Skip to main content

tv   The Film Review  BBC News  January 16, 2022 11:45pm-12:01am GMT

11:45 pm
i suspect their response similar?" i suspect their response will be, _ similar?" i suspect their response will be, "this wasn't similar, this was an_ will be, "this wasn't similar, this was an actual work event, not a government work event, which was obviously— government work event, which was obviously code now for party central1'— obviously code now for party central. " ~ obviously code now for party central." ~ , obviously code now for party central- "— obviously code now for party central." ~ ,, t, t, t, central." we have time for one more away from politics, _ central.�* we have time for one more away from politics, i'll— central." we have time for one more away from politics, i'll get _ central." we have time for one more away from politics, i'll get a - away from politics, i'll get a word from both of you because this is very much your area, martin — "gopac, djokovic," is the headline the metro. a, �*gopac, d'okovic,�* is the headline the metro. �* ., ., ., the metro. a huge amount of relief for the peeple _ the metro. a huge amount of relief for the people of _ the metro. a huge amount of relief for the people of australia, - the metro. a huge amount of relief for the people of australia, and - the metro. a huge amount of relief for the people of australia, and an | for the people of australia, and an awful— for the people of australia, and an awful lot _ for the people of australia, and an awful lot of— for the people of australia, and an awful lot of people around the world who think that novak djokovic did not deserve to stay and play, he deserved — not deserve to stay and play, he deserved to be sent home. he knew the rules, _ deserved to be sent home. he knew the rules, he tried to circumvent them, _ the rules, he tried to circumvent them, he — the rules, he tried to circumvent them, he even misled the australian border— them, he even misled the australian border force on his visa documentation. no sympathy. he said that these were _ documentation. no sympathy. he said that these were all _ documentation. no sympathy. he said that these were all genuine _ that these were all genuine mistakes, honest mistakes will stop a word on that, djokovic? i don't
11:46 pm
know if you're a tennis fan, but what do you make of the whole saga? one of the things to remember is that australia treats its migrants appallingly. so that detention centre where he went, he saw how desperate human beings are treated. he adjusted entitled, spoiled tennis player. i'm really glad he's been thrown out that she is just and entitled. thrown out that she is “ust and entitled. . ~ thrown out that she is “ust and entitled. ., ~ , ., thrown out that she is “ust and entitled. . ~' , ., ., thrown out that she is “ust and entitled. ., ~ , ., ., ., thrown out that she is “ust and entitled. ., ., ., entitled. thank you for all your oinions entitled. thank you for all your opinions on — entitled. thank you for all your opinions on the _ entitled. thank you for all your opinions on the front _ entitled. thank you for all your opinions on the front pages - entitled. thank you for all your - opinions on the front pages tonight. that's it for the papers this hour. coming up as the film review. goodbye for now.
11:47 pm
hello, and a very warm welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases, mark kermode is back with me. hi, mark, what have you been watching? can ijust say happy new year. this is the first show we've done together. i know it's a bit late. ok, so, we have memoria, which is a cannesjury prizewinner. the scream franchise is back with scream — scream 5, but it's just called scream. and andrea arnold's feature documentary debut, cow. well, there's a good mixture. yes, kick us off. ok, so, memoria, which is the new film from apichatpong weerasethakul, who won the palme d'or for uncle boonmee who can recall his past lives, which is a really wonderful film. tilda swinton, who i think is great in almost everything, is a botanist, a flower trader. she is in bogota, where her sister is in hospital. we see her visiting her sister and talking to her sister and her partner.
11:48 pm
she is woken in the middle of the night by a sound. a strange booming sound. and she thinks that there must be building work going on next door, but she speaks to people and there isn't any building work going on. and she starts hearing the sound wherever she is and it's a really peculiar sound, and she becomes obsessed with the idea that nobody else appears to be able to hear it. so she goes to a sound engineer to say can you make a copy of this sound for me to describe it? here is a clip.
11:49 pm
so, the film was columbia's submission for the oscars for best international feature. it's very elusive and meditative. i mean, apichatpong weerasethakul�*s kind of thought of of the high priest of slow cinema, and if somebody says what's the film is about the temptation is to say it's about two and a quarter hours. it's about the disjuncture between the past and present, between man and nature. people have memories that aren't their memories, there are people who appear to be dead but then aren't dead,
11:50 pm
and a lot of this is to do with tilda swinton wondering if everything is in her own mind as she makes a journey into the jungle to discover some kind of ecstatic truth. i have to say, i really liked it because i find this something meditative about this kind of cinema. i mean, you just watch. you look at things for a really long time, this is the opening shot before she even wakes up. it's not for everybody. but if you are a fan of apichatpong weerasethakul, which i am, this is a really intriguing film. in the third act, it does something which is completely out of the blue. and i think some people will think this is ridiculous, some people think this is very important and others will think, as i do, it's a bit of both. i love the fact that with his movies you never know where they are going. the key to this is tilda swinton. if you didn't have an actor of her skill holding it all together — because what you're doing is you're watching the world through her eyes. you are watching her befuddlement about the sound. what does it mean, where is it going?
11:51 pm
why is everything i know about the world suddenly uncertain? and when the film provides an answer, or at least some of an answer, you would either go "oh" or you go "aw," but it's watching her respond that really makes it work and it's in cinemas only and i thought it was really impressive, i really liked it. 0k. intriguing. definitely intriguing. something rather different. it is horror movie time again. happy days. happy new year. my friend alanjones are said to try and sell this horror movie. this is the scream franchise "requeled", which is part sequel, part reboot, in much the same way as the 2018 halloween, was just called halloween. so this is scream. and we're back in modern—day winnsboro, the ghost face killings, which have been immortalised in the film, within the film, are starting up again and there's the usual cocktail of meta—textual gags, because the whole thing about the scream franchises is it's a scary movie, which people talk about
11:52 pm
being in a scary movie, but there's original cast members and there's also a fresh new blood. the co—directors and writer of this made a film called ready or not. which you and i talked about before. it's a kind of horror movie—black comedy hybrid and i really liked it. so i went into this with fairly high expectations. they weren't generally met because the film is fine — if you've never seen the wes craven original in the cinema, ok, fine, there will be a new generation of people wanting to see this on the big screen. the problem is, what you don't have is the fear of the original. the original scream was scary. people forget. ok, it was post—modern and everything, but it was scary. and also, you don't have that an amazing thrill of originality. the thing i would say is, if you are really interested in scream and you want to see something else go back and that at wes craven's new nightmare which is the film before scream which is also the film that basically inspired matrix resurrections and every year that goes by that film just looks better and better. this is fine and i have no doubt it will prove a crowd pleaser
11:53 pm
but for somebody of my vintage i was kind of there the first time around with scream and it feels a bit like show us a new trick. right, yeah. do we need five of them? 0k. a documentary for your third choice. this is directed by andrea arnold. i know you are a fan of andrea arnold. red road, fish tank, american honey. it follows the life of luna, who is cow on a dairy farm and the cycle of her life is basically impregnation, then birth, lactation, separation from calves, largely within strip—lit barns, fairly industrial barns, but very briefly out in the open. here's a clip. mooing
11:54 pm
now, i have to say, that is an unusual moment in the film — most of it takes place within very confined spaces in this very industrialised environment. and do remember the film gunda, a viktor kossakovsky film, which was just an observational documentary about a pig. what the director said he was trying to do was to demonstrate
11:55 pm
that animals are living, experiencing creatures, but without a narration telling you about that. well, you get that here. gunda was shot in very elegant black and white. this is much more urgent, hand—held, you know, very up close and personal and a lot of looking straight into the cow's eyes. i have to say it's very well done and very upsetting. i was about to say, is it upsetting? it is, it absolutely is. but here's the thing that's important about it. it's not a film which tells you what to think about this or lectures you or anything, but what it does is, it says if you are partaking of the dairy industry you need to be aware of how it works, you need to know where to produce that's on your table comes from. and i think the thing that is really powerful about this is, without lecturing you or seeming like it's banging its drum, it tells its story and its visual images and it says ok, this is what it is. you make of this what you will.
11:56 pm
i know one film critic friend of mine who was in floods of tears for a lot of it. not everybody will feel the same way. i think that's one of its strengths. it is, here it is, you make your own decisions. yes. i want to see it. i have slight a knot in my stomach at the thought of seeing it. but it is a labour of love, i know, for andrea arnold. so best out, mark? licorice pizza. you are not a fan, are you? i want to know what you think. i think it's great. i love paul thomas anderson. i think it's a great coming—of—age movie. i think it's the evocation of the valley in the 19705. it's brilliant and i love the use of music in it. i think alana haim and cooper hoffman are brilliant in their first starring roles. i know that you don't like it. some of that i agree with. i think the two leads are just fantastic. both of them. and so captivating. the first 45 minutes to an hour, i was loving it. and then it dips in the middle, and i have spoken to a lot of people who do agree with me they think it's too long and could have
11:57 pm
done with some editing. and the fundamental problem with that central premise of a 15—year—old boy and a 25—year—old woman. who are not having a relationship. who aren't having a relationship. but i'm trying not to say anything... it's not a plot spoiler. it's not. she does say that. she has to get him off the phone and he finds her up and it's a really scary thing to do. let me ask you a question. did you like punch—drunk love? i can't remember enough about it, i'm afraid. punch—drunk love is that adam sandler movie after having made magnolia, they asked what will you do now, and he said "i'll make a 90—minute comedy with adam sandler" — and he did. it has turned out to be a marmite film — it's currently in the pack leaders for best film nomination. it looks beautiful. it's beautifully made and i love the two performances. love them.
11:58 pm
let's consolidate that part that we like. this might be do i need to watch it again? you gave it a fair hearing. hey, i just love it. i've seen it three times. we may never agree on that one. so, streaming, dvd? tragedy of macbeth has come to apple tv. i think it looks brilliant. now, very recently seen a stage production. no, very recently seen a stage production. so i am interested to compare. i have seen a lot of versions of it. i admired it, but from a distance. i thought this looks really good, these individual performances are great but they all seem to be in their own movie, and particularly when you see macbeth on stage, it's all about if they appear to be
11:59 pm
in two different films, it's like, where is the central conflict? so people love it, i've read loads of 5—star reviews, i feel the same way that you do about licorice pizza. there are things in there that are great. but i'm not buying the whole thing. we will go with that. that's our theme for this for this week. thank you for watching and enjoy your cinemagoing. see you next time. goodbye.
12:00 am
welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... novak djokovic has been deported from australia, afterjudges rejected the unvaccinated tennis star's appeal to stay in the country. he left melbourne on a flight to dubai — where he's expected to land in the next 90 minutes. also in the programme: the man who took four people hostage at a synagogue in texas is confirmed to be a 44—year—old british citizen. now, uk police make two arrests in manchester. surveillance flights head to the pacific island nation of tonga — to assess the damage caused by a volcanic eruption and tsunami. in the uk, opposition leader keir starmer says borisjohnson broke the law and lied over
12:01 am
lockdown parties in downing street and that the pm should resign in the national

30 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on