving ambulances and the like, and politicians have thought, well, we should get the military involved here. what they would do is still unclear. it was said that the navy has been given the supremacy over all government vessels in the channel. so border force and whatever. that is not et so border force and whatever. that is not yet clear. _ so border force and whatever. that is not yet clear, but _ so border force and whatever. inst is not yet clear, but what we know is not yet clear, but what we know is that there is a navy rare admiral who is leading these discussions at the moment with the border force and home office about what the military could do. —— rearadmiral. it has been given a name, operation isotope, so they are clearly serious
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about that, but to be clear, operations are named by a computer, so don't read too much into that! and i think it is also important to say that this is not the first time that they have had some involvement, limited involvement in the past. so, for example, we have seen small warships, patrol vessels, in the channel, not doing very much, but there to help the border force symbolically. we have also seen drones, surveillance aircraft, going across in the height of the summer when there were lots of migrants coming across, making sure that they have the situational awareness, so there has been some military involvement. this is clearly larger military involvement, but the statement we've had from the ministry of defence, it says the government is exploring every avenue to prevent further crossings and details of how that can be achieved will be made in due course. in other words, we don't know the answer.
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so a deterrent, but i suppose some might say it would incentivise people, if they think they are coming across, hang on, the british royal navy is going to... yes. coming across, hang on, the british royal navy is going to. . .— royal navy is going to... yes, that is the worry- _ royal navy is going to... yes, that is the worry. what _ royal navy is going to... yes, that is the worry. what they _ royal navy is going to... yes, that is the worry. what they are - royal navy is going to... yes, that| is the worry. what they are worried about is the situation where lives are lost at sea. and they don't want to be in a situation where essentially, they are encouraging migrant gangs to do even less to just push people in and boats across and, because they know the navy will just pick them up, for example, so i think that is a concern. so they have to look at the big picture. in the military do not have all the answers here. politicians have to work out what they are going to do with those people who come across on those little boats in the channel, how they get them back if they do not have a right to stay, and those things have not been sorted out. jonathan with the latest, thank you very much.
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the world's 10 wealthiest men doubled their fortunes during the first two years of the pandemic as poverty and inequality soared, says a report by oxfam. it's called on governments to tax the gains made by billionaires who's wealth increased by an average rate of 1.3 billion dollars a day. the world's 10 wealthiest men doubled their fortunes in a briefing published before a virtual mini—summit of world leaders, the charity has calculated that 160 million people have been plunged into poverty, with non—white ethnic minorities and women bearing the brunt. amazon has announced it's put a temporary stop to its plans to stop accepting visa credit card payments in the uk. the change was due to take effect on wednesday following a dispute about payment fees, but the online retailer said it is now working closely with visa on a potential solution that will enable customers to continue using their visa credit cards. the chair of the global banking giant, credit suisse, has resigned following allegations that he broke the uk's covid quarantine rules.
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antonio horta—osorio reportedly went to wimbledon injuly at a time when the uk's covid rules required him to be in isolation. in a statement, he said he regretted that a number of his personal actions led to difficulties for the bank. heavy snow and ice has knocked out power to thousands of homes and businesses in parts of the us and canada. virginia, georgia, and the carolinas have all declared a state of emergency, with more than a foot of snow still expected in some areas. more than 3,000 flights into and out of the us were cancelled yesterday. one of the most decorated african—american military pilots, charles mcgee, has died at the age of 102. he was an original member of the tuskegee airmen, an all—black us air force unit formed during the second world war. charles mcgee flew 409 combat missions spanning world war two, and the korean and vietnam conflicts. he also fought passionately against segregation in the us military.
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in 2016 he talked about what the tuskegee airmen stood for. being brought up, you know, as they were, african—american, or black, but we're american. and the country was at war. we were just as interested in supporting that effort as anyone else at that time. and so we turned our back on the fact that there was segregation, if you will, took advantage of the opportunity to prove that we can fly aeroplanes, we can maintain aeroplanes, and we can do whatever our education and aspirations, where those things lead us. his comments on the tuskegee airmen there. a 29—year—old bachelorfrom london has been receiving thousands of messages from women all over the world, in response to his billboard advertisement that he set up in a quest to find himself a wife. muhammad malik has advertised
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himself on hoardings across london, birmingham and manchester. the bbc�*s south asia diaspora reporter gaggan sabherwal went to meet malik to find out what led to this innovative idea of finding a bride. hi, i'm malik. you might have seen my face on a billboard somewhere. i'm an entrepreneur, and i am religious. i am looking for someone who is working on her din. i am open to any ethnicity. if you're interested, fill out the form or check out my details. 29—year—old muhammad malik from hounslow in west london decided to advertise himself on billboards in a quest to find a wife. malik decided to take this unconventional approach after years of struggling to find a life partner through other methods, including dating apps. the kernel of an idea was presented to me by a friend who i know in marketing. and it was me kind of complaining about, man, you know, i'm doing so many things, i'm so busy with work, with a side hustle, with hobbies. on top of that, events are closing
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because of the pandemic, right? so how can you get out there? the conversation led to something quite extreme, literally getting yourself out there, oldschool billboards, and the billboards are dotted around manchester, birmingham and london, in particular those areas with more ethnic minorities. hey, i'm malik and that's my billboard. why do you have a problem with arranged marriages? i am definitely not against arranged marriages. if anything, i think the evidence and the research goes to show this is probably one of the best ways to find a spouse, because you go beyond face value, to real values. but i thought, you know what, let's try this route. if not, i'm definitely not against going through the good old grapevine. so far, malik has received over 1,000 messages from women and his story has travelled all over the world. i'm getting messages from tanzania, america, overseas. it's phenomenal. friends and people who know me
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really well have said to me, mate, what is going on? this is absolutely... you were playing football with us the other day, just chilling, and now you are being spoken about on forums, you're being spoken about on news channels and stuff like that. the 29—year—old has been following in his dad's footsteps, who also did something similar when he was searching for a wife. this is going back 30—odd years, somebody mentioned there is an urdu paper, you don't have to worry about it, just put it in the paper and get some response. and i did that. and that is how i got married. so it runs in the family, i suppose. how are you going to filter these messages, and how are you going to find the one? i've got a spreadsheet and i am going through with all of the messages that have come through. so, whittling it down initially with questions. i've got some personality questions. like, what type of person are you in this scenario? and then getting it to the next stage, which is kind of skype calls,
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zoom calls with the person and their family as well. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. areas of low pressure are in charge of our weather, so things will be fairly settled. today we have this ridge of high pressure across us. a cold start the day and also a frosty one, and we have a weather front waiting in the wings coming our way later on. a lot of dry weather around today, a lot of sunshine, more cloud across the north of scotland which will push back to the coast through the day, and not as windy as yesterday, but some of that cloud could still produce and drizzle. temperatures between about 7—10. through the evening, we will see fog reform across the midlands, eastern and southern parts of england. at the same time, whether from weights southern parts of england. at the same time, whetherfrom weights in the wings in the west, meaning there will be cloud and rain, said
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temperatures not falling away as much here, but we are looking at a widespread frost, and where there is far, it will be freezing fog. here is our high—pressure drifting southwards tomorrow, allowing this weather front to push southwards tomorrow, allowing this weatherfront to push in southwards tomorrow, allowing this weather front to push in across scotland and also northern ireland. fog will be slow to live tomorrow. it may linger till well into the afternoon. as our weather front comes in, followed hot on its heels by a second one, it will bring in thicker clouds, and some strong winds, thickening to gale force with exposure. temperatures between 5—10. through tuesday night and into wednesday, here is ourfirst through tuesday night and into wednesday, here is our first weather front followed by the second one, both slipping southwards. from the isobars, you can tell it is a cold north—westerly wind, and it will be noticeable. weather fronts north—westerly wind, and it will be noticeable. weatherfronts moving noticeable. weather fronts moving south noticeable. weatherfronts moving south take their cloud and patchy rain with them. lots of dry conditions following behind with sunshine. cold wind and wintry showers across the hills in the north, and also the east. temperatures five in aberdeen, nine
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in cardiff. as we move through wednesday night into thursday, this high pressure edges towards us, but you can still see the blues across the chart, and still this north—westerly wind. on thursday, it will start on a cold note with a widespread frost. we are not anticipating any issues with fog. probably not too windy, a lot of sunshine around, but still some showers coming on down there is no sea coastline. it can also be wintry in nature, but again it should —— should not be problematic. temperature six to ninth, feeling cold. —— 6—9.
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unfortunately the fallout was entirely predictable. this is bbc news. the headlines: two teenagers have been arrested in manchester in connection with the texas synagogue siege — the british hostage—taker was a man from blackburn. search and rescue continues in tonga after a huge volcanic eruption triggered a tsunami. relatives of a british woman missing say they're desperately waiting for news. the education secretary, nadhim zahawi, denies the prime minister'sjob is in danger — and says borisjohnson recognises the public anger surrounding the parties which took place in downing street during the lockdown. more than a quarter of households will struggle to pay their energy bills soon, according to a new report today. it's come to the point where if i'm a bit short on electric and it's close to the time i'm going to be paid, to top up again, i have to be clever enough to say,
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"don't do that washing because you will run out of electricity." and novak djokovic is back in belgrade, following his deportation, as the australian open begins without the world number one. hello and welcome to the programme. two teenagers have been arrested in manchester as part of the investigation into a siege at a synagogue in the united states. the man responsible — malik faisal akram from lancashire — was shot and killed by police near dallas in texas, after he took a rabbi and three other people hostage during a service. they were later freed unharmed. counter—terrorism authorities on both sides of the atlantic are now investigating what happened, as sophie long reports.
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this is the moment the three final hostages ran for their lives, more than ten hours after their ordeal began. a successful, but nonetheless terrifying end, to the delicate, day—long operation involving negotiators and heavily armed police. the man, now identified as malik faisal akram, a 44—year—old british citizen, originally from lancashire, was shot and killed. he'd claimed to have a gun and a bomb when he interrupted a peaceful morning service being streamed from the congregation beth israel in dallas. akram, who arrived in the united states two weeks ago, was heard ranting about religion and demanding the release of a pakistani neuroscientist with suspected links to al-qaeda, currently serving a prison sentence in texas. people came here, a place of worship, to pray.
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but once again in america, a moment of peace became a moment of profound pain. as the people who were trapped, terrified, try to come to terms with what happened, synagogues across the country have increased security in fear of copycat attacks. this was an act of terror. we're not going to tolerate this. we have this capacity to deal with assaults on, particularly the anti—semitism that has grown up. and so i'll be talking with — i put a call into the rabbi. we missed one another on the way up here. but they should rest assured that we are focused. as soon as it became known that akram was a british citizen, the investigation became global. counter—terror police in manchester are assisting the us authorities, and are now questioning two teenagers who were arrested in the city last night. sophie long, bbc news, dallas.
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our correspondence is in blackburn were fires of akram was from. a problem with that interview. we can bring it to you now. obviously people in a state of disbelief here in blackburn as are his family. they have issued a statement, his brothers said in a statement, his brothers said in a statement on social akram's family spent a number of hours here at blackburn police station as they negotiated with authorities in the hope to bring the
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stand—off to a peaceful conclusion. as we know, the hostages were thankfully released unharmed although akram was killed by law enforcement officers in the states. police on both sides of the atlantic are now looking into why he went to america, was anybody else involved or was he operating on his own? his family insisted he had mental health issues. they are not saying that the excuses what he did but this has come out of the blue to them and they are cooperating with the police. meanwhile those arrested in manchester over night, you do expect a bit of police activity in the wake of a terror —related incident, so the fact they have been some progress not too surprising. what we don't know is who these people are. we note that it was in the south manchester area, we know they are teenagers but we don't know their ages or gender. this is an ongoing investigation, police are liaising with local communities to try and
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calm them and the family of this man, akram, still trying to come to terms with what he did. with the latest on the investigation, here's our security correspondent, frank gardner. britain and the us already share a huge amount of intelligence and obviously the origins of this come back to the uk, because malik faisal akram travelled two weeks' ago to the us via jfk airport. he is believed to have bought his weapon there in the us and travelled down to dallas, where he carried this out, but the investigation is, although it has been led by the fbi, the federal bureau of investigation, it is liaising very closely notjust with british counter terrorism police, that is greater manchester police as well, but also with, they have been in contact with israel, because of the synagogue connection here. this doesn't look on the surface to be like a kind of classics isis or al-qaeda operation.
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the brother has suggested that there were mental health issues involved, but the fact that he was making a political statement demanding the release of aafia siddiqui, who is a pakistani neuroscientist, you heard there in sophie long's report, that has pushed it into the realm of terrorism, which is why all leads are being investigated, and as you heard there, two teenagers have been arrested last night in manchester, but they have not as yet been charged. the serbian tennis star novak djokovic has arrived in belgrade after his deportation from australia. the men's player was deported on sunday after losing a visa battle that centred on the fact he is unvaccinated. under australia's immigration laws, he now won't be granted another visa for three years — but australia's prime minister said he could be allowed entry sooner under the "right circumstances".
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novak djokovic filmed as he left the aeroplane at the airport. our correspondent guy de launey is at the airport. what sort of reaction was there for him there? :, ::, what sort of reaction was there for him there?— what sort of reaction was there for him there? :, :. , , :, :, him there? you can 'ust swing around her to my right — him there? you can 'ust swing around her to my right and — him there? you can just swing around her to my right and you _ him there? you can just swing around her to my right and you can _ him there? you can just swing around her to my right and you can see - her to my right and you can see there are quite a few novak djokovic supporters here to cheer for their sporting icon. unfortunately for them and perhaps for novak djokovic as well, he didn't come here to the vip terminal of the airport as a lot of people had expected. he didn't go through regular arrivals but he snuck out through the diplomatic channel and nobody was there to see him. it was the kind of switch we were half expecting. personally i wondered if hejumped on a plane and went to monte carlo but he is now on
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a plane to belgrade. but he had a small and welcome committee here. and a lot of anger? if small and welcome committee here. and a lot of anger?— and a lot of anger? if not boiling anter but and a lot of anger? if not boiling anger but people _ and a lot of anger? if not boiling anger but people are _ and a lot of anger? if not boiling anger but people are not - and a lot of anger? if not boiling i anger but people are not impressed here whether that is the prime minister or president, both of whom i have spoken to in recent days. they are not impressed with australia's action, they believe novak djokovic is the victim of a political game with the scott morrison government looking towards elections in may rather than being fair in their attitude to novak djokovic, and also feeling the relationship between serbia and australia is not on an equal footing. serbia, lot less wealthy, a lot smaller than australia and the president said said that if novak djokovic had not been from serbia, this would not have happened. nobody
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has done a poll but when i talk to people, whether they are friends or people, whether they are friends or people who i meet during my reporting, even if they have been vaccinated, they do think novak djokovic got a run deal in australia but at the end of the day, he is a player and human being that represents serbia better than any of us throughout the world, very successfully most of the time. and as you can hear, people would be much rather shouting for novak djokovic rather than missing him and he not participating in one of his favourite tournaments.- he not participating in one of his favourite tournaments. small but enthusiastic. _ favourite tournaments. small but enthusiastic. there _ favourite tournaments. small but enthusiastic. there were - favourite tournaments. small but enthusiastic. there were a - favourite tournaments. small but enthusiastic. there were a few i favourite tournaments. small but. enthusiastic. there were a few more earlier but the _ enthusiastic. there were a few more earlier but the word _ enthusiastic. there were a few more earlier but the word has _ enthusiastic. there were a few more earlier but the word has got - enthusiastic. there were a few more earlier but the word has got out - earlier but the word has got out that novak has gone. from today, people in england with coronavirus can end their isolation after five full days — providing they test negative on days five and six. it's hoped the change will ease
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staff shortages across the economy. the latest phase of the covid vaccine programme in england also begins today — with boosterjabs available to all 16 and 17—year—olds. scotland is welcoming back full crowds at large outdoor public events such as football matches. the holyrood government limited numbers to 500 people last month, as part of a series of measures to help slow the spread of the omicron variant of covid. people must provide proof of covid vaccination or a recent negative test. the education secretary, nadhim zahawi, says the prime minister recognises the anger surrounding the parties which took place in downing street during the lockdown. mr zahawi again urged people to wait for the findings of an inquiry being headed by a senior civil servant. six conservative mps have now called on borisjohnson to resign over the issue. our political correspondent chris mason reports. this is leigh in greater manchester. labourfor the best part
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of a century, until borisjohnson asked for votes in the town. then, the conservatives won. so what do people here make of what's gone on, and whether he should stay on as prime minister? it's all the nurses and the doctors who've worked hard during the pandemic, who obviously have been let down. they say that the devil that you know is better than the devil you don't know. and at least we know where we are with him. he won't do nothing, but somebody else might do something. i think he should go. i mean, there's been plenty of things happened in the past where politicians have done not half as bad as he's done, and they've had to leave. they've resigned, or they've been forced out. they should alljust go, for me. they're all out for themselves, not for the working people, are they? not one of them. the list of social do's that went on in westminster, when social do's were banned, is long. and these are just the ones we know about. it's up to this woman, sue gray, a senior civil servant,
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to catalogue the lot of them. but it could be another week or so before we find out what she's found out, leaving lots of conservative mps to ponder that. what my constituents are doing now, is they're comparing their own experiences over the last — well, almost two years, isn't it? — with what they're seeing on television. and a number of them are now looking on in disbelief that it's been the interpretation of some people in downing street that the law ends at the number 10 garden wall. so many conservative mps feel hugely let down, angry and unable to justify what has happened. but, for plenty of them, borisjohnson is the reason they're in politics, the reason they're in parliament. so, to topple him just two years after winning so big a a general election, is a huge thing for them to contemplate, let alone do. mps return here this morning with plenty to ponder.
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chris mason, bbc news. that is where we will be saying goodbye to our viewers on bbc two. i'm joined now by lord kerslake — he's a former head of the civil service and has recently worked with the labour party. you carried out a review for keir starmer. can i start, sue gray has a fearsome reputation. some are saying she has the fate of borisjohnson in her hands. is that how you see it? no, i don't. her hands. is that how you see it? no, idon't. i her hands. is that how you see it? no, i don't. i have a huge amount of time for super great, she is fearless, forensic and formidable but the challenge here is the nature of the internal investigation she is doing. it has been commissioned by the prime minister, it is for the prime minister, it will report to the prime minister and the prime minister will decide what to do with
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it. midway through the review, we find the prime minister himself is front and centre of the investigation. and she can't be in a position as a civil servant who is there after all as all civil servants are, to serve the government. she will get to the bottom of the facts, i'm sure of that but anything that leads to his departure will be a matter for mps in the conservative party to decide in the conservative party to decide in my view. i hope people don't expect she can go that far because she can't. it is not the review you would have done had you known the prime minister would be so deeply implicated in the actual investigation.— implicated in the actual investigation. implicated in the actual investitation. 9 , :, implicated in the actual investitation. 9 , implicated in the actual investitation. ~ , investigation. when you say she has a du as a investigation. when you say she has a duty as a civil— investigation. when you say she has a duty as a civil servant _ investigation. when you say she has a duty as a civil servant to _ a duty as a civil servant to government, is it government itself or the government? if it is the
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former, then perhaps she could take that sort of decision and draw that conclusion. it that sort of decision and draw that conclusion-— conclusion. it is a good point you raise and some _ conclusion. it is a good point you raise and some have _ conclusion. it is a good point you raise and some have argued - conclusion. it is a good point you. raise and some have argued about this but ultimately it is the government of the day. when enquiries have been done by sue gray before, the prime minister has not been implicated, if you think of liam fox and damian green, she was investigating on behalf of the prime minister and then reporting the findings. it is quite extraordinary that he is now himself part of that investigation. i think if a civil servant were to produce a report that gave the prime minister no choice but to resign, i think that would be seen as a very difficult place to be. she can be and i hope she will be very, very critical of the appallingly lax culture in number ten that seems to have allowed seemingly endless numbers of
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social events to happen in almost an uncontrolled way and i think that is pretty unforgivable, but the judgment on the prime minister's future cannot be with sue gray, it has to be with mps to make. she is investigating _ has to be with mps to make. she is investigating wrongdoing _ has to be with mps to make. she is investigating wrongdoing but - has to be with mps to make. she is investigating wrongdoing but again the distinction between wrongdoing and criminal wrongdoing. and if she doesn't find criminal wrongdoing, with that potentially get the prime minister off the hook?— minister off the hook? again, the --eole minister off the hook? again, the people who _ minister off the hook? again, the people who find _ minister off the hook? again, the people who find criminal- minister off the hook? again, the i people who find criminal wrongdoing are the police and they would have tooth and follow—up if they felt there was enough evidence in sue gray's report to justify an investigation, notwithstanding their decision that they won't do retrospective investigations. so it is not for sue gray to take on the role of the police, she can only report the facts as she sees them and if she identifies that these
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events were in any, which they look to be come in any meaningful sense parties that were at that time not parties that were at that time not part of the rules, restricted, explicitly ruled out if you like, then you would expect someone to follow—up. i don't expect sue gray's report to be the end of the affair, i think there will be other... you would like _ i think there will be other... you would like a _ i think there will be other... you would like a judge _ i think there will be other... you would like a judge led enquiry, is that right? i would like a 'udge led enquiry, is that ritht? ~ :, would like a 'udge led enquiry, is that ritht? ,, :, , that right? i think an independent, erha -s that right? i think an independent, perhaps retired _ that right? i think an independent, perhaps retired judge _ that right? i think an independent, perhaps retired judge would i that right? i think an independent, perhaps retired judge would have l perhaps retired judge would have been a better way forward to put it beyond doubt that there was complete separation and independence to the process. i recognise that would take time now and of course we didn't start from this point, we started with one party being investigated and now we have 17. the world has changed from the start and it would have been better given how much the prime minister is featured in this review for it to have been done through an independent process like
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a retired judge. d0 through an independent process like a retired judge-— a retired 'udge. do you think she should a retired judge. do you think she should be investigating - a retired judge. do you think she should be investigating keir- should be investigating keir starmer�*s drinks party last year? that is a separate issue entirely, a part of parliamentary standards. i won't make a comment but it doesn't match what we are hearing happened number ten. and i think that is a separate question. that would not be for sue gray to explore, that would be a separate issue to be picked up by the commission on parliamentary standards. just by the commission on parliamentary standards. , . :, by the commission on parliamentary standards. , , :, :, by the commission on parliamentary standards. , :, :, :, standards. just one two-point to the fact that sue — standards. just one two-point to the fact that sue gray _ standards. just one two-point to the fact that sue gray was _ standards. just one two-point to the fact that sue gray was married i standards. just one two-point to the fact that sue gray was married to i standards. just one two-point to the fact that sue gray was married to a i fact that sue gray was married to a country and western singer. one of his hits was bitter tears. she is quite a tough lady. she ran a pub in northern ireland as well. i quite a tough lady. she ran a pub in northern ireland as well.— northern ireland as well. i have no doubt about— northern ireland as well. i have no doubt about sue _ northern ireland as well. i have no doubt about sue gray's _ northern ireland as well. i have no doubt about sue gray's ability i northern ireland as well. i have no doubt about sue gray's ability to l doubt about sue gray's ability to get to the bottom of this. she is absolutely somebody with a formidable reputation.
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winter olympic officials have announced that there will be no general ticket sales for the games because of the covid instead spectators will be organized via government/party organizations and be expected to adhere to strict coronavirus countermeasures. relatives of a british woman missing after a tsunami hit the pacific island nation of tonga say they're desperately waiting for news. angela glover, who runs an animal rescue centre, was swept away by a wave. air force planes from australia and new zealand have been sent to tonga — to survey the damage caused by the tsunami, which was triggered by a massive volcanic eruption. howard johnson reports. a military surveillance plane leaving auckland, new zealand this morning, bound for tonga. australia has also sent planes to carry out an assessment of the damage caused by saturday's eruption of an underwater volcano. satellite images captured the moment a tsunami, triggered by the eruption, engulfed tonga and sent a shock wave across the pacific ocean.
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and listen to this. a sonic boom captured on video more than 400 miles away in fiji. sonic boom sounds. the international federation of the red cross estimate that more than 80,000 people have been affected by the eruption, with stories of missing people being reported on social media. briton angela glover was last seen by her husband clinging to a tree, before she was swept away by the tsunami. the family have put a number of posts on social media, appealing for information. she moved to tonga in 2015, leaving behind an advertising job to start an animal shelter, where she looks after and houses stray dogs, and is a popular figure on the island. the local authorities have been conducting searches and i believe they are still ongoing. it is daytime there. look, it is 48 hours. i am not holding out much hope. communications to tonga
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remain badly affected. not knowing what happened to loved ones is creating an unbearable concern. howard johnson, bbc news, manila. let's talk to anna chinn, news editor at radio new zealand. new zealand sending ships as well. how far away is tonga from you and how bad is the situation you are hearing on the ground there? tote how bad is the situation you are hearing on the ground there? we are the 2300 kilometres _ hearing on the ground there? we are the 2300 kilometres away _ hearing on the ground there? we are the 2300 kilometres away and i hearing on the ground there? we are the 2300 kilometres away and that i hearing on the ground there? we are j the 2300 kilometres away and that is three days by ship, so when you mention our government defence forces actually not under orders from the governmentjust yet forces actually not under orders from the government just yet so just unilaterally sending three ships this morning. basically to close that distance pending a request from tonga. they can assume that water will be needed in tonga because it will be needed in tonga because it will have affected the drink of
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water supplies. they haven't had a request for that particular form of aid yet, they are tending to set sail in the morning, to be near to tonga in case it is requested. they can take to hunt metres of water on one of the ships that will go this morning. as for the scale of the damage, we know that there is a thick film of ash all over the main island. we know that houses have been damaged and rocks and boats and things have been thrown ashore by the tsunami. we have been told so far it is not looking like a mass casualty event, but we have not heard from lots of the outer islands. tonga is actually an archipelago so there are 36 inhabited islands and we have only heard from the main island at the
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moment. :, : :, :, , :, moment. how much aid has gone alread , moment. how much aid has gone already, bearing _ moment. how much aid has gone already, bearing in _ moment. how much aid has gone already, bearing in mind - moment. how much aid has gone already, bearing in mind how- moment. how much aid has gone already, bearing in mind how we| moment. how much aid has gone i already, bearing in mind how we sent this has happened.— this has happened. none. so far new zealand and — this has happened. none. so far new zealand and australia _ this has happened. none. so far new zealand and australia have _ this has happened. none. so far new zealand and australia have just i zealand and australia have just flown surveillance flights over the islands to survey the damage from the air, so you have to bear in mind that tonga is one of the few countries in the world that doesn't have covid—19. they are trying to assess what they need before bringing aid. tonga have supplies already there on the ground, in stock to support about 1200 households. forthe stock to support about 1200 households. for the time being. 50 households. forthe time being. so that means, fascinating tonga is one of the only countries that doesn't have coronavirus, so that means anyone going in what had to be strictly tested.— anyone going in what had to be strictly tested. yes. australia is rife with covid-19 _ strictly tested. yes. australia is rife with covid-19 at _ strictly tested. yes. australia is
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rife with covid-19 at the i strictly tested. yes. australia is i rife with covid-19 at the moment, so rife with covid—19 at the moment, so they will have to be particularly careful. new zealand is not so bad in terms of community transmission, omicron is not in our communityjust yet at all. however they have had disasters during the pandemic previously from cyclones and hurricane is and what they did then was just hurricane is and what they did then wasjust airdrop hurricane is and what they did then was just airdrop supplies in and there was no physical contact or interaction between say troops and the local forces. interaction between say troops and the localforces. so it interaction between say troops and the local forces. so it may work out that way as well, i'm not quite sure yet because we haven't had requests from tonga apart from the reconnaissance flights that have taken place. reconnaissance flights that have taken place-— reconnaissance flights that have taken lace. :. ~' , : the world's 10 wealthiest men doubled their fortunes during the first two years of the pandemic as poverty and inequality soared, claims a report by the british aid charity, oxfam. the charity has calculated that 160 million people have been plunged into poverty because of the pandemic,
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with non—white ethnic minorities and women bearing the brunt. it's called on governments to tax the gains made by billionaires who's wealth increased by an average rate of 1.3 billion dollars a day. a report has warned more than a quarter of households will struggle to pay their energy bills in april when the average household energy bill is expected to increase by six to seven hundred pounds. the rise is coming because of an increase in the price cap — the maximum price that suppliers in england, wales and scotland can charge domestic customers on a standard tariff. the cap at the moment means no household should pay more than 1,277 pounds per year for a typical amount of energy. but energy firms are having to pay more for the gas they sell onto us and many smallerfirms have been forced out of business. that means the energy price cap will have to rise: some experts think the new cap could be set at almost two thousand pounds a year. one group that looks at this —
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the resolution foundation — says the decision could mean more than 6 million households are spending at least 10 percent of their monthly budgets on energy bills. people who fall into that category used to be described as being in fuel poverty. the government changed the official definition in 2013 so it's now referrred to as fuel stress. whatever the term — the reality is more worry for people who've already seen their bills rise quite sharply this year. michael buchannan has been speaking to some of the people who are struggling. i weigh six stone at the moment. so i'm cold all the time. and because i'm a wheelchair user, and a lot of me doesn't move any more, my circulation is really very poor. anne vivian—smith has a neurodegenerative condition. she lives with her husband — a university manager — in a small, increasingly cold bungalow in nottinghamshire, and the rising cost of energy is harming her health. i have three thermal layers on almost all the time now. i was sat under four blankets last week.
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i no longer eat breakfast and lunch because it's too expensive. this morning, anne checked her energy bills, and received an almighty shock. we found out today — our energy bill is usually £84 a month, and it's going up to 140. that's nearly doubled, and yet dave's salary is not going up, my benefits aren't going up, and i'm really distressed about it, and i've already had a little cry, and i'm likely to have another one! many more families will be similarly anguished by rapidly rising gas and electricity bills. the resolution foundation think tank calculates that, by april, over six million households in england will struggle with their energy bills, with costs set to increase on average from £100 to £150 a month. £50 a month increase is beyond the means of millions of families, especially coming at the same time as changes to the tax system, where national insurance
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contributions will increase. so, you know, we'll see a lot of families really struggling, come april. the government say it has put a range of measures in place to support households, and will continue to listen to consumers and business on how to manage their energy costs. can i have £25 on that, please? james harpin has already seen his costs nearly double in a year, each top—up lasting less time. i've put my postcode in. usually he'd just change providers. but this time, there's no point. it turns out that i am actually, in comparison to current energy deals available, on quite a good deal, it would seem, by quite a margin. james cares for his daughter for half the week, so heats his flat when she stays. otherwise, the 33—year—old lives frugally, even limiting his use of the washing machine. it's come to the point where, if i'm a bit short on electric and it's close to the time i'm going to be paid to top up again, i have to be clever enough to say, "don't do that washing, because you'll run
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out of electricity." so, let it build up, get paid, top up and then work through the washing, which is, again, a situation i've neverfound myself in until this year. low—income families, says today's report, should be offered a bigger and broader support package by ministers. but the scale of the looming price rises creates understandable worry. i have no choice but to use my hoists to change chairs, and to use my power chair to get around. i have no choice but to use my electric bed. and all of this is going to have an impact on the costs that our energy company is going to throw us. michael buchanan, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise hello. after a frosty and foggy start it is a glorious afternoon with winter sunshine out there. a
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little bit of winter cloud across north—west england and stretching up to scotland but temperatures between seven and 10 degrees. but as darkness falls, so also the temperatures and we will see with light winds, fog reforming. some of it dense and possibly freezing in central and eastern england as temperatures fall below freezing. milder start on tuesday. once again in the far north—west of scotland are some patchy rain arriving later on. the fog will readily lift. in one or two places where it lingers it will have an impact on temperatures but for many, a good slice of sunshine. temperatures between five and 9 degrees. a quiet story continuing on wednesday with weak weather fronts thinking their way steadily south.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... two teenagers have been arrested in manchester in connection with the texas synagogue siege. the british hostage—taker was a man from blackburn. search and rescue continues in tonga after a huge volcanic eruption triggered a tsunami. relatives of a british woman missing say they're desperately waiting for news. the education secretary, nadhim zahawi, denies the prime minister'sjob is in danger — and says borisjohnson recognises the public anger surrounding the parties which took place in downing street during the lockdown. more than a quarter of households will struggle to pay their energy bills soon, according to a new report today. and novak djokovic is back in belgrade following his deportation, as the australian open begins without the world number one.
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let's get more now on our top story. two teenagers have been arrested in manchester as part of the investigation into a siege in texas on saturday. malik faisal akram, who was from blackburn, was shot dead by police after taking four people hostage at a synagogue. in the last few minutes, the prime minister's spokesman has said it was a "terrible and anti—semitic act of terrorism". i'm joined now by dr david lowe, a former counter—terrorist detective who's now a senior research fellow at leeds beckett university's law school. thank you forjoining us here. the fbi spokesman yesterday, i think, was very quick to say they would be working with their british and israeli counterparts. what sort of communication will they be having? apart from sharing intelligence, they will be working together in the investigation. as you said, introducing the story, two individuals have been arrested in the greater manchester area, so
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there will be counterterrorism officers dealing with that aspect of the investigation at this end, and obviously, any progress or events that come out of the interviews and any subsequent searches of premises will be passed on to the fbi. do we know if he was on the watch list? i don't think anything has been released yet, and sometimes we already have that information when we look at incidents in the past, so there is that potential that this may not be the case for malik, whether he was on the list or not, we will have to wait and see. but it is one of those, if he was a high risk, certainly, ithink is one of those, if he was a high risk, certainly, i think he would have struggled to leave the uk, and if he left the uk, actually to arrive through the security atjfk airport. there surprise ue was able to buy a gun so easily as well, being a
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british citizen? well, the firearms laws do vary state vary state to state in the 50 states of the us, and he has gone to texas, and it's something we have to appreciate here in the uk, the comparative ease of actually purchasing a firearm in the us, so it is not too surprising. clearly, there has been a degree of planning carried out by him. harrowing scenes, of course, for the hostages who were genuinely in fear of their lives. harrowing scenes also for malik�*s family, who got involved in the negotiation. how unusual is that? it involved in the negotiation. how unusual is that?— involved in the negotiation. how unusual is that? it would depend on how the negotiations _ unusual is that? it would depend on how the negotiations are _ unusual is that? it would depend on how the negotiations are going, i unusual is that? it would depend on j how the negotiations are going, and also, if a family member, because what is important is doing that assessment, if a hostage take a has assessment, if a hostage take a has a close relationship with a family
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member, that could be an actual asset during negotiations, but the reports that have come out from the fbi regarding these negotiations, malik was getting a little bit more agitated as the negotiations were going on, so obviously, that's the reason why they took the decision to actually go into the synagogue. but it is not totally unusual. any asset which is going to be beneficial during negotiations is always something to be considered, and as i said, you have to look at that relationship before you use it. he said that he wanted the release of a woman, we understand, known as lady al-qaeda, arrested in afghanistan, serving 86 years. is she the sort of go to al-qaeda operative that is used a lot in events like this, because she is seen are so important for what is left of al-qaeda now?—
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seen are so important for what is left of al-qaeda now? yes, al-qaeda is still operating. _ left of al-qaeda now? yes, al-qaeda is still operating. i— left of al-qaeda now? yes, al-qaeda is still operating. i think _ left of al-qaeda now? yes, al-qaeda is still operating. i think we _ left of al-qaeda now? yes, al-qaeda is still operating. i think we have i is still operating. i think we have had a big focus on the group islamic state, certainly in afghanistan. we have now got the talibi and having to deal with islamic state in another province. what we have seen here is something that has been unusual in many ways, that we have had an actual hostagetaking situation. i think we have become used to an actual attack being carried out in the name of a group with a purpose behind it, so i wouldn't say it's always a go to, but i think this has been an actual development test —— interesting development test —— interesting development in both scene of the last two years. thank you very much forjoining us. the government has said the armed forces will take charge of operations to try to limit the number of migrants crossing the channel. the move is intended to allow home office officials to focus on the government's reforms to the asylum system. jonathan beale told us more.
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these discussions with the military have been going on for a number of weeks now, and you can understand the political reasons. they have seen the military involved in covid, responding to this military assistance for civil authority requests, driving ambulances and the like, and politicians of thought, wish to get the military involved here. what they will actually do is still not clear. i think it was capped at other times this morning, wasn't it, saying effectively the navy has been given supremacy over all government vessels in the channel. so border force, and whatever? that vessels in the channel. so border force, and whatever?— vessels in the channel. so border force, and whatever? that is not yet clear, but force, and whatever? that is not yet clear. but what _ force, and whatever? that is not yet clear, but what we _ force, and whatever? that is not yet clear, but what we do _ force, and whatever? that is not yet clear, but what we do know - force, and whatever? that is not yet clear, but what we do know is i force, and whatever? that is not yet clear, but what we do know is there l clear, but what we do know is there is a navy rear admiral, mike hockley, who is leading these discussions at the moment with the border force and the home office about what the military could do. it has been given a name, operation
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isotrope, so they are clearly serious about this. i should be clear that operations are named by a computer! i clear that operations are named by a comuter! �* :, 9 computer! i don't know where isotro -e computer! i don't know where isotrope comes _ computer! i don't know where isotrope comes into _ computer! i don't know where isotrope comes into this! i computer! i don't know where j isotrope comes into this! yes, computer! i don't know where i isotrope comes into this! yes, don't read too much _ isotrope comes into this! yes, don't read too much into _ isotrope comes into this! yes, don't read too much into that. _ isotrope comes into this! yes, don't read too much into that. and it is i read too much into that. and it is important to say this is in the first time that they have had some involvement. limited involvement in the past. for example, we have seen operation patrol vessels, small warships if you like, in the channel, not doing very much, but symbolically there to help the border force. we have also seen drones, surveillance aircraft, going across the height of the summer, when there were lots of migrants coming across, making sure that they had situational awareness, so there has been some military involvement, but this was clearly signalling a larger military involvement, but in the statement we have had from the ministry of defence, the government say they are exploring every avenue to prevent further presence, and details of how that can be achieved will be made in due course, so they don't know the answer to that. so a
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deterrent, don't know the answer to that. so a deterrent. but _ don't know the answer to that. so a deterrent, but i _ don't know the answer to that. so a deterrent, but i suppose some might say could also incentivise people. if they are coming across, hang on, the british royal navy is going to... 9. . the british royal navy is going to... :, , :, , : :, , to... that is the worry. what they are worried _ to... that is the worry. what they are worried about _ to... that is the worry. what they are worried about is _ to... that is the worry. what they are worried about is a _ to... that is the worry. what they are worried about is a situation i are worried about is a situation where lives are lost at sea. and they don't want to be in a situation where essentially they are encouraging migrant gangs to do even less, tojust push people in and boats across, because they know the navy will just pick them out, boats across, because they know the navy willjust pick them out, for example, so i think that is a concern. they have to look at the big picture. and the military do not have all the answers here. the politicians really have to work out what they are going to do with those people who come across on those little boats in the channel, how they get them back if they do not have a right to stay, and those things have not been sorted out. the chair of the global banking giant, credit suisse, has resigned following allegations that he broke the uk's covid quarantine rules.
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antonio horta—osorio reportedly went to wimbledon injuly at a time when the uk's covid rules required him to be in isolation. in a statement, he said he regretted that a number of his personal actions led to difficulties for the bank. more now on the news that scotland is welcoming back full crowds at large outdoor public events such as football matches. our scotland reporter alexandra mackenzie gave us this update from outside celtic park in glasgow. yes, no fancier yet, yes, no fancieryet, but yes, no fancier yet, but i'm sure they are gearing up for the game tonight. yes, as you said, outdoor live events are back at full capacity. there has been a cap of 500 since boxing day, because of the sharp rise of cases because of the omicron variant. so it does mean that the hibs and celtic game
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postponed from the 29th of december can go ahead tonight in front of a full capacity crowd which will be around 60,000. vaccine passports will also be back in place, and there will be a couple of changes there. to prove you are fully vaccinated, that now includes the booster. if you had your second vaccine more than four months ago, and if that second dose was more than four months ago, but you can also show that you have evidence of also show that you have evidence of a negative lateral flow test within the last 24 hours. around 50% of the crowd now will be checked, and the government has said that the club is advising everyone to take a lateral flow test before coming here tonight. obviously a negative lateralflow tonight. obviously a negative lateral flow test. and the advice is obviously for everyone to wear a mask. even though it is outside, it
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is obviously a large event, so the advice is for everyone to wear a mask. the advice is also for everyone to arrive early. the grounds will open around two hours before the match begins. a big night for all fans tonight, before the match begins. a big night forall fans tonight, hibs before the match begins. a big night for all fans tonight, hibs and celtic fans here at celtic park. the chinese government is drawing up contingency plans to control the spread of covid, as millions begin their chinese new year holiday. there are fears the 40—day travel season could see omicron spread throughout the country. meanwhile, restrictions remain in place in parts of europe as the number of infections remains high. russell trott reports. with chinese new year and the winter olympics both set to trigger mass movement across the country, beijing is determined to keep covid in check. the spring festival is the biggest annual human migration on earth, and, as such, authorities are laying out plans to control mass transit. translation: we will coordinate
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l with local authorities to adjust l transport plans if local outbreaks occur, we will suspend or reduce passenger trains in the affected areas, restrict or hold ticket sales from stations and strictly manage passenger movements. the chinese government expects around 1.5 billion trips which will be made during the spring festival travel season. and with the omicron variant present in several regions, there are fears to what degree it may spread over the coming weeks. in france, meanwhile, parliament there has approved a government's latest measures to tackle covid. the new law, which takes effect on thursday, requires anyone over 16 to have a vaccine certificate to enter public places, like restaurants, cafes, cinemas and long—distance trains. and in amsterdam, as infection numbers hit a new record, thousands packed city streets to protest against restrictions. the netherlands has relaxed some of the measures it implemented over the christmas holidays, but bars, restaurants and cultural
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venues have been instructed to remain closed until at least january the 25th. i think in fact we are one of the only countries, or maybe the only country, which is still in lockdown. countries around us are actually going backwards, back to normal life, slowly. in response to the protests, riot police were deployed across the city, as almost two years on countries around the world continue to grapple with the covid pandemic. russell trott, bbc news. amazon has announced its put a temporary stop to its plans to stop accepting visa credit card payments in the uk. the change was due to take effect on wednesday following a dispute about payment fees, but the online retailer said it is now working closely with visa on a potential solution that will enable customers to continue using their visa credit cards. there's been a significant increase in the number of fatal
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collisions on uk roads. a bbc panorama investigation has found that hundreds of speed cameras are switched off, police are doing fewer breathalyser tests, and there are fewer dedicated traffic police officers. richard bilton reports. something is happening on our roads. for the first time in 40 years, there has been a significant rise in the fatality rate, the deaths per mile. uk roads are getting more dangerous. the thing is, it shouldn't be like this. cars are getting safer, roads should be getting safer. but that is not what is going on. panorama has found there has been a sharp reduction in the number of dedicated police traffic officers. we got figures from 34 of the 44 police forces. they had 5,000 dedicated
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traffic officers in 2016. but 757 officers have been lost in just five years. that's a fall of 15%. the police watchdog is concerned. there are some police forces that have got negligible presence on the road. that has happened because, in general, it's been given a low priority. you have a scenario where the fatality rate has risen for the first time in 40 years. yeah. is that because there are fewer police officers out there? yeah, we think so. 1,600 people die on uk roads every year. the police say roads policing remains a priority. but panorama found key methods of catching offenders have been reduced. in the last decade, the number of breathalyser tests have been cut by more than 50%. and freedom of information responses
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from 26 forces reveal almost half of their fixed speed cameras are not switched on. if there's less chance of being caught, some drivers, and i say some, will take those risks. they will be reckless, they will speed, they will cause deaths. the government says our roads are among the safest in the world. they add that deployment of resources is a matter for individual police forces. but it's investing an extra £1.1 billion in police funding next year. but what panorama has found is a road network with fewer checks and increased danger. richard bilton, bbc news. the parents of a young woman who was fatally stabbed in derbyshire last year are one step closer to getting a new law in her memory. it's thought 23—year—old gracie spinks was killed by a former work colleague, whom she had previously reported for stalking.
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he was found dead near the murder scene. a petition calling for more support for stalking victims will be debated in parliament. luxmy gopal has been speaking to gracie's family. go on, gracie! woohoo! just full of life and energy, and just lived for her horses, didn't she? such a beautiful young girl with her whole life ahead of her. she did light up the room wherever she went. gracie spinks was stabbed in the neck as she was looking after her horse lastjune. it's believed the killer was a former colleague, who was found dead shortly afterwards nearby. gracie had reported him to derbyshire police for stalking her. a bag of weapons had been found and reported to police near the spot, where, just a week later, gracie was killed. the force is being investigated by the police watchdog over its handling of the case. christmas was particularly difficult, and her birthday on the 19th of october. notjust the family,
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but close friends and people beyond. it's been the worst christmas we've ever had. so painful. and just... just getting worse. the pain's getting worse, not better. a petition in gracie's name, to improve support for victims of stalking, has now passed 100,000 signatures. how does it feel that this is now going to be potentially discussed in parliament? one of my work colleagues actually sent me a screenshot of a football stadium and said, "just to put it into perspective, this is how many people, you know, loved gracie and have signed for gracie." and i thought, yeah, that puts it into perspective, really, when you see... ..see those numbers. yeah, amazing. the campaigner who set up the petition wants police forces to allocate specific funding for stalking cases. i'd like a separate pot - for stalking, for investigations, for the cps, for the courts, in order to prioritize -
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stalking cases. in response to the petition, the government said... for gracie's parents, it's about making a lasting difference. to make girls, women and men feel safer when they're out. this will go on. this will be gracie's law, gracie's legacy. it's like a message from gracie saying, "it's time for change." one young woman's life cut short by violence. but now, in her memory, a mission to try to protect others from suffering the same fate. luxmy gopal, bbc news. one of the most decorated african—american military pilots, charles mcgee, has died at the age of 102. he was an original member of the tuskegee airmen,
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an all—black us air force unit formed during the second world war, mcgee flew 409 combat missions spanning world war two, and the korean and vietnam conflicts. h also fought passionately against segregation in the us military. a 29—year—old bachelorfrom london has been receiving thousands of messages from women all over the world, in response to his billboard advertisement that he set up in a quest to find himself a wife. muhammad malik has advertised himself on hoardings across london, birmingham and manchester. the bbc�*s south asia diaspora reporter gaggun sabrawaal went to meet malik to find out what led to this innovative idea of finding a bride. hi, i'm malik. you might have seen my face on a billboard somewhere. i'm an entrepreneur, and i am religious. i am looking for someone who is working on her din. i am open to any ethnicity. if you're interested, fill out
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the form or check out my details. 29—year—old muhammad malik from hounslow in west london decided to advertise himself on billboards in a quest to find a wife. malik decided to take this unconventional approach after years of struggling to find a life partner through other methods, including dating apps. the kernel of an idea was presented to me by a friend who i know in marketing. and it was me kind of complaining about, man, you know, i'm doing so many things, i'm so busy with work, with a side hustle, with hobbies. on top of that, events are closing because of the pandemic, right? so how can you get out there? the conversation led to something quite extreme, literally getting yourself out there, oldschool billboards, and the billboards are dotted around manchester, birmingham and london, in particular those areas with more ethnic minorities. hey, i'm malik and that's my billboard. why do you have a problem with arranged marriages? i am definitely not against arranged marriages.
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if anything, i think the evidence and the research goes to show this is probably one of the best ways to find a spouse, because you go beyond face value, to real values. but i thought, you know what, let's try this route. if not, i'm definitely not against going through the good old grapevine. so far, malik has received over 1,000 messages from women and his story has travelled all over the world. i'm getting messages from tanzania, america, overseas. it's phenomenal. friends and people who know me really well have said to me, mate, what is going on? this is absolutely... you were playing football with us the other day, just chilling, and now you are being spoken about on forums, you're being spoken about on news channels and stuff like that. the 29—year—old has been following in his dad's footsteps, who also did something similar when he was searching for a wife. this is going back 30—odd years, somebody mentioned there is an urdu paper, you don't have to worry
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about it, just put it in the paper and get some response. and i did that. and that is how i got married. so it runs in the family, i suppose. how are you going to filter these messages, and how are you going to find the one? i've got a spreadsheet and i am going through with all of the messages that have come through. so, whittling it down initially with questions. i've got some personality questions. like, what type of person are you in this scenario? and then getting it to the next stage, which is kind of skype calls, zoom calls with the person and their family as well. coming up, retre with a one o'clock news. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise. hello. a settled week of weather lies ahead with a cold and at times frosting and foggy one. it led to a stunning start for many this morning with hardly a cloud in the sky, but
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quite a significant fast out there. the exception was the far north west, because although high pressure is keeping things quiet, a few more isobars across the top of that high means a little more cloud for the northern isles in general today. more cloud into the north of england and north west midlands at times but are dry, subtle story, and temperatures will recover, ranging from 7—10 as we go through the afternoon. we keep those clear skies through the night and fog is likely to reform once again with light winds across central and eastern england. some of it is dense and freezing in places, as temperatures fall below freezing. the exception again out towards the west, particularly the north—west of scotland. but there is a weather front that will gradually push on. winds will strengthen, gust of gale force are likely we will see some rain toppling across that hi somewhat erratically through the day. the fog will readily left as we go through the morning. slowly and surely the most of us, if it lingers
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on one or two spots, that could have an impact on the feel of the weather. that wet weather sitting out of the west of scotland, gradually moving erratically eastwards, so that is the story as we get through tuesday. those weather fronts still have to sing south as we move through the day on wednesday. weakening to a band of cloud and drizzle, just like we had on sunday afternoon across england and wales, but it will clear, and then quite a clearance behind with a cold, northerly wind, sunny spells and scattered showers, with the risk of them turning wintry to higher ground, as there fall away. a cool afternoon for scotland on wednesday. highest values further south of 10 degrees. high pressure sits out in the atlantic. winds swinging round to a northerly direction, so a cooler source on thursday. colder still for many. shelley started thursday morning. widespread frost across the country. but largely fine the strongest winds moving down
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through the north sea. they could have an impact and will make it feel cool have an impact and will make it feel cool, particularly unexposed east coast. that's it. take care.
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two teenagers from manchester are questioned by police investigating a hostage—taking incident at a synagogue in texas on saturday. a british man from blackburn, malik faisal akram, held four people captive and was shot dead after a ten—hour stand—off. a dramatic escape — among the hostages who fled unharmed, the rabbi who says he was praying when he realised what was going on. i heard a click, and it could have been anything. and it turned out that it was his gun. downing street has described it as a terrible and anti—semitic act of terrorism. also this lunchtime: borisjohnson is safe in hisjob, says the education secretary, adding he recognises the public anger over lockdown parties in downing street.

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