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tv   Newsday  BBC News  January 17, 2022 12:00am-12:31am GMT

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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... novak djokovic has been deported from australia, afterjudges rejected the unvaccinated tennis star's appeal to stay in the country. he left melbourne on a flight to dubai — where he's expected to land in the next 90 minutes. also in the programme: the man who took four people hostage at a synagogue in texas is confirmed to be a 44—year—old british citizen. now, uk police make two arrests in manchester. surveillance flights head to the pacific island nation of tonga — to assess the damage caused by a volcanic eruption and tsunami. in the uk, opposition leader keir starmer says borisjohnson broke the law and lied over
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lockdown parties in downing street and that the pm should resign in the national interest. live from our studio in singapore — this is bbc news. it's newsday. it's 8am in singapore, ”am in melbourne and 4am in dubai where in the next 90 minutes or so, novak djokovic is expected to touch down following his deportation from australia. a panel ofjudges upheld the australian government's decision — that his refusal to be vaccinated against covid—19 made him a threat to public health. the serbian prime minster has accused australia of a witch hunt. meanwhile, back in melbourne, the australian open is now under way —
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without its defending men's champion. from there shaimaa khalil reports he's used to winning on court, but today, he was defeated in it. the world number one men's tennis player lost his last—ditch battle to stay in the country and was forced out of australia. ..the amended application be dismissed, with costs... threejudges upheld the government's decision to cancel his visa. the immigration minister had argued that the unvaccinated tennis star's presence here could bolster anti—vaccination sentiment. in his statement, the world number one said... outside the court, many of his fans were still in shock. and emotions were high. it's disgraceful, how has his first visa been...? how did the first court ruling rule in his favour but now it's ruled against him, why?
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he had an exemption to come here and play tennis, he was allowed to come here, and that's what he should be doing. it's a political stunt. and serbia's president was even more indignant. he came there with medical exemption proposal, and then you were mistreating him for ten days, why did you do it? and then doing that witches hunt campaign against him, and that is something that no—one can understand. this was a high—stakes court battle for both sides. the government has been publicly embarrassed by its mishandling of the controversy, while the player was desperate to avoid forfeiting the chance to compete for his record—breaking 21st grand slam title. our correspondent phil mercer got fans reaction to the djokovic deportation at the open.
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to be honest, most of the tennis players are vaccinated, so obviously that was a requirement to get into the country, so i feel as though it's everyone else did it, he should have done it. the government should have taken some responsibility with giving him the exemption initially. it just went out of control. it shouldn't have got to this point, basically.— shouldn't have got to this point, basically. i've got a theory here. _ point, basically. i've got a theory here, anyone - point, basically. i've got a theory here, anyone whol point, basically. i've got a l theory here, anyone who is vaccinated, who can't go to work. — vaccinated, who can't go to work. can_ vaccinated, who can't go to work, can go to a restaurant, can't _ work, can go to a restaurant, can't walk— work, can go to a restaurant, can't walk in the day here today, _ can't walk in the day here today, so_ can't walk in the day here today, so why should anyone be able _ today, so why should anyone be able to — today, so why should anyone be able to work while i'm vaccinated in australia. next stop — vaccinated in australia. next stop. he's a great athlete, i love — stop. he's a great athlete, i love him. _ stop. he's a great athlete, i love him, but i think they made the right— love him, but i think they made the right decision. i love him, but i think they made the right decision.— the right decision. i think he deserved — the right decision. i think he deserved that, _ the right decision. i think he deserved that, although, . the right decision. i think he deserved that, although, i. deserved that, although, i mean, he's an excellent player, but no player is above the game. he set himself up for that. all he had to do was get vaccinated or do the right thing, and he could have stayed, but he made it very
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awful for himself.— stayed, but he made it very awful for himself. 9096 of the eo - le awful for himself. 9096 of the peeple are — awful for himself. 9096 of the people are vaccinated. - awful for himself. 9096 of the people are vaccinated. you i people are vaccinated. you know. _ people are vaccinated. you know. if— people are vaccinated. you know, if you don't go by that, you _ know, if you don't go by that, you are — know, if you don't go by that, you are letting the whole setup down — you are letting the whole setup down so. _ you are letting the whole setup down. so, ithink you are letting the whole setup down. so, i think it's a difficult _ down. so, i think it's a difficult situation for all, and _ difficult situation for all, and it_ difficult situation for all, and it could've been easier, like — and it could've been easier, like the _ and it could've been easier, like the prime minister said, 'ust like the prime minister said, just get— like the prime minister said, just get vaccinated. phil mercerjoins us now from the rod lavuh arena in melbourne where the australian open is taking place. great to have you back on the programme. just listening to some of those fans that you spoke to. the consensus seems to be overwhelmingly that novak was in the wrong. life to be overwhelmingly that novak was in the wrong.— was in the wrong. life goes on, and certainly — was in the wrong. life goes on, and certainly the _ was in the wrong. life goes on, and certainly the australian - and certainly the australian open is going on. big gates open is going on. big gates open herejust over an hour or so ago. there are capacity limits on the crowd, but as you are hearing there, the majority if not everyone we have spoken to today is of the opinion that
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novak djokovic tried to exploit a loophole in australia's immigration pandemic regulations that he was trying to circumvent the rules, and the government and the courts made the right decision in rubber—stamping his deportation. of course this leaves the australian open without its king, if you like, and novak djokovic has won the title here nine times, he was and still is the defending champion, he will not get the opportunity to win a tenth grand slam here at the australian open, a 21st record—breaking one. it would've been. i think many fans are happy in a way that novak check at the edge is no longer here because of those vaccination issues, but they are, of course, disappointed that the men's number one seed is not here to showcase his skills. , .., is not here to showcase his skills. , , ., skills. yes, i can understand that there — skills. yes, i can understand that there has _ skills. yes, i can understand that there has been - skills. yes, i can understand that there has been a - skills. yes, i can understand| that there has been a degree skills. yes, i can understand i that there has been a degree of
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criticism about novak djokovic, as you have described there, but what has been said about the government responds to all of this? ., ., ~' the government responds to all of this? ., ., ~ , . the government responds to all of this? ., .«i , . , of this? novak d'okovic is expected h of this? novak d'okovic is expected to h of this? novak djokovic is expected to land - of this? novak djokovic is expected to land in - of this? novak djokovic is expected to land in dubai| of this? novak djokovic is - expected to land in dubai quite shortly. he left the country, australia, late on sunday evening. many, many questions still remain, especially around the medical waiver that he thought he had when he arrived at melbourne's international airport a week and a half ago. that way very was issued by tennis australia, the governing body that organises the australian open and also the victoria state governments. melbourne is the state capital of victoria, see antennas australia and victoria state governments granting this medical exemption from covid—i9 vaccination regulations. however, when djokovic arrived at the border when he arrived at the border when he arrived at melbourne airport, that waiver was challenged by federal authorities and set in
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this long—running saga when novak check of edge —— djokovic's visa was cancelled twice, he was an immigration, he went to court, he's been expeued he went to court, he's been expelled from the country. the questions do remain why that waiver was granted in the first place, and why it was challenged at the border. indeed. fail, thank you for keeping us up—to—date on that story for us right here on newsday. that's philip. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines. more than 70 million americans are in the grip of a winter storm sweeping up the eastern united states towards canada. weather forecasters are warning of strong winds, hail, and snow, with coastal flooding possible. the states of georgia, virginia, north carolina and south carolina have already declared a state of emergency. several hundred thousand people are without power. france's parliament has approved the government's implentation of a vaccine pass. it paves the way for the regulation to come into effect in the coming days.
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the pass will require people to have a certificate of vaccination to enter public places like restaurants, cafes, cinemas and long—distance trains. somalia's government spokesman has been injured in a suicide attack on his car in the capital mogadishu. eyewitnesses said mohamed ibrahim moalimuu was targeted directly because the suicide bomber detonated the explosives close to where he was sitting. the islamist group al shabaab said it carried out the attack. the uk culture secretary has said that the bbc licence fee will be abolished in 2027. in a tweet nadine dorries said a forthcoming announcement on the price of the licence fee for the next few years would be the last but hasn't said how it will be replaced. date for you and astray we have
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been volleying for you and newsday in the last hour —— police in manchester in england have said two teenagers have been arrested in connection with the hoistage stand off in texas on saturday. president biden has called the event an act of terror. four people escaped unharmed after being held for several hours in a synagogue near dallas. the hostage— taker was a british citizen named malik faisal akram. he died during the siege. sophie long reports this is the moment the three final hostages ran for their lives, more than ten hours after their ordeal began. a successful but nonetheless terrifying end to the delicate day—long operation involving negotiators and heavily armed police. the man, now identified as malik faisal akram, a 44—year—old british citizen originally from lancashire, was shot and killed. he'd claimed to have a gun and a bomb when he interrupted
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a peaceful morning service being streamed from the congregation beth israel in dallas. initially, four people were taken hostage, including the rabbi. six hours later, one was released unharmed. for the others, the ordeal was to continue until the fbi swat team stormed the building. sometime around 9pm today, this evening, the hrt, the hostage rescue team, breached the synagogue, they rescued the three hostages and the subject is deceased. people came here, a place of worship, to pray, but once again in america, a moment of peace became a moment of profound pain. as the people who were trapped, terrified, try to come to terms with what happened, synagogues across the country have increased security in fear of copycat attacks. this was an act of terror, this was an out of terror, we're not going to tolerate this. we have this capacity to deal with assaults on particularly
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the anti—semitism that has grown up, i'll be putting a call into the rabbi, we missed one another on the way up here, but they should rest assured that we are focused. akram, who arrived in the united states two weeks ago, was heard ranting about religion and demanding the release of a pakistani neuroscientist with suspected links to al-qaeda currently serving a prison sentence in texas. british police are now assisting the us authorities with their investigation. sophie long, bbc news, dallas. we can now speak to our news reporter ash the two teenagers that have been arrested into the arrest at the texas and he got attacked, we can now speak to every news reporter, greg, who has the latest for us on these events. i know that information is coming in sporadically and that it is coming in sporadically and thatitis, is coming in sporadically and that it is, you know, information isn't that
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available right now, but if you could just tell us in on the latest of what's happened. that's right. greater manchester police have announced in the last hour that they have made two arrests. these are two teenagers who have been arrested in south manchester as part of this investigation following the incident over the weekend. now incident over the weekend. now in terms of the teenagers, the police are not revealing their genders, so we don't know whether they are male or female or their ages or why they have been arrested or indeed their connection to the incidents, but what we do know is that they are currently being interviewed by counterterrorism police in manchester and the police in manchester and the police in manchester have issued a statement saying that forces will remain in the region of manchester and are liaising with local communities to put in place any measure us to put in place any measure us to provide further reassurance to provide further reassurance to local communities.- to local communities. greg mckenzie. _ to local communities. greg mckenzie, keeping - to local communities. greg mckenzie, keeping us- to local communities. greg mckenzie, keeping us up—to—date on the latest on that story for
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you. thank you so much for joining us on newsday. you are watching newsday on the bbc... still to come... we'll get the latest from tonga as a new zealand airforce plane flys to the island to assess the damage caused by saturday's volcanic eruption and tsunami. day one of operation desert storm to force the iraqis out of kuwait has seen the most intense air attacks since the second world war. tobacco is america's oldest industry, and it's one of its biggest. but the industry is nervous of this report — this may tend to make people want to stop smoking cigarettes. there is not a street that is unaffected. huge parts of kobe were simply demolished as buildings crashed into one another. this woman said she'd been given no help and no advice by the authorities. she stood outside the ruins of her business. tens of thousands of black. children in south africa have taken advantage of laws passed
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by the country's new— multiracial government - and enrolled at formerly—white schools. tonight sees the 96ioth performance of the long—running play the mousetrap. when they heard of her death today, the management considered whether to cancel tonight's performance, but agatha christie would've been the last person to want such a thing. this is newsday on the bbc. i'm karisha vaswani, in singapore. our headlines... novak djokovic has been deported from australia, afterjudges rejected the unvaccinated tennis star's appeal to stay in the country. he's set to land in dubai in around an hour. british police make two arrests in manchester over the siege at a synagogue in texas, just hours after the hostage taker was confirmed as a british citzen. the capital of tonga is reported to have suffered significant damage after an underwater volcanic
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eruption in the south pacific. much of the island nation was covered with a layer of ash. the tsunami triggered by the eruption caused flooding on parts of the us west coast and japan. rupert wingfield—hayes reports from tokyo. from high up in space, weather satellites caught the moment the huge underwater volcano let loose, sending a cloud of ash and rock 20 kilometres high and at least 500 kilometres wide. that's an ash cloud that could stretch from london to edinburgh, and somewhere beneath it is the tiny island kingdom of tonga. the first thing to hit the island was the shockwave. then came the rushing waters of a tsunami, smashing into seawalls and flooding what here appears to be a church. next, day turned tonight as the ash to fall. these pictures are reportedly from saturday afternoon,
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as people were trying to flee from the coast. in new zealand, prime ministerjacinda ardern said communication with tonga remains difficult. shops along the coast have been damaged and a significantly clean—up will be needed. nuku'alofa is covered in a thick film of volcanic dust, but otherwise, conditions are calm and stable. the hunga—tonga—hunga—ha'apai volcano has been active since mid—december. the eruption sent a tsunami wave right across the pacific ocean. i'm sure we'll find out, but at the moment it's not clear whether the tsunami was caused by a big collapse of material underwater, or even the shockwave itself perhaps acting as a fist and slapping down on the sea and producing a displacement which then propagates as a wave. in new zealand, the tsunami caused serious damage, smashing boats against each other and causing some to sink. but tonight, the main concern remains tonga. until the ash cloud clears
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and new zealand and australia can begin sending military flights, it remains very unclear how bad the situation on the island really is. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in tokyo. i've been speaking to anna jane lagi, a tongan university student in neighbouring fiji, who began by sharing some good news. i did hearjust an hour before this interview that my mum and my siblings are good, and hopefully my dad and my auntie as well. we were able to contact them by asking someone who was working at a place where they have a satellite phone. they were able to contact a few family members and get back to us that they are safe. that is excellent news, and i am so happy to hear that. it must be such a worrying time
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for the tonga community, obviously notjust on the island nation, but in fiji, which i understand has quite a sizeable community. yes, quite a number of us are here. as well as in other countries, and we have already been pulled —— as well as in other countries, and we have all really been pulled together by this event. it is really unifying a lot of us around the globe, so there were numerous programmes where everyone had come together to pray and encourage each other as we wait together for any updates. in the early hours of this unfolding, i imagine it was very difficult to get any sort of communication from loved ones from the area. talk us through how you and yourfriends in fiji tried to get in touch with family members? not a lot of us were actually aware of what was going on. we understood that there was a tsunami warning, but it had been so long
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since one had actually happened in tonga, that i guess we were alljust so comfortable and didn't expect it to carry through until the eruptions happened sometime earlier in the afternoon. itjust derailed after that, the whole situation, and family members were calling us, my sister called me, my mum, we were on call coming in within the span of 30 minutes, we watched as tonga went from shady too dark to pitch black, the road was only lit by the lights of the cars as they were queuing up to get to evacuation places. just around 6pm to 7pm that night, the call switched off, and i assume that they turned it off so that they could settle themselves and or something, but then a lot of the students here where messaging each other because they could not get a hold of theirfamily members
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either, and we realised that there must have been a blackout. it was really hard. there was nothing we could do, we couldn't talk to them, we can ask them how they were doing orfind out whether they had reached the evacuation place, but we sat and hoped together for the best, so far, the updates are good. into us a little bit earlier but the situation on into us a little bit earlier but the situation on the ground there. into us a little bit earlier but the let's bring you some breaking news. we are getting reports from that news agency in korea that north korea has fired an unidentified projectile towards the sea off its east coast. that report citing details from south korea's military. this of course comes after the south korean government said last
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week that north korea had testified two missiles off the sea of the east coast making his third weapons test this year. at this point in time, thatis year. at this point in time, that is all the details that we have so far. no confirmation of precisely what kind of missile, but we will be sure to reported as and when we get it. moving on to other stories for you today. the uk labour leader says borisjohnson has presided over "industrial scale partying" in downing street and renewed his call for the prime minister to resign. sir keir starmer said there was no need to wait for the senior civil servant inquiry into a series of alleged rule—breaking parties. the tory party chairman oliver dowden admitted there were failings in number 10 but denied it was a resigning matter for the prime minister. here's our political correspondent chris mason. this remains a moment of danger for the prime minister. conservative mps have spent the weekend back in the patches that sent them to westminster, eyes and ears alert to the outrage, or otherwise,
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of their electorate. places like grimsby, in lincolnshire, labourfor decades, until borisjohnson wooed this town the labour leader, a former director of public prosecutions, has definitely made his mind up. he reckons the prime minister is a lawbreaker and a liar. i think it's pretty obvious
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what has happened, that industrial scale partying has been going on at downing street, not much of it is really denied, and i think the public have made up their mind, i think the facts speak for themselves, i think the prime minister broke the law, i think he then lied about what had happened. mr speaker, iwant to apologise... the prime minister has admitted turning up at one drinks do and said sorry. but there was a catalogue of whitehall partying when parties were banned, and this is just some of the get—togethers we currently know about. it is the job of this woman, a senior civil servant, sue gray, to assemble the definitive compilation of events. her report is expected in the next week or so. the chair of the conservative party... in the meantime those loyal to borisjohnson are saying... the culture in downing street does need to be addressed and i think it is absolutely essential that when the prime minister responds to the report by sue gray and he is committed to doing that in parliament, that he addresses that culture. i know from many conversations i have had with the prime minister that he is in absolutely no doubt that he should and will
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take responsibility. conservative mps will head back here in the morning to share with each other horror stories of fury over what has happened and to mull over what to do next. chris may send reporting there for us. before we end the programme, if you're a fan of flowers — here's something to make you smile. the markets in southern china are in full bloom — ahead of the lunar new year. throngs of shoppers in guangxi have been enjoying the bright colours as they shope for for floral designs to decorate their homes for the holiday. roses are usually very popular as red is seen as a festive color. wintersweets are also a favourite — because they bloom for a long time. baskets of artificial flowers, which are called fortune baskets, are also popular. the store owners said they expect flower sales to peak in the next week when many people will begin their holiday.
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that's all for now — stay with bbc world news. hello there. a bit like it was last week — this week will be a quiet one, high pressure never too far away. and that means a lot of dry weather. indeed, some parts of the midlands, eastern england could be completely dry this week. there's going to be quite cold, not so much during the day, but i think overnight, we will find some frost. and, with clearer skies developing at the moment, we start monday with a frost, particularly across england, wales, and also northern ireland. some patches of mist and fog around by the morning, mainly across parts of wales and the west country. those should fairly quickly lift, and there's going to be a lot of sunshine around for most of us and light winds, too. the winds won't be as strong as they were on sunday in northern scotland — should be dry here, but there will be a lot of cloud. and we're sitting at temperatures of 8—9 celsius, which isn't bad, really, for this time of the year. now i mentioned high pressure, there it is on monday — as we head into tuesday
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with these weather fronts are poking in from the northwest. but underneath the centre of the high, with those clearer skies and light winds, we'll start with more fog on tuesday, particularly across parts of the midlands, east anglia, and the southeast and, whilst it lifts, it could stay a bit grey all day. some sunshine around, but more cloud coming in on tuesday, and those weak weather fronts bring in some rain across northern ireland, eventually into western parts of scotland, but lifting temperatures perhaps into double figures. likely to be a colder day, though, for england and wales, especially where it stays grey and misty. those weather fronts continue to move down from the northwest with a stronger wind, as well, but those weather fronts are weakening all the while. so there's not much rain away from northwestern parts of the uk. more cloud, a bit of patchy light rain or drizzle to clear from england and wales. then sunshine follows from the north, strengthening those northwesterly winds — and it's getting colder, as well, hence those wintry showers in the far north of scotland. could make double figures still in the far southwest of england. now i mentioned high pressure will dominate over the week ahead, and another one is coming in later in the week.
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but, for a while, it's going to be centred to the west of the uk — hence those colder northwesterly winds coming our way and dropping the temperatures overnight. so thursday, a more widespread frost. those are the temperatures in towns and cities. maybe a bit more cloud keeping temperatures up in northern ireland, and there'll be more cloud across northern scotland, a stronger wind here, maybe pushing 1—2 showers down some of those north sea coasts. but generally, thursday will be dry, and again, there'll be a lot of sunshine. a chilly wind, yes, and temperatures will be typically around 6—8 celsius.
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this is bbc news. we'll have the headlines and all the main news stories for you at the top of the hour, as newsday continues — straight after hardtalk. welcome to hardtalk, i'm stephen sackur. of all the front lines in the so—called culture wars, none has stirred up more vitriol and bad blood than the argument over sex, gender and identity.
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how should society regard people who transition away

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