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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 17, 2022 2:00am-2:31am GMT

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welcome to bbc news, i'm david eades. our top stories: no turning back — novak djokovic has just touched down in dubai after being deported from australia over the country's vaccine policy. we'll be live with our correspondent near dubai airport and get the mood in melbourne as the australian open begins without the mens number one. the man who took four people hostage at a synagogue in texas is confirmed as a 44—year—old british citizen. now, uk police make two arrests in manchester. surveillance flights head to the pacific island nation of tonga to assess the damage caused by a volcanic eruption and tsunami.
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the australian open tennis tournament is underway in melbourne, but without the particpation of the men's world number one, novak djokovic. the build—up to the event was dominated not by the usual concerns over the form and health of the world's best players, but by djokovic�*s unvaccinated status and his right to enter the country. after a final ruling by a court, he's now on his way back home, landing in dubai in the last hour. he's used to winning on court, but today, he was defeated in it. the world number one men's tennis player lost his last—ditch battle to stay in the country and was forced out of australia. ..the amended application be dismissed, with costs... threejudges upheld
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the government's decision to cancel his visa. the immigration minister had argued that the unvaccinated tennis star's presence here could bolster anti—vaccination sentiment. in his statement, the world number one said... outside the court, many of his fans were still in shock. and emotions were high. it's disgraceful, how has his first visa been...? how did the first court ruling rule in his favour but now it's ruled against him, why? he had an exemption to come here and play tennis, he was allowed to come here, and that's what he should be doing. it's a political stunt. and serbia's president was even more indignant.
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he came there with medical exemption proposal, and then you were mistreating him for ten days, why did you do it? and then doing that witches hunt campaign against him, and that is something that no—one can understand. this was a high—stakes court battle for both sides. the government has been publicly embarrassed by its mishandling of the controversy, while the player was desperate to avoid forfeiting the chance to compete for his record—breaking 21st grand slam title. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, melbourne. our middle east correspondent sameer hashmi is near dubai's international airport and phil mercer is in melbourne. feel i will come to you first because the tennis at last is under way. that is some respect for tennis fans, but what is the view of most of the fans there in terms of the departure of djokovic —— respite? i there in terms of the departure of djokovic -- respite?- of d'okovic -- respite? i think ou of djokovic -- respite? i think you really _ of djokovic -- respite? i think you really have _ of djokovic -- respite? i think you really have to _ of djokovic -- respite? i think you really have to put - of djokovic -- respite? i think you really have to put this - you really have to put this thing into context, the
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coronavirus situation in this country, we are hearing of tens of thousands of new infections being reported every day in this country, we have never seen these sorts of numbers right throughout the pandemic. this is a highly vaccinated nation, more than 90%, well over 90% of the population is fully vaccinated and has been a feeling that novak djokovic has exploited australia �*s pandemic border regulations. anyone coming into the country, any foreign national coming and must be fully vaccinated or have a medical exemption. many australians are very frustrated that novak djokovic was allowed into the country given his vaccination status. certainly mistakes and missteps by all sides involved in this saga but when it comes to the views of tennis fans here at the australian open, they are very much of the opinion that novak djokovic had to go.—
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djokovic had to go. most of the tennis players _ djokovic had to go. most of the tennis players are _ djokovic had to go. most of the tennis players are vaccinated i tennis players are vaccinated so obviously that was a requirement of getting into the country— requirement of getting into the country so it feels as if everyone else could have done it he _ everyone else could have done it he should have but i feel the government should have taken — the government should have taken some responsibility with giving — taken some responsibility with giving him the exemption initially, and itjust got out of control and should not have got to — of control and should not have got to this point basically. anyone _ got to this point basically. anyone in australia who is not vaccinated can't go to work, can't go to a restaurant, probably can't walk in today, so why should anyone be able to work with without being vaccinated in australia, full stop. i think they have made the right decision. is a great athlete but they have made the right decision. i athlete but they have made the right decision.— right decision. i think he deserved _ right decision. i think he deserved it, _ right decision. i think he deserved it, i— right decision. i think he deserved it, i mean - right decision. i think he deserved it, i mean he l right decision. i think he | deserved it, i mean he is right decision. i think he - deserved it, i mean he is an excellent player but no player is about the game, so he set himself up for that. all here do was get vaccinated and do the right thing, and he could have stayed, but he just made it very awful for himself. obi-s it very awful for himself. 9096 ofthe it very awful for himself. 9096 of the peeple _ it very awful for himself. 9096 of the people are _
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it very awful for himself. 90% of the people are vaccinated, and if— of the people are vaccinated, and if you _ of the people are vaccinated, and if you don't go by that, you — and if you don't go by that, you are _ and if you don't go by that, you are letting the whole setup down, — you are letting the whole setup down, so — you are letting the whole setup down, so i _ you are letting the whole setup down, so i think it is a difficult _ down, so i think it is a difficult situation for all and it could _ difficult situation for all and it could have been easier like the prime _ it could have been easier like the prime minister said, just .et the prime minister said, just get vaccinated. the prime minister said, 'ust get vaccinatedi the prime minister said, 'ust get vaccinated. interesting to note, as well, _ get vaccinated. interesting to note, as well, the _ get vaccinated. interesting to note, as well, the gates - get vaccinated. interesting to note, as well, the gates here j note, as well, the gates here at the australian open opened a couple of hours ago, and many of those fans we spoke to also said that they would clearly ms novak djokovic, and you can understand why he has been the king of melbourne park, he has won the title here, novak djokovic, nine times. he was the defending champion and had he been allowed to compete ear and had he won, he would have snared that record—breaking zist snared that record—breaking 21st grand slam when, the most successful man �*s player of all time, so that record will have to wait. he was expelled from australia on a flight leaving melbourne airport late on
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sunday night, now in dubai, and his whereabouts or his destination after that we'll have to wait. novak djokovic, not here at the australian open, but life goes on, and so does the australian open. that does the australian open. at last it starts. as you say he is gone. crossing over to you now, dubai is welcomed that has welcomed him to the airport. what are his movements there? his flight landed 30 minutes before, it landed ahead of time, it was supposed to land at 5:40am but it was about 530, the flight landing here, and we still don't know what he is going to do next. there are a few options in front of him, the first one he goes back to his home country serbia, where not just his family but the whole country has been rallying behind him, he would certainly get a grand hero �*s welcome, and the second option is spain,
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he flew in from spain via dubai just ten days back, to australia, that is the second option and the third one is monaco, where he has a lot of residences and spends a lot of time when he is not playing tennis and last but not least could be dubai, because next month is the dubai duty—free tournament with novak djokovic played in 2020 and one here, but that some of the so it's very unlikely he will stay long, even if he decides to part from that event but for now, serbia seems to be the destination where he could be headed next but we're still for more answers.— headed next but we're still for more answers. thank you very much to both _ more answers. thank you very much to both of _ more answers. thank you very much to both of you, - more answers. thank you very much to both of you, as - more answers. thank you very much to both of you, as at - more answers. thank you very | much to both of you, as at last the tennis itself can get under way. police in the english city of manchester say two teenagers have been arrested in connection with the hostage stand off in texas on saturday. president biden has called it an act of terror. four people escaped unharmed after being held for several hours in a synagogue near dallas. the hostage—taker was a british citizen named malik faisal akram. he died during the siege. sophie long reports.
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this is the moment the three final hostages ran for their lives, more than ten hours after their ordeal began. a successful but nonetheless terrifying end to the delicate day—long operation involving negotiators and heavily armed police. the man, now identified as malik faisal akram, a 44—year—old british citizen originally from lancashire, was shot and killed. he'd claimed to have a gun and a bomb when he interrupted a peaceful morning service being streamed from the congregation beth israel in dallas. initially, four people were taken hostage, including the rabbi. six hours later, one was released unharmed. for the others, the ordeal was to continue until the fbi swat team stormed the building. sometime around 9pm today, this evening, the hrt,
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the hostage rescue team, breached the synagogue, they rescued the three hostages and the subject is deceased. people came here, a place of worship, to pray, but once again in america, a moment of peace became a moment of profound pain. as the people who were trapped, terrified, try to come to terms with what happened, synagogues across the country have increased security in fear of copycat attacks. this was an act of terror, this was an out of terror, we're not going to tolerate this. we have this capacity to deal with assaults on particularly the anti—semitism that has grown up, i'll be putting a call into the rabbi, we missed one another on the way up here, but they should rest assured that we are focused. akram, who arrived in the united states two weeks ago, was heard ranting about religion and demanding the release of a pakistani neuroscientist with suspected links to al-qaeda currently serving a prison sentence in texas.
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british police are now assisting the us authorities with their investigation. sophie long, bbc news, dallas. assisting the us police for a couple of precise reasons, we can support our reporter greg mckenzie. what can you tell us about these two arrests in manchester?— about these two arrests in manchester? , ., . , manchester? greater manchester police announced _ manchester? greater manchester police announced that _ manchester? greater manchester police announced that they - manchester? greater manchester police announced that they made j police announced that they made the arrests on sunday evening, two teenagers. police have not revealed the genders of the teenagers, or indeed their ages, but what we do know is they are currently in custody and will be questioned by counterterrorism police. the two teenagers were arrested in the evening yesterday.- the evening yesterday. thank ou ve the evening yesterday. thank you very much _ the evening yesterday. thank you very much greg. - the evening yesterday. thank you very much greg. that - the evening yesterday. thank you very much greg. that is l the evening yesterday. thank i you very much greg. that is the latest as we have it at the
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moment. overto latest as we have it at the moment. over to dallas now because we could speak to tracy walder, the former fbi special agent and indeed you are tracy just down the road from the synagogue itself, which i believe is also close to the airport and perhaps that is the reason it was targeted? iama i am a member of thejewish community myself and the synagogue is about 20 minutes orso synagogue is about 20 minutes or so from my home in dallas, and i personally believe that he selected this simply out of convenience. the prison where she is being held, there are synagogues that are closer, and colleyville where this happened has a very smalljewish community, it is a small congregation, so i believe this temple was selected out of sheer convenience. joe biden said we are — sheer convenience. joe biden said we are focused - sheer convenience. joe biden said we are focused on - sheer convenience. joe biden said we are focused on this . said we are focused on this issue and he recognises the severity of it. ijust wonder
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how much focus the fbi, you think, actually had on the man in fact? i think, actually had on the man in fact? , , , in fact? i will be blind, my cuess in fact? i will be blind, my guess is— in fact? i will be blind, my guess is not _ in fact? i will be blind, my guess is not a _ in fact? i will be blind, my guess is not a lot. - in fact? i will be blind, my guess is not a lot. i - in fact? i will be blind, my guess is not a lot. i have l in fact? i will be blind, my - guess is not a lot. i have seen various outlets calling for her release in the uk, as early as really september and was organising people to call for her release and here in the dallas area the council for american islamic relations was also calling for her release, and held a fundraiser for that as early as last month. those probably should have been on someone �*s radar. again, it's sort of like looking through a a haystack for a needle, but i'm just wondering with the rest of these two teens if this is something of a larger issue going on. is something of a larger issue auoin on. , is something of a larger issue going on-_
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is something of a larger issue auoin on. , , ., ., �*, going on. his brother, akram 's brother has _ going on. his brother, akram 's brother has been _ going on. his brother, akram 's brother has been quoted - going on. his brother, akram 's brother has been quoted as - brother has been quoted as saying we don't condone actions he took and we would like to sincerely apologise to everybody involved. will that go some way to assuaging the pain and anxiety do you think? i believe so. i don't hold an entire family accountable for the actions of one person. i do not think his entire family wanted this, or even knew exactly what he was doing and i am glad they came out and made am glad they came out and made a statement. i am glad they came out and made a statement-— a statement. i wanted to ask ou a statement. i wanted to ask you about — a statement. i wanted to ask you about the _ a statement. i wanted to ask you about the rabbi - a statement. i wanted to ask you about the rabbi at - a statement. i wanted to ask you about the rabbi at the i you about the rabbi at the synagogue, charlie, who i think has security training, and maybe that is now a standard practice for rabbis, and within synagogues but it does seems to have counted here?— have counted here? what some ma not have counted here? what some may not realise _ have counted here? what some may not realise is _ have counted here? what some may not realise is we _ have counted here? what some may not realise is we have - have counted here? what some may not realise is we have a - may not realise is we have a lot of security training, particularly in synagogues and i personally do not send my six—year—old to hebrew school because i am concerned about
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safety issues, so it is quite normal to have various active shooting drills and techniques taught to us in a synagogue setting. i taught to us in a synagogue settin.. ., ,, .., , taught to us in a synagogue settin.. .., , , taught to us in a synagogue settin.. ., ,, .., , ,., setting. i appreciate this is a very difficult _ setting. i appreciate this is a very difficult time _ setting. i appreciate this is a very difficult time for- setting. i appreciate this is a very difficult time for you - setting. i appreciate this is a very difficult time for you as| very difficult time for you as well as many others, but thank you very much for talking to us. north korea has fired a missile into the sea of japan — its fourth launch this month. south korean and japanese military units detected the missile, which was fired from north korea's east coast. it's not known what type of weapon was being tested. earlier this month, north korea claimed to have successfully launched two hypersonic missiles and a pair of short—range ballistic missiles. stay with us on bbc news. still to come on the programme: surveillance flights head to the pacific island nation of tonga to assess the damage caused by a volcanic eruption and tsunami.
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donald trump is now the 45th president of the united states. he was sworn in before several thousand people on the steps —— he was sworn in before several hundred thousand people on the steps of capitol hill in washington. it's going to be only america first. america first. demonstrators waiting for mike gatting and his rebel cricket team were attacked with tear gas and set upon by police dogs. anti—apartheid campaigners say they would carry on the protests throughout the tour. klaus altmann was holed up in bolivia. the west germans wanted to extradite input crimes committed in wartime france. there, he was the gestapo chief klaus barbie. millions _ chief klaus barbie. minions — chief klaus barbie. came to bathe as minions _ chief klaus barbie. came to bathe as close as millions came to bathe as close as possible _ millions came to bathe as close as possible to— millions came to bathe as close as possible to this _ millions came to bathe as close as possible to this spot. - this tide of humanity- is believed to have broken
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all records. this is bbc news. the main story this hour: novak djokovic arrives in dubai after being deported from australia, where the tennis open he was hoping to compete in gets under way. staying with that story now. maria o'sullivan is deputy director of the castan centre for human rights law at monash university. she's in melbourne. thank you very much indeed maria forjoining us. ijust wonder what you make of the ultimate court decision, really, and the government's approach to that which really seems to be novak djokovic in all: problem in australia and thatis all: problem in australia and that is good enough to keep him out —— inaudible. {line
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that is good enough to keep him out -- inaudible.— out -- inaudible. one of the defining _ out -- inaudible. one of the defining aspects _ out -- inaudible. one of the defining aspects of - out -- inaudible. one of the defining aspects of the - defining aspects of the migration act in australia is that they have these broad ministerial powders —— powers that require personal and the section in question referred to public order safety and the public order safety and the public interest and it wasn't just that djokovic courts —— might cause civil unrest in australia but may do so and thatis australia but may do so and that is the first problem that we have broad, vague powers and the migration act and personally decided by the minister. in terms of the government's arguments, they put a lot of emphasis on the back of documents being an iconic star and even if he did not want to or had influence people to not get vaccinated, that was the community perception of him. so i have a legal problem with that, in that i don't think the evidence was particularly strong but because of the breadth of the powers and because of the limited function of the court,
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to only look at the legality, mr djokovic did not succeed. 0k, mr djokovic did not succeed. ok, so the court view was "that's good enough for us". i suppose it does raise questions about anybody perceived to be a role model or have iconic status with views that don't chime necessarily with the government of the day could find themselves in a similar position?— find themselves in a similar osition? . , , ., ., position? precisely. now, we do have president _ position? precisely. now, we do have president in _ position? precisely. now, we do have president in australia. - have president in australia. like many countries, we can refuse people's visas are in the past few years we have refused the fees of kris brown the rubber who had been involved in domestic violence incident, —— chris brown the rapper. we also rejected a prominent us anti—abortion activists and two so—called pick up artists who had exhibited behaviours and views that were derogatory to women
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so there is a set of presidents in australia, but what demarcate the djokovic case is what you alluded to earlier, david — this idea that it is not only the personal views of the person but the way they are perceived and this idea that an iconic tennis star will have a positive influence and can make money from that, and there was talk in the hearing about the fact that kenneth stars make a lot of money out of endorsements, the negative side is sometimes they can be perceived as having a view that they may not necessarily personally have. perception, perception- _ personally have. perception, perception. maria, _ personally have. perception, perception. maria, thank- personally have. perception, j perception. maria, thank you indeed for explaining that to us. maria o'sullivan. the capital of tonga is reported to have suffered significant damage after an underwater volcanic eruption in the south pacific. much of the island nation was covered with a layer of ash. the tsunami triggered by the eruption caused flooding on parts of the us west coast and japan. rupert wingfield—hayes reports from tokyo. from high up in space,
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weather satellites caught the moment the huge underwater volcano let loose, sending a cloud of ash and rock 20km high and at least 500km wide — that's an ash cloud that could stretch from london to edinburgh — and somewhere beneath it is the tiny island kingdom of tonga. the first thing to hit the island was the shock wave, (bang). (bleep). then came the rushing waters of a tsunami, smashing into seawalls and flooding what here appears to be a church. sirens wail. next, day turn to night as the ash began to fall. these pictures are reportedly from saturday afternoon as people were trying to flee from the coast. in new zealand, prime ministerjacinda ardern said communication with tonga remains difficult. shops along the coast have been damaged and a significant clean—up will be needed. shops along the coast have been damaged and a significant clean—up will be needed. nuku'alofa is covered
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in a thick film of volcanic dust but otherwise, conditions are calm and stable. the hunga tonga—hunga—ha'apai volcano has been active since mid—december. the eruption sent a tsunami wave right across the pacific ocean. i'm sure we'll find out but at the moment, it's not clear whether the tsunami was caused by a big collapse of material underwater or even the shock wave itself, perhaps kind of acting as a fist and slapping down on the sea and producing a displacement which then propagates as a wave. in new zealand, the tsunami caused serious damage, smashing boats against each other and causing some to sink but tonight, the main concern remains tonga. until the ash cloud clears and new zealand and australia can begin sending military flights, it remains very unclear how bad the situation on the island really is. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in tokyo. the uk labour leader says borisjohnson has presided over "industrial scale partying"
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in downing street and renewed his call for the prime minister to resign. sir keir starmer said there was no need to wait for the senior civil servant inquiry into a series of alleged rule—breaking parties. the conservative party chairman oliver dowden admitted there were failings in number 10, but denied it was a resigning matter for the prime minister. here's our political correspondent chris mason. this remains a moment of danger for the prime minister. conservative mps have spent the weekend back in the patches that sent them to westminster, eyes and ears alert to the outrage — or otherwise — of their electorate. places like grimsby, in lincolnshire. labour for decades, until boris johnson wooed this town to turn it tory. he don't get my vote again, definitely not. going conservative as a working family thought it would be in ourfavour, but i think now,
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the way they've behaved, we need a change to the other side so i will definitely change my vote. everybody makes a mistake, it's not a big deal. ijust think it's cruel to hear about it, i really do. - i think it's disgusting — i especially when you come to a town like grimsby. you know, it's been tough, it's been really tough. - the labour leader, a former director of public prosecutions, has definitely made his mind up. he reckons the prime minister is a lawbreaker and a liar. i think it's pretty obvious what has happened. there's industrial—scale partying that's been going on at downing street. not much of it is really denied. i think the public have made up their mind. i think the facts speak for themselves. i think the prime minister broke the law, i think he then lied about what had happened. mr speaker, iwant to apologise... the prime minister has admitted turning up at one drinks do and said sorry. but there was a catalogue of whitehall partying
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when parties were banned, and this is just some of the get—togethers we currently know about. it is the job of this woman, a senior civil servant, sue gray, to assemble the definitive compilation of events. her report is expected in the next week or so. the chair of the conservative party... in the meantime, those loyal to borisjohnson are saying... the culture in downing street does need to be addressed and i think it's absolutely essential that when the prime minister responds to the report by sue gray — and he is committed to doing that in parliament — that he addresses that culture. i know from many conversations i have had with the prime minister, he is in absolutely no doubt that he should and will take responsibility. conservative mps will head back here in the morning to share with each other horror stories of fury over what has happened and to mull over what to do next. chris mason with that report. if you go to our website you can actually trace those
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different downing street parties and, indeed, what the covid rules were at the time they took place. that's all on the website. you are watching bbc news. hello there. a bit like it was last week, this week is going to be a quiet one. high pressure never too far away, and that means a lot of dry weather. indeed, some parts of the midlands, eastern england could be completely dry this week. it is going to be quite cold, not so much during the day but i think overnight, we are going to find some frost and with clearer skies developing at the moment, we start monday with a frost, particularly across england, wales and also northern ireland. some patches of mist and fog around by the morning, mainly across parts of wales and the west country. those should fairly quickly lift and there's going to be a lot of sunshine around for most of us, and light winds too. the winds won't be as strong as they were on sunday in northern scotland — should be dry here but there will be a lot of cloud — and we're sitting at temperatures of 8 or 9 degrees, which isn't bad, really,
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for this time of the year. now, i mentioned high pressure. there it is on monday. as we head into tuesday, these weather fronts are poking in from the north—west but underneath the centre of the high, with those clearer skies and light winds, we'll are going to start with more fog on tuesday, —— we are going to start with more fog on tuesday, particularly across parts of the midlands, east anglia and the south—east and whilst it lifts, it could stay a bit grey all day. some sunshine around but more cloud coming in on tuesday, and those weak weather fronts bring in some rain across northern ireland, eventually into western parts of scotland, but lifting temperatures perhaps into double figures. likely to be a colder day, though, for england and wales, especially where it stays grey and misty. those weather fronts continue to move down from the north—west with a stronger wind, as well, but those weather fronts are weakening all the while, so there's not much rain away from north—western parts of the uk. more cloud, a bit of patchy light rain or drizzle to clear from england and wales, then sunshine follows from the north, strengthening those north—westerly winds and it's getting colder, as well, hence those wintry showers in the far north of scotland. could make double figures still in the far south—est of england.
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—— south—west of england. now, i mentioned high pressure is going to dominate over the week ahead, and another one is coming in later in the week but for a while, it's going to be centred to the west of the uk, hence those colder north—westerly winds coming our way and dropping the temperatures overnight, so thursday, a more widespread frost. those are the temperatures in towns and cities. maybe a bit more cloud keeping temperatures up in northern ireland and there'll be more cloud across northern scotland, a stronger wind here, maybe pushing one or two showers down some of those north sea coasts but generally, thursday will be dry and, again, there'll be a lot of sunshine, a chilly wind, yes, and temperatures will be typically around 6—8 celsius.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: novak djokovic has arrived in dubai after being deported from australia. it comes after a 10—day legal tussle over whether he could be granted a visa despite being unvaccinated. the australian open, in which he was hoping to defend his title, is now under way. it's not clear where he'll go next. here in the uk, police have arrested two teenagers in manchester over the siege at a synagogue in the us. four people escaped unharmed after being held for several hours near dallas. the hostage taker was a british citizen named malik faisal akram. north korea has fired a missile into the sea of japan, its fourth launch this month. south korean and japanese military units detected the missile which was fired from north korea's east coast. it's not known what type of weapon was being tested.
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now on bbc news, it's time for political thinking

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