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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 16, 2022 12:00pm-12:29pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. novak djokovic has taken off on a flight out of australia, afterjudges rejected the unvaccinated tennis star's appeal to stay in the country on public health grounds. the orders of the court are, one, the amended application be dismissed with costs. disappointment and dismay from supporters in melbourne — djokovic himself says he is �*extremely disappointed' but will co—operate fully. tennis australia said it respects the court's decision. labour leader sir keir starmer says borisjohnson broke the law and should resign, over a series of parties at downing street during coronavirus restrictions. the conservative party chairman, oliver dowden, says the culture
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in downing street must be addressed. i think the facts speak for themselves. i think the prime minister broke the law, i think he then lied about what had happened. people feel angry about what's going on in downing street, i feel angry about what is going on in downing street but the correct process now is to get to the full facts. australia and new zealand are sending surveillance flights to tonga, after a tsunami triggered by an underwater volcanic eruption caused �*significant�* damage to the island nation. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. novak djokovic has now left australia — after a court ruled the world number one tennis player
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could not stay in the country — upholding the government's decision to cancel his visa. three federaljudges have dismissed his application and the world's men's tennis number one will not now have the opportunity to defend his australian open title. in the past hour he's been escorted through melbourne airport by security and his plane has now taken off. djokovic says he is "extremely disappointed" with the court's decision to deport him. he was bidding to have the chance to win a record 21st men's grand slam title, moving him clear of spain's rafael nadal and switzerland's roger federer for the first time in the last few minutes, novak djokovic�*s flight has left melbourne for dubai. it's thought he will continue on to europe from there. the decision deport novak dojokovic ends an 11—day legal dispute row over whether the serb would be able to play. he had his visa cancelled when he landed in melbourne on 5th
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january and was then detained in an immigration hotel. although that decision was overturned on procedural grounds, australia immigration minister alex hawke cancelled his visa again on friday. britain's andy murray told the bbc he hoped the sport could move on from the saga and learn lessons for the future. the association of tennis players — the men's governing body — said the decision marked the end of "a deeply regrettable series of events". it wished djokovic well and added it continued to "strongly recommend" all players were vaccinated. australian prime minister scott morrison has given his reaction. in a statement he's said: the federal court ruling will help "keep our borders strong and keep australians safe". he went on to say: "it's now time to get on with the australian open and get back to enjoying tennis over the summer". so what is the view from novak djokovic�*s home country? our correspondent guy de launey is in belgrade and spoke to serbia's president aleksandar vucic.
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as you can imagine, nobody is saying that this is a moment of infamy and embarrassment for novak djokovic, rather they're saying it's a moment of shame for australia. that's certainly been the view widespread among very closely indeed. we've also seen throughout this affair that the very top levels of the government here in serbia have been putting their support right behind novak djokovic and they are continuing to do so even after this judgment, which means he won't be able to take part in the australian open this year and he will be deported from the country. i met the serbian president aleksandar vucic and asked him for his initial reaction to the judgment. i'm not an anti—vaxxer. i was three times vaccinated, so it is not about that, — if you wanted to put principles in front of everything,
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you should have said "ok, unvaccinated people cannot enter the territory of australia", but you didn't say so, you said there could be medical exemptions. he came there with a medical exemption proposal, and then you mistreated him for ten days. why did you do it? a witch hunt campaign against him. and that is something that no—one can understand. and my response to australian people is that we're going to host in the very best their athletes when they're going to come our country within a month, because there is a world athletic indoor championship here in serbia and they are very welcome to our country, we will not treat them in the way that they treated the world number one player, novak djokovic. of course, people here are frustrated and people here, 90% of them at least, are on the side of novak,
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and anyway, to end this story, i believe that novak is not humiliated. humiliated are those people who organised this kind of witch hunt process and novak can proudly come back to his country. support from the very top levels of government in serbia, probably widely reflected across serbian society as a whole. president vucic told me they would have to work on improving relations between serbia and australia and this affair was notjust about novak djokovic but about truth and justice and he believed it would not have happened if novak djokovic had been from another country, not a small east european country like serbia, as he put it, if he had been from somewhere else, mr vukic thought the whole affair would not have happened at all. maria jockel is the global and national immigration leader at the australian law firm bdo and is following the case from melbourne. this is her reaction. it was a just and fair ruling,
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and unanimous by all three of the federal court of australia bench. so i do not think there is any basis upon which, unless of course you are an avid fan of mr djokovic, or more broadly, perhaps an anti—vaxxer or perhaps have some other reason to be disgruntled after this worldwide media and the urgency with which mr djokovic's cases have been dealt with. again i say to see fair and just result. again i say it is a fair and just result. i spoke to an immigration officer in australia earlier and he spoke of his concerns around the powers that the minister has.
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he said a minister previously described the extent of the powers they have as godlike and he says he is reluctant to use them. it is not a secret powers were there but he says now they have been used he thinks this may spark a debate around the extent of those powers. what are your thoughts on that? i disagree. when you think about the impact of the pandemic on australia, with over 750,000 current active omicron cases, well—over 300 million globally, and untold deaths, significant disruption to everyday life and our economy, health and mental and physical well—being, it is critical that a minister be able to exercise his personal powers when it is in the public interest to do so. it has been exceedingly rare that this power has been used, generally in very hardened criminal cases. this is an example where it has been used so as to protect
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the community here, which as you may be aware, well over 90% of the eligible public are fully vaccinated and now some 6% of children over the age of five and growing. a hostage—taker who was shot dead after a stand—off at a synagogue in texas was british, according to reports. the four hostages, which included the rabbi, are now all safe after the ten—hour stand—off at the �*congregation beth israel�* synagogue in the city of colleyville near dallas. the foreign office says it is aware of the death of a british here in the uk pressure is mounting on borisjohnson, was in lockdown intensifies. calls for him to resign from within his own party are growing.— as our political correspondent
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iain watson reports.
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some conservative mps are now saying that it is the reaction on the doorsteps that will determine whether boris johnson is shown the door. iain watson, bbc news. earlier i spoke with our political correspondent nick eardley. he told me that the next big question is what tory mps will do next. we have six publicly saying that they think the prime minister should resign. speaking to other mps off the record, there is a considerable number who are unhappy, uncomfortable, many of them waiting to see what happens in this report
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from the senior civil servant in downing street and in other government departments, getting a lot of hassle from their constituents, who are saying we are really unhappy about this, then you have the labour party now saying that they think the prime minister broke the law, and that he lied, and that there was industrial scale partying happening in downing street at the time, and then you have the tory chairman oliver dowden saying this morning that there needs to be a culture change in downing street. let�*s have a listen first to the labour leader. it is obvious what is happening,
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industrial scale partying at downing street, not much of it really denied and i think the public have made up their mind, i think the facts speak for themselves. i think the prime minister broke the law and _ i think the prime minister broke the law and then he lied about what happened. i'm clear in my mind he broke_ happened. i'm clear in my mind he broke the— happened. i'm clear in my mind he broke the rules, broke the law, he has apologised to the queen and i do not need _ has apologised to the queen and i do not need to— has apologised to the queen and i do not need to do so grade report, i'm not need to do so grade report, i'm not doing _ not need to do so grade report, i'm not doing her down, she is woman of great _ not doing her down, she is woman of great integrity, everyone who knows says the _ great integrity, everyone who knows says the same thing, but if you look at her_ says the same thing, but if you look at her remit, — says the same thing, but if you look at her remit, it is to establish the facts _ at her remit, it is to establish the facts and — at her remit, it is to establish the facts and so — at her remit, it is to establish the facts and so she will say this is what _ facts and so she will say this is what happened, this is when it happened, is who was there. but i think_ happened, is who was there. but i think it _ happened, is who was there. but i think it is — happened, is who was there. but i think it is extremely unlikely that she is— think it is extremely unlikely that she is going to start saying the prime — she is going to start saying the prime minister or anybody else committed a criminal offence. that is the labour leader�*s view, accusing the prime minister notjust of breaking the rules or bending the rules but breaking the law now, which is obviously a very serious an allegation.
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what is going on in the conservative party? what we heard from a couple of ministers this morning is pointing at the culture in downing street, and it feels like that is the way the government is going, saying there is a problem with people drinking and that needs to be addressed, but what is also interesting is when oliver dowden, the tory chairman, was pushed and this is morning he said, yes, ultimately it is the prime minister responsible for setting the culture, have a listen to mr dowden. the culture in downing street needs to be addressed and i think it is absolutely essential that when the prime minister responds to the sue gray report and he is committed to doing that parliament, that he addresses that culture. i know the prime minister is committed to doing exactly this. the failings, we should have done better, much, much better, we need to up our game and that needs to be addressed. i know the prime minister is committed to addressing that. yes, the pm is responsible
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for it and i think you saw in his statement to parliament him taking responsability for and when he response to the sue gray report i think you will see him again take full responsibility. i know from many conversations i've had with the prime minister he is an absolutely no doubt he should and will take responsibility, and i think you will see that in the statement he makes to the house of commons when this report is produced. oliver dowden speaking to the bbc this morning. we are expecting to get the report from sue gray potentially next week. the next week in parliament is going to be really significant, firstly for what the report says... if it put some blame on the prime minister or some suggestion of the prime minister not doing what he should have, i think that will dramatically increase the pressure on borisjohnson to stand down. we will also get tory mps back in the corridors of power discussing what they have been hearing from the constituents over the weekend, that could increase the pressure as well. quite clearfrom downing street
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and ministers this morning borisjohnson has no intention of resigning. in the next few days that could be tested by what goes on in parliament. the duke of sussex has launched a legal challenge for the right to pay for police protection when he�*s in the uk. prince harry lost his security when he stepped back from royal duties in 2020. he says his private protection team in the us doesn�*t have adequate jurisdiction abroad or access to uk intelligence information needed to keep his family safe. the headlines on bbc news... novak djokovic has been deported from australia, afterjudges rejected his appeal to stay in the country on public health grounds. the unvaccinated tennis star says he is �*extremely disappointed�*, but respects the decision. labour leader sir keir starmer says borisjohnson broke the law and should resign, over a series of parties at downing street during coronavirus restrictions. australia and new zealand are sending surveillance flights to tonga after a tsunami triggered by an underwater volcanic eruption caused significant damage
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to the island nation the culture secretary, nadine dorries, has signalled the government�*s intention to alter the way the bbc is funded in the long term. it follows negotiations over the licence fee that people must pay to watch tv, or stream programmes online. in a post on social media, ms dorries said her imminent announcement on the licence fee settlement would be the last. the days of the elderly being threatened with prison senctences or bailiffs knocking on doors are over, she said on twitter. she said it is time to discuss new ways of funding, supporting and selling great british content. our media and arts correspondent david sillito is here — should the bbc be worried by this? is this a defensive government policy now? element there has been debate and discussion about the licence fee for decades. this
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debate and discussion about the licence fee for decades.- debate and discussion about the licence fee for decades. this is a significant _ licence fee for decades. this is a significant announcement - licence fee for decades. this is a significant announcement by - licence fee for decades. this is a significant announcement by the j significant announcement by the person who is directly responsible for the bbc, the culture secretary. that tweet, she says this licence fee announcement will be the last. this licence fee announcement, we are expecting an official announcement of what the licence fee will be over the next five years. this is sort of halfway through the bbc�*s ii this is sort of halfway through the bbc�*s 11 year charter. she retweeted an article from the mail on sunday today which says there is going to be a two—year freeze of the licence fee at £159, and maybe even a below inflation increase after that, which would be a very significant cut for the bbc. but she goes further. she says it is time now to discuss and debate new ways of funding, supporting and selling great british content. essentially signalling that when the future of the bbc is discussed, is next charter, which comes to an end in 2027, she has a
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view that the idea of there being a compulsory fee—based and ownership of tvs is, in her mind, over. compulsory fee-based and ownership of tvs is, in her mind, over.- of tvs is, in her mind, over. there are opposite _ of tvs is, in her mind, over. there are opposite two — of tvs is, in her mind, over. there are opposite two elements - of tvs is, in her mind, over. there are opposite two elements arising | are opposite two elements arising from this, the funding over the next five years, what impact would it haveif five years, what impact would it have if the details outlined this morning are correct? that there is no inflation rise over the next two years? if no inflation rise over the next two ears? , ., ., no inflation rise over the next two ears? y., ., . ~ ., no inflation rise over the next two ears? ., ., ::':: years? if you go back to 2010, the amount spent _ years? if you go back to 2010, the amount spent by _ years? if you go back to 2010, the amount spent by the _ years? if you go back to 2010, the amount spent by the bbc- years? if you go back to 2010, the amount spent by the bbc on - years? if you go back to 2010, the amount spent by the bbc on bbc. years? if you go back to 2010, the - amount spent by the bbc on bbc one, was 1.1 billion. last year it was just over 900 million. so over 12 years the bbc is spending less, 200 million less on bbc one. if you factor in inflation and factor in the fact it pays for things like large parts of the world service and free license fees for the over 75 is full, it is about a £1.3 billion cut the bbc has had over the last two
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years. if you factor in this next freeze for the next two years, enders analysis, he did an examination, said it looked like by the end of 2000 and will essentially be £480 million less each year —— by the end of 2027. something about 2 billion less to spend programmes. a very significant cut. is billion less to spend programmes. a very significant cut.— very significant cut. is this now auoin to very significant cut. is this now going to be _ very significant cut. is this now going to be the _ very significant cut. is this now going to be the last _ very significant cut. is this now going to be the last licence - very significant cut. is this now. going to be the last licence fee? very significant cut. is this now - going to be the last licence fee? is that going to be guaranteed? element there are many questions. could the bbc be converted to something like netflix? could it be a subscription model? , ., , netflix? could it be a subscription model? , ., ., netflix? could it be a subscription model? , ., , ., ., ., , model? the problem about that many oliticians model? the problem about that many politicians have _ model? the problem about that many politicians have examined _ model? the problem about that many politicians have examined this - politicians have examined this realise the big problem is very large parts of the audience... the bbc is reaching more than 90% of the population every week, nearly 100% every month, and very large numbers
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of them are watching on things free view, orjust listening to the radio. there is no method at the moment of making those subscription services. what would you do to someone who does not pay a subscription and still wanted to listen to radio one, two, three, four or wanted to watch bbc one or two on normal free view terrestrial television? that is the problem. how would you bring that about? some countries have got rid of their tv licence fees, germany and so on, but they have replaced them with things like household taxes or added them to other bills orjust bundled it by central taxation. to other bills orjust bundled it by centraltaxation. —— to other bills orjust bundled it by central taxation. —— funded it by central taxation. there are very few countries that have stopped the funding and introduced a subscription model for public television. australia and new zealand will send surveillance flights to the pacific island nation of tonga, to assess the damage caused by a volcanic eruption and tsunami. there are no official reports of injuries or deaths, the red cross in fiji has told us more than 80 thousand people are likely to have been affected. russell trott reports.
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the tsunami left a trail of destruction across tonga�*s archipelago. many parts are completely covered in ash. with communications down, neighbouring countries are frantically trying to make contact. we need to finely balance the need to get there quickly and to make sure that we get the people and resources they need there, as well, and in some cases there are parts of tonga that we have not been able to establish communication with. the underwater volcanic eruption that triggered the tsunami, as seen from space, lasted less than ten minutes, but caused waves of more than one metre high to crash into tonga and fiji. plumes of gas and smoke are still pouring from the volcano, reaching 20km into the sky. alerts are in place from the west coast of the united states to japan, where people were warned to stay away from the coast if possible.
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usually when we get a tsunami on the west coast, it is due to an earthquake, so this is an exceptionally rare event where a volcano that was mostly underwater has exploded and caused a tsunami across the pacific. the south pacific eruption sent a shock wave around the world, with air pressure changes recorded as far afield as canada and even scotland. the concern is now that, for the tongans who may not have scrambled to safety in time, the fear that further eruptions can�*t be ruled out. i�*ve been speaking to katie greenwood who is the head of the pacific delegation for the international federation of red cross. she explained the difficulty of getting through to those people affected. there�*s a lot that we do know but, unfortunately, there�*s still a lot that we don�*t know. international red cross has urgently been trying to re—establish communication with our red cross teams on the ground for about 2k hours now. we did have some initial contact
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with our team just after the major eruption and when the tsunami alert had been raised and our teams were supporting local authorities to move people to the very limited higher ground around nuku�*alofa on the main island in tonga, so we do know that. we do know also that there has been some significant damage in the northern shore of the main island in tonga. we are very keen to hear from the low—lying and outer atolls within tonga itself closer to the eruption site and we have not been able to establish that contact. it�*s very difficult, with the ash cloud causing problems with satellite phones, the undersea cable has been damaged, and also frequent power outages making communication very difficult. we do know, though, that despite that there is action happening on the ground.
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the lower lying atolls you mention, how many people live there and how much morning with they have had? where they completely submerge? we where they completely submerge? - don't know quite the extent of the don�*t know quite the extent of the damage. there are some reports of completely submerged atolls, but we really can�*t say that is actually accurate and confirmed information at this point time. it is part of why we are very keen to hear from those communities. we are also very keen for the new zealand defence force flight and the australian flight that has been offered of the assistance of the tongan government to be able to take off hopefully tomorrow morning, to do some surveillance and reconnaissance so we can get more information about that. we suspect there could be up to 80,000 people throughout tonga affected by either the eruption itself or from the tsunami waves,
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and inundation as a result of the eruption. people definitely were taken by surprise, even though there had been small eruptions happening over the past six weeks or couple of months. really this was unexpected, and especially the short period of time between the massive blasts and also the first tsunami waves that began to inundate the islands. that was a shock to people. so we do hold some concerns for those outer islands and are very can to hear from people. cricket — australia have won the fifth and final ashes test in hobart after another batting collapse by england. the tourists were chasing a total of 271 to win, but they were bowled out for 124, before the end of day three. they lost all ten wickets forjust 56 runs. the hosts had already won the series.
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you�*re watching bbc news. she�*s one of britain�*s most famous — and controversial — artists, and for her next project, tracey emin is turning her attention to something a little different. it involves transforming a former victorian bathhouse in margate. piers hopkirk reports. this is part of the old bathhouse. margate had all these hotels and everything built. all the edwardian people worked, but they didn�*t have any baths. there is a female side and a male side. it has these old skylights, but you can see, brilliant artist studios. it is arguably tracey emin�*s biggest challenge yet. transforming an edwardian bath complex into an art school that will bear her name. i earn money from my own work
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now, so rather than buy art, iwould rather facilitate other artists, do something for them that wasn�*t done for me. the aim to nurture artists from all ages and backgrounds, and in so doing, regenerate the town that has inspired her. i want to make the art world more accessible and make margate a cool art haven. i want some legacy. i don�*t have children, i don�*t have a partner. all i have ever had is my art. this is time for me to give art back what art has given to me. tracey emin�*s sometimes controversial work has made her one of the most recognisable names in modern art. but a gruelling battle with bladder cancer has inspired her to do more. when i thought i was going to die, it was more probable than not probable, i thought, what have i done? i haven�*t done anything. now, i think if i can get this off the ground and the other things i am doing in margate,
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i think i will be happier. i feel a lot better in myself. who wants to die feeling bad? no one. now given the all clear following her treatment, tracy hopes the art school and art studios, coupled with a museum of her own work, will create a new and lasting legacy. it is so exciting. it doesn�*t matter how much money you have, you cannot take it to heaven. it doesn�*t matter how much of anything you have, you cannot take it with you when you die. but as you are going, you can look back and see what you left behind. it is hoped tke studios will be open by the end of the year. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with tomasz. hello. a pleasant enough day for most of us today. just the chance of it clouding over for a time with some spots of rain
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if it hasn�*t done so already through this morning. i think around two or three in the afternoon, we�*ll probably see increasing amounts of cloud across more southern areas of the uk, but further north it is a case of mostly sunny weather. quite blustery, though, in the north of scotland, with a few showers here. this evening and overnight, high pressure builds across the uk, the winds fall light, it�*ll be clear, there will be a frost forming, and we�*ll have some mist and fog as well developing by the early hours across parts of england and wales. nothing too widespread, though. i think, on the whole, it�*s going to be a mostly sunny start to monday and that�*s how it�*s going to stay through the day, really a very pleasant afternoon on the way, with temperatures hovering around eight degrees pretty much across the board. have a great day. hello, this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines: novak djokovic has been deported from australia
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afterjudges rejected the unvaccinated tennis star�*s appeal to stay in the country on public health grounds.

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