Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 17, 2022 4:00am-4:31am GMT

4:00 am
this is bbc news — welcome if you're watching here in the uk or around the globe. i'm david eades. our top stories: no turning back. novak djokovic has touched down in dubai after being deported from australia over the country's vaccine policy. the man who took four people hostage at a synagogue in texas is confirmed as a 44—year—old british citizen. now, uk police make two arrests in manchester. surveillance flights head to the pacific island nation of tonga to assess the damage caused by a volcanic eruption and tsunami. we were as important to support that effort as anyone else at that effort as anyone else at
4:01 am
that time. charles mcgee, one of the most decorated african americans of the second world war, has died aged 102, an original member of pioneering all—black fighter squadron the tuskeegee airmen. he may be the number one men's tennis player, but novak djokovic is out of the australian open, out of the country and, it seems, out of favour. as the tournament in melbourne finally gets under way, mr djokovic has landed in dubai, leaving behind a frantic and messy legal wrangle, which, ultimately, he lost. the federal court agreed with the government's view that his status as a role model, coupled with his perceived opposition to being vaccinated against covid, could have an impact on public health orders in australia.
4:02 am
our middle east correspondent sameer hashmi is near the airport in dubai and phil mercer is in melbourne. i asked sameer first, what djokovic�*s next move is likely to be. there are two or three options in front of him. number one, whether he heads to serbia where notjust his family but the whole country has been rallying behind him. the president has also appealed to him to come to serbia and he will surely get a grand welcome. the second option is to head to spain because it when he travelled to australia via dubai ten days ago he travelled from spain. the third option could be monaco where he has a lot of residences. he spent a lot of time when he is not playing tennis there. the fourth unlikely option could be dubai. there is a tennis tournament starting next month in february 1a and djokovic did play that tournament two years ago and won. that could be the other option.
4:03 am
just note, david, as far as dubai goes you do not need to be vaccinated to enter the city as long as you have a pcr test. so there will be no hassles as far as vaccination goes. but the tournament is one month away so we still don't know whether he will decide to stay. so far reports indicate that serbia could be his next stop but we still do not know. we wait to see where he may move to next. clearly a lot of interest from those in the airport at that particular time of day when they see djokovic come along. no surprises there. phil mercer in melbourne. no djokovic, a real shock to the system if you just step back for a moment and take that on board. this is the man who virtually owns melbourne and he is not there. he has been the king of melbourne park and has won the title here nine times. he was the defending champion but the defence of the title obviously ended before it even began with the long legal battle which ultimately
4:04 am
ended in deportation. mistakes and missteps by both sides in this very long saga. the player himself and of course australian authorities. fans here at the australian open digesting the news that the man who has won so many titles and was on the verge, potentially, of a history—making 21st grand slam will not be here but the fans we have been speaking to, david, there is an overwhelming feeling that novak had to go. to be honest, most of the tennis players are vaccinated so obviously that was a requirement to get into the country, so i feel like if everyone else did it he should have but i do feel the government should have taken some responsibility in giving him an exemption initially and it just went out of control and it should not have gotten to this point, basically. i have a theory that anyone
4:05 am
in australia who is not - vaccinated, can't go to work, can't go to a restaurant - and probably can't walk - in the gate here today so why should anybody be able to work being unvaccinated here in australia. - yes, he is a great athlete. but i think they have made the right decision, - unfortunately for him. i think he deserved it. although he is an excellent player, but no player is above the game and he set himself up for this. so all he had to do was get vaccinated or do the right thing and he could have stayed. but he just made it awful for himself. 90% of the people are vaccinated and if you don't go by that you are letting the whole setup down. so i think it is a difficult situation for all and it could have been easier, like the prime minister said, tojust get vaccinated. i can't think of any other high—profile athlete or anyone
4:06 am
else of that standing who has been deported from australia so what awaits novak djokovic in the months and years to come. will it be infamy, will he be embarrassed or humiliated? no doubt when he returns home to serbia there will be a hero's welcome for him and you have to put this storm into context, david. we are hearing reports of every single day tens of thousands of new coronavirus infections. australia has never experienced a ring deal with these sorts australia has never experienced or endured these sorts of numbers right through the pandemic. this is a highly vaccinated country and as we heard from those fans here in melbourne park, there was a frustration that in many people's opinion here was a highly celebrated and titled athlete who was trying to exploit a loophole and there will be big questions about how he was granted a medical waiverfrom a coronavirus vaccination perspective in the first place but now the tennis goes on and life goes on and so does the australian open.
4:07 am
police in the english city of manchester say two teenagers have been arrested in connection with the hostage stand off in texas on saturday. president biden has called it an act of terror. four people escaped unharmed after being held for several hours in a synagogue near dallas. the hostage—taker was a british citizen named malik faisal akram. he died during the siege. sophie long reports. this is the moment the three final hostages ran for their lives, more than ten hours after their ordeal began. a successful but nonetheless terrifying end to the delicate day—long operation involving negotiators and heavily armed police. the man, now identified as malik faisal akram, a 44—year—old british citizen originally from lancashire, was shot and killed. he'd claimed to have a gun and a bomb when he interrupted a peaceful morning service being streamed from the congregation
4:08 am
beth israel in dallas. initially, four people were taken hostage, including the rabbi. six hours later, one was released unharmed. for the others, the ordeal was to continue until the fbi swat team stormed the building. sometime around 9pm today, this evening, the hrt, the hostage rescue team, breached the synagogue, they rescued the three hostages and the subject is deceased. people came here, a place of worship, to pray, but once again in america, a moment of peace became a moment of profound pain. as the people who were trapped, terrified, try to come to terms with what happened, synagogues across the country have increased security in fear of copycat attacks. this was an act of terror, this was an out of terror, we're not going to tolerate this. we have this capacity to deal with assaults on particularly the anti—semitism that has grown up, i'll be putting a call into the rabbi, we missed one another on the way up here,
4:09 am
but they should rest assured that we are focused. akram, who arrived in the united states two weeks ago, was heard ranting about religion and demanding the release of a pakistani neuroscientist with suspected links to al-qaeda currently serving a prison sentence in texas. british police are now assisting the us authorities with their investigation. sophie long, bbc news, dallas. well earlier i spoke to javed ali who's a former senior intelligence analyst at the fbi. we began by discussing the fbi's successful hostage rescue operation. you heard the senior fbi agent on the ground in dallas, the special agent in charge say specifically that operators from the hostage rescue team made the entry and fired upon akram and killed him and the hostage rescue
4:10 am
team of the fbi is the most specialised operational unit the fbi has. these agents train specifically for these types of missions and operations. they do not really have a traditional investigative duties of other fbi agents. they were on the ground. they must have been mobilised quickly and it must have also taken them a few hours to get on the scene but once the order was made to breach the synagogue then they managed to get hostages out and also take down the hostage taker. it was an effective response and with your experience, the questions we are asking is what was the understanding or the knowledge of this man beforehand? a great question. obviously he is dead so we will not be able, the fbi will not be able to interview him or get to any of that. so i would think that through the course of the investigation going on now that they will be talking to people who knew him, his family obviously and it
4:11 am
sounds like the british authorities are assisting with that. how much evidence did he leave from a digital perspective either on his devices, his phones, social media? clearly he was making statements during the stand—off so there is a lot to unpack in terms of his radicalisation and mobilisation of why he acted this way but right now it is still too early to tell specifically. if he was on a british watchlist would you have expected and assumed that intelligence in the us would know of him and about him? that is one of the interesting aspects. if he was known to british intelligence or british law enforcement, how was he able to get on a plane and leave britain for the united states ? and if the reporting is true that he did fly intojfk two weeks ago, how was he not stopped if he was on a watchlist and either turned around or interviewed? it does not look like that
4:12 am
happened based on current reporting. so a lot of questions about what british authorities knew and then if he was unknown, what was he doing here for the last two weeks and how did he also purchase a firearm? that is an intelligence analyst at the fbi. let's get some of the day's other news. a massive winter storm is creating hazardous conditions for millions in the us and is expected to travel north as far as canada by the weekend. north carolina is urging people to stay off the roads and travel only when it's absolutely necessary. an estimated 100 million people are expected to be affected by snow and wind. somalia's government spokesman has been injured in a suicide attack on his car in the capital mogadishu. eyewitnesses said mohamed ibrahim moalimuu was targeted directly because the suicide bomber detonated the explosives close to where he was sitting. the islamist group al shabaab said it carried out the attack. the uk culture secretary has
4:13 am
said that the bbc licence fee will be abolished in 2027. in a tweet, nadine dorries said a forthcoming announcement on the price of the licence fee for the next few years would be the last but hasn't said how it will be replaced. the chinese government is preparing contingency plans to control the spread of covid, as millions of citizens begin travelling across the country to celebrate chinese new year. there are fears the 40—day travel season could see omicron spread throughout the country. meanwhile, in europe restrictions remain in place as covid cases continue to remain high — as gareth barlow reports. with chinese new year in the winter olympics had to trigger mass move, beijing is determined to keep covid into daniel and migration on and got
4:14 am
authorities are laying out control mass transit. irate authorities are laying out control mass transit. we will co-ordinate _ control mass transit. we will co-ordinate with _ control mass transit. we will co-ordinate with local - co—ordinate with local authorities to adjust transport plans of local outbreaks occur. we will suspend or reduce passenger trains in the affected areas, restrict or halt ticket sales and manage passenger movement. the chinese government _ passenger movement. the chinese government expects _ passenger movement. the chinese government expects around - passenger movement. the chinese government expects around 1.5 - government expects around 1.5 billion troops will be made during the spring festival travel season with the omicron variant present in several regions, there are fears to what degree it may spread over the coming weeks. in france, meanwhile, parliament there has approved the government's latest measures to tackle covid. the new law which takes effect on thursday requires anyone over 16 to have a vaccine certificate to enter public places such as restaurants, cafe's, cinemas and long—distance trains. and in amsterdam as infection numbers hit a new record,
4:15 am
thousands packed city streets to protest against restrictions. another ones has relaxed some of the measures it implemented over christmas bars, restaurants and co— that my cultural venues have been instructed to remain closed until at least january 25. we ma be until at least january 25. we may be the _ until at least january 25. we may be the only _ until at least january 25. - may be the only country which is still in lockdown and countries around us are actually, yeah, moving back to normal life slowly. in actually, yeah, moving back to normal life slowly. in response to the protest, _ normal life slowly. in response to the protest, riot _ normal life slowly. in response to the protest, riot police - to the protest, riot police were deployed across the city and almost two years on, countries around the world continue to grapple with the covid pandemic. north korea has fired a missile into the sea of japan — its fourth launch this month. south korean and japanese military units detected the missile, which was fired from north korea's east coast. it's not known what type of weapon was being tested. earlier this month, north korea claimed to have successfully launched two hypersonic missiles and a pair of short—range ballistic missiles.
4:16 am
stay with us on bbc news. surveillance flights head to the pacific island nation of tonga to assess the damage caused by a volcanic eruption and tsunami. donald trump is now the 45th president of the united states. he was sworn in before several hundred thousand people on the steps of capitol hill in washington. it's going to be only america first. demonstrators waiting for mike gatting and his rebel cricket team were attacked with tear gas and set upon by police dogs. anti—apartheid campaigners say they would carry on the protests throughout the tour. they called him
4:17 am
the 'butcher of lyon'. klaus altmann is being held on a fraud charge in bolivia. the west germans wanted to extradite him for crimes committed in wartime france. there, he was the gestapo chief klaus barbie. millions came to bathe as close as possible to this spot. - a tide of humanity- that's believed by officials to have broken all records. this is bbc world news. the main story this hour: novak djokovic arrives in dubai after being deported from australia, where the tennis open he was hoping to compete in gets under way. staying with that story now. daniel estrin is an immigration lawyer who has been following the case and he's in perth. daniel, thank you forjoining us. your expertise is in
4:18 am
immigration lawyer, the irony of this court case ruling seems to be that all the talk about the form filling, whether he got it right or wrong or what have you, has gone by the board. ., , ., have you, has gone by the board. . , ., ., board. indeed it has, and that was quite _ board. indeed it has, and that was quite a — board. indeed it has, and that was quite a surprising - board. indeed it has, and that was quite a surprising twist, l board. indeed it has, and that was quite a surprising twist, i | was quite a surprising twist, i guess, but strategically quite smart from the minister to do that because all of those matters about the validity of travel exemptions and medical contraindications and all of those matters were discussed at the original hearing and did not need to be discussed in the second and mr djokovic was given the benefit of the doubt and had his visa cancelled completely different reasons but strategically i think it was smart. i think the minister was smart. i think the minister was not keen to have those issues raised again and determined by a court. this was the federal _ determined by a court. this was the federal court _ determined by a court. this was the federal court ruling - determined by a court. this was the federal court ruling but - the federal court ruling but was this actually the end of the line for documents? could he have pursued another avenue? so, there was another avenue for him, what is called special
4:19 am
leave, and it is special leave to the high court of australia, and it is for extraordinary cases where a point of order is raised or a point of water that has been explored has wide—ranging implications for other people, for example, but in the time that was available to him, i don't think it would have succeeded and i think his lawyers smartly advised him this was pretty much the end of the road. what's is that mr djokovic had a visa cancellation on friday and had a full court hearing on sunday so justice was definitely served here, pardon the pun, but i do not think you could have realistically taken it further to have played in the australian open.— further to have played in the australian open. this has been an extraordinary _ australian open. this has been an extraordinary case - australian open. this has been an extraordinary case and - an extraordinary case and perhaps it shouldn't have been inasmuch as it is one individual. but he faces a three—year ban, we understand. is it automatic? there is a three—year band attached to this, to come back to australia?— this, to come back to australia? . �* , ., , australia? that's right, he has a three-year _ australia? that's right, he has a three-year band _ australia? that's right, he has a three-year band by - australia? that's right, he has| a three-year band by operation a three—year band by operation of law and any temporary visa
4:20 am
he would like to apply for in the future including the same visa he was granted a 408 fees are, to participate in next year's extremely open for example will be subject to public interest criteria for a 13 which is if you have had a visa cancelled, you are banned for three years —— ban. you can apply for a waiver, including four compelling reasons affecting the interests of australia, so i'm reasonably confident he would be able to cross that line however, he would need to make sure he enters australia with the right travel exemptions or being vaccinated, whatever the rules are at the time of the next australian open.— are at the time of the next australian open. daniel, one last thing _ australian open. daniel, one last thing to _ australian open. daniel, one last thing to ask _ australian open. daniel, one last thing to ask you, - australian open. daniel, one last thing to ask you, they i last thing to ask you, they talk about the god powers of the immigration minister has at his disposal. the reality of this argument is that djokovic could be perceived to have an impact on individuals because of his status. that's an extraordinary sort of extrapolation of what he may or
4:21 am
may not be guilty of all capable of. the length of the powers are amazing.- capable of. the length of the powers are amazing. they are indeed and — powers are amazing. they are indeed and it _ powers are amazing. they are indeed and it was _ powers are amazing. they are indeed and it was a _ powers are amazing. they are indeed and it was a former . indeed and it was a former immigration minister i think in 2008 who came and said i have too much power and i would like to, ifeel uncomfortable too much power and i would like to, i feel uncomfortable with the amount of power i have, i think what is different, look, these powers have been used in these powers have been used in the art for far right commentators who in the true sense of the word are talismans of their movement but mr djokovic i do not think in the spokesman for the anti—vaxxer movements of this was a vastly different shift where you have people who may be perceived by a certain group of people to be a certain group of people to be a talisman are not necessarily, to have their visas cancelled so i do think it's moving in quite a dangerous direction with these types of powers. daniel, thank you indeed for your expertise. daniel estrin joining us there.— your expertise. daniel estrin joining us there. thank you so much. the capital of tonga is reported to have suffered significant damage after an underwater volcanic eruption in the south pacific. much of the island nation was
4:22 am
covered with a layer of ash. the tsunami triggered by the eruption caused flooding on parts of the us west coast and japan. rupert wingfield—hayes reports from tokyo. from high up in space, weather satellites caught the moment the huge underwater volcano let loose, sending a cloud of ash and rock 20km high and at least 500km wide — that's an ash cloud that could stretch from london to edinburgh. somewhere beneath it is the tiny island kingdom of tonga. the first thing to hit the island was the shock wave. bang. 0h, bleep! then came the rushing waters of a tsunami, smashing into seawalls and flooding what here appears to be a church. sirens wail. next, day turned to night as the ash began to fall. these pictures are reportedly from saturday afternoon as people were trying to flee from the coast. in new zealand, prime ministerjacinda ardern said communication with tonga
4:23 am
remains difficult. shops along the coast have been damaged and a significant clean—up will be needed. nuku'alofa is covered in a thick film of volcanic dust but otherwise, conditions are calm and stable. the hunga tonga—hunga—ha'apai volcano has been active since mid—december. the eruption sent a tsunami wave right across the pacific ocean. i'm sure we'll find out but at the moment, it's not clear whether the tsunami was caused by a big collapse of material underwater or even the shock wave itself, perhaps kind of acting as a fist and slapping down on the sea and producing a displacement which then propagates as a wave. in new zealand, the tsunami caused serious damage, smashing boats against each other and causing some to sink. but tonight, the main concern remains tonga. until the ash cloud clears and new zealand and australia can begin sending military flights, it remains very
4:24 am
unclear how bad the situation on the island really is. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in tokyo. communications are extremely difficult still there. one of the most decorated african—american military pilots, charles mcgee, has died aged 102. an original member of the tuskegee airmen, an all—black aviation unit formed during the second world war, charles mcgee flew 409 combat missions during that war and the korean and vietnam conflicts. mcgee also fought against segregation in the us military. in 2016, he explained what the aims of the tuskegee airmen had been. being brought up, you know, to say we were african—american or black but we were american and the country was at war, we were just as interested in supporting that effort as anyone else about time and so we turned our back on the fact
4:25 am
that there was segregation, if you will, and took advantage of the opportunity to prove that we can fly aeroplanes, we can maintain our plans. we can do whatever our education and aspirations could lead us. charles mcgee, who has died at 102. i want to remind you of our top story. the australian open tennis tournament is taking place in melbourne but of course without the participation of the men's world number one novak djokovic. these pictures are coming from dubai, he landed there about 1.5 hours ago, and there about 1.5 hours ago, and the whole build up to the tournament was nominated not by all of those usual concerns about former fitness of the players but by doctor mitch's status ——by djokovic's vaccination status —— form and fitness. after a final ruling from a court, he is on his way,
4:26 am
we understand, back home and the attention switches to the sport itself. australia's ash barty, the women's world number one, please herfirst much barty, the women's world number one, please her first much at the australian open today. —— plays her first match. a bit like it was last week, this week is going to be a quiet one. high pressure never too far away, and that means a lot of dry weather. indeed, some parts of the midlands, eastern england could be completely dry this week. it is going to be quite cold, not so much during the day but i think overnight, we are going to find some frost. with clearer skies developing at the moment, we start monday with a frost, particularly across england, wales and also northern ireland. some patches of mist and fog around by the morning, mainly across parts of wales and the west country. those should fairly quickly lift and there's going to be a lot of sunshine around for most of us, and light winds too. the winds won't be as strong as they were on sunday in northern scotland — should be dry here but there will be a lot of cloud — and we're sitting at temperatures of 8 or 9 degrees,
4:27 am
which isn't bad, really, for this time of the year. now, i mentioned high pressure. there it is on monday. as we head into tuesday, these weather fronts are poking in from the north—west but underneath the centre of the high, with those clearer skies and light winds, we are going to start with more fog on tuesday, particularly across parts of the midlands, east anglia and the south—east and whilst it lifts, it could stay a bit grey all day. some sunshine around but more cloud coming in on tuesday, and those weak weather fronts bring in some rain across northern ireland, eventually into western parts of scotland, but lifting temperatures perhaps into double figures. likely to be a colder day, though, for england and wales, especially where it stays grey and misty. those weather fronts continue to move down from the north—west with a stronger wind, as well, but those weather fronts are weakening all the while, so there's not much rain away from north—western parts of the uk. more cloud, a bit of patchy light rain or drizzle to clear from england and wales, then sunshine follows from the north, strengthening those north—westerly winds and it's getting colder, as well, hence those wintry showers in the far north of scotland. could make double figures still in the far south—west of england.
4:28 am
now, i mentioned high pressure is going to dominate over the week ahead, and another one is coming in later in the week but for a while, it's going to be centred to the west of the uk, hence those colder north—westerly winds coming our way and dropping the temperatures overnight, so thursday, a more widespread frost. those are the temperatures in towns and cities. maybe a bit more cloud keeping temperatures up in northern ireland and there'll be more cloud across northern scotland, a stronger wind here, maybe pushing one or two showers down some of those north sea coasts but generally, thursday will be dry and, again, there'll be a lot of sunshine, a chilly wind, yes, and temperatures will be typically around 6—8 celsius.
4:29 am
4:30 am
this is bbc news, the headlines: novak djokovic has arrived in dubai after being deported from australia. it comes after a ten day legal tussle over whether he could be granted a visa despite being unvaccinated. the australian open, in which he was hoping to defend his title, is now under way. it's not clear where he'll go next. here in the uk, police have arrested two teenagers in manchester over the siege at a synagogue in the us. four people escaped unharmed after being held for several hours near dallas. the hostagetaker was a british citizen named malik faisal akram. one of the most decorated african—american military pilots, charles mcgee, has died aged 102. an original member of the tuskegee airmen, an all—black aviation unit formed during the second world war. he flew 409 combat missions during that war and the korean and vietnam conflicts.
4:31 am
now on bbc news, it's time for hardtalk.

43 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on