Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 17, 2022 9:00am-10:01am GMT

9:00 am
good morning, it's monday, welcome to bbc news — here are your headlines at nine o'clock. two teenagers have been arrested in manchester in connection with the texas synagogue siege. the british hostage—taker was a man from blackburn. more than a quarter of households will struggle to pay their energy bills soon, according to a new report today. it's come to the point where, if i'm a bit short on electric and it's close to the time i'm going to be paying to top up again, i have to be clever enough to say, "don't do that washing, because you'll run out of electricity." let me know how much of your budget is going on energy bills. what were you paying per month and what's it now? @vicdebryshire on twitter and instagram. search and rescue flights continue over tonga, as fears grow for a missing british
9:01 am
woman who it's thought was swept away in the tsunami. on his way home. novak djokovic boards a flight to belgrade at dubai airport, following his deportation from australia. and coming up this hour. scotland eases its boxing day restrictions on large outdoor events including football matches and concerts. we'll be live at celtic park ahead of tonight's match against hibs. two teenagers have been arrested in manchester as part of the investigation into a siege at a synagogue in the united states. the man responsible — malik faisal akram from lancashire — was shot and killed by police near dallas in texas, after he took a rabbi and three other people hostage during a service. they were later freed unharmed.
9:02 am
counter—terrorism authorities on both sides of the atlantic are now investigating what happened, as sophie long reports. this is the moment the three final hostages ran for their lives, more than ten hours after their ordeal began. a successful, but nonetheless terrifying end, to the delicate, day—long operation involving negotiators and heavily armed police. the man, now identified as malik faisal akram, a 44—year—old british citizen, originally from lancashire, was shot and killed. he'd claimed to have a gun and a bomb when he interrupted a peaceful morning service being streamed from the congregation beth israel in dallas. akram was heard ranting about religion and demanding the release of a pakistani neuroscientist with suspected links to al-qaeda, currently serving a prison sentence in texas.
9:03 am
people came here, a place of worship, to pray. but once again in america, a moment of peace became a moment of profound pain. as the people who were trapped, terrified, try to come to terms with what happened, synagogues across the country have increased security in fear of copycat attacks. this was an act of terror. we're not going to tolerate this. we have this capacity to deal with assaults on, particularly the anti—semitism that has grown up. and so i'll be talking with — i put a call into the rabbi. we missed one another on the way up here. but they should rest assured that we are focused. as soon as it became known that akram was a british citizen who, according to the fbi, entered the united states just two weeks ago, the investigation became global. counter—terror police in manchester are assisting the us authorities, and are now questioning two teenagers who were arrested in the city last night. sophie long, bbc news, dallas.
9:04 am
our correspondent dave guest is in blackburn, where malik faisal akram was from. so, what else have you found out about him and what are people saying about him and what are people saying about this? ~ .,, ., , , , .,, about this? well, obviously people are in a states _ about this? well, obviously people are in a states of _ about this? well, obviously people are in a states of disbelief - about this? well, obviously people are in a states of disbelief here - about this? well, obviously people are in a states of disbelief here in l are in a states of disbelief here in blackburn as are his family. they haveissued blackburn as are his family. they have issued a statement. his brother said in a statement on social media, we as a family do not condone any of his actions and would like to apologise wholeheartedly to all the victims involved in the unfortunate incident. we would like to add that any attack on any human being, be it any attack on any human being, be it ajew, christian any attack on any human being, be it a jew, christian or muslim any attack on any human being, be it ajew, christian or muslim is any attack on any human being, be it a jew, christian or muslim is wrong and should be condemned. akram's family spent a number of tense hours here at the police station over the weekend, as they liaised with fbi negotiators and british authorities in the hope of trying to bring this to a peaceful conclusion, as we know the hostages thankfully were
9:05 am
rerealised unharmed but akram was killed by law enforcement officers in the states. of course, police on both sides of the atlantic are looking into why he went to america, was anybody else involved of was he just operating on his own? his family insist that he had mental health issues, they are not saying that excuses what he did but they are saying that, you know e this has come out of the blue to them and they are co—operating with the police. meanwhile those arrested in manchester overnight, you expect a bit of police activity in the wake of a terror related incident and so the fact there have been some arrests not too surprising, what we don't know is who these people are, we know it was in the south manchester area, we know they are teenager, we don't know their ages or gender therks is an ongoing investigation, police liaising with local communities to try and calm them and the family of this man akram still trying to come to terms
9:06 am
with what he did. thank you very much. with the latest on the investigation, here's our security correspondent, frank gardner. britain and the us already share a huge amount of intelligence and obviously the origins of this come back to the uk, because malik faisal akram travelled two weeks' ago to the us via jfk he is believed to have bought his weapon there in the us and travelled down to dallas, where he carried this out, but the investigation is, although it has been led by the fbi, the federal bureau of investigation, it is liaising very closely notjust with british counter terrorism police, that is greater manchester police as well, but also with, they have been in contact with israel, because of the synagogue connection here. this doesn't look on the surface to be like a kind of classics isis or al-qaeda operation. the brother has suggested that there were mental health issues involved, but the fact that he was making a political statement demanding the release of aafia siddiqui, who is a pakistani neuroscientist, you heard there in sophie long's report, that has pushed it into the realm of terrorism, which is why all leads
9:07 am
are being investigated, and as you heard there, two teenagers have been arrested last night in manchester, but they have not as yet been charged. the average household energy bill is widely expected to increase by £600—700 pounds this spring. many people are already struggling to cope with the cost of heating their home. the rise is coming because of an increase in the price cap — the maximum price that suppliers in england, wales and scotland can charge domestic customers on a standard tariff. the cap at the moment means no
9:08 am
household should pay more than £1,277 per yearfor a typical amount of energy. but energy firms are having to pay more for the gas they sell onto us, and many smallerfirms have been forced out of business. that means the energy price cap will have to rise. some experts think the new cap could be set at almost could be set at almost £2,000 a year. one group that looks at this — the resolution foundation — says the decision could mean more than six million households are spending at least 10% of their monthly budgets on energy bills. people who fall into that category used to be described as being in fuel poverty. the government changed the official definition in 2013 so it's now referrred to as fuel stress. whatever the term, the reality is more worry for people who've already seen their bills rise quite sharply this year. michael buchannan has been speaking to some of the people who are struggling.
9:09 am
i weigh six stone at the moment. so i'm cold all the time. and because i'm a wheelchair user, and a lot of me doesn't move any more, my circulation is really very poor. anne vivian—smith has a neurodegenerative condition. she lives with her husband — a university manager — in a small, increasingly cold bungalow in nottinghamshire, and the rising cost of energy is harming her health. i have three thermal layers on almost all the time now. i was sat under four blankets last week. i no longer eat breakfast and lunch because it's too expensive. this morning, anne checked her energy bills, and received an almighty shock. we found out today — our energy bill is usually £81; a month, and it's going up to 140. that's nearly doubled, and yet
9:10 am
dave's salary is not going up, my benefits aren't going up, and i'm really distressed about it, and i've already had a little cry, and i'm likely to have another one! many more families will be similarly anguished by rapidly rising gas and electricity bills. the resolution foundation think tank calculates that, by april, over six million households in england will struggle with their energy bills, with costs set to increase on average from £100 to £150 a month. £50 a month increase is beyond the means of millions of families, especially coming at the same time as changes to the tax system, where national insurance contributions will increase. so, you know, we'll see a lot of families really struggling, come april. the government say it has put a range of measures in place to support households, and will continue to listen to consumers and business on how to manage their energy costs. can i have £25 on that, please? james harpin has already seen his costs nearly double in a year, each top—up lasting less time.
9:11 am
i've put my postcode in. usually he'd just change providers. but this time, there's no point. it turns out that i am actually, in comparison to current energy deals available, on quite a good deal, it would seem, by quite a margin. james cares for his daughter for half the week, so heats his flat when she stays. otherwise, the 33—year—old lives frugally, even limiting his use of the washing machine. it's come to the point where, if i'm a bit short on electric and it's close to the time i'm going to be paid to top up again, i have to be clever enough to say, "don't do that washing, because you'll run out of electricity." so, let it build up, get paid, top up and then work through the washing, which is, again, a situation i've neverfound myself in until this year. low—income families, says today's report, should be offered a bigger and broader support package by ministers. but the scale of the looming price rises creates understandable worry. i have no choice but to use my hoists to change chairs,
9:12 am
and to use my power chair to get around. i have no choice but to use my electric bed. and all of this is going to have an impact on the costs that our energy company is going to throw us. michael buchanan, bbc news. harry lay lives in social housing, is on universal credit and uses a food bank. he says he's resorted to using candles in the evenings when his kids have gone to bed. harry, thank you for talking to us. how old are you children? so they are five, how old are you children? so they are five. eight _ how old are you children? so they are five, eight and _ how old are you children? so they are five, eight and 11. _ how old are you children? so they are five, eight and 11. ok. - how old are you children? so they are five, eight and 11. ok. and - how old are you children? so theyj are five, eight and 11. ok. and tell us about your _ are five, eight and 11. ok. and tell us about your family _ are five, eight and 11. ok. and tell us about your family budget - are five, eight and 11. ok. and tell us about your family budget and i are five, eight and 11. ok. and tell i us about your family budget and how much is going on energy bills? fist much is going on energy bills? git the moment, at the moment, and astronomical amount, so 18 months
9:13 am
ago i think we were paying round 130, 150 for 500 litres of oil and now they are wanting almost £400 for that. we are struggling to make ends meet, we are using the food bank every week as well as being in receipt of universal credit. we are both working so it is not manageable.— both working so it is not manageable. both working so it is not manaueable. ., ~ ., manageable. so, what kind of decisions are _ manageable. so, what kind of decisions are you _ manageable. so, what kind of decisions are you having - manageable. so, what kind of decisions are you having to i manageable. so, what kind of. decisions are you having to make manageable. so, what kind of- decisions are you having to make in your house, if the energy bills aren't manageable?— your house, if the energy bills aren't manageable? your house, if the energy bills aren't manaueable? ~ g, ., . aren't manageable? well, have to cut back on everything. _ aren't manageable? well, have to cut back on everything. which, _ aren't manageable? well, have to cut back on everything. which, you - aren't manageable? well, have to cut back on everything. which, you know| back on everything. which, you know isn't always realistic. i mean we, me and my wife have started using candles in the everening when the two of us are downstairs which is ridiculous but it is sort of the only way, really we can kind of limit the amount of energy we are using. it, yeah it is a real struggle at the moment, it's
9:14 am
frequently a struggle. it was last year as well but now it has gone up so much, sort of the idea of us not being able to use the food bank for example, is yeah, it isjust, it is not possible, we have to keep using it. i not possible, we have to keep using it. ., not possible, we have to keep using it. . w , ., g, not possible, we have to keep using it. i mean the fact you are using candles at _ it. i mean the fact you are using candles at night _ it. i mean the fact you are using candles at night it _ it. i mean the fact you are using candles at night it is _ it. i mean the fact you are using candles at night it is like - it. i mean the fact you are using candles at night it is like going i candles at night it is like going back to dickensian times. it candles at night it is like going back to dickensian times. it very much is. back to dickensian times. it very much is- my _ back to dickensian times. it very much is. my wife _ back to dickensian times. it very much is. my wife said _ back to dickensian times. it very much is. my wife said that, - back to dickensian times. it very much is. my wife said that, and| back to dickensian times. it very i much is. my wife said that, and for lots of over people, it is notjust us, lots of other people are struggling but it does feel like that, absolutely, yeah. the struggling but it does feel like that, absolutely, yeah. the work and pensions secretary, _ that, absolutely, yeah. the work and pensions secretary, not _ that, absolutely, yeah. the work and pensions secretary, not that - that, absolutely, yeah. the work and pensions secretary, not that long - pensions secretary, not that long ago suggested that if you wanted my lord money you should work more hours, would that work for you harry? hours, would that work for you har ? ., ., , �* hours, would that work for you har ? ., ., ,�* .," hours, would that work for you har? harry? no, it doesn't work, but, because the _ harry? no, it doesn't work, but, because the way _ harry? no, it doesn't work, but, because the way that _ harry? no, it doesn't work, but, because the way that the - harry? no, it doesn't work, but, i because the way that the universal credit system is, is the more hours you work, the more money they take from you, so you never get ahead of yourself, never ever get ahead of yourself, never ever get ahead of yourself, it is like a trap and it
9:15 am
is very hard to get out of that, i mean, what we would have to earn, between the two of us, to get us off universal credit, to, you know, so we can stop using the food bank, and sort of get ahead of ourselves is just, we are not able to earn that. do you get this warm homes discount which the government points to, for people who are struggling with energy bills and are on low incomes? no, we haven't been offered anything like that. we, so, for example our local charity for energy is warm and safe wiltshire, they have helped us and gave us a food voucher before christmas which was really helpful, but other than that, we haven't been offered anything. fik. but other than that, we haven't been offered anything-— but other than that, we haven't been offered anything. ok. you might have to a- -l for offered anything. ok. you might have to apply for it. — offered anything. ok. you might have to apply for it. harry _ offered anything. ok. you might have to apply for it, harry to _ offered anything. ok. you might have to apply for it, harry to be _ offered anything. ok. you might have to apply for it, harry to be honest - to apply for it, harry to be honest but it is 140 quid a year, if you got that, how much would that help?
9:16 am
it would certainly help, but, i mean, would it sort of, would it help us enough to get us out of the situation that we are in? no, unfortunately it wouldn't, and it is not us being ungrateful, we are very grateful for any help we receive, but did you say £140 a year? yes. but did you say £140 a year? yes, the prime — but did you say £140 a year? yes, the prime minister _ but did you say £140 a year? yes, the prime minister said _ but did you say £140 a year? yes, the prime minister said it - but did you say £140 a year? yes, the prime minister said it was 140 a week but it is not, it is £140 a year, it week but it is not, it is £140 a ear, ., �* ,. g, g year, it wouldn't scratch the surface- _ year, it wouldn't scratch the surface. you _ year, it wouldn't scratch the surface. you said _ year, it wouldn't scratch the surface. you said for - year, it wouldn't scratch the surface. you said for 500 i year, it wouldn't scratch the i surface. you said for 500 litres year, it wouldn't scratch the - surface. you said for 500 litres you used to pay — surface. you said for 500 litres you used to pay 130 _ surface. you said for 500 litres you used to pay 130 quid, _ surface. you said for 500 litres you used to pay 130 quid, over- surface. you said for 500 litres you used to pay 130 quid, over what i used to pay 130 quid, over what period of time is that, harry? 50. period of time is that, harry? so, if we were — period of time is that, harry? so, if we were careful _ period of time is that, harry? srr, if we were careful with period of time is that, harry? 557, if we were careful with it we might get three months out of it. and if we were careful with it we might get three months out of it. and you said that has _ get three months out of it. and you said that has gone _ get three months out of it. and you said that has gone up _ get three months out of it. and you said that has gone up to _ get three months out of it. and you said that has gone up to 400 i get three months out of it. and you said that has gone up to 400 quid. | said that has gone up to 400 quid. yes. ., $1 $1 , said that has gone up to 400 quid. yes. ., :: :: , g, , g, yes. for 500 litres, i mean, yeah, it wouldn't. _ yes. for 500 litres, i mean, yeah, it wouldn't, obviously, _ yes. for 500 litres, i mean, yeah, it wouldn't, obviously, if, - yes. for 500 litres, i mean, yeah, it wouldn't, obviously, if, it - yes. for 500 litres, i mean, yeah, it wouldn't, obviously, if, it is i it wouldn't, obviously, if, it is not going to get to you 400 quid over three months. trio. not going to get to you 400 quid over three months.— not going to get to you 400 quid over three months. no, but it is the
9:17 am
same with the _ over three months. no, but it is the same with the increase _ over three months. no, but it is the same with the increase in _ over three months. no, but it is the same with the increase in the, i over three months. no, but it is the same with the increase in the, they| same with the increase in the, they increased the universal credit by whatever, you know, increased it by, but again, you know, they say it like it's a wonderful thing, but again, for, for people that are already struggling, that extra little bit they gives you u it doesn't do, it doesn't scratch the surface, its doesn't help actually. it is just, surface, its doesn't help actually. it isjust, i mean, yeah. the problem, the poverty problem in this country is getting, is getting bigger and bigger and bigger, country is getting, is getting biggerand biggerand bigger, and it is not, yes, we need to government to actually step in, and do something about it, but actually we need to change the mentality of everyone around us, so that, you know, more people are aware that lots of people are struggling. thank ou ve lots of people are struggling. thank you very much _ lots of people are struggling. thank you very much for — lots of people are struggling. thank you very much for talking _ lots of people are struggling. thank you very much for talking to - lots of people are struggling. thank you very much for talking to us, i you very much for talking to us, harry, thank you. harry lay, he and his wife work, he's self—employed cleaner, think i am right in saying harris, and his wife is a hair
9:18 am
dresser, they have three children, and as you heard, they use candles at night in order to save money on theirfuel bills. at night in order to save money on theirfuel bills. relatives of a british woman missing after a tsunami hit the pacific island nation of tonga say they're desperately waiting for news. angela glover, who runs an animal rescue centre, was swept away by a wave. air force planes from australia and new zealand have been sent to tonga — to survey the damage caused by the tsunami, which was triggered by a massive volcanic eruption. howard johnson reports. a military surveillance plane leaving auckland, new zealand this morning, bound for tonga. australia has also sent planes to carry out an assessment of the damage caused by saturday's eruption of an underwater volcano. satellite images captured the moment a tsunami, triggered by the eruption, engulfed tonga and sent a shock wave across the pacific ocean. and listen to this. a sonic boom captured on video more than 400 miles away in fiji. sonic boom sounds.
9:19 am
the international federation of the red cross estimate that more than 80,000 people have been affected by the eruption, with stories of missing people being reported on social media. briton angela glover was last seen by her husband clinging to a tree, before she was swept away by the tsunami. the family have put a number of posts on social media, appealing for information. she moved to tonga in 2015, leaving behind an advertising job to start an animal shelter, where she looks after and houses stray dogs, and is a popular figure on the island. the local authorities have been conducting searches and i believe they are still ongoing. it is daytime here. look, it is 48 hours. i am not holding out much hope. communications to tonga remain badly affected. not knowing what happened to loved ones is creating an unbearable concern. howard johnson, bbc news, manila.
9:20 am
from today, people in england with coronavirus can end their isolation after five full days — providing they test negative on days five and six. it's hoped the change will ease staff shortages across the economy. the latest phase of the covid vaccine programme in england also begins today — with boosterjabs available to all 16 and 17—year—olds. the education secretary, nadhim zahawi, says the prime minister recognises the anger surrounding the parties which took place in downing street during the lockdown. mr zahawi again urged people to wait for the findings of an inquiry being headed by a senior civil servant. six conservative mps have now called on borisjohnson to resign over the issue. 0ur political correspondent chris mason reports. this is leigh in greater manchester. labourfor the best part of a century, until borisjohnson asked for votes in the town. then, the conservatives won.
9:21 am
so what do people here make of what's gone on, and whether he should stay on as prime minister? it's all the nurses and the doctors who've worked hard during the pandemic, who obviously have been let down. they say that the devil that you know is better than the devil you don't know. and at least we know where we are with him. he won't do nothing, but somebody else might do something. i think he should go. i mean, there's been plenty of things happened in the past where politicians have done not half as bad as he's done, and they've had to leave. they've resigned, or they've been forced out. they should alljust go, for me. they're all out for themselves, not for the working people, are they? not one of them. the list of social do's that went on in westminster, when social do's were banned, is long. and these are just the ones we know about. it's up to this woman, sue gray, a senior civil servant, to catalogue the lot of them. but it could be another week or so before we find out what she's found out, leaving lots of conservative
9:22 am
mps to ponder that... what my constituents are doing now, is they're comparing their own experiences over the last — well, almost two years, isn't it? — with what they're seeing on television. and a number of them are now looking on in disbelief that it's been the interpretation of some people in downing street that the law ends at the number 10 garden wall. so many conservative mps feel hugely let down, angry and unable to justify what has happened. but, for plenty of them, borisjohnson is the reason they're in politics, the reason they're in parliament. so, to topple him just two years after winning so big a a general election, is a huge thing for them to contemplate, let alone do. mps return here this morning with plenty to ponder. chris mason, bbc news. let's speak to adam fleming, our chief political correspondent.
9:23 am
what are you hearing about what tory mps have heard from their constituents.— mps have heard from their constituents. ., , , , , constituents. the tory party seems to be pulling _ constituents. the tory party seems to be pulling in _ constituents. the tory party seems to be pulling in two _ constituents. the tory party seems to be pulling in two different i to be pulling in two different directions in you have an increase in the number of backbenchers calling for the prime minister to 90, calling for the prime minister to go, that ticked up to six over the weekend of people who have gone public, several more are saying the same sort of thing in private but equally you get some mps saying they were surprised how little grief they got from their constituents when they saw them over the weekend, i was hearing from one red wall mp, from one of those his #20rically labour seat has —— historically labour seat has —— historically labour seats who said they had a lot less, they picked up a lower temperature from people when they were chatting over the weekend. this is a bit of a phoney period, because we are waiting for the report into what went on by the senior civil servant sue gray, and here is how the education secretary put it this morning servant sue gray, and here is how the education secretary put morning
9:24 am
people, in my post bag, feel upset that the people who make the rules look like they haven't been following the rules, some say, you know, we want to make sure that this investigation is thorough, they want to know it is going to be thorough, and i reassure my constituents that sue gray is a very senior civil servant, very well able to conduct this investigation and will do an absolutely thorough job, and she can follow the evidence where ever it takes her and if she finds any form of law breaking, criminalactivity, then that will be submitted to the metropolitan police. and while we are waiting for that report from sue gray, which we are told is probably not going to be the end of this week at the overlieiest, and that is when everything will change, the government is trying to fill that time by briefing a series of policies, and sort of things they were already working on that we were sort of expecting but maybe accelerating them a bit, maybe seasoning them so they seem even more appealing to conservative
9:25 am
backbenchers, so for example you have the two—year freeze for the level of the bbc license fee, but accompanied by a tweet from the culture secretary says the license fee should be replaced. then you got the ministry of defence taking over the ministry of defence taking over the operation in the channel to deal with migrant boats coming from france, it is being put out there in a partial way, some people say for political reasons, and you can already pick up a bit of disquiet in whitehall, there are long thought out long plan things being rushed out long plan things being rushed out for political reasons.- out long plan things being rushed out for political reasons. thank you adam. out for political reasons. thank you adam- thank— out for political reasons. thank you adam. thank you. _ thank you. i'm joined now by matthew parris, times columnist and former conservative mp. hello to you. good morning. what do ou think hello to you. good morning. what do you think of — hello to you. good morning. what do you think of these _ hello to you. good morning. what do you think of these announcements i you think of these announcements that are being brought forward, under so—called 0peration red meat will they distract people's
9:26 am
attention.— will they distract people's attention. ., ., , attention. the other one is operation _ attention. the other one is operation save _ attention. the other one is operation save big - attention. the other one is operation save big dog. it| attention. the other one is i operation save big dog. it is so 0peration save big dog. it is so neckachedly an attempt to move the focus away from downing street parties, that i don't think any make any mistake it could be anything but that, journalists can all immediately see what it is. is. members of parliament can see, the license fee thing, that has been bubbling on four year, the getting the military more involved that has been bubbling on, the idea of sending asylum—seekers to rwanda or ghana is so evidently crazy this reeks more of desperation and i think the subterranean volcanic eruption will have done more for downing street to move the focus a away rather than this 0peration save big dog stuff, it is almost funny. people may know, or they may not, you are not a fan of borisjohnson,
9:27 am
but do you think he will survive, and if so how? l but do you think he will survive, and if so how?— and if so how? i think he has a chance of— and if so how? i think he has a chance of surviving, _ and if so how? i think he has a chance of surviving, the i and if so how? i think he has a chance of surviving, the sue i and if so how? i think he has a i chance of surviving, the sue gray investigation can't come out for a good few days yet, i mean she has so much top investigate, and you notice there, if there is any evidence of wrongdoing it will be referred to the metropolitan police. even if it is referred to the metropolitan police, the metropolitan police have all britain's police forces have a policy of not prosecuting things that are more than a year old, in this instance, so downing street may at the end of it all, be able to say this was just a storm in a tea cup, normal service is now resuming, perhaps some other big news event will intervene, you know, russia will intervene, you know, russia will invade ukraine, something like that, perhaps the local government
9:28 am
elections in may, though bad for the conservatives won't be as disastrous as everyone has said, and boris johnson will limp on, but he will neverfly again, his johnson will limp on, but he will never fly again, his credibility has gone, but i would give him at least 40% chance of surviving through to the end of the year. ok, the end of the year. 0k, and so what, with a 06%, how will he not survive past the year, what do you think might happen? we what do you think might happen? - may have up to 35 mp5 who have may have up to 35 mps who have already submitted no confidence letters to the chairman of the 1922 committee, i think we need 54, so it is possible, especially after the sue gray inquiry, so many mps say they are waiting for it. some will have been saying that because they hope it will defuse everything but others will say that because they want to give time for due process but have already decided what they
9:29 am
will do if the inquiry is critical. 0ne will do if the inquiry is critical. one might reach the 54 within a couple of week, in which case there will be a vote of no confidence in the prime minister, among the parliamentary conservative party. i don't know if he would survive it, but if he doesn't you will have a full on leadership election, and talk is already beginning to revolve round who the likely contenders might be. round who the likely contenders miaht be. ., g round who the likely contenders miaht be. ., ~' ,, round who the likely contenders miaht be. ., ,, , round who the likely contenders miahtbe. ., , . ., might be. thank you very much for talkin: to might be. thank you very much for talking to us- _ might be. thank you very much for talking to us. thank— might be. thank you very much for talking to us. thank you. _ talking to us. thank you. matthew parris a columnist for the times newspaper and a former conservative mp. the chair of the global banking giant, credit suisse, has resigned following allegations that he broke the uk's covid quarantine rules. antonio horta—0sorio reportedly attended the wimbledon tennis finals injuly at a time when the uk's covid rules required him to be in isolation. in a statement, he said he regretted that a number of his personal actions led to difficulties for the bank. after nearly a fortnight of controversy, play is under way at the australian open
9:30 am
tennis in melbourne. last year's men's singles champion, novak djokovic, was deported from australia yesterday — when a court upheld a decision to cancel his visa on the grounds he hadn't been vaccinated against covid. he's due to arrive home in serbia later this morning. the australian home affairs minister has hinted that he won't be allowed back into the country until 2025 — throwing his hopes of a tenth title in melbourne into chaos. gareth barlow reports. taking selfies with fans after landing in dubai. taking selfies with fans after landing in dubai. it taking selfies with fans after landing in dubai. it isn't taking selfies with fans after landing in dubai. it isn't how taking selfies with fans after landing in dubai. it isn't how novak djokovic envisage spending the first day of the australian open. not in australia, and not playing tennis. the world number one was on the first flight out of melbourne on sunday, after a court backed the australian immigration minister's decision to cancel djokovic's visa. the serbian said he was extremely disappointed by the ruling. the australian government said he was a talisman of anti—vaccination sentiment, and his presence risked
9:31 am
civil unrest. and as crowds arrived to watch the action in the right type of court, public sentiment was mostly on the government's side. you'll go to be honest, most of the tennis players are vaccinated. 0bviously that was a requirement of getting into the country. ifeel as though if everyone else did it, he should have done it. i do feel the government should have taken some responsibility, with giving him the exemption initially. some i have a theory that anyone in australia who is not vaccinated, cannot go to work, can't go to a restaurant, probably can't walk into the gate here today, why should anyone go to work without vaccination in australia full stop? l work without vaccination in australia full stop?- work without vaccination in australia full stop? i think he deserved it. _ australia full stop? i think he deserved it. no _ australia full stop? i think he deserved it. no player- australia full stop? i think he deserved it. no player is i australia full stop? i think he i deserved it. no player is above the game _ deserved it. no player is above the game he — deserved it. no player is above the game he set — deserved it. no player is above the game. he set himself— deserved it. no player is above the game. he set himself up— deserved it. no player is above the game. he set himself up for- deserved it. no player is above the game. he set himself up for that. i game. he set himself up for that. all he _ game. he set himself up for that. all he had — game. he set himself up for that. all he had to _ game. he set himself up for that. all he had to do _ game. he set himself up for that. all he had to do was _ game. he set himself up for that. all he had to do was get - game. he set himself up for that. i all he had to do was get vaccinated or do— all he had to do was get vaccinated or do the _ all he had to do was get vaccinated or do the right _ all he had to do was get vaccinated or do the right thing, _ all he had to do was get vaccinated or do the right thing, and - all he had to do was get vaccinated or do the right thing, and he - all he had to do was get vaccinated or do the right thing, and he couldl or do the right thing, and he could have _ or do the right thing, and he could have stayed — or do the right thing, and he could have stayed. for— or do the right thing, and he could have stayed-— or do the right thing, and he could have stayed. for 11 days, the focus ofthe have stayed. for 11 days, the focus
9:32 am
of the australian _ have stayed. for 11 days, the focus of the australian open _ have stayed. for 11 days, the focus of the australian open has - have stayed. for 11 days, the focus of the australian open has not i have stayed. for 11 days, the focus| of the australian open has not been on sport. it has been on djokovic's unvaccinated status and the status of his visa. the hope for the open and for australia will be that tennis will distract from the circus. for djokovic now, some time to collect his thoughts and response to collect his thoughts and response to the most tortuous period of his career. —— tumultuous. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. good morning. it has been a cold and frosty start to the day. we have had some patchy fog, lifting now. most will have a dry and sunny day. some wispy cloud, but their cloud across the north and west of scotland, producing some drizzle. even so, through the afternoon, some of the cloud will be eroded, back towards the coast. it is windy here, but not as windy as yesterday, with temperatures ranging from about 8—10 across the board. through this evening, very rapidly we will see a
9:33 am
return to some fog, across the midlands, eastern and southern parts of england. and a weather front coming in from the west which is going to introduce decca cloud and eventually some rain. so, here it is not going to be as cold as it is across the rest of the uk, where there will be widespread frost ads and freezing fog. that fog will lift very slowly tomorrow. for some areas, possibly into the afternoon, they will have it. the rain coming from the west across northern ireland and scotland, accompanied by gusty wind and it is going to feel cold. hello, this is bbc news.
9:34 am
the headlines... two teenagers have been arrested in manchester in connection with the texas synagogue siege the british hostage—taker was a man from blackburn. more than a quarter of households will struggle to pay their energy bills soon, according to a new report today. search and rescue flights continue over tonga, as fears grow for a missing british woman who it's thought was swept away in the tsunami. on his way home — novak djokovic boards a flight to belgrade at dubai airport, following his deportation from australia. and coming up, scotland eases its boxing day restrictions on large outdoor events including football matches and concerts. we'll be live at celtic park ahead of tonight's match against hibs. sport now, and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good morning. the australian open is under way in melbourne — but without the world number one novak djokovic. the build—up to the event has been
9:35 am
dominated by his fight to stay and compete after his visa was cancelled due to his vaccination status. he arrived in dubai this morning after being deported and is currently on a flight back to his native serbia, but the tournament continues without him. so, to the action on the court and disappointment for cameron norrie — he's been knocked out in the first round. the british men's number one — who was seeded 12th — lost in straight sets to american rising star sebastian korda. no such trouble for rafael nadal though. the spaniard's bid for a men's record 21st grand slam title got under way with victory over marcos giron. the sixth seed — the only former champion left in the men's draw — beat american giron 6—16—4 6—2. nadal is making his return to grand slam tennis after a five—month lay—off with a foot injury. also a winning start for the defending women's champion japan's naomi 0saka. she beat camila 0sorio to go
9:36 am
through to the second round. number one seed and home favourite ashleigh barty is also through to the second round, she comfortably defeated ukraine's lesia tsurenko 6—0, 6—1. barty could face 0saka in the fourth round. and six more british players, led by emma raducanu and andy murray, are in action tomorrow. another premier league weekend and another managerial casualty — this was not too surprising, rafa benitez who was sacked yesterday after less than seven months in charge at everton. it comes after their 2—1 defeat at strugglers norwich city. there were angry scenes from travelling fans. everton have lost nine of their past 12 premier league games, sinking from fourth in the table to 16th. after he was sacked, he said he didn't realise the magnitude of the task. liverpool are up to second
9:37 am
in the premier league with a 3—0 win over brentford at anfield. it's a crucial three points forjurgen klopp's side. fabinho, alex 0xlade—chamberlain and takumi minamino here with the goals. the victory moves liverpool above chelsea, 11 points behind the leaders manchester city, but with a game in hand. west ham boss david moyes was unhappy with the premier league after his side lost 3—2 at home to leeds. west ham played in midweek to fit in a rearranged match but despite leeds having two postponed games they had the week off to prepare. west ham scored a late equaliser to draw 1—1 with tottenham in the women's super league. kate longhurst headed home in stoppage time to give the 10—player irons a point. spurs are fourth, west ham 8th. earlier leicester beat brighton 1—0. having beaten south africa on saturday, england made it two wins out of two in netball�*s quad series yesterday with victory over new zealand.
9:38 am
they came back from eight points down at london's copper box arena against the silver ferns, to win their second group game by 49 points to 46. they'll play australia in their final group game tomorrow. and ten years after first lifting the trophy, neil robertson has won his second masters championship. the australian beat england's barry hawkins by ten frames to four in the final at alexandra palace in london. he pockets a cheque for a quarter of a million pounds. it's been a decade since he last won it, back in 2012 — here he is celebrating with his young son alexander. and last night he was able to celebrate with daughter penelope too. he is the same age that alexander was when he won it the first time around.
9:39 am
every match has thrown a lot of challenges. i think coming here, when the tournament was announced last year that we were getting the crowds back, i was so excited. and then we went into lockdown again and i was so disappointed. but it is so fantastic to hear london cheering again for a snooker tournament. cheering and applause that's all the sport for now. changes to coronavirus restrictions in scotland, come in today, including lifting the limit of 500 people at big outdoor events like football and gigs. the restrictions had been in place since boxing day in response to the 0micron variant. the change means fans can go to celtic versus hibernian at celtic park tonight. alexander mackenzie is there. they will be pleased about that? tic alexander mackenzie is there. they will be pleased about that? no fans here et, will be pleased about that? no fans here yet. but _ will be pleased about that? no fans here yet. but i _ will be pleased about that? no fans here yet, but i am _ will be pleased about that? no fans here yet, but i am sure _ will be pleased about that? no fans here yet, but i am sure they - will be pleased about that? no fans here yet, but i am sure they are i here yet, but i am sure they are gearing up for the game. 0utdoor live events are back at full
9:40 am
capacity. there has been a cap of 500 since boxing day because of the sharp rise in cases because of the 0micron variant. so, it does mean that the hibs and celtic game that was postponed from the 29th of december can go ahead here tonight, in front of a full capacity crowd, which will be around 60,000. vaccine passports will also be back in place, and there will be a couple of changes there, to prove that you are fully vaccinated, that now includes the booster, if you had your second vaccine more than four months ago. if that second dose was more than four months ago. you can also show that you have evidence of a negative lateral flow test within the last 24 hours. a slight tightening as well, the 20% of crowds that will be tested, that will be about 50% of
9:41 am
the crowd now that will be tracked. the government has said the club is advising everyone to take a lateral flow test before coming here tonight. 0bviously flow test before coming here tonight. obviously a negative lateralflow tonight. obviously a negative lateral flow test. and the advice is also for everyone to wear a mask, even though it is outside, the advice is to wear a mask. the advice is to arrive early, the ground will be open about two hours before the match begins. a big night for the fans at celtic park.— match begins. a big night for the fans at celtic park. thank you very much. joining me now is celtic supporter declan mcconville. i assume you are going to night? yes, definitely, looking forward to getting back to celtic park. hagar getting back to celtic park. how much have _ getting back to celtic park. how much have you _ getting back to celtic park. how much have you missed - getting back to celtic park. how much have you missed being there? yes, i think every football fan across the country has missed going to celtic park and other venues
9:42 am
across the country. the initial winter break was brought forward, which ten clubs voted for. there was concern that it might be longer than three weeks, because glasgow was in a circuit breaker a couple of years back and it lasted a lot longer than three weeks. at the decision to bring the winter break forward seems to be paying dividends, and i think everybody across the country is just looking forward to getting back to supporting their football clubs. because the opportunity to go and see them in the flesh, live, was taken away from you, do you think that you kind of appreciate it more? i don't want to put words in your mouth, but did you take for granted? i think when we got back to the stadiums in august, we thought, this is it, we are back in and those days are gone of watching football from home, streams and on sky sports and stuff. but when it was taken away again, it was a big miss for your life, especially when it continued
9:43 am
on, the premier league and stuff, watching games down there and it has been full capacity. so, you know, the gap in your life that it leaves is huge, but there is always a winter break, and it isjust an extra week. so there is always wanting to get back afterjanuary, but the extra week and the uncertainty of if we would go back, it has made is that extra bit special for tonight. it has made is that extra bit specialfortonight. i it has made is that extra bit specialfor tonight. i good luck, take care. sendin send in your messages on twitter and instagram, or e—mail, about the state of your energy bills. instagram, or e-mail, about the state of your energy bills.- state of your energy bills. dawn sa s that state of your energy bills. dawn says that my — state of your energy bills. dawn says that my direct _ state of your energy bills. dawn says that my direct debit - state of your energy bills. dawn says that my direct debit was i says that my direct debit was increased from 95 quid a month to £230 per month. i'm a single occupancy nhs worker, i am out for 16 hours for three four days when i am working, and when i am home i can only afford to heat one room. i never had anybody over because the place is too cold. tom says, hello, we are with bulb, we were paying £80
9:44 am
a month and we are now paying 158, and that is without the price cap increasing in april. peter says i just watched your interview with the guy using candles at night, low energy light bulbs are cheaper to use than light bulbs. 500 litres of oil costs 340 quid. i assume he was in his house for the interview, i suggest he puts on warmer clothes and notjust a t—shirt. jenny says i am 91% bedbound and have home care, which i pay towards. the government have a formula of financial assessment for care. a few years ago they reduced the amount they let people like me keep. last year, all of my benefit rises were taken by social services. of my benefit rises were taken by socialservices. i of my benefit rises were taken by social services. i currently pay £4000 plus for my home care. i simply do not know how i will cope with the impending fuel rise. that isjenny with the impending fuel rise. that is jenny and harrogate. with the impending fuel rise. that isjenny and harrogate. thank with the impending fuel rise. that is jenny and harrogate. thank you for those. is jenny and harrogate. thank you forthose. if is jenny and harrogate. thank you for those. if you want to get in touch, you are very welcome. the reason we are asking this today is
9:45 am
because a reporter may think tank that concentrates on policy will people on low and middle incomes, and it is essentially warning that fuel bills are going to be unaffordable or barely for millions of people, come april, when the price cap, which is supposed to limit bills, has to rise. that is because of worldwide gas prices going up. the chinese government is drawing up contingency plans to control the spread of covid, as millions begin their chinese new year holiday. there are fears the 40—day travel season could see 0micron spread throughout the country. meanwhile, restrictions remain in place in parts russell trott reportsw.e with chinese new year and the winter olympics both set to trigger mass movement across the country, beijing is determined to keep covid in check. the spring festival is the biggest annual human migration on earth, and, as such, authorities are laying out plans to control mass transit. translation: we will coordinate i with local authorities to adjust i
9:46 am
transport plans if local outbreaks occur, we will suspend or reduce passenger trains on the affected areas. restrict or hold ticket sales from stations and strictly manage passenger movements. the chinese government expects around 1.5 billion trips, which will be made during the spring festival travel season. and with the 0micron variant present in several regions, there are fears to what degree it may spread over the coming weeks. in france, meanwhile, parliament there has approved a government's latest measures to tackle covid. the new law, which takes effect on thursday, requires anyone over 16 to have a vaccine certificate to enter public places, like restaurants, cafes, cinemas and long—distance trains. and in amsterdam, as infection numbers hit a new record, thousands packed city streets to protest against restrictions. the netherlands has relaxed some of the measures it implemented over
9:47 am
the christmas holidays, but bars, restaurants and cultural venues have been instructed to remain closed until at least january the 25th. i think in fact we are one of the only countries, or maybe the only country, which is still in lockdown. countries around us are actually going backwards, back to normal life, slowly. in response to the protests, riot police were deployed across the city, as almost two years on countries around the world continue to grapple with the covid pandemic. russell trott, bbc news. there's been a significant increase in the number of fatal collisions on uk roads. a bbc panorama investigation has found that hundreds of speed cameras are switched off, police are doing fewer breathalyser tests — and there are fewer dedicated traffic police officers. richard bilton reports. something is happening on our roads.
9:48 am
for the first time in 40 years, there has been a significant rise in the fatality rate, the deaths per mile. uk roads are getting more dangerous. the thing is, it shouldn't be like this. cars are getting safer, roads should be getting safer. but that is not what is going on. panorama has found there has been a sharp reduction in the number of dedicated police traffic officers. we got figures from 34 of the 44 police forces. they had 5,000 dedicated traffic officers in 2016. but 757 officers have been lost in just five years. that's a fall of 15%. the police watchdog is concerned. there are some police forces that have got negligible presence on the road.
9:49 am
that has happened because, in general, it's been given a low priority. you have a scenario where the fatality rate has risen for the first time in 40 years. yeah. is that because there are fewer police officers out there? yeah, we think so. 1,600 people die on uk roads every year. the police say roads policing remains a priority. but panorama found key methods of catching offenders have been reduced. in the last decade, the number of breathalyser tests have been cut by more than 50%. and freedom of information responses from 26 forces reveal almost half of their fixed speed cameras are not switched on. if there's less chance of being caught, some drivers, and i say some, will take those risks. they will be reckless, they will speed, they will cause deaths. the government says our roads are among the safest in the world. they add that deployment
9:50 am
of resources is a matter for individual police forces. but it's investing an extra £1.1 billion in police funding next year. but what panorama has found is a road network with fewer checks and increased danger. richard bilton, bbc news. you can see the full investigation on bbc one tonight at 7.30. the parents of a young woman who was fatally stabbed in derbyshire last year are one step closer to getting a new law in her memory. it's thought 23—year—old gracie spinks was killed by a former work colleague, whom she had previously reported for stalking. he was found dead near the murder scene. a petition calling for more support for stalking victims will be debated in parliament. luxmy gopal has been speaking to gracie's family go on, gracie!
9:51 am
woo—hoo! just full of life and energy, and just lived for her horses, didn't she? such a beautiful young girl with her whole life ahead of her. she did light up the room wherever she went. gracie spinks was stabbed in the neck as she was looking after her horse lastjune. it's believed the killer was a former colleague, who was found dead shortly afterwards nearby. gracie had reported him to derbyshire police for stalking her. a bag of weapons had been found and reported to police near the spot, where, just a week later, gracie was killed. the force is being investigated by the police watchdog over its handling of the case. christmas was particularly difficult, and her birthday on the 19th of october. notjust the family, but close friends and people beyond. it's been the worst christmas we've ever had. so painful. and just... just getting worse. the pain's getting
9:52 am
worse, not better. a petition in gracie's name, to improve support for victims of stalking, has now passed 100,000 signatures. how does it feel that this is now going to be potentially discussed in parliament? one of my work colleagues actually sent me a screenshot of a football stadium and said, "just to put it into perspective, this is how many people, you know, loved gracie and have signed for gracie." and i thought, yeah, that puts it into perspective, really, when you see... ..see those numbers. yeah, amazing. the campaigner who set up the petition wants police forces to allocate specific funding for stalking cases. i'd like a separate pot - for stalking, for investigations, for the cps, for the courts, in order to prioritize - stalking cases. in response to the petition, the government said... "to ensure victims and survivors are supported, the home office part funds the national stalking helpline, and has recently tripled its funding."
9:53 am
it says it's also made a commitment to work with police, to make sure they're making proper use of stalking protection orders. for gracie's parents, it's about making a lasting difference. to make girls, women and men feel safer when they're out. this will go on. this will be gracie's law, gracie's legacy. it's like a message from gracie saying, "it's time for change." 0ne young woman's life cut short by violence. but now, in her memory, a mission to try to protect others from suffering the same fate. luxmy gopal, bbc news. one of the most decorated african—american military pilots, charles mcgee, has died at the age of 102. he was an original member of the tuskegee airmen, an all—black us air force unit formed during the second world war, charles mcgee flew 409 combat missions spanning world war two, and the korean and vietnam conflicts. h also fought passionately against segregation in the us military. in 2016 he talked about
9:54 am
what the tuskegee airmen stood for. being brought up, you know, as they were, african—american, or black, but we're american. and the country was at war. we were just as interested in supporting that effort as anyone else at that time. and so we turned our back on the fact that there was segregation, if you will, took advantage of the opportunity to prove that we can fly aeroplanes, we can maintain aeroplanes, and we can do whatever our education and aspirations, where those things lead us. a 29—year—old man from london has been receiving thousands of messages from women all over the world, in response to his billboard advertisement to help find him a wife. muhammad malik advertised himself on hoardings across london, birmingham and manchester.
9:55 am
hi,| hi, iam hi, i am malik. hi, iam malik. you might have hi, i am malik. you might have seen my face on a billboard somewhere. i am an entrepreneur, i am religious. i am open to any ethnicity. if you are interested, fill out the form and cheque of my details. 24—year—old muhammad malikfrom hounslow in london decided to advertise himself on billboards to find a wife. he decided to take this unconventional approach after years of struggling to find a life partner through other methods, including dating apps. the through other methods, including dating apps-— through other methods, including dating apps. the kernel of an idea was presented _ dating apps. the kernel of an idea was presented to _ dating apps. the kernel of an idea was presented to me _ dating apps. the kernel of an idea was presented to me by _ dating apps. the kernel of an idea was presented to me by a - dating apps. the kernel of an idea was presented to me by a friend, | dating apps. the kernel of an idea i was presented to me by a friend, in marketing. and it was me kind of complaining about, man, you know, i'm doing so many things, i'm so busy with work, with a side hustle, hobbies. 0n busy with work, with a side hustle, hobbies. on top of that, events are closing because of the pandemic, right? so how can you get out of there? the conversation led to something quite extreme, literally
9:56 am
getting yourself out there, old school billboards, and they are dotted around manchester, birmingham and london, in particular those areas with more ethnic minorities. hey, i am malik and that is my billboard. i why do you have a problem with arranged marriages? i am definitely not against arranged marriages. if anything, am definitely not against arranged marriages. ifanything, i am definitely not against arranged marriages. if anything, i think the evidence and the research goes to show this is probably one of the best ways to find a spouse, because you go beyond face value, to real values. but i thought, you know what, let's try this route. if not, i'm definitely not against going to the good old grapevine. so i'm definitely not against going to the good old grapevine.— the good old grapevine. so far, malik has received _ the good old grapevine. so far, malik has received over- the good old grapevine. so far, malik has received over 1000 i malik has received over 1000 messages from women and his story has travelled all over the world. i'm getting messages from tanzania, america, overseas. it's phenomenal. friends and people who know me really well have said to me, mate, what is going on? this is a... you are playing football with us the
9:57 am
other day, just chilling, and now you are being spoken about on forums, you are being spoken about news channels and stuff like that. the 29—year—old has been following in his dad's footsteps, who also did something similar when he was searching for a wife. this something similar when he was searching for a wife.— something similar when he was searching for a wife. this is going back 30 years. — searching for a wife. this is going back 30 years, somebody - searching for a wife. this is going i back 30 years, somebody mentioned, in a paper, _ back 30 years, somebody mentioned, in a paper, people trying to get some _ in a paper, people trying to get some response, and i did that. and that is— some response, and i did that. and that is how— some response, and i did that. and that is how i — some response, and i did that. and that is how i got married. so it runs— that is how i got married. so it runs in— that is how i got married. so it runs in the _ that is how i got married. so it runs in the family, i suppose. how are ou runs in the family, i suppose. how are you going _ runs in the family, i suppose. how are you going to — runs in the family, i suppose. how are you going to filter— runs in the family, i suppose. time" are you going to filter these messages, and how are you going to find the one? t’ee messages, and how are you going to find the one?— find the one? i've got a spreadsheet and i am find the one? i've got a spreadsheet and i am going _ find the one? i've got a spreadsheet and i am going through _ find the one? i've got a spreadsheet and i am going through with - find the one? i've got a spreadsheet and i am going through with all- find the one? i've got a spreadsheet and i am going through with all of. and i am going through with all of the messages that have come through. so, whittling it down initially with questions. i've got some personality questions. i've got some personality questions. what type of person are you in this scenario? and then getting it to the next stage, which is kind of skype calls, zoom calls with the person and their family as well. ,, , . , with the person and their family as well, ,, , ., , ., ~' with the person and their family as well, ,,, ., , ., ~' ,., with the person and their family as well. ,,, . , ., ~ i. ., well. spreadsheet! thank you for our well. spreadsheet! thank you for
9:58 am
your messages — well. spreadsheet! thank you for your messages about _ well. spreadsheet! thank you for your messages about the - well. spreadsheet! thank you for your messages about the state i well. spreadsheet! thank you for| your messages about the state of your messages about the state of your energy bills at the moment. i just want to read this from peggy. she asked not to give her surname, i suspect it is today with her pride. i am 69 and sitting with a warm throw and hot water bottle watching you. i'm afraid to turn on the central heating except in extreme weather, and then only for a couple of hours per day. i don't cook in the oven or use the hob, but i rely on the microwave for ready meals. i put the water heater on once a week for an hour to have a shower, and for an hour to have a shower, and for cleaning. i use the kettle boiling water to clean the rest of the time, and i wash myself daily. i rarely put the lights on. in fact, the only electricity users from itv which brings me great enjoyment, apart from the fridge on the regular use of the cattle. i've got used to finding my way around in the dark. i am diabetic and! finding my way around in the dark. i am diabetic and i don't moan or complain. my electricity bill per month for my frugal use of electricity is 50 quid per month, and the vast majority of that bill is swallowed up by the ever—increasing tariff charges.
9:59 am
thanks for that, you can e—mail me. a cold start to the day—to—day, quite a lot of frost. but it does mean we are looking at clear skies and a lot of sunshine now. we have a bit more cloud across the north and west of scotland. that is taken of currently for some drizzle. through the day it will push back towards the day it will push back towards the coast. although there is a noticeable wind here, it is not as windy yesterday. temperatures are widely eight, nine, up to 10 degrees. now, at sunset we will see once again widespread fog form, particularly across the midlands, eastern and southern parts of england. at the same time, a weather front coming in the west is going to introduce thicker cloud, and also some rain. not as cold here as it is going to be elsewhere, we are expecting a frost and freezing fog. that fog will be slow to lift through the course of tomorrow, maybe not until the afternoon. rain will come in from the west across northern ireland and scotland,
10:00 am
accompanied by gusty wind. it will feel cold. this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. two teenagers have been arrested in manchester in connection with the texas synagogue siege. the british hostage—taker was a man from blackburn. more than a quarter of households will struggle to pay their energy bills soon, according to a new report today. it's come to the point where, if i'm a bit short on electric and it's close to the time i'm going to be paying to top up again, i have to be clever enough to say, "don't do that washing, because you'll run out of electricity." let me know how much of your budget is going on energy bills. what were you paying per month and what's it now? @vicdebryshire on twitter and instagram. search and rescue continues in tonga after a huge volcanic eruption triggered a tsunami. relatives of a british woman missing say they're desperately waiting for news.

29 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on