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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 16, 2022 9:00pm-9:30pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm samantha simmonds. the man who took four people hostage at a synagogue in texas is confirmed to be a british man named malik faisal akram. his family say they are devastated and do not condone his actions. police here confirm malik faisal akram was originally from blackburn and say they're helping with the investigation led by us authorities. labour leader sir keir starmer says borisjohnson broke the law and should resign over a series of parties at downing street during coronavirus restrictions. novak djokovic has been deported from australia afterjudges rejected the unvaccinated tennis star's appeal to stay in the country on public health grounds. while his on court record will
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always be the best are among the best in the history of our sport, some of his off court decisions are questionable. surveillance flights prepare to head to the pacific island nation of tonga to assess the damage caused by a volcanic eruption and tsunami. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the family of the briton who's been identified as the man who took four people hostage at a synagogue in texas have confirmed that he has died in the incident. malik faisal akram, who came from blackburn, was named as the hostage—taker by the fbi earlier this evening. according to federal law enforcement officials, he was 44 and arrived in the us about two weeks ago. his family said they were devastated, didn't condone any of his actions and apologised to those involved.
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all four hostages were freed unharmed after a ten—hour stand—off between the assailant and police. here in the uk, counter terror policing northwest has confirmed that it's helping the us authorities with the investigation. the us presidentjoe biden has called the siege "an act of terror". here's what the president had to say a short time ago. i spoke this morning with the attorney general to get a rundown. he said there was overwhelming cooperation with the local authorities and fbi, and they did one hell of a job. this was an act of terror. this was an act of terror, and not only was he related to someone who had been arrested, i might add, 15 years ago and been injailfor ten years, the idea there was something new. and they did just a greatjob. i also told him that i wanted to make sure we got the word out to synagogues and places of worship that we won't tolerate this, that we have this capacity
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to deal with assaults on... particularly the anti—semitism, and so i'll put a call in with the rabbi. we missed one another on the way up here. but they should rest assured that we are focused, the attorney general is focused on making sure that we deal with these kinds of acts. earlier, sophie long sent this report on the unfolding events from colleyville in texas. more than ten hours after their ordeal began, this is the moment you can see the three final hostages running for their lives. a successful, but nonetheless terrifying end to the delicate day—long operation. the man who claimed to have a gun and a bomb had disrupted a peaceful morning service being streamed from the congregation beth israel in dallas. you may be able to hear his british accent. indistinct speech.
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initially, four people were taken hostage, including the rabbi. six hours later, one was released unharmed. for the others, the ordeal would continue until the swat teams stormed the building. they rescued the three hostages and the subject is deceased. people came here, a place of worship, to pray — but once again in america, a moment of peace became a moment of profound pain, as people were trapped, terrified, tried to come to terms with what happened. the now deceased hostage taker was heard ranting about religion and demanding the release of a pakistani neuroscientist with suspected links to al-qaeda in prison in texas for trying to kill us military personnel in afghanistan. sophie long, bbc news, dallas. let's speak to our north america correspondent, peter bowes, who's in los angeles.
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welcome to you. in the past few minutes, the rabbi who was one of the hostages in this incident has released a statement. what has he said? , �* , , , said? yes, it's very interesting what he's _ said? yes, it's very interesting what he's got _ said? yes, it's very interesting what he's got to _ said? yes, it's very interesting what he's got to say. - said? yes, it's very interesting what he's got to say. this - said? yes, it's very interesting what he's got to say. this is i said? yes, it's very interesting i what he's got to say. this is rabbi charlie walker, one of the four people held hostage. three members of the conversation. —— congregation. he says, "overthe years, my congregation and i have participated in multiple security courses from the colleyville police department. he says we are alive today because of that education, and i encourage alljewish congregations, religious groups, schools and others to participate in active shooter security courses." he goes on," in the last hour, the gunman became increasingly belligerent and threatening. without the instruction we receive, we would
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not have been prepared to act and flee when the situation presented itself." i think that gives quite a graphic and site into what these people went through during what was an 11 hour siege. people went through during what was an 11 hoursiege. ithink people went through during what was an 11 hour siege. i think it also reflects whatjewish people around the united states and around the world have felt about this particular incident and why there was so much fear, while we saw alerts at many other places around the country, a synagogue here in los angeles. the police said they were stepping up patrols. we heard the same from dallas, from new york as well. �* ., , .,, same from dallas, from new york as well. �* ., , ~ , well. peter bowes in los angeles, thank yom — the labour leader says borisjohnson has presided over "industrial scale partying" in downing street and renewed his call for the prime minister to resign. sir keir starmer said there was no need to wait for the senior civil servant inquiry into a series of alleged rule—breaking parties. the tory party chairman oliver dowden admitted there were failings in number ten,
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but denied it was a resigning matter for the prime minister. here's our political correspondent, nick eardley. a prime minister under pressure over what went on in here. were covid rules broken in downing street? how often did staff drink late into the night while the country was locked down, and can boris johnson survive? labour's leader has made his mind up. i think it's pretty obvious what's happened. there was industrial scale partying going on at downing street. not much of it is really denied, and i think that the public have made up their mind. i think the facts speak for themselves. i think the prime minister broke the law. i think he then lied about what had happened. mr speaker, i want to apologise. the prime minister has admitted he attended one drinks gathering at a time when socialising was extremely limited. that left many of his mps furious. this woman, sue gray, is looking into allegations spanning almost a year.
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her report is expected soon, but ministers are already suggesting it's the culture, not the man at the top, that needs to change. the culture in downing street does need to be addressed, and i think it's absolutely essential that when the prime minister responds to the sue gray report, and he's committed to doing that in parliament, that he addresses that culture. i know from many conversations i've had with the prime minister that he's in absolutely no doubt that he should and will take responsibility. but many tory mps are worried about the man at the top. former minister tim loughton is the sixth to say the prime minister should go, tweeting... others are angry in private. the next week could be crucial in deciding if that happens. mps will return to parliament afterjudging the mood in the country, and the report on parties in downing street is set to be published.
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will the prime minister be able to move on, or is the clock ticking on boris johnson's premiership? nick eardley, bbc news. novak djokovic has been deported from australia after losing his legal challenge to the cancellation of his visa. a panel ofjudges upheld the australian government's decision. they held that his refusal to be vaccinated against covid made him a threat to public health. the serbian prime minster has accused australia of a witch hunt. from melbourne, shaimaa khalil reports. he's used to winning on court, but today, he was defeated in it. the world number one men's tennis player lost his last ditch battle to stay in the country and was forced out of australia. the amended application... three judges upheld the government decision to cancel his visa. the immigration minister had argued that the unvaccinated tennis star's presence here could bolster anti—vaccination sentiment.
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in his statement, the world number one said... outside the court, many of his fans were still in shock, and emotions were high. it's disgraceful. how was his first visa. . . ? how did the first court ruling rule in his favour, but now it ruled against him? why? he had an exemption to come here and play tennis. he was allowed to come here. that's what he should be doing. it's a political stunt. and serbia's president was even more indignant. he came there with a medical exemption proposal, and then you were mistreating him for ten days. why did you do it? and then doing that witches—hunt campaign against him? that is something that no—one can understand. this was a high—stakes court battle for both sides.
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the government has been publicly embarrassed by its mishandling of the controversy. while the player was desperate to avoid forfeiting the chance to compete for his record—breaking 21st grand slam title. after being accompanied to the airport by federal police officers, novak djokovic boarded a plane to dubai, ending a saga that has bruised the country the player and the australian open. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, melbourne. and coming in a moment, i've been speaking to the american grand slam tennis champion pam shriverfor her reaction to djokovic's deportation from australia. that's coming in after the sport in a moment. the french parliament has given final approval to measures that will ban people who haven't had coronavirus vaccinations from most of public life.
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the new law requires people older than 16 to have a certificate of vaccination to enter public places until now, unvaccinated people have been able to show a recent negative test. the measure takes effect on thursday. the austrian chancellor says their proposed law on compulsory coronavirus vaccinations will apply to everybody over the age of eighteen. the punishment for not being vaccinated will be fines of up to around 600 euros a time. parliament votes on the plan in the coming week, and the rule will take effect on february the first. austria was the first eu country to propose compulsoryjabs. on saturday, around 27,000 people protested in vienna against the measures which opponents say is an attack on personalfreedoms. the family and friends of a british woman missing in tonga in the tsunami which has devastated the pacific island nation say they're desperate for news about her. angela glover, who runs a dog rescue centre in tonga, was washed away when the wave hit. her husband james, who was with her, managed to hold on to a tree. it's unclear yet how much damage has been caused by the tsunami and the volcanic eruption that preceded it. but much of the island appears to be
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covered in a layer of ash, and australia and new zealand are preparing to send surveillance flights. rupert wingfield—hayes reports. from high up in space, weather satellites caught the moment the huge underwater volcano let loose, sending a cloud of ash and rock 20 kilometres high and at least 500 kilometres wide. that is an ash cloud that could stretch from london to edinburgh. somewhere beneath it, is the tiny island kingdom of tonga. the first thing to hit the island was the shock wave. then came the rushing waters of the tsunami, smashing into sea walls and flooding what here appears to be a church. next, day turns to night as the ash began to form. these pictures are from saturday afternoon as people were trying to flee from the coast. in new zealand, prime minister jacinda ardern said communication
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with tonga remains difficult, but the situation is now calm. shops along the coast have been damaged and significant clean—up will be needed. one of the islands is covered in the thick film of volcanic dust, but otherwise, conditions are calm and stable. the volcano has been active since mid—december, but saturday's huge eruption took experts by surprise. i would expect the activity to continue for a while yet. i'm not necessarily expecting it to get any bigger, but it could conceivably continue on at a similar scale. the eruption sent a tsunami wave right across the pacific ocean. in new zealand, the tsunami caused serious damage, smashing boats against each other and causing some to sink. but tonight, the main concern remains tonga. until the ash cloud clears and new zealand and australia can begin sending military flights, it remains very unclear how bad the situation on the island really is. rupert wingfield—hayes,
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bbc news, in tokyo. the headlines on bbc news... the man who took four people hostage at a synagogue in texas is confirmed to be a british man named malik faisal akram — named malik faisal akram. his family say they are devastated and do not condone his actions. the leader of the opposition labour party in the uk has accused prime minister borisjohnson of presiding over "industrial scale partying" in downing street during lockdowns. sir keir starmer said mrjohnson should resign. novak djokovic has been deported from australia, afterjudges rejected the unvaccinated tennis star's appeal to stay in the country on public health grounds. sport now, and a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. let's head over. we will start with the english premier league. right
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file said football's lack of patience cost him his job after he was sacked. his departure came... there were angry scenes from travelling fans. everton have lost nine of their last 12 games, sinking from fourth in the table at the start of the season to where they are currently, which is a 16th, six points off the bottom three. the club has set an update on his permanent replacement will be made in due course. in the statement of his own, bonito has said... everton�*s city rivals liverpool are up to second place in the premier league table
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with a 3—nil win over brentford at anfield — a crucial three points forjurgen klopp�*s side. fabinho, alex oxlade chamberlain and takumi minamino with the goals. the win moves liverpool above chelsea, 11 points behind the leaders manchester city with a game in hand. in spain, real madrid have become the super cup champions for a 12th time. goals from luka modric and karim benzema gave them a 2—nil win over athletic bilbao. to the africa cup of nations, where defending champions algeria have work to do after losing i—nil to equitorial guinea in their second group game. algeria face ivory coast next, who earlier drew 2—all with sierra leone, who were helped by an astonishing mistake from the ivory coast's goalkeeper in the final minutes of the game. algeria havejust one point from their opening two games and must win their final group e game to have a chance of reaching the last 16. esteban obiang slid in at the far post to convert a flick—on and net
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the only goal with 20 minutes left in douala. it ended a 35—match unbeaten run for algeria. also on sunday, tunisia beat mauritania whilst gambia and mali played out a i—all draw. the australian open gets under way in just a few hours' time without it's top men's seed, novak djokovic. the world number one says he's extremely disappointed with the ruling that has seen him deported from australia — but respects the decision. djokovic, who is unvaccinated against covid—i9, failed to overturn a decision from the government to cancel his visa on public health grounds. it ends an ii—day legal row over whether djokovic would be able to defend his title at the tournament. his wait for a record 2ist grand slam title will go on. djokovic says he will now take some time to rest and recuperate. different emotions from two sides as the ashes series ended in australia, with the hosts winning the fifth and final test against england by 146 runs to claim
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a a—nil series win. england had been set 271 to win. they reached 68 without loss but then lost all 10 wickets for the addition of another 56 runs in hobart. england all out for 124 after another batting collapse to end their already miserable ashes series. by the time they return to australia in 2025 it will be 1a years since england's last success in an away ashes test. disappointed to be set here, being as heavily, very much in the game, even... so, yeah, it's difficult to take. but it's clear and very evident what we need to do and where we need to improve.
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disappointing way to finish this sports report for now. thanks very much. let's get more on novak djokovic's deportation from australia on the grounds that he was a threat to public order in the country, according to the country's government. earlier, i spoke to the former us tennis champion pam shriver to find out what impact the expulsion could have on djokovic's legacy. the fact that he thought his covid test that came six days after the deadline, there'sjust test that came six days after the deadline, there's just been so many choices that he's made that i think while he's court record will always be the best, or among the best in the history of our sport, some of his off court decisions are questionable.— his off court decisions are questionable. his off court decisions are auestionable. , ., ., questionable. given how hard he fou~ht questionable. given how hard he fou . ht to questionable. given how hard he fought to defend _ questionable. given how hard he fought to defend his _ questionable. given how hard he fought to defend his title, - questionable. given how hard he fought to defend his title, how i questionable. given how hard he| fought to defend his title, how do you think he'll be feeling right now? �* , ., ., ,
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now? he's got to be feeling horrendous _ now? he's got to be feeling horrendous on _ now? he's got to be feeling horrendous on all _ now? he's got to be feeling horrendous on all levels. i now? he's got to be feeling l horrendous on all levels. the now? he's got to be feeling i horrendous on all levels. the fact that he cannot, at his favourite major, where he's won it nine times and he can't go to the record 21st, the fact that... he would not have entered australia if he didn't honestly believe he had the papers, the and exemptions from not the federal government. this has all... some of this i think has been poor communication, between the tournament, the state of victoria and of course, the most, above it all in decision—making, which is the federal government. the fact that the different arms down in australia weren't communicating led novak to believe he could get in on this exemption, but the exemption was a loophole. it was not a correct medical exemption.— loophole. it was not a correct medical exemption. tennis australia . ranted medical exemption. tennis australia granted him — medical exemption. tennis australia granted him an _ medical exemption. tennis australia granted him an exemption, - medical exemption. tennis australia granted him an exemption, and i medical exemption. tennis australia | granted him an exemption, and what implications are there now for them in other tournaments around the world? ~ ~ ,
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world? well, i think tennis in australia _ world? well, i think tennis in australia needs _ world? well, i think tennis in australia needs to _ world? well, i think tennis in australia needs to look i world? well, i think tennis in australia needs to look at i world? well, i think tennis in i australia needs to look at their part in how this happened to one of our great champions, so i think there needs to be some changes because there is something that's not quite right. i haven't been down there in two years, and i know everybody means well and nobody knew they'd be putting on these tournaments during a global pandemic. so it's very complicated. what about the tenets itself? with federer and djokovic out, they won the last titles for the past eight years. who's going to win? well, the only champion _ years. who's going to win? well, the only champion on _ years. who's going to win? well, the only champion on the _ years. who's going to win? well, the only champion on the men's - years. who's going to win? well, the only champion on the men's side i years. who's going to win? well, the only champion on the men's side is l only champion on the men's side is rafael nadal. hejust only champion on the men's side is rafael nadal. he just won the us open. he's been playing great tennis. the story of andy murray, and his comeback was terrific because everybody announced his retirement down under. on the
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women's side, so many incredible storylines. osaka is on her way back, and she's... ash party is trying to be the first australian woman to wind down under. and how will emma raducanu play in herfirst major championship since winning? it's been a tough road living with that pressure of a major champion. i'm happy that these storylines can now be told without the shadow of the djokovic �*s saga. she's one of britain's most famous — and controversial — artists, and for her next project, tracey emin is turning her attention to something a little different. it involves transforming a former victorian bathhouse in margate. piers hopkirk reports. so, this is actually part of the old bathhouse, because margate had all these hotels and everything built in the edwardian era, but of course, they didn't have baths. there was a male side and a female side.
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and it's got this old skylight — i'm actually having to replace both skylights — but you can see really, really brilliant artist studios. it's arguably tracey emin's biggest artistic challenge yet — transforming a former victorian bathhouse complex into an art school that'll bear her name. instead of me saying i earn quite a lot of money now from my own work, i can go and buy art, i would rather help other artists make work. i would rather facilitate that. i'd rather do something for them that wasn't done for me. the aim, to nurture artists from all ages and backgrounds, and in so doing, regenerate the town that's inspired her. i want to make the art world more accessible. i want to make margate a really cool art haven. i want some legacy. i don't have children, i don't have a partner.
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all of these things i've never had because... all of these things i've never had because all i have ever had is my art. this is time for me to give art back what art has given to me. tracey emin's sometimes controversial work has made her one of the most recognisable names in modern art. but a gruelling battle with bladder cancer has inspired her to do more. when i thought i was going to die, it was more probable than not probable, i thought, "what have i done? i haven't done anything." now, i think if i can get this off the ground and the other things i'm doing in margate, i think i will be happier. i feel a lot better in myself. who wants to die feeling bad? no one. this is for maybe two more artists. now given the all clear following her treatment, tracey hopes the art school and art studios, coupled with a museum of her own work, will create a new and lasting legacy. it's so exciting. it doesn't matter how
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much money you have, you cannot take it to heaven. it doesn't matter how much of anything you have, you cannot take it with you when you die. it doesn't matter how much of anything you have, you can't take it with you when you die. but as you're going, you can look back and see what you left behind. it's hoped tke studios will be open by the end of the year. piers hopkirk, bbc news. now we say goodbye to viewers outside the uk. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise. hello there. it's a quietjanuary week of weather ahead — that basically means this high pressure continues to dominate the story. we will see a good deal of dry weather in the forecast, but unfortunately, that comes at a price at this time of year with some frost and fog — and some of that may well linger and have an impact on the feel of the weather. we've still got this weak weather front to sink its way south and east so, during the next few hours, we will continue to see a fair amount of cloud, perhaps across east anglia and southeast england,
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but that will ease away. skies continue to clear as the breeze falls light, those temperatures will fall away as well, but perhaps not quite as much fog first thing tomorrow morning, temperatures down to —2 celsius. a bit more of a westerly feed, bringing more moisture in off the atlantic, keeping those temperatures up to the northwest of the great glen. but high pressure is establishing itself, keeping things largely fine and quiet. not that many isobars on the chart — so light winds, lots of clear skies, lots of sparkling winter sunshine to look out for on monday. even some sunshine into northern ireland and eastern scotland, just the far north and west, seeing more cloud and thick enough for a little spot or two of drizzle. temperatures quite widely between 8—9 celsius — pretty much where they should be, really, for the time of year. now, as we move into monday evening, we will start to see some fog forming under clear skies and light winds across england and wales, and some of that could be quite dense in places. again, more of a breeze into the far northwest, so temperatures holding up at around
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5—6 celsius — but in towns and city centres under those clear skies, expect those temperatures just to fall below freezing. so, a frosty and foggy start as we go into tuesday. weather fronts trying to push their way in from the north and west as we go through the day, but they will take their time in doing so. the fog just confining itself into central and southern england on tuesday slowly, hopefully lifting away more showery outbreaks of rain, moving their way across scotland with those weather fronts pushing in. they will continue to sink their way steadily south. more of a breeze in scotland, as well, with those fronts. that means potentially, there'll be less chance of fog forming towards the end of the week. but it stays largely fine and dry, and there will be glimpses of sunshine from time to time. that's it — whatever you're doing, enjoy.
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she hello, this is bbc news. i'm samantha simmonds. the headlines... the man who took four people hostage at a synagogue in texas is confirmed to be a british man named malik faisal akram. his family say they are devastated and do not condone his actions. police here confirm malik faisal akram was originally from blackburn — and say they're helping with the investigation led by us authorities. labour leader sir keir starmer says borisjohnson broke the law and should resign, over a series of parties at downing street during coronavirus restrictions. i think the fact speak for themselves, i think the prime minister broke the law, i think he then lied about what had happened. novak djokovic has been deported from australia afterjudges rejected on public health grounds the unvaccinated tennis star's appeal to stay in the country. a british woman is missing in tonga after being washed away in the tsunami which hit the island
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— the amount of damage it's caused is still unclear. now on bbc news, we look at the hidden world of girls in gangs — and the extent to which teenage girls are being criminally and sexually exploited. this programme contains some scenes which some viewers may find upsetting. the way children have been groomed has been the same for centuries, but the tactics around that exploitation have changed. it's very normalised that girls should be sexualised and sent around. this is a generation that has been born into the internet age. - the boys that are in gangs, they have girlfriends. the girls will do a lot of bad stuff for them just because they're in love with them. he had me selling his drugs for him. i think i was about 12, i they gave me stuff to hold. i looked in the bag and it was a gun. i that was when they were i grooming me for other stuff. lots of people told me to do it, and then you have other people

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